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Jewellery Historian

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE


DECEMBER 2015 03

EDITOR’S LETTER

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NEWS

INTRODUCING STANISLAV DROKIN

THE ART OF CREATIVITY SUZANNE SYZ

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SPOTLIGHT PAOLO PIOVAN

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ESTHÈTE

BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS RUBY

OUR FAVES

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EDITOR’S LETTER As a human being, I was terribly chocked of the terrorist attacks of November 13, 2015 in Paris. There are no words to express my feelings during and after the events. I have been deeply shocked and saddened by the terrible loss of life in Paris and wanted to express my “utter, total horror”. For us French people, liberté, égalité, fraternité (liberty, equality, fraternity) is more that the national motto of France. The road to liberty, equality and fraternity in France was a long one. Liberty is as precious to the French as it is to any national. Our passion for freedom of thought and speech is especially intense. Our passion for equality is intense and this because it took years to get full equality of all citizens. Any man aspires to liberty, to equality, but he cannot achieve it without the assistance of other men, without fraternity. The national motto is inscribed on our public buildings and our schools. It appears in the constitutions of 1946 and 1958 and today is an integral part of our national heritage and of who we, French people, are and to what we believe. The terrorist attacks were not just attacks in Paris, not just on the people of France, but attacks on all of humanity and the universal values that we all share. Terrorism is an attack against our universal values. When some groups choose to attack our universal values, our citizens and our country, we have to be united and protect ourselves. The death of innocent and the sum of the suffering inflicted on civilians by terrorist groups is not and cannot be justified by any religion. Our struggle as citizens of this world must remain ideological, not against a religion, but we have to defend our values against the obscurantism of some illuminated. This issue is our Christmas issue and our initial plans were to make a festive issue, full of joy and Christmas spirit. As you understand, for the entire team, this was very difficult. We tried to do our best, but our sorrow for all the innocent people killed in Paris is huge. We lost friends, relatives, family, compatriots, citizens that shared the same universal values with us. I would like to dedicate this issue to the memory of all the innocent victims of the Paris terrorist attacks of November 13. I join my prays hoping that all this madness will stop and humanity will live in peace. The entire team of the Jewellery Historian, express our most sincere condolences to the families of those who have died and to the French people.

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Founder & Editor-in-Chief

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NEWS


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HOLIDAY TREASURES AT SOTHEBY’S December Auction of Magnificent Jewels Just in time for the holidays, Sotheby’s fi- nal jewelry auction of the fall season will be held in New York on 9 December 2015. The more than 500 pieces on offer – with estimates starting at $5,000 – will be on view in our York Avenue galleries begin- ning 5 December, alongside the auctions of Important Watches and RM Sotheby’s Driven by Disruption sale of notable auto- mobiles. Lisa Hubbard, Co-Chairman of Sotheby’s Jewelry Division, North & South America, commented: “If these jewels could talk, what a tale they would tell: an iconic Art Deco diamond necklace made in 1939 by Van Cleef & Arpels for Queen Nazli of Egypt, and an avantgarde creation made by designer Suzanne Belperron circa 1935 for Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor for whom King Edward VIII gave up his throne. The rare combination of superb original design with romantic prove- nance is irresistible to lovers of fine jewels, and we are thrilled to present them to col- lectors this December.” The December auction is led by a Magnifi- cent and Historic Platinum and Diamond Necklace, Van Cleef & Arpels (estimate $3.6/4.6 million), created by the Parisian jeweler in 1939 for Queen Nazli of Egypt. Set with 217 carats of diamonds in a sun- burst motif, the sensational bib-style neck- lace has been called ‘a perfect piece of jewelry’ by Vincent Meylan, author of Van Cleef & Arpels: Treasures and Legends. Queen Nazli (1894-1978), mother of Egypt’s King Farouk, commissioned the diamond necklace and a matching tiara

Jewellery Historian

for the wedding ceremony of her daughter, Princess Fawzia, to the Crown Prince of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, in 1939. According to Vincent Meylan, their wedding banquet was the most lavish event to ever take place in modern Egypt, and Queen Nazli attended literally covered in diamonds. By the late 1940s Queen Nazli had moved to the United States with her jewels and she re- sided primarily in California for the remain- der of her life. A large part of Nazli’s jewelry collection, including her Van Cleef & Arpels diamond necklace and tiara, was sold by Sotheby Parke Bernet in New York in November 1975. The diamond necklace has since remained in a private collection for 40 years, and is to be sold this December for the benefit of a charitable foundation. The auction also will offer two seminal jew- els designed by Suzanne Belperron that were first sold by Sotheby’s Genena in the landmark 1987 auction of The Jewels of the Duchess of Windsor : a Pair of White Gold, Chalcedony, Sapphire and Diamond ‘Couronne’ CuffBracelets and a Platinum White Gold, Chalcedony, Sapphire and Diamond ‘Flower.Head* necklace. Made by Belperron in Paris circa 1935, both pieces have since been lauded as iconic exemples of the Duke and Duchess’ vision- ary connoisseurship of 20th century jew- elry design. Their appearance at auction coincides with the relaunch of the Belper- ron salon in New York this fall. >

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OUR NEWS

Magnificent and Historic Platinum and Diamond Necklace, Van Cleef & Arpels, France Formerly from the Collection of Queen Nazli Fouad, former Queen Mother of Egypt.

Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

Estimate $3,600,000 — 4,600,000

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OUR NEWS

IMPORTANT DIAMONDS & EXCEPTIONAL COLORED STONES Gary Schuler, Co-Chairman of Sotheby’s Jewelry Division, North & South America, said: “As there are no more Kashmir sapphires yet to be recovered from a mine, the only way to present an exceptional Kashmir at auction is when one emerges from a great collection. To have the opportunity to present to the world a sugarloaf cabochon Kashmir sapphire of such size, quality and distinguished provenance as the Ryan family sapphire is truly a privilege. This December we are also fortunate to have several important white diamonds from private collections, each of top quality and possessing both unique characteristics and inherent beauty.” Following the record-breaking sale of the Jewel of Kashmir for $242,145 per-carat at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in October, the December sale will offer an Exceptional Platinum, Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring (estimate $3.5/4.5 million), set with a sugarloaf cabochon sapphire of 25.87 carats, and with no indications of heating. This Kashmir sapphire hails from three generations of one of America’s most prominent families: that of Thomas Fortune Ryan (1851-1928), who stands alongside J.P. Morgan, Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller in the annals of American financial history. The selection of impressive top-quality diamond rings from private collections includes the Magnificent Platinum and Diamond Ring (estimate $3.5/4.5 million), set with a square emerald- cut diamond weighing 38.27 carats, D color, VVS2 clarity and type IIA – on offer from the Estate of an Italian Countess sold to benefit her charitable founda- tion – and the Very Fine Platinum, Fancy Pink Diamond and Diamond Ring (estimate $2.5/3.5 million), set with a pear-shape stone of 6.93 carats, VS1 clarity, the Property of a Lady. The Highly Important Pair of Emerald and Diamond Earrings (estimate $1.8/2.2 million) are set with Classic Colombian emeralds. Known as The Stars of Muzo, the impressive emeralds weighing 22.97 and 21.37 carats are accompanied by two gemological reports stating the stones are unenhanced. These exceptionally rare emeralds are accented by more than 5 carats of D color, Internally Flawless diamonds. An Important Pair of Platinum, Diamond and Sapphire Earrings (estimate $1,650/ 1,850,000) are designed with cushion-cut diamonds weighing 29.39 and 28.03 carats, both L color and VS2 clarity, set on the bias for a sophisticated contemporary look. JEWELS BY RENOWNED DESIGN HOUSES An extensive collection of Bulgari jewels from the estate of philanthropist and arts patron Adele G. Bergreen coincides with the showcase of Bulgari’s heritage collection in New York. The Bergreen estate includes examples of Bulgari’s most celebrated designs of the 1960s and 70s, including gold link chains, coin jewels, ‘Serpenti’ designs and colorful evening-wear. The highlight of the Bergreen estate is a Platinum, Fancy Colored Diamond and Diamond Brooch, Bulgari, 1964, which features a Fancy Intense Blue diamond weighing 2.47 carats (estimate $500/700,000). Collectors will discover two ‘Drape’ Bracelets by Schlumberger, one lapis lazuli, turquoise and colored diamond, the other coral and diamond, (estimates $20/30,000 each) formerly from the collection of Mrs. Paul Mellon. Mrs. Mellon was known to be a patron of Jean Schlumberger’s jewels and much of her Schlumberger jewelry collection was bequeathed to The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts last year. The spectrum of signed jewels in the sale ranges from late- 19th century pieces to modern designs. One of the most elegant necklaces to be offered is an Exquisite Silver- Topped Gold and Diamond Necklace, René Lalique for Lacloche Frères, Paris, circa 1890 (estimate $750/850,000). Composed of 13 entwined ribbon-style links of graduated design and set with approximately 72 carats of diamonds, this necklace is notable as the only collaboration between Lalique and Lacloche known to still exist. A century later, JAR created a Pair of Silver, Gold, Topaz and Diamond ‘Feather’ Earclips (estimate $250/350,000). These earclips were included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Jewels by JAR in 2013-2014. For more information visit : www.sothebys.com

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

OUR NEWS

Exceptional Platinum, Sapphire of Kashmir origin Diamond Ring Centering a cushion-cut sugarloaf cabochon sapphire weighing 25.87 carats, flanked by two bullet-cut diamonds weighing approximately .40 carat, size 5; 1930s. Estimate $3,500,000 — 4,500,000

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

OUR NEWS

Highly Important Pair of Platinum, Emerald and Diamond Earrings Suspending two cushion-cut 'Stars of Muzo' emeralds weighing 22.97 and 21.37 carats, topped by two old mine-cut diamonds weighing 2.01 and 2.00 carats, completed by two smaller old mine-cut diamonds weighing .72 and .70 carat. Estimate $1,800,000 — 2,200,000

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

OUR NEWS

Magnificent Platinum and Diamond Ring Centering a square emerald-cut diamond weighing 38.27 carats, flanked by tapered baguette diamonds weighing approximately 1.25 carats Estimate $3,500,000 — 4,500,000

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

OUR NEWS

Important Pair of Platinum, Diamond and Sapphire Earrings Suspending two cushion-cut diamonds weighing 29.39 and 28.03 carats, surmounted by round sapphires weighing 1.02 carats. Estimate $1,650,000 — 1,850,000

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

OUR NEWS

Very Fine Platinum, Fancy Pink Diamond and Diamond Ring Centering a pear-shaped Fancy Pink diamond weighing 6.93 carats, flanked by two pear-shaped near colorless diamonds weighing approximately 2.10 carats, Estimate $2,500,000 — 3,500,000

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GUCCI GUCCI Jewelry presents its new collection : LE MARCHÉ DES MERVEILLES

Gucci has recently incorporated a new honeybee motif into its designs, and this charming yet potent new icon is now being released as a standalone jewelry collection, Le Marché des Merveilles. The bee ushers in a more eclectic, poetic mood, first seen during Gucci’s Spring-Summer 2016 runway collections. Available in 18kt yellow or pink gold, the collection is composed of pendants, earrings and a ring. This new motif is a gentle nod to Gucci’s continuous evolution of creativity and innovativeness. About Gucci Jewelry All Gucci jewelry is handcrafted by highly skilled Italian goldsmiths and the high end jewelry collection is the epitome of impeccable craftsmanship. Luxury is defined by the choice of precious materials, the uniqueness of each design and the meticulous attention to detail. Gucci Jewelry offers Italian made designs that can be worn everyday and treasured forever. For more information about Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry, please visit www.gucci.com.

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Photo courtesy of GUCCI © GUCCI

Gucci is part of the Kering Group, a world leader in apparel and accessories which develops an ensemble of powerful Luxury and Sport & Lifestyle brands.

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Photo courtesy of GUCCI © GUCCI

OUR NEWS

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U LY S SE N A RDI N Ulysse Nardin Dual Time Manufacture Lady Reveals a Fresh Face, New Movement.

A classic beauty, the Dual Time Manufacture Lady shows a fresh face and new movement. Both ladylike and practical, this lovely timepiece communicates a style of elegance and playfulness powered for the first time by the in-house conceived and manufactured Caliber 334. Offered in a winter white palette that shim- mers with the iridescence found only in mother of pearl – the outer coating of a pearl – and a rich, shiny black, the watch is available in these two dial colors and two styles, as well. Both are decorated in gold or stainless steel and diamonds ga- lore with elegant and colorful wristbands to match. For the woman who prefers a wealth of sparkle, she can select the time- keeper adorned with diamonds encircling the entire bezel. The model with the sleek, unembellished bezel is ideal for the woman who finds less to be more. Each alluring version features a face that exudes a timeless radiance, dressed up by a very whimsical Roman numeral XII encompassing 12 diamonds; diamond hour markers; small seconds at 6 o’clock comprised of 12 diamonds; and even more diamonds decorating the crown. The hour and second hands, and iconic Ulysse Nardin anchor, are crafted in gold, adding to the wristwatch’s lasting allure. Devised with frequent travelers in mind, the dual time manufacture – a significant milestone in the history of contemporary watchmaking – allows wearers to adjust the second time zone and date forward, as well as backward. The movement, implemented here for the first time in the lat-

Jewellery Historian

est version of the Dual Time Lady, is an extension of this great feat. Easy to read and adjust, the “home time” indicator advances steadily over 24 hours in an aperture at 9 o’clock, while the small hand can easily be aligned with local time, either forward or backward. This is achieved by pressing the (+) or (-) pushers at 10 o’clock and 8 o’clock, without having to remove the watch from the wrist or interrupt its timekeeping. The large date display synchronizes with the hour hand adjusters, for the date moves automati- cally forward or backward when adjust- ments are made over midnight. An exquisite timepiece for the woman on the move, the Dual Time Lady bares not only the soft side of Ulysse Nardin but it also represents the manufacture’s commit- ment to enhancing its Ladies Collection. With the implementation of such move- ment, the Dual Time Lady is both a state- of-the-art timepiece and a dazzling piece of jewelry. For nearly 170 years, Ulysse Nardin has forged ahead, anchored in seafaring roots with sights set on the horizon. Forever in- ventive, the manufacturer remains stead- fast in its pioneering precision of fusing bold innovation with undeniable style. No- vember 2014 heralds a new era for Ulysse Nardin who joined Kering’s “Luxury – Watches and Jewellery “ division. Through this acquisition, Kering will support the continuation of Ulysse Nardin’s path of in- novation and ensure the future growth of independence in the manufacture of in- house movements.

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Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

OUR NEWS

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JEWELLERY HISTORIAN Olivier Dupon joins our team

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of excit- ing names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid pre- cious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery will be published in Autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon will expose inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centred around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry. At the Jewellery Historian we are honored to welcome to our family Olivier !

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OUR NEWS

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GU C C I GUCCI Timepieces & Jewelry introduces new GUCCI Handmaster automatic variants

When first released in 2014, the Gucci Handmaster collection embodied a new breed of luxury watches for Gucci Timepieces, showcasing the very best of its watchmaking artistry. Blending graceful aesthetics with refined materials and quality movements, Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry is delighted to extend this premium range with two new models that introduce a classic, rounded design.

dial display. Each sun-brushed dial, in black or grey, is en-

With their handsome allure, range of functionalities and automatic movements, the new variants continue to uphold the Gucci Handmaster hallmarks of elegance and craftsmanship. The House’s quintessential Italian styling is seen in a wealth of smart details that include sophisticated crocodile leather straps and elegant Gucci accents on the clasp and dial.

Each Gucci Handmaster Automatic watch is part of a limited edition, one of 99 models that comes individually numbered. These unique pieces represent an ideal way to mark the year’s achievements, or to welcome in a New Year with a statement of handcrafted style.

These two new models, both in a 40mm size, come in a choice of two different materials and movements: a stainless steel and black version, or a precious variant in pink gold and grey. The stainless steel model is equipped with a GP3300 automatic movement by Sowind Manufactures. This movement drives the power reserve indicator, and the watch also shows a date display and small seconds counter. The stylish 18kt pink gold variant features a GP2700 automatic movement, also by Sowind Manufactures, with three hands and date dis- play at 6 o’clock. On each piece, these inner mechanics are visible through the transparent glass case back, a window onto the oscillating weight, which is personalized with Gucci’s iconic diamante pattern.

Gucci Timepieces has been designing, developing and manufacturing iconic Gucci watches since the early 1970s. Taking advantage of the worldwide recognition of the Florentine house – and its unique duality in brand positioning, pairing modernity and heritage, innovation and craftsmanship, trendsetting and sophistication – Gucci Timepieces is one of the most reliable and consistent fashion watch brands, with a clear design approach and positioning. Made in Switzerland, Gucci watches are recognized for their design, quality and craftsmanship and are distributed worldwide through the exclusive network of directly operated Gucci boutiques and selected watch distributors. Since January 2010, Gucci Timepieces has also been distributing the Gucci Jewelry collections, capitalizing on the expertise gained in the watch sector and leveraging the synergies between the watch and jewelry industries. For more informa- tion about Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry, please visit www.gucciwatches.com. Gucci is part of the Kering Group, a world leader in apparel and

The appeal of the new Gucci Handmaster Auto- matic timepieces lies in their visually pleasing style: the rounded cases are echoed by Roman numerals laid out in a circular sun-

Jewellery Historian

hanced with the Gucci diamante pattern at its centre, offset with silver tone numerals and indexes. Each watch, available with either a black or grey crocodile leather strap, features the ‘Gucci Automatic’ logo at 12 o’clock and ‘Swiss Made’ seal at 6 o’clock.

About Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry

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Photo courtesy of GUCCI © GUCCI

OUR NEWS

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INTRODUCING


STA N IS L AV D R O KI N

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Photo courtesy of STANISLAV DROKIN © STANISLAV DROKIN

INTRODUCING

Jewellery atelier of Stanislav Drokin – is a creative laboratory where constantly occurs an experiment with a search for new forms and colour combinations of gemstones. The purpose of this process is the creation of jewellery with emotions, character. Every piece is produced in a single copy, rarely in a limited edition and is intended for connoisseurs of jewellery art.

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INTRODUCING

Professional knowledge and experience accumulated by Stanislav Drokin are passed on today to apprentices – masters of atelier. At the same time new innovative technologies are put into operation. This makes it possible to save received and discover new knowledge and skills for future generations. Today in the world dominated by mass reproduction, there are not many high-level author atelier left.

Jewellery atelier of Stanislav Drokin – is a creative laboratory where constantly occurs an experiment with a search for new forms and colour combinations of gemstones. The pur- pose of this process is the creation of jewellery with emotions, character. Every piece is created in a single copy, rarely in a limited edition and is intended for connoisseurs of contemporary jewellery art. Each jewel goes a long way from idea to realization. The production of one piece can take up to 300 working hours. Moreover, a search for right colour and sizes of stones sometimes takes months. In the process of creation modern technologies and handwork are used. This combination gives a possibility to achieve the highest quality performance. One of the most important components of the atelier is professional competence. When Stanislav Drokin was 15 years old he started to master refinements and secrets of the craft of metal working — engraving and jewellery. Founding in Kharkiv in 1994 jewellery atelier, Stanislav has already had many years of professional experience and creative po- tential. This made it possible to master and launch in the atelier all cycles of production, including casting. During 1998-1999 Stanislav Drokin got trained in gemmological centres of Ukraine, Ger- many and Poland. In 1998 he became a member of the Designers Union of Ukraine and the International Association “Society of Designers”. In 2011 he graduated from the Kharkiv State Academy of Design and Fine Arts. Professional knowledge and experience accumulated by Stanislav Drokin are passed on today to apprentices – masters of atelier. At the same time new innovative technologies are put into operation. This makes it possible to save received and discover new knowl- edge and skills for future generations. Today in the world dominated by mass reproduc- tion, there are not many high-level author atelier left. Love of Stanislav Drokin for his work and stones led to the implementation of two projects — the exhibition “The Magical World of Stone”, first held in 1995 and Ukrainian festival of design “JewelerArtProm” was held at the Kharkiv Art Museum in 2004. Stanislav Drokin was one of the initiators of the first in Kharkiv trade jewellery exhibitions. Coloured gemstones and opals as of today occupy a special place in jewellery from Stan- islav Drokin. Giving preference to European facet of the best houses with centuries-old tradition, taking care of the process of creating jewellery, bringing his own creativity, this way the main components of the value of jewellery are formed. Debut of Stanislav Drokin in European exhibitions and international competitions took place in 2014. Jewellery by Stanislav Drokin was appreciated by authoritative experts — members of the jury of prestigious international competitions, as confirmed by victories in them. This was the beginning of a new stage in the development of the atelier.

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY By Olivier Dupon


SUZ AN NE SYZ

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY

SUZANNE SY Z By Olivier Dupon

Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ Š SUZANNE SYZ

The contemporary jewellery designer, Suzanne Syz is renowned for her highly original and unconventional designs which draw on many sources for inspiration. Born in Zurich and educated in Paris, she moved to New York City in the 1980s and became part of the circle of Andy Warhol, Jean Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, Francesco Clemente and Jeff Koons. The nearness of these revolutionary creative spirits and their work not only greatly impacted her contemporary art collection; it also proved to be a formi- dable catalyst for her jewellery creations. Radiant colours, audacious compositions and unusual materials have become trademarks of Suzanne Syz’s work.

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Swiss designer Suzanne Syz revels in breaking certain codes of the Haute Joaillerie tightknit circle

What better way to express creativity than to refer to playfulness and apply an approach directly aimed at making one smile. This would not sound too ‘out of the ordinary’ were it not employed to create luxurious jewels. Unlike most other joailliers, who treat luxury literally as a serious affair, Swiss designer Suzanne Syz revels in breaking certain codes of the Haute Joaillerie tightknit circle. Not in a radical manner, rather with a canny eye for unconventional designs and experimentation, a respectful touch when it comes to gems, in the sense that they are often treated as Nature intended, and a fun spirit all around. The latter can be found as much in the names, which could easily pass for romantic song titles – Sex On the Beach ring, Moon and Sun Play It Fun ring –, borrow from ordinary treats – Smarties bracelet – or evoke dreamlike escapism – The Caribbean Beauty and Summer Breeze necklaces; as in the visual marketing of the pieces themselves – a shot shows the Lady in Red ring (in titanium set with Burmese cabochon spinel and pink sapphires) worn over none other than turquoise Mapa gloves. Is it another way to tell us that once you own a Suzanne Syz’s jewel, you hardly can part with it, even if this means whilst doing the dishes? The artful clash of colours, the union of high and lowbrow, the unexpected marriage between the exceptional and the mundane: this could all sum-up Suzanne Syz’s philosophy. In addition, all the elements that spell ultimate luxury are at the core of her practice. Superlative craftsmanship? Check. Exquisite designs? Check. Confidential service? Check, during the public fairs or private events her small team organizes around the world or better ‘by appointment only’ in her Geneva purple boudoir, a cocooning space with lilac walls and green carpet, surrounded by Suzanne’s private Artworks (‘a wonderful escape form the grey walls of the city’, she quips). And to top it all: each piece is a one-off. Even with the more replicable series such as the Life Savers one – under the ‘Pop’ theme, turning the idea of donut shaped candies into diamond studded, colourfully enamelled gold and silver is genius in its desirability -, a best selling line for which Suzanne had to make sure no two combinations of colours were similar, keeping the promise that each customer ended up owning a unique rendition. ‘Ideas come in many different situations: blocked at JFK during a storm and in need of some sugar, I bought some Life Savers sweets and thought it would be a great idea for earrings. This other time, in front of a hip hop video clip, I spotted some barbwire that became an element in a design’, Suzanne says,’or just walking my dogs in the countryside. Then I go back to my office and sit down with my ateliers. I explain to them what I want. Then, we work directly on the piece and they come back and forth to show me the piece. I correct the mistakes or looks until it is perfect, as in my mind.’ An avid and reputable Art collector, Suzanne is a self-described autodidact when it comes to jewellery design. It all started with her passion for stones, and as a client for high-end jewels herself, she felt she had to delve further into the industry by travelling to meet the best dealers and workshops across the world, an exploratory as well as life changing journey, which now allows her to produce the best quality designs under her own name.

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY

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THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Sometimes my workshops tell me it is impossible but they know that this is a word that does not sit well with me’, she smiles. ‘In the end we always find a solution: no rule is the rule!’

‘Besides I could not find any jewellery that reached my standards. I am in love with beautiful objects, one of a kind pieces and perfect execution. So there was not a specific moment for me to embark on this new career: it was just all about good timing and curiosity’, she shares. Her very first presentation in Paris in 2002 came with mixed feelings: happiness and a bit of anxiety as it was the first time Suzanne was going to show her first ever pieces to the press and clients. ‘Your friends always tell you good things but the press can be tough’, she notes. ‘Luckily everyone was so nice and offered so many compliments that I felt overwhelmingly relieved and happy’. In retrospect, her instant success had possibly to do with her visionary eye for jewellery design, and still today she is often told that she is ahead of her time. As the years have passed, she can see how many other jewellery pieces resemble creations she had herself previously conjured up. Not taking umbrage from these deferred copycat homages, she says they make her happy, while surely cementing her resolve in keeping what she is doing so well: looking forward. Finding novel contemporary materials that she can incorporate in her designs is cornerstone to this. A prime example is Titanium memory wire. ‘It is a wire that is usually used in surgery, that comes back to the shape you gave it at the beginning. I love it cause you can squeeze it or bend it and it always come back to the original shape’, she adds. Then there is the fact that Suzanne has been applying a very eclectic creative approach from day one, so that her designs have always been very different, keeping the fifty or so unique jewels she creates each year, fresh and surprising, ‘maybe less figurative than at the beginning’, she says, ‘but the common denominator is the execution: I want the very best in craftsmanship.’ And last but not least, her free spirit / defiant position in the face of technical feasibility: ‘I am free to do whatever I want! Sometimes my workshops tell me it is impossible but they know that this is a word that does not sit well with me’, she smiles. ‘In the end we always find a solution: no rule is the rule!’ In Suzanne’s case, her belief that the sky is the Limit is possibly the key that helps her unleash a constant creative flow. Case in point, her first ever watch design that is for the first time unveiled here in these pages.

www.suzannesyz.ch

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OL IVIE R DUPON As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Flo- ral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery will be published in autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon will expose inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

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Our Best wishes for a Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year The Jewellery Historian team

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SPOTLIGHT


PAOLO PIOVA N

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PAOL O P I O VAN Daring and uncompromising

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Italian company Paolo Piovan Gioielli has been a successful family business for more than 40 years. The founder, Paolo Piovan is considered one of the top Italian jeweler ever. With his strong, personal taste and the finest quality of work- manship, he gives birth to a range of highly acclaimed jewellery. Daring and uncompromising, his designs include only the highest quality of gemstones and each jewel is fully handmade, made one by one to satisfy the most demanding clien- tele. Worldwide acclaimed jewelry house for over forty years, Italian company PAOLO PIOVAN GIOIELLI forges the finest high jewelry masterpieces. Paolo Piovan's designs include only the high- est quality of gemstones and each creation is fully handmade in Italy with accuracy and passion. A solid tradition of Italian craftsmanship com- bined with originality and true innovation. In two words : uniqueness and exclusivity. The company has developed over time but has maintained unchanged the attributes that have always been its strong point : excellent Italian craftsmanship and a creative attitude towards jewelry. But in the case of Paolo Piovan, his creations talk for him better than words.

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ESTHĂˆTE

Une personne qui considère l'art comme une valeur essentielle


Photo courtesy of LORENZ BÄUMER © LORENZ BÄUMER

E STH È T E

An amazing timepiece by Lorenz Bäumer

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BREATHTAKING GEMS

By Eva Kountouraki


RUBY

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[Photo in Public domain]

BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS

RUBY Think of the strongest emotions, anger, passion, and more importantly love. Now think of a colour to describe these feelings. Red. Red like ripe juicy fruit, like good wine, like fast cars and roses and red lips, red like the blood that circulates in our veins and sustains our very life. That responds to our emotions by showing off on our cheeks when we are happy, shy, or in love. That storms in our body when we get upset or passionate. Red like ruby. The “king of precious stones” as it has been named, ruby, has always been one of the most important gemstones for all cultures; there were even periods when the value of rubies would exceed that of diamonds. Its sanguine appearance and its fierce durability have made humans believe

Jewellery Historian

that it has magical and protective powers. Many historical jewelry pieces include rubies as these gemstones were always thought to have an extremely high value and only the royals and the pure ones could own and wear a high quality ruby. Traditional sources of ruby include Thailand, Myanmar, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, among other Asian sources. Africa is also producing some of the world’s most beautiful rubies, and some regions of East Africa such as Mozambique and Madagascar are considered to become the world’s most important suppliers of high quality ruby. Since it is a gemstone that has accompanied humans for centuries, and never lost its popularity, we can find rubies in jewelry from

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“Ruby gives to the wearer the force of a lion, the fearlessness of an eagle and the wisdom of a snake” states an old eastern saying.

all periods and styles, from traditional Indian pieces to art deco period jewelry usually set together with other important gemstones, like diamonds, sapphires and emeralds, to contemporary designs, usually in high-end important pieces. Still today, rubies are the ones that could fetch the highest per carat price of all the colored stones. Probably the most famous and historic source of ruby is the Mogok region in Myanmar. It is tied to the highest qualities and best colours although not all the rubies mined there are fine. In the market they are referred to as “pigeon blood” that indicates an exceptionally saturated red colour, strong red fluorescence that intensifies the hue and tiny inclusions that may give the gems a “soft” look.

Photo courtesy of ADLER JOAILLIERS © ADLER JOAILLIERS

A Burmese legend says that a strong, beautiful and fearful eagle named Lal lived and ruled high in the mountains. All the animals were awed by his presence and scared of him. Years went by, his plumage started turning gray and he caught himself flying shorter distances every day. One day, he spread his wings to fly but he was too weak to lift off the ground. This is when he realized that his reign over the mountains and the other animals is coming to an end, together with his life. Returning to his cave he found an owl waiting for him without being scared of him. The owl offered to share the food with the now powerless eagle with the condition that Lal would not touch the owl’s nestlings. The eagle did not respond. He spent some time deeply pondering on his life and then he decided to react. So he gathered his remaining strength to the last drop and took off to what he knew would be his last flight. The animals from below stared at his majestic flight and then witnessed his fall until his body hit the rocks on the ground. The drops of his blood poured in the earth and became the most beautiful red crystals.. Rubies are the red variety of the gem species corundum that also includes blue and fancy sapphires. Most rubies mined around the world do not initially look as pretty as they are when we set them in our jewelry. Their colours tend to be too dark or too purplish or the gems may be a bit overly included, so that some kind of treatment is required in order to bring out the most desired red or slightly purplish red hue and the transparency that the market prefers. So, most rubies undergo a thermal enhancement right after they are surfaced. Those few rubies that exhibit good-quality colour combined with a high degree of freedom from eye-visible and distracting clarity characteristics without being treated are typically accompanied by a valid certificate that attests the natural origin and lack of treatment. Those gems demand a sky-high price as they are extremely rare. “Ruby gives to the wearer the force of a lion, the fearlessness of an eagle and the wisdom of a snake” states an old eastern saying. Rubies have always been the symbol of devotion and emotional strength, of desire and passion; All powerful emotions that stem from the force of this gem’s colour. Red like energy and motivation, like lust, heat, and an untamable and purely physical will to survive. Red like ruby.

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E VA KOU NTOUR AKI Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies.

Efstathios Chatzistathis / Shutterstock.com

Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of the jewelry

Jewellery Historian

industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students -famous professionals from around world. Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful purchases and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gempassionates. At the Jewellery Historian we are proud to have in our team Eva Kountouraki and her monthly column in every issue. Every month, discover a new gemstone and the unique breathtaking beauty of gems.

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OUR FAVES

In every issue, we handpick the finest jewellery for you to choose , enabling you to add a sophisticated, elegant touch to the most important times of your life. - Address book at page 154 -


DARI YA/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

OUR FAVES

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ADLER

OUR FAVES

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ANTONINI

ORLOV

BUTANI

OUR FAVES

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DARI YA/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

OUR FAVES

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ANNA HU

FABERGÉ

QEELIN

OUR FAVES

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ANTONINI

OUR FAVES

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ORLOV

LYDIA COURTEILLE

SUTRA

NIKOS KOULIS

OUR FAVES

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DARI YA/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

OUR FAVES

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ADLER

NIKOS KOULIS

QEELIN

OUR FAVES

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ADLER

OUR FAVES

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FABERGÉ

CARRERA Y CARRERA

SUTRA

OUR FAVES

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DARI YA/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

OUR FAVES

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ADLER

LETICIA LINTON

MAGERIT

LE VIAN

OUR FAVES

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JACK VARTANIAN

OUR FAVES

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YOKO LONDON

LETICIA LINTON

MEGHNA

OUR FAVES

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DARI YA/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

OUR FAVES

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MAGERIT

ORLOV

FABERGÉ

OUR FAVES

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BUTANI

OUR FAVES

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ROBERTO COIN

AVAKIAN

FABERGÉ

OUR FAVES

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CONRADO / Shutterstock.com

LeJour Comme La Nuit - Address book at page 154 -

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CONRADO / Shutterstock.com

LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

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Photo courtesy of TIFFANY & CO.© TIFFANY & CO.

LE JOUR TIMEPIECES COMME LA NUIT

TIFFANY & CO.

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

LE VIAN

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

FABERGÉ

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CONRADO / Shutterstock.com

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Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

ULYSSE NARDIN

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

BAUME & MERCIER

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

BOUCHERON

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CONRADO / Shutterstock.com

LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT


Photo courtesy of BAUME & MERCIER © BAUME & MERCIER

LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

BAUME & MERCIER

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

LE VIAN

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LE JOUR COMME LA NUIT

BOUCHERON

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BOUCHERON

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TIFFANY & CO.

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GUCCI

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ADDRESS BOOK


ADDRESS BOOK

ADLER www.adler.ch

LETICIA LINTON www.lbldesign.com.br

TIFFANY & CO. www.tiffany.com

ANNA HU www.anna-hu.com

LE VIAN www.levian.com

ULYSSE NARDIN www.ulysse-nardin.com

ANTONINI www.antonini.it

LORENZ BÄUMER www.lorenzbaumer.com

YOKO LONDON www.yokolondon.com

AVAKIAN www.avakian.com

LYDIA COURTEILLE www.lydiacourteille.com

BAYCO www.bayco.com

MAGERIT www.mageritjoyas.com

BAUME & MERCIER www.baume-et-mercier.com

MEGHNA www.meghnajewels.com

BOUCHERON www.boucheron.com

ORLOV www.orlovjewelry.com

BUTANI www.butani.com

PAOLO PIOVAN www.paolopiovan.com

CARRERA Y CARRERA www.carreraycarrera.com

QEELIN www.qeelin.com

FABERGÉ www.faberge.com

ROBERTO COIN www.robertocoin.com

GUCCI Jewelry & Timespieces www.guccitimeless.com GUMUCHIAN www.gumuchian.com JACK VARTANIAN www.jackvartanian.com NIKOS KOULIS www.nikoskoulis.gr

SOTHEBY’S www.sothebys.com STANISLAV DROKIN www.stanislavdrokin.com SUTRA www.sutrajewels.com SYZANNE SYZ www.suzannesyz.ch

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Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Contributors Eva Kountouraki, Olivier Dupon, Martin Huynh, Christina Rodopoulou --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian Publishing Jewellery Historian & 16ml --Photo agencies Shutterstock, Pixabay, Freepik, The stocks Cover Marina Pekarskaya / Shutterstock. com ---

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Jewellery Historian

| DECEMBER 2015

155


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Photo : Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

We would like to thank all who have contributed to the compilation of this issue. It would not have been accomplished without their significant contribution. The successful publication that owes a great deal to the professionals in the creative industry who have given us precious insights and feedbacks. And to the many others whose names are not credited but have made specific input in this issue, we thank you for your continuous support.

Jewellery Historian

| DECEMBER 2015

156


#Committed to Heritage and Creativity

Stand up for their promotion Stand up for their protection

United Nations Educational, ScientiďŹ c and Cultural Organization A campaign led with the support of the French customs

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Jewellery Historian, issue #16  

Discover the issue 16 of the Jewellery Historian, the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury".

Jewellery Historian, issue #16  

Discover the issue 16 of the Jewellery Historian, the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury".