Page 1

Growing Concern

The

NO VEMB ER 2 0 1 8

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Annual Meeting Nov. 15, 2018 / St. Michael’s Woodside

PAGE 7

Dormant Pruning Clinic

Nov. 27, 2018 / Willoway Nurseries – Avon, OH Nov. 29, 2018 / Premier Plant Solutions – Hillard, OH

PAGE 20

Sales Training Clinic

Dec. 6, 2018 / Indiana Wesleyan University

PAGE 21


Botson Insurance is the RIGHT CHOICE for Landscapers Insurance.

PROVIDING MORE SAVINGS AND BETTER COVERAGE! knows insurance for “ Greg Design-Build contractors. He has helped me for over 8 years. He gave me much better coverage to protect my equipment and trucks and saved me over 22%. I value our relationship. Bob Oster Green Source, LLC

Standard Policy

No No

COVERED RISK

Botson Policy

Replace a lawn that you sprayed with the wrong Pesticides.

Yes

Rebuild a faulty patio/retaining wall your employees built.

Yes

Replace your Large Equipment after a fire or theft with NEW!

Yes

(ODA Compliance coverage)

(Errors and Omissions Coverage)

No

(Replacement Cost on Equipment)

No No

Put MONEY back in your pocket!

(Average 22.5% savings)

Rebate check for average 7% for favorable claims experience.

Yes Yes

Greg Botson, CIC President 36480 Detroit Rd Avon, OH 44011

botsoninsurancegroup.com • (440) 537-2292


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

VALUE November is here and I now have 11 articles under my belt – granted this one was submitted a little late – but only because I have so much to share and was having a hard time wrapping my head around it all. That said, I officially have one more article left to write before I hand the reins over to next year’s president in January. I will say, that for as hesitant as I was to take on the writing portion of my duties as president, I have learned so much about myself and what we – as a company, an association, and personally – mean to the communities we serve. Many of you may not know this, but over the course of this year I’ve been honored with the opportunity to teach a class on Garden Center and Nursery Management for the Plant Science Technology Department at Tri-C. When offered the position, all I could think was WOW! Now that the class is well on its way, my thoughts are more “holy cannoli,” because the college, and our industry, is counting on me to give value to these potential employees. The word “value” can mean so many different things. As a noun, the definition is: the regard that something is held to deserve; the importance, worth, or usefulness of something. As a verb, the definition is: to consider (someone or something) to be important or beneficial; have a high

opinion of or to be given monetary worth. But value is perceived by everyone very differently. It turns out, value is solely in the eye of the beholder. As either a noun, or a verb, it helps to have a standard when assigning value. The standard I’ve assigned to my value, as it applies to the students in my class, is how well I fulfill the expectation of providing information that enables them to earn a better living. As it applies to the industry – a profession that is struggling to attract quality employees – I’ve also assigned myself a value based on whether or not those I teach possess the knowledge necessary to contribute. Talk about pressure, right? continued on page 6 The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards merit award winner, The University of Akron, for their submission in the category of Commercial Installation.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Value

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

Perennials for Commercial Landscapes

12 FISCAL FITNESS

Saving For Retirement

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Silicosis: Why OSHA Silica Dust Regulations and Table 1 Compliance Matters

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Ptelea trifoliata: Hoptree, Wafer-Ash, Stinking-Ash

27 FEATURE ARTICLE

Quick Tips for Winterizing Heavy and Small Machines

30 DIRECTIONS 31 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 31 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way

Membership Coordinator Laura Massie


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

COMING IN 2019...

NOVEMBER 15, 2018 OLA ANNUAL MEETING (NE OHIO)

DECEMBER 6, 2018 BE MORE THAN A SALESPERSON: BECOME A TRUSTED ADVISOR

FEBRUARY •  OHIO GREEN INDUSTRY ADVOCACY DAY (2/27)

Tom Wasinski, CEO of Aerial Agents, LLC – a professional aerial photography and videography company – will discuss and demonstrate the ways that drone services can enhance your portfolios to help you do a better job of telling the stories of your work. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. See page 7.

NOVEMBER 27, 2018 DORMANT PRUNING / NE OHIO Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio. See page 20.

NOVEMBER 29, 2018 DORMANT PRUNING / CENTRAL OHIO Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Premier Plant Services in Hilliard, Ohio. See page 20.

Marvin Montgomery, better known as the “Sales Doctor,” will conduct a one day sales training course that will provide participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term client relationships. Held at Indiana Wesleyan University, Independence, OH. Register online, or call the OLA offices. See page 21.

MARCH •  OLA MEETING : SAFETY WHAT IS YOUR ROLE? (3/14) •  LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA DINNER APRIL •  SAFETY TRAINING DAY

DECEMBER 14, 2018 LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINE

JULY •  PLANT IDENTIFICATION

Don’t miss the opportunity to become an award winning landscape contractor. Entries for the 2018 program are due in the OLA office by 5pm on Dec. 14. For rules, regulations and entry information go to ohiolandscapers.org/. landscapeohioawards.html. Questions? Contact OLA at 1-800-335-6521. See outside, back cover.

AUGUST •  SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

JANUARY JANUARY 24, 2019 OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Tim Tokarczyk, of the Fails Management Institute (FMI), will guide us through the challenges of helping our team members transition from one position to the next, addressing the “good luck, figure it out” mentality, and changing it to one of coaching for upwards success. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS OLA committees are a great way for members to get more involved with the association. We are always looking for new volunteers to help! If you, or one of your team members, is interested in joining one of our committees for the 2019 year, please contact the OLA office at 440.717.0002 by January 14th, 2019. We will be holding committee meetings on January 24th, prior to our regularly scheduled meeting.

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 5


PR E S IDENT’ S C OL UMN continued from page 3

When it comes to my value as an OLA board member, I look at it from two perspectives. Personally, I can honestly say that becoming involved with this organization has added value to my sense of self-worth. Prior to this, I would have never thought about becoming an adjunct teacher, or being a presenter at an educational event. Not to mention, I’ve met so many great professionals – some of whom I’ve built working relationships with – all due to my involvement. The networking alone has undoubtedly helped my career! In regards to what value I bring members and potential members as the current president, it really boils down to boosting the perceived value of an association membership. When some asks “what can the OLA do for me,” I sometimes have to contain my excitement, step back, and ask them questions that specifically address their needs. Sure, I may think networking is the best thing about the OLA, but if they are having labor or trucking issues then they may be more concerned with the legislative dealings of the association. Just like our company’s products and services, the OLA should always have value, and that value will vary from one member to another. Finally, we all should look at our businesses and attempt to draw some of these same conclusions, as it is value that sets us apart from our competition. We are in a “sellers’ market” now and are in high demand, so there is no need to try to undercut the competition just for the sake of making a sale. If someone asks why the price is high, ask them what they think it should be and then explain to them your value as it applies to their wants and needs. You won’t win every job, but you will win the customers you really want in the end.

As always, Marie

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA MEETINGS SERIES

EVENT INFORMATION

DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 15, 2018 ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM OLA ANNUAL MEETING 7:00 PM TO 7:30 PM PROGRAM 7:30 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND MEMBERS: NO CHARGE NON MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY NOVEMBER 8, 2018

SPONSORED BY

EMERALD SPONSORS

OLA ANNUAL MEETING

Drones & the Landscaping Industry In late 2014, Green Scene Landscaping & Pools, a Los Angeles-based design and construction firm specializing in high-end landscapes, announced that it had begun using a quad-rotor unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) equipped with a high-resolution camera to capture aerial landscape images. Fast forward to 2018 and videography for promotional purposes seems to be the fastest-growing use for small unmanned aircraft in the landscape industry. Small landscape, tree care or irrigation businesses typically hire an FAA-certified company specializing in professional aerial photography on a project-by-project basis. There are good reasons for doing so, liability being a big one since these professionals typically have property and casualty insurance. Join us at our Annual Meeting on November 15th, as Tom Wasinski, CEO of Aerial Agents, Northeast Ohio’s premier professional, experienced aerial photography and videography company - discusses the rules for flying drones commercially, barriers to entry for flying drones, recommended drones & technology, and more.

GUEST SPEAKER

TOM WASINSKI, CEO OF AERIAL AGENTS, LLC Tom has been a remote pilot for over 5 years, and is commercially licensed through the FAA to fly for clients’ business purposes. Mr. Wasinski has flown for over 10,000 hours; he has a keen eye for capturing inspiring still images and exciting video; and he and his team make the magic happen using the latest editing software in the Aerial Agents media production studio. Previously, Tom worked in the automotive industry to deliver photo and video services to dealerships all over the United States. He has trained other drone pilots, is considered an expert in aerial imaging, and has served as a member on the advisory board for US Congresswoman Marcia Fudge, who has put together an innovative program to increase awareness, education and utilization of science, technology, recreation,

SILVER SPONSORS EMMETT EQUIPMENT COMPANY BRONZE SPONSORS CASCADE LIGHTING DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY EN GARDE DEER DEFENSE SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR THIS YEAR’S MEETING SCHEDULE ARE NOW AVAILABLE. CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 1.5 CEU’S

engineering, arts, and mathematics fields in our region.

Aerial Agents prides themselves on offering courteous, professional, and affordable services, while providing clients with outstanding aerial view opportunities. Their services are designed to provide clients with captivating aerial imagery that captures inspiration. Take this opportunity to learn from one of the best as to how drone services can enhance your portfolios to help you do a better job of telling the stories of your work.

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/NOVEMBER


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb The golden blooms of Asclepias tuberosa ‘Hello Yellow’ contrast beautifully with the blue of Larkspur.

PERENNIALS FOR COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPES Commercial landscaping, whether it be in parking lots or office building beds, for churches or hospitals, for restaurants or college campuses, is seen by thousands of people every day but most of it can be considered boring rather than inspiring or exciting. If we avail ourselves of an expanded plant palette, we can constructively influence the public’s perception of landscaping. When designing such landscapes, what attributes are we looking for? We want high performance and low maintenance, thus long bloom, more than one season of interest, little deadheading, and no staking. Many perennials and ornamental grasses offer long seasons of interest although not necessarily bloom color, colorful or texturally interesting foliage, movement, fragrance, seed heads or pods, and winter interest.

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

An example of a perennial with many of these characteristics is Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Weed). If the color orange is a tough sell, try using the cultivar ‘Hello Yellow’ which is golden yellow. It is in bloom for six to nine weeks in July and August, has interesting seed capsules in late August and September, needs no staking, is a magnet for pollinators (particularly Monarch butterflies), and needs only to be cut to the ground in early spring. If seeding is not desired, the


In this long bed at a German display garden, groupings of Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’ are used repeatedly as punctuation marks.

capsules should be removed before splitting open. However, this is the perfect perennial for a naturalistic design. Hardy to zone 4, this perennial will thrive in full sun and in average to dry soil. One of my favorite perennials for constant change is the upright Sedum (Stonecrop). Best known is ‘Autumn Joy’ but I also use ‘Neon’ quite a bit because it is a bit shorter and doesn’t flop as much. This is another zone 4 hardy perennial for hot, dry spaces. The early spring rosette is attractive with its succulent leaves but stonecrops really come into their own starting in July when they resemble short heads of broccoli. Most commercial properties are large and therefore require large masses of plants in order to have an impact. If these masses are arranged somewhat naturally, as in drifts which feather in and out, they will not look artificial as do masses in which the plants are lined up like soldiers or in blobs. There is a huge shopping center on Long Island which utilizes sweeping

masses of perennials and grasses in the majority of the beds, including slopes which come right down to major streets and would be very difficult to mow. Because large properties often consist of several beds or long beds, repetition is an easy way to unify them. This can be done by using a specific plant in many of the beds, by using a particular form such as pyramidal or mounding, by using a specific texture like that of grasses, or by using one color with groupings of one genus or several different genera that all have that color bloom or foliage. Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ is an ornamental grass that I often use for its early foliation and long bloom. Hardy to zone 4, this grass, when in bloom, has a very stiff, linear form that echoes the rectilinear design of many office buildings but provides great contrast to the looser form of many perennials such as Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ (hardy to zone 5, possibly zone 4). Plant in full sun even though many books and catalogs say partial shade will do; in partial shade, it will lean or flop. Cut to the ground in very early spring. continued on page 10 The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 9


P EREN N I AL FOCU S continued from page 9

MIDWEST GREEN INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

Member Summit DECEMBER

12–13,

2018

Hilton Columbus at Easton

KEYNOTE SPEAKER Terri McEnaney President, Bailey Nurseries

What Is It? ONLA's Annual Conference—MGIX 2.0! This two-day event includes networking opportunities, professional development sessions, and sponsor displays.

Let us remember that not all commercial properties are blessed with sun. For partially shaded, moist areas, Ligularia dentata or stenocephala cultivars are an excellent choice. The foliage is just as important as the flowers, adding interest to the garden from the minute it appears until frost. These leaves are large, rounded, often serrated and can be green or bronze or purple. The blooms are either golden yellow daisy-like flowers or clear yellow tall spikes. Given optimum conditions (moisture), prolific seeding will occur, meaning that area will fill in quickly. The flower stalks remain upright throughout the winter and are very attractive when covered with snow. Merely cut to the base in spring. Color selection affects how and what the viewer sees. Want to make sure that an entrance is readily apparent? Use hot, strong colors like red, orange, yellow, and white that are seen immediately and from afar. Pastels like pink, lilac, blue and silver fade away from the viewer and often make an area seem larger than it is. Pastels are inviting and will not be overwhelming along a lengthy roadway. If a color scheme such as blue and yellow is used, it is important to use more blue than yellow or the mass of yellow will be overwhelming. The shade of the color is also important. Sulfur yellow will seem like a larger mass than pale or lemon yellow. Beds are frequently bare during the winter on commercial properties. When searching for evergreens to fill these beds, don’t forget about evergreen perennials, many of which make excellent groundcovers for slopes and don’t have to be wrapped with burlap which defeats the reason for using

Who Is It For? Our industry's most ambitious landscape and nursery business owners, managers, and crew members who are ready to change up their status quo.

Presenting Sponsors:

ONLA.ORG/MGIX 10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Ligularia dentata is used en masse at the bottom of a shady slope that hides the parking lot of a shopping mall on Long Island.


evergreens. Some perennials look like sculptures in the winter landscape and should not be cut to the ground until spring. Ornamental grasses are highly prized for their winter interest; their dried foliage and inflorescences sway in the wind, hold the snow, and add a more natural and appealing look to the landscape. An excellent but sadly neglected evergreen perennial groundcover is Arabis caucasica (Rock Cress). Hardy to zone 4, its multiplicity of small, six to twelve-inch high, white flowers in May cover the foliage and bring smiles to people’s faces. There are some rosy-pink cultivars as well. The fuzzy foliage is only an inch high but clambers over the ground quickly. Excellent drainage in full sun is essential to prevent winter rot. Maintenance is always an issue. The client usually wants as low a bill as possible; the landscaper wants to make money. Many perennials and grasses are relatively low maintenance, particularly the grasses that only need to be cut down once a year in early spring (not Festuca or Helictotrichon). You can lower maintenance for your clients with careful plant selection but you need to educate them that there is no such thing as no maintenance. If you can hire or train people who are knowledgeable about perennial maintenance, you can provide specialized care and charge accordingly. Know that there are many more perennials and ornamental grasses that are just as useful as the ones I have highlighted for high performance and low maintenance.

Get double duty from the same space by interplanting the tiny bulb Anemone blanda that will push up through the Arabis foliage.

Growing High Quality Plants, People, and Relationships

SERVING GARDEN CENTERS AND LANDSCAPERS SINCE 1978

Annuals Combo Planters Grasses Hardy Ferns

Herbs Peonies Perennials

Proven Winners® Succulents Vines

Now growing Proven Winners® shrubs

800-948-1234 • www.millcreekplants.com • sales@millcreekplants.com 15088 Smart Cole Road, Ostrander, OH 43061

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

Asclepias tuberosa shown in combination with other low maintenance perennials (Astilbe deadheads, Vitex agnus-castus ‘Abbeville Blue’, Sedum, Rudbeckia missouriensis, and Eupatorium fistulosum) on New York’s High Line, a great public park.

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 11


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

SAVING FOR RETIREMENT One of the biggest questions our clients ask is “How much do I/we need to retire?” The question sounds simple enough, but is complex in so many ways. Each client is different. Spending habits, lifestyle changes, working part time in retirement, health concerns, planning to travel or buy a vacation home, leaving assets to heirs or charities, etc. The list goes on and on. Much of our retirement spending discussion actually takes place before the client retires. Some will say you need to replace 75% of your pre-retirement income. But that is too generic for all clients, who have different goals and risk levels. What we have found is that it works much better to create an actual retirement budget once the client is within shouting distance of calling it a career.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

We also have to determine how to draw down the savings in retirement. One client may want the account to continue to grow and draw a smaller amount. Another may want to spend down the account over time. We had a client recently say they wanted to travel now, as they didn’t want to be strolling on the beach with a walker in hand. continued on page 14


We Deliver!

Check us out on the web at www.davistreefarm.com 330-483-3324 sales@davistreefarm.com www.davistreefarm.com

• • • • • • • • •

Flagstone (40+ choices) Wallstone (30+ choices) Outcroppings Boulder & Chunks Step Treads (Sawn/Stepped/Irregular) Travertine Natural Veneer Stone (Thin & Full Bed) Barn Stone Decorative Gravel (20+ choices)

QUARRY DIRECT PRICES AVAILABLE JOBSITE MOFFETT DELIVERY UNMATCHED PRODUCT SELECTION ADDRESS: 9718 AVON LAKE RD, LODI, OH 44254 PHONE: (330) 948-1006 EMAIL: DOUG.FRANKBROS@GMAIL.COM The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 13


FI SCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 12 The most important part is the actual saving and investing. A qualified Financial Advisor should be invaluable to helping you assess your risk and develop a plan to follow through your saving and investing years and the retirement years. So let’s talk about that saving part… Half of Americans think $1 million is enough to retire on, according to personal finance site NerdWallet. Depending on when you stop working and what you want your lifestyle to look like in your golden years, you may need more or less. But if you’re aiming for $1 million, here’s the breakdown of exactly how much to save per month to reach that goal by age 67.

NECESSARY SAVINGS PER MONTH Age 20: $319 per month Age 25: $440 per month Age 30: $613 per month Age 35: $864 per month Age 40: $1,240 per month Age 45: $1,831 per month Age 50: $2,831 per month Assumes 6% average annual investment return, monthly compounding and a retirement age of 67. Numbers are rounded in some cases. Retirement needs vary by income and cost of living –– $1 million isn’t an adequate goal for every saver.

As the chart shows, the amount you have to save depends a lot on how early you start. If you begin setting aside money at age 20, you have to save $319 per month to reach $1 million. If you start at age 30, though, that number nearly doubles: You need to save $613 per month.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

If you haven’t already started investing, the simplest way to start is to contribute to your employer’s retirement plan, a taxadvantaged retirement savings account, or other retirement savings accounts, such as a Roth IRA or traditional IRA. Supplement those with savings in outside accounts and remember to diversify. From the stocks, bonds and funds in your bank or brokerage accounts to real estate, collectibles, your business and even commodities and precious metals, use your money to make money. Compounding interest on investments is a very powerful tool. A million dollar account with a 6% rate of return is making $60,000. In twelve years that one million turns into two million with no additional investments! Diversify, assess your risk and rebalance on a regular basis. Talk to your financial advisor to help with your specific needs, goals and risk tolerance.

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com Securities & advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company Registered Broker/Dealer Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 (800) 478-0788


Since 1986, VanCuren Tree Services has been Northeast Ohio’s complete tree care specialist. We provide comprehensive services for any residential, commercial, or utility tree care need. The tree professionals at VanCuren Tree Services have helped home and business owners throughout Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio maintain the beauty, vitality, and safety of their trees. We are proud to offer a full range of tree care services, from tree and stump removal to storm damage clean up to utility work and beyond.

To find out more about what VanCuren has to offer, visit our website at www.vancurentreecare.com, or call us at 440.338.5005 today for a free consultation. • Complete Tree Maintenance Programs

• 75’ Bucket Trucks

• Certified Arborists on Staff

• Deep Root Fertilization

• Tree Removal

• 24-Hour Emergency Service

• Tree Trimming

• Stump Grinding

• Land Clearing

• Tree Moving

• 178’ 40 Ton Crane SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Michael Sowul, Certified Arborist James DiRosa, Certified Arborist David R. Van Curen

PHONE: 440.338.5005 FAX: 440.564.9319

Your Complete Tree Care Specialists 15 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscapewww.vancurentreecare.com Association

continued on page 36


FOR SAFETY SAK E

SILICOSIS WHY OSHA SILICA DUST REGULATIONS AND TABLE 1 COMPLIANCE MATTERS

Few people really enjoy expanding government regulations. While there’s certainly been a lot of focus on the recent silica dust regulation updates, we haven’t spent much time looking at the rationale behind it. Namely, the silicosis OSHA is trying to prevent construction pros from suffering through later in life.

WHAT IS SILICOSIS? Silicosis is a lung fibrosis that takes hold when you breathe in silica dust – the kind of dust you kick up in concrete and masonry work, mining, and other sectors. As you breathe in silica dust, it damages the lining of your lungs’ air sacs. This will create scar tissue inside your lungs and can cause fluid buildup, affecting your ability to breathe as your lungs stiffen. Acute silicosis symptoms can begin as early as a few weeks after exposure and include a cough, weight loss, and fatigue. In some people, it may take years before the symptoms occur.

Chronic silicosis typically shows up 10–30 years after you are exposed. This gets into your upper lungs and can result in extensive scarring. If you remain in a high-exposure environment, you’ll experience accelerated silicosis, which means you’ll experience the longterm effects even sooner – usually within 10 years. What’s disturbing is that there’s no cure for silicosis and it also increases your risk of lung cancer, tuberculosis, and COPD. Only preventative measures will keep your lungs healthy. continued on page 18

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


L

ND

SCA

PE

A

A

D

S

C

L

S S I F I E

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Classified and Help Wanted ads? Want to post one of your own? You’ll find them at ohiolandscapers.org or myohiolandscape.com. HELP WANTED ADS Help Wanted ads are posted on both our industry website and our consumer website, along with bi-monthly postings via social media. CLASSIFIED ADS (I.E. Equipment for sale) Classified ads are posted on our industry website ohiolandscapers.org COST MEMBERS: $35 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. NON MEMBER: $70 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. Please send all inquiries and ad content to: info@ohiolandscapers.org or call the OLA office at 440-717-0002.

>>>

All n’ One

FIRE PI T & FIREPLACE

KITS

INTRODUCING

<<<

ALL N’ ONE FIRE PIT & OUTDOOR FIREPLACE KITS >> Designed to SAVE time and make things easy and simple for you >> No guesswork on quanities of wall block or caps >> Get everything you need to complete the job, including adhesive, inserts, and even stone veneer for one price! only at

330-483-3400

ValleyCitySupply.com

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 17


FOR SAFETY SAK E continued from page 16

BEST WORK PRACTICES WHAT EMPLOYEES CAN DO TO REDUCE SILICA INTAKE If workers know about silica and understand the severity of its health hazard, they will be more likely to do the following: • • • • • • • • •

Know which work operations can lead to silica exposure. Participate in any air monitoring or training programs offered by the employer. Change into disposable or washable work clothes at the worksite; shower (where available) and change into clean clothing before leaving the worksite. Not eat, drink, use tobacco, products, or apply cosmetics in areas where there is dust containing crystalline silica. Wash their hands and face before eating, drinking, smoking, or applying cosmetics outside of the exposure area. If using respirators, not alter the respirator in any way. Use type CE positive pressure abrasive blasting respirators for sandblasting. For other operations where respirators may be required, use a respirator approved for protection against crystalline silicacontaining dust. Not grow beards or mustaches if often using tight-fitting respirators.

REDUCING RISK ON SITE OSHA’s updated regulations lower the permissible exposure level (PEL) from 250 micrograms per cubic meter to 50 micrograms. Table 1 (See https://www.osha.gov/silica/ Table1sect1926.1153.pdf ) was created to offer an easyto-read guide for selecting the right tools, accessories, and dust collection systems to keep you in compliance. If your application isn’t on the list, you can use objective data that proves a system of tools and methods keeps you under the limit. Finally, you can fit your crew with monitors to gather actual exposure data and ensure they’re below the limit. Many tool manufacturers, like Bosch, are making the process of selecting Table 1 compliant systems easier and providing objective data documentation straight from their website. You can easily bring up the information in your job planning meeting, morning safety meeting, or access it on your smartphone on site.

ADDITIONAL STEPS TO PREVENT SILICOSIS If you work in a trade that has a risk of silica dust exposure, be proactive with your medical care. Your insurance likely carries a free or low-cost annual wellness exam anyway, so just let your doctor know that you want to stay ahead of silicosis so he or she pays close attention to your lungs.

They may want a CT scan of your lungs, bronchoscopy, or biopsy of your lungs depending on whether they think you’re already down the silicosis path or just want to establish a baseline to continue monitoring you. Either way, the upfront cost will be worth it down the road if you’re able to prevent damage.

TREATING SILICOSIS If your doctor establishes that you have silicosis, it’s not the end of the world, but you will have some lifestyle changes. Obviously, you’ll need to eliminate any exposure you’re still getting. You may get an inhaler to help decrease sputum or to relax your air tubes. If your silicosis is more advanced, you may need oxygen on a regular basis. You may even be put on the list for a lung transplant. Once the disease sets in, you’ll have to avoid airborne irritants like smoke, pollen, and air pollution. Managing the disease will take a lot of care and there’s no getting around the fact that it will be expensive.

Written by Pro Tool Reviews Managing Editor, Kenny Kohler. Pro Tool Reviews is written by Pros for Pros, and strives to bring a professional’s perspective to which power tools are the best performing and best valued. Check them out online at https://www.protoolreviews.com.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


Eldorado Outdoor products quickly assemble into a virtually limitless combination of configurations! Each piece is made of glass-fiber reinforced concrete which can be installed on any solid flooring surface without concrete footings or rebar. Eliminate construction waste and the extra time associated with traditional masonry block installations. Eldorado Outdoor products can be easily assembled in just hours!

Mason Steel

Your Outdoor Living Headquarters

7500 Northfield Road • Walton Hills, OH 44146

(440) 439-1040

www.masonsteel.com

1-866-666-SALT (7258) DRY BULK SALT & BAGGED MATERIAL 24 hour / 7 days a week availability 10-25 ton dry salt—same day delivery pick up of bulk salt every order weighed and ticketed state

- approved scale / delivery of bagged salt or deicing material

pickup

volume discounts available we supply clearlane™ enhanced deicer by cargill a sodium and magnesium blend

-

bagged deicing chemicals

DOME LOCATION 11444 Brookpark Rd • Brooklyn, OH, 44130

ROYALTON SUPPLY LOCATION 11528 Royalton Rd, North Royalton, OH 44133

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 19


FOROLA SAFETY SAKE EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

SPONSORED & HOSTED BY

EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 27, 2018 1:00PM - 4:30PM WILLOWAY NURSERIES 4825 CENTER RD. AVON, OH 44011

NOVEMBER 29, 2018 8:30AM - 12:00PM PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS 6981 SCIOTO-DARBY RD. HILLIARD, OH 43026

DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC

The most important landscape maintenance practice is the control of plant size by the correct method of pruning to retain the natural branching characteristics of the plants and integrity of the landscape design. Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to get back to the basics and learn the proper way to prune in time for winter and early spring pruning. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar will include a lecture as well as hands-on training. Attendees will need to bring their own notepad and pen, hand pruning shears, a small pruning saw, and long handle lopping shears, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training.

INSTRUCTED BY

GAIL REINHART / HIDDEN CREEK LANDSCAPING Gail joined the Hidden Creek Team in 2014, bringing with her over 15 years of experience in Horticulture, Sales, Project, and Operations Management, and Employee Development. She has an Associate’s Degree in Landscape and Turfgrass Management from Owens Community College and has spent time working out of state in Michigan and Delaware gaining knowledge of Golf Course and Retail Garden Center operations, and Residential and Commercial Landscape Management. Gail grew up on a 500- acre farm in Northwest Ohio which cultivated her love of the outdoors.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 11/13/18 - $69 AFTER 11/13/18 - $99 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 11/13/18 - $99 AFTER 11/13/18 - $129 PLEASE NOTE: THE NOV. 27 MORNING CLINIC IS STILL SCHEDULED, BUT IS FULL. THE CLINIC LISTED ABOVE IS AN ADDITIONAL CLINIC.

GIVEAWAY ITEM

As an attendee, you will receive a gift provided by A.M. Leonard. to be determined closer to the date of your clinic.

2018 DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 11/20/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company

Contact

Address City Phone (______)

State Fax (______)

Zip

Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE

FEE

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No.

Exp. Date

Name on Card

Signature

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 3.520 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association REGISTER ONLINE AT CEU’S OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PRUNING.HTML


FOR SAFETY SAK E SERIES OLA EDUCATION “If you want to improve your results utilizing simple tools that you can immediately apply, make Marvin your first call.” – Sam A. Misseri, Vice President of Business Development

GET MARVINIZED! EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION DECEMBER 6, 2018 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM – 8:30AM SALES CLINIC 8:30AM – 12:00PM LUNCH (INCLUDED) 12:00PM – 1:00PM

SALES TRAINING CLINIC

Be More than a Salesperson: Become a Trusted Advisor

Are the sales techniques that your staff utilizes following a proven method of success, or are they simply implementing “trial and error” techniques while losing valuable sales opportunities in the process? It’s been proven that people buy from people whom they know, like & trust. Marvin Montgomery better known as the “Sales Doctor,” will conduct a one day workshop that will provide the participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term relationships and benefit from the Three R’s: Repeat Business, Referrals and Request. You don’t want to miss this opportunity to send your entire team to “Get Marvinized.” This is also a great refresher for anyone who has already taken Marvin’s sales training!

INSTRUCTED BY

MARVIN MONTGOMERY / MARVIN MONTGOMERY & ASSOCIATES For more than 30 years, Marvin Montgomery has earned widespread national recognition and

SALES CLINIC 1:00PM – 4:00PM

praise for his informative, practical and stimulating programs that reflect his basic philosophy: “Preparation and practice are the keys to sales success.”

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 11/21/18 - $179 AFTER 11/21/18 - $209 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 11/21/18 - $209 AFTER 11/21/18 - $239

Marvin’s captivating presentations have assisted hundreds of organizations to meet or exceed their sales goals using his training programs. Many of Marvin’s clients have said that getting “Marvinized” has truly made a difference in their company and

Marvin has become a

mandatory part of company training.

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SALES TRAINING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 11/29/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email FEE

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

$

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No.

Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SALESTRAINING

21 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

6 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Stinking Ash is easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soils in part to full shade. It will tolerates full sun and is adaptable to a wide range of growing conditions.

PTELEA TRIFOLIATA HOPTREE, WAFER-ASH, STINKING-ASH Plants in the family of Rutaceae are a vast, interesting group of plants. With at least 160 genera in the family, there is a lot to learn. By far the most famous genus is Citrus, which is one of the most economically-important, woody plants in the world. A deep dive into the family Rutaceae reveals a lot of unique plants, all with a common trait – they smell. In fact, other than Citrus and a few other obscure tropicals, most plants in this family downright stink! That said, we’d still like to share a Native-to-Ohio member of the family with you, which we believe deserves more love in our landscapes, despite its odorous traits. We’d also like to mention – before you turn your nose up at our plant of the month – that you would really have to crush the leaves or scrape the bark of this plant to bring out its smell, so unless you are pruning the plant, you will never notice it. Ptelea trifoliata is the only member of the genus Ptelea, so perhaps out of pity of being a loner, we’ve given it numerous common names including Hoptree (fruits were a substitute for hops), Wafer-Ash (fruits look like little flat wafers), and Stinking-Ash (kind of looks like an Ash tree and it smells).

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Hoptree is a small, low-branched, rounded-crown tree reaching around 15 feet tall and wide. It is a fairly adaptable plant, but will perform best in a soil that drains well. It does fine in full sun to a fair amount of shade. The specific epithet is a direct reference to the three-part, compound leaf that resembles three separate leaves (tri = three, foliate = leaves). Some references describe the flower as fragrant, but we find that word to have a connotation of pleasant smelling, which this flower is not. While it isn’t a very powerful scent, the flower is pollinated by Carrion Flies, a group of flies that like to eat dead meat. It’s probably safe to surmise that because the pollinator is attracted to dead animals, this may explain the attraction to the flower. These flowers, greenish-yellow in color, form in panicles


New/Used Commercial & Construction Equipment

klynnurseries.com

Parts and Service

Over 1800 Different Species And Cultivars To Meet Your Needs!

Now With 7 Locations To Serve You!

bamboo

wooster

mansfield

mt vernon

330-345-9023

419-529-6160

740-392-6160

grasses perennials

monroeville

copley

burbank

419-465-4622

330-666-8400

330-948-7437

ferns

north royalton

vines

440-237-4806

roses dwarf conifers bog & marginals

www.ShearerEquipment.com

shade & ornamental trees

in June and are not overly showy. (We’re really selling the flowers 5/14/2015 11:31:24 AM here if you haven’t noticed.)

Shearer Qtr 0315.indd 1

In August the fruit becomes apparent in a very well-ordered, round, flat wafer. With a small seed in the middle, this fruit will dry to a light brown and persist into winter. They are really an interesting winter feature, for a small native tree. While this isn’t a tree that is going to knock people over with ornamental features, we think it is important to remember that we are also planting to improve our failing ecosystems. As this plant is the sole member of the genus, that lends to some evolutionary benefits. Think of the major, species limiting, insects and diseases that have come through our country. They are all foreign pests/diseases that our native species have never been exposed to, thus don’t know how to defend against. The trouble is, these foreign pests figure out how to attack our natives by training on cousins to our plants. Dutch Elm? Yeah, it had Ulmus species to figure it out. Emerald Ash Borer? There were Asian Fraxinus to help figure ours out.

Visit Our Website For Product Availability, Our 2018 2016 Catalog, Quote Form, And More!

(contact us to receive your username and password.) klyn nurseries, inc.

1-800-860-8104 klynnurseries.com

There are no other Ptelea in the world, which means that the only pests that attempt to attack this plant are native and thus have evolved with the plant. Hoptree is virtually pest free and will likely stay that way. Add to this a native range from South-East continued on page 24 0116 Klyn Half.indd 1

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 23 12/16/2015 3:27:07 PM


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 23 Canada south down to Florida, reaching in bands west towards Arizona and into Southern Mexico, and it becomes apparent that global warming should not become an issue either. There may be some medicinal properties yet to be discovered in this plant. Many plants in Rutaceae have been found to have unique properties including high amounts of vitamin C in Citrus. Another member of the family, Angostura, has been used in some traditional medicines for centuries, with the bark still being the primary flavoring agent in Angostura Bitters, used in a number of cocktail drinks including a nice Old Fashioned (muddle sugar and bitters, then add whiskey) or perhaps you fancy a Manhattan, for less effort (bitters and sweet vermouth with a rye whiskey). Another member of the family, Orixa, has been found to produce compounds that can kill the protozoan pest that causes malaria in humans.

landscape and it will have the entire party talking about its crazy curved stems and medieval thorny branches. Or perhaps plant the arguably-native Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree). While it is considered to be native to the Amur River Valley in Mongolia, there are fossil records of this plant in North America from the Early Oligocene period. (OK, so maybe that was around 30 million years ago.) But, it helps prove the point that “native” is a moving target and to fix a line in the ground now is pretty silly of us. Fact of the matter is, we need more plants, we need more trees, and we desperately need to increase the urban canopy. Ptelea trifoliate is a plant that has trained for millennia to rise to the challenge of global climate change and increasing global trade – which is how the invasive pests arrive in the first place. Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited

There are a few other members of this family – also ornamental in size – that are deserving of a place in the landscape, such as Poncirus trifoliata (Hardy Orange), especially the cultivar ‘Flying Dragon’. If you find yourself starting conversations at your own parties, plant one of these in the middle of your

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


U-CARA

U-MAZING

U-Caraâ&#x201E;˘, the revolutionary multi-face wall system. Unilock has once again reinvented hardscaping with U-Cara, bringing landscape walls to a whole new level. Two components. Endless possibilities.

One simple platform with unlimited possibilities.

Easy-to-handle U-Cara fascia panels and Sure Trackâ&#x201E;˘ backer blocks work together for ease, flexibility and efficiency.

Build more with U-Cara.

Unilock.com/ucara | 1-800-UNILOCK US Pat. 9,453,341


F EATURE ARTI CLE

QUICK TIPS FOR WINTERIZING HEAVY AND SMALL MACHINES To prepare for frosty winter conditions, you must take steps to safeguard your outdoor equipment. With the following 11 steps, you can ensure your machines and equipment remain healthy and robust through all months of the year.

FILL WITH PROPER LUBRICANTS AND CHECK FLUID LEVELS BEFORE EACH USE In advance of the impending winter cold, fill the fluid compartments with lubricants of the proper viscosity. Before you power on a machine, check the transmission and hydraulic components, as well as the oil tank, to ensure the fluid levels are optimal for the flow of the machine. Pull the dipstick out from each fluid container before each operation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if the fluid drips from the stick, the compartment is sufficiently lubricated. Do not use oil that has been thinned with kerosene.

CONDITION THE HYDRAULIC HOSES Other components to double-check before each use throughout the winter are hydraulic hoses, which can crack if strained under cold conditions. To condition the hoses for wintertime

operations in advance of each use, run the motor to raise the hydraulic oil to 150 degrees Fahrenheit, and continue to run the machine for a minimum of 60 minutes. For optimal performance, use a specially formulated arctic hydraulic oil during winter months.

KEEP EQUIPMENT STORED INSIDE ENCLOSED FACILITIES When freezing winds and snowfall hit, the effects can be damaging to the exterior and internal components of outdoor machines and equipment. After a snowstorm, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d need to brush the snow and ice from the body of an exposed snow plow just to run it across your driveway. In worst-case scenarios, you might have to dig the plow out from several inches of snow. Meanwhile, the engine fluids within a machine could freeze if left exposed to subzero temperatures. continued on page 28 The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 27


F EATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 27 Throughout the weeks and months when your machines are not in use, store everything inside an enclosed facility. This way, the machines will be protected from the wintertime elements. For best results, remove any attachment parts and store them separately. Furthermore, keep all fluids specially stored in a room-temperature setting to protect the viscosity.

USE A BLOCK HEATER TO WARM THE ENGINE For most outdoor machines, the quickest way to warm the engine is with the use of a block heater, which can raise the temperatures of interior components and hydraulic fluid. To make this process as fast as possible, block the flow of the engine fan from the radiator as you warm the machine.

KEEP BATTERIES CHARGED & WARM When temperatures drop below normal, a battery needs double the number of cranking amps to power on a machine. In order to make the startup process easier on the battery, keep it charged and sufficiently warm throughout the winter months. If the temperatures in your area drop to subzero levels, remove the battery from the machine and store it in a room-temperature setting during weeks when the machine is not in use.

USE PROPERLY STORED STARTING FLUID Have starting fluid handy for the wintertime startup of

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

outdoor machines. Make sure that starting fluid is stored properly in a room-temperature setting between uses. Beware â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the toxic, flammable nature of starting fluid can render the product dangerous if not properly isolated, so never store the fluid alongside combustible materials. Inject the fluid as the engine cranks for optimal startup performance. It is important to know that starting fluid should only be used on certain machines. Contact your nearest equipment dealer before using starting fluid on your machine.

RUN THE ENGINE CONTINUOUSLY UNTIL IT REACHES OPERATING TEMPERATURE Before you put a machine to use, run it in idle until the engine reaches full operating temperature. This way, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll prevent sticking in the valves of the intake and exhaust systems. As you run the machine along your yard or driveway, activate each of the functions for a minute to distribute oil throughout the machine body. This step will give the machine a workout, so to speak, and help keep the engine and its functions in proper working condition.

INSPECT TIRES & MAINTAIN PROPER INFLATION When temperatures drop, tires can lose air more rapidly. To ensure tires are sufficiently filled to support the weight of a machine, inspect each tire every time before you put the


machine to use. For optimal seating of the tire bead, inflate each tire in an area with access to a heat supply, such as in your garage. One of the worst problems that can develop inside of a tire is the formation of ice crystals, which can occur under subzero temperatures and exacerbate deflation issues. To prevent this from happening, inflate each tire with dry nitrogen gas.

INSPECT THE ENGINE, BODY & UNDERCARRIAGE In advance of each use, perform a visual inspection of the outer body, engine components and underside of your outdoor equipment. Make sure the parts inside the engine — including all the wires and hoses — are in clean, optimal working condition and free of wear or cracks. If you notice any abrasions along the hydraulic hoses, tires or belts, replace those parts immediately. If snow or dirt are present along the tires or underside components, clean the spots in question before starting up the machine. To ensure the undercarriage of an outdoor machine is in healthy shape for the winter, have the machine inspected by a licensed specialist in advance of the cold season.

KEEP DIESEL EXHAUST FLUID IN SAFE STORAGE When temperatures drop to 12 degrees or lower, diesel fluid within an exposed container will freeze into sludgy crystal-laden form. To prevent this from happening, store diesel exhaust fluid containers in a room-temperature setting with sufficient insulation. If you do store diesel exhaust fuel, make sure the container itself is non-expansive. This way, if the fluid thaws, it won’t burst through the container. It is also important to note that DEF fluid has a limited shelf life in comparison to other fluids. Always be aware of the expiration date of the material.

REFILL THE FUEL TANK AFTER EACH USE To prevent the fuel tank from freezing overnight in the midst of a cold stretch, refill the tank after each use. Also, clean and drain the water separator after each use, in advance of the refill. This step will help protect the fuel tank from the leak-over of dirt, sediment and water. With a clean fuel system, the machine will be better-equipped to handle even the coldest of winter seasons.

This story originally ran on the Altorfer CAT site at https://www.altorfer.com/ quick-tips-for-winterizing-heavy-and-small-machines/

The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 29


D I RECTI ON S

UPDATES

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVOCACY First, I would like to share that our advocacy is working. While we cannot control outcomes, we can influence them. Our advocacy efforts are getting our voice heard. Last month, I told you about our opportunity to have George Hohman, Joe Drake and Tom Demaline participate in a roundtable discussion with President Trump at the Ohio GOP State Dinner in Columbus. At the President’s request, George provided written information to the president outlining the problems with H2B and what we need to fix the problem. George has continued to follow up with the White House and recently sent them the Plain Dealer article about H2B that ran on Sunday, October 2nd. This effort prompted a representative from the White House to call George. The White House representative was very interested in how the labor shortage – and more specifically, how the shortage of H2B visas has affected his company and the green industry. George was told that President Trump and the Administration have this problem on their radar and want to see it fixed. Wow! It is not every day you get a phone call from the White House! Way to go George! Your persistence is paying off!

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Additionally, Congressman Dave Joyce has introduced us to a contact that is influential at the White House. If you are speaking with Congressman Joyce or his staff, please be sure to say thank you for the help they have been providing.

CDL LICENSE RENEWALS The Ohio Department of Motor Vehicles and Ohio Department of Public Safety have announced that in order to renew a CDL License, individuals will need to present documentation that proves you are a U.S. Citizen or that you have Lawful Permanent Residency. If you have a CDL that expires soon, be sure to check that you have the documentation that is required. If you are a citizen, you will need to present your U.S. Passport, Passport Card, Certified copy of your Birth Certificate, Consular Report of Birth Abroad, Certificate of Naturalization, or Certificate of Citizenship. If your current full legal name isn’t on these documents, you will have to provide a Marriage Certificate, Certified Copy of your Decree of Divorce, Dissolution or Annulment of Marriage, or a Certified Copy of a court order name change. If you are a Foreign National with Legal


Presence in the United States, you need to present a valid Permanent Resident Card (I-551) issued by the USCIS or another similar document showing legal presence. Daryl Lengyel of CDL Training sent me a copy of the renewal letter and a form showing the acceptable documents. I would be happy to scan these and email them to you if you want to be sure you are prepared. Just be sure not to wait until the last minute in the event you cannot easily locate the needed documents.

ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

19 2

Abraxus Salt, Inc. Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

13

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

Please join me in welcoming Laura Massie to the OLA Staff. Laura is our new part-time Membership Coordinator. We are excited to have Laura aboard! She comes to us with a background in public affairs and communications, primarily with universities and the National Association of College Stores. She is currently hard at work processing membership renewals and sending out your receipts and login information. Some of you got to meet Laura at our Plant Health Care Day at the Holden Arboretum on October 2nd. Laura will be at our Annual Meeting coming up on November 15th. I hope you are planning to attend so that you can say hello in person!

13

Frank Brothers Landscape Supply, Inc.

23

Klyn Nurseries, Inc.

19

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

11

Millcreek Gardens

10

ONLA

17

O’Reilly Equipment

We are all looking forward to seeing you at the fall and winter OLA events!

25

Premier Plant Solutions

23

Shearer Equipment

29

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

26

Unilock

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

17

Valley City Supply

15

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

NEW OLA STAFF MEMBER

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

Acme Fence 1053 Bank Street Akron, OH 44305 (330) 784-0456 Randy Lewis

6

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern |

November 2018 | 31


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

11/18

Get the recognition your company deserves...

ENTER TODAY!

Ohio’s most prestigious landscape enhancement awards program. 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Oh 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002 Toll Free: 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 OhioLandscapers.org MyOhioLandscape.com

DEADLINE TO ENTER DECEMBER 14, 2018

RULES, REGULATIONS & ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE @ OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG

The Growing Concern November 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern November 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

Advertisement