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Growing Concern

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MAY 2 0 1 8

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

CDL Training Clinic

June 7, 2018 / Indiana Wesleyan University / PAGE 7

Plant I.D. Clinic

July 12, 2018 / Davis Tree Farm & Nursery / PAGE 16

OLA Scholarship Golf Classic August 2, 2018 / Mallard Creek Golf Course / PAGE 22


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

THE FIGHT TO STAY POSITIVE Have you noticed the negative vibe that surrounds everything these days? I’m sure you have. It doesn’t seem to matter if it’s in business or with your friends and family – hopefully, not in your personal life – but quite possibly. It is everywhere and it can be unbearable. Quite frankly, I am drained just turning on the TV anymore. The truth of the matter is, trying to stay positive in an increasingly negative world can be a very difficult task – but someone has to do it. Why not you? I am always looking for inspiration in all aspects of my life. Every day I ask myself, “How can I stay positive and help encourage others?” When I posed this question to myself, in what is now Take 5 of this month’s article, the first positive thought I had was how blessed we all are to have the opportunity to work in the Green Profession! We create beautiful spaces that are tranquil, colorful and promote the outdoors! Furthermore, we have the unique opportunity to be the inspiration in many of our client’s lives. So let’s start there.

From a nursery woman’s perspective, as February and March tend to be the Garden Show months, it isn’t beyond me to notice attendees enjoying the preview of what’s to come. And while spring truly is a wondrous time of year, this phenomenon begs me to ask, “Why not add more plants to the landscape that will encourage homeowners to go outside and explore in late winter?” A surprise of color such as Lenten Rose, Witchhazel, Crocus, Evergreens, or Snowdrops, might just do the trick. Also, utilizing plants that attract migratory birds can do wonders for a person’s demeanor on those chilly, continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS M AY 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards participant, Green Impressions. Residential Installation submission.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN The Fight to Stay Positive

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

Phlox Paniculata: Garden Phlox

12 FISCAL FITNESS

Greed and Market Volatility

18 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Safe Operation of Hydroseeders

24 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

4 CORE Elements to Business Success: Close the Deal

26 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Viburnum Dilatatum: Linden Viburnum

32 FEATURE ARTICLE A Guide on How to Fail

38 DIRECTIONS 39 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 39 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS U P CO M I N G O L A MEETINGS , EDUC ATION SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R GREEN INDUS TR Y EVE N T S

JUNE

AUGUST

JUNE 7, 2018 CDL TRAINING

AUGUST 2, 2018 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

Join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training and learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. Taught by former truck driver and state test examiner, Daryl Lengyel. See page 7 for more details.

Join us at Mallard Creek Golf Club in Columbia Station for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. See page 22 – 23 for more details.

JUNE 7, 2018 OLA/CLA TOUR THE ‘SHOE Join the OLA and CLA (Columbus Landscape Association) for this joint organization event as we tour The Ohio State University’s Chadwick Aboretum and Ohio Stadium, a.k.a. The Horseshoe. Guest speakers will include Pamela Bennett, Associate Professor, and Dr. Steven Still. $10 for members of either association. $35 for non-members. Register online, or call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002 for more information.

AUGUST 23, 2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, Roundtable Discussions with your peers, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration and Sponsorship Opportunities are available. Register online, or call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002.

TEST DATES & APPLICATION DEADLINES AUG. 8, 2018 WRITTEN TEST 2:30pm @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

AUG. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

AUG. 9, 2018 HANDS-ON TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

OCT. 2, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM

JULY

SEPTEMBER

9:00am @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 09/11/18

JULY 12, 2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 (TENTATIVE) OLA MEETING (NE Ohio)

OCT. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 16 for more details.

Our annual Landscape Facilities Tour. Location TBD. Call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002 for more info.

9:00am @ OLA Offices, Broadview Hts. 9240 Broadview Road, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Application Deadline: 09/11/18

OCTOBER OCTOBER 11, 2018 (TENTATIVE) OLA MEETING (Cental Ohio) Subject matter and location TBD.

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 15, 2018 OLA ANNUAL MEETING Subject matter TBD. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002. The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3

overcast mornings. Hearing birds chirping, or seeing that first robin, can give them hope that spring is on its way. We get to be a part of that! On a more personal level, my second thought really deals with our own well-being. “Attitudes of Gratitude,” I like to say. For example, being grateful that we get to do “chores” might sound crazy, but when you look at it from the perspective of just being fortunate to have the ability to do something – physically, or financially – it takes on a whole new meaning. The way we look at and talk about these “chores” can actually change our attitudes on life. The same goes for being able to pay rent/mortgages, being able to grocery shop, being able to wash our trucks, and so on. My third thought, and this is somewhat of an oxymoron, is to embrace rejection. While hopefully we’ll all experience more acceptance than rejection in our lives, the fact is that rejection helps us grow. As we work on projects, if something is rejected, it can be an opportunity to stretch our imaginations, as well as our knowledge-base, while pushing us out of our comfort zone. It is very easy to become creatures of habit and always do what comes easy, but when faced with criticism – as I am sure most of us are – while we don’t always have to agree, we should try to approach rejection with an open mind. My fourth thought is one that I find particularly hard personally, yet continue to work on. Keep a journal. We track everything at work and it is a true chore for me. Even though we work in a profession that relies on so many unknown elements, we track these things because we understand the need for accountability. And, while tracking everything that happens in a day may not be a true reflection of our efforts, it can be a means towards measuring progress, or regression. That said, if it can be measured (calls, dollars, credits, weather, production, etc.), write it down. Then plot it, chart it, average it, and so on. While we’re all striving for progress, if regression is what we are seeing, then at least we can make the determination of how to change our course, before it’s too late. The best part of the journaling process is learning self-discipline. My fifth thought on staying positive is one of the easiest for me. Find humor in life, even in the most difficult moments. Ask anyone in our office “Where is Marie?” and it is usually answered with “Just follow the laughter!” A past employer

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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told me that the office is awfully quiet without me, which some might consider a rude comment, but not by me. Sales and customer service personnel have to be thick-skinned, or they will be eaten alive by those clients who have no idea what they are asking for, or how they sound. Find humor in these, and other situations, because they may be the saving grace that gets you through the day. While I could go on, for the sake of brevity, let’s do this lightening-round style. Make sure you take your lunch. Use lists to organize your day. Remember deep breathing (yoga!), sunshine and smiles can help lead you to a healthier lifestyle and finally – do something daily that makes you feel good. Mix in a little of the aforementioned ways to stay positive and you will be well on your way towards keeping yourself and those around you happier! Remember, the landscaping season is a journey, not a marathon. You have to go the distance, because only you can turn a dirt road into golden bricks. Happy Spring Everyone! As always, Marie


PL ANTOLA OF TH E M ON TH SERIES EDUCATION

COURSE DATE JUNE 7, 2018

CDL TRAINING

LOCATION INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

Join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training and learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. Back by demand, and instructed by a former truck driver, this interactive course will include videos and handouts that will cover:

AGENDA 8:30AM – 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

• • •

9:00AM – 3:00 PM CLINIC

A truck and trailer will be on site so that attendees receive a hands-on, pre-trip training session. All registrations include continental breakfast and lunch. Attendees will need to come prepared for both indoor and outdoor classroom. Please note: This course is not intended to teach anyone to back a trailer, or drive on the road.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 05/24/18 - $129 AFTER 05/24/18 - $159 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 05/24/18 - $179 AFTER 05/24/18 - $209

GET HELP PASSING THE STATE CDL TEST

State Pre-Trip Inspection State Yard Skills State Road Test

Daryl Lengyel is a former truck driver and the owner/president of CDL Training Consultants. CDL Training Consultants has been in business since 1990 and Daryl has been a valued member of the OLA for over 18 years. He is a former state test examiner who has been helping train employees on the steps to obtaining their CDL liscense for many years, specializing in commercial drivers license training and driver’s safety training. CDL Training Consultants is located in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.

INSTRUCTED BY DARYL LENGYEL Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 CDL TRAINING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 05/31/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/CDLTRAINING


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Garden Phlox is a staple of the perennial border. It mixes well with other perennials and provides long summer bloom. Regardless of flower color, Garden Phlox is attractive to hummingbirds and is a good selection for inclusion in a bird garden.

PHLOX PANICULATA GARDEN PHLOX

Phlox paniculata is one of the mainstays of the mid-summer to early fall garden. Commonly referred to as Garden Phlox, this upright native of the eastern United States is usually magenta-pink in its native habitat. The species is rarely seen in gardens because the selections are superior in floriferousness, vigor, and mildew resistance. These selections and cultivars have an extended color range which includes almost all colors except yellow and blue. Although some of the cultivar names say blue, there is yet to be a true blue. Phlox paniculata, in average soil, moisture and full sun, will grow 2 to 4 feet tall. Good air circulation is essential although not a cure-all to prevent powdery mildew; thus, spacing Phlox paniculata two feet apart is highly recommended. Additional methods of assuring good air movement are thinning a clump to only four or five strong stems and watering only at soil level in order to keep the foliage dry. If overhead watering is necessary, water early in the day to allow time for the foliage to dry before evening. Deadheading immediately after bloom will encourage more blossoms on lateral branches. After the laterals have bloomed,

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

pruning down to the next set of laterals will encourage further bloom. The first terminal blooms are usually quite large, dense, pyramidal panicles, often 6 to 8 inches wide. Later blooms become successively smaller. The linear foliage is 2 to 5 inches long, with a slender point at the end. Among older cultivars, the literature indicates that the cultivars ‘Bright Eyes’, ‘Franz Schubert’, and ‘Katherine’ are fairly mildew resistant. ‘Bright Eyes’ is pale pink with a crimson eye while the other two are lavender. Then along came ‘David’ who was the star for many years. However, even continued on page 10 ‘David’ occasionally has mildew.


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

continued from page 8 The only Phlox on which I have never seen mildew is ‘Blushing Shortwood’, a pale pink cultivar that is probably a hybrid of ‘David’ and ‘Shortwood’, a rosy pink with a touch of magenta sport, discovered in a Philadelphia garden. I have also been impressed with ‘Glamour Girl’, a 32 inch, vivid-pink, that has illuminated one of my back beds for the past four years. In the past few years, two new series have been introduced that are extremely mildew resistant. One is Candy Store®. Among its cultivars are Coral Crème Drop, Grape Lollipop (magenta with white starburst center), Bubblegum (bright pink), and Cotton Candy (soft pink with dark pink center). I’ve only grown Coral Crème Drop so far but have been delighted with the coral-pink color and the lack of mildew. The Phloxes in this series only grow 18-24”. The other relatively new series is Flame™, the selections of which grow 15-18 inches high. They are named by color, i.e. Light Pink, Lilac, Pink, Purple, and Red. I haven’t grown any of them but the reports on them are very good.

Phlox are so easy to use in the garden. One of the taller cultivars could be used at the back of a perennial border with a medium-sized mounding ornamental grass such as Pennisetum alopecuroides in front of it and one of the coneflowers, either Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ or one of the new, shorter Echinacea purpurea cultivars beside it. A medium height Phlox paniculata cultivar could be used against a background of Miscanthus sinensis ‘Adagio’ (only 4 foot high) with Aster ‘Purple Dome’ or ‘Vibrant Dome’ beside it. Phlox paniculata can be propagated by division any time of year although spring or fall would be more desirable so as to enjoy the blooms. Propagation can also be done with terminal cuttings of sterile shoots. Plant the new mildew resistant cultivars of Phlox paniculata and keep an eye out for more new ones yet to come. Make yourself and your clients happy with this beautiful perennial; it’s too good a plant to evict from our gardens now that the mildew problem can be combatted with the right cultivar rather than fungicides.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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FI SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

GREED AND MARKET VOLATILITY Recent research in the field of behavioral finance suggests that much of an individual investor’s performance can best be explained by his natural behavior. Investors – if left to their own devices – tend to succumb to their natural emotions of fear and greed, causing damage to their portfolios. One of the most common reasons that investors fail to beat the market return over time is the lure of the big score. “If only I had been invested in Microsoft when it went public” or “if only I had put money in XYZ Fund last year when it was up 50%” are common laments. This psychology often leads to chasing returns or investing in what was hot in the prior year or quarter. As a result, the average investor frequently turns to high-volatility stocks or mutual funds that have big swings in returns. The volatility of returns is most often associated with risk and also plays into the emotional side of investing, leading investors to make the wrong decisions at the wrong time. A high-volatility investment will stand out from its peer group based on stellar returns in a given year and will attract significant new assets – only to end up trailing the index for the next several years.

The funds that fit this high-volatility profile are usually very style-specific. There’s something about the manager’s investment philosophy or process that allows the portfolio to dramatically outperform the benchmark – but only under certain market conditions. It might be a momentum-based growth portfolio or one that invests in companies emerging from bankruptcy. The “dot com” bubble in the late 1990s and the Bitcoin craze recently are examples of greed and the fear of missing out. When the magazines, financial shows and social media is ablaze with the news, it is probably near a peak. Be careful not to get caught up in the wave of greed and the ensuing bubble. Just as the market can become overwhelmed with greed, the same can happen with fear (“an unpleasant, often strong continued on page 15

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


JULY 16-19, 2018 SNOWFIGHTERS INSTITUTE

SALES STRATEGIES How to successfully bridge the gap of turning “suspects” into prospects is one of the focal points of this event. Attendees will learn how to successfully navigate all the excuses various prospects have to avoid making a decision. The role play exercises are designed to force you to “think on your feet” in order to achieve a successful conclusion to your quest to bring more business to your company.

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FI SCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 12 emotion, of anticipation or awareness of danger”). When stocks suffer large losses for a sustained period, the overall market can become more fearful of sustaining further losses. But being too fearful can be just as costly as being too greedy. The same can be said of the prevalence of fear following a stock market bust. In a bid to stem their losses after the “dot com” bubble burst in 2001 and the recession of 2008-2009, investors quickly moved out of the stock market in search of less risky buys. Money poured into money market and low-risk and low-return securities. This mass exodus out of the stock market shows a complete disregard for a long-term investing plan based on fundamentals. Investors threw their plans out the window because they were scared, overrun by a fear of sustaining further losses. Granted, losing a large portion of your equity portfolio’s worth is a tough pill to swallow, but missing out on a recovery could be even worse. Just as scrapping your investment plan to hop on the latest getrich-quick investment can tear a large hole in your portfolio, so too can getting swept up in the prevailing fear of the overall market by switching to low-risk, low-return investments.

Make sure your assets are properly diversified, though. It is sometimes advantageous to be overweight or underweight in certain sectors at different times, but they should periodically be reviewed to keep a reasonable balance. For example, home builders were among top performers when interest rates were declining, but may be a lagging sector in a rising interest rate environment. Chasing performance often leads to disastrous consequences in a portfolio. Sometimes when a sector, or even a single stock, has a big run, it will become a larger percentage in a portfolio. It is then important to rebalance. It is important that certain sectors or individual stocks do not dominate the overall portfolio. Every investor has different goals and strategies. I believe it is important for the investor and their advisor to develop rules and strategies to help reduce risk. As always, consult with your financial advisor for information specific to your individual situation. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email:

The best strategy is to stay the course in respect to diversification. If the markets look a little too expensive, and other investors seem “fat, dumb and happy,” get defensive and move some assets into cash. When everyone is panicking in a declining market look to buy. Bottom line, greed and fear can help investors judge market fluctuations.

donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company Registered Broker/Dealer Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 (800) 478-0788

The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 15


PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

COURSE DATE JULY 12, 2018 LOCATION DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY VALLEY CITY, OHIO 44280 AGENDA 8:30AM – 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM – 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM – 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 06/28/18 - $79 AFTER 06/28/18 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 06/28/18 - $109 AFTER 06/28/18 - $139 A P P R O V E D

PLANT I.D.

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen and deciduous. Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Wendy Moore Davis Tree Farm

Bridget Comes Portage Lakes Career Ctr.

Russ Luyster, OCNT Impact Grounds Maint.

2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/05/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PLANTID


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The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 17 3/1/18 2:13 PM


FOR SAFETY SAK E

SAFE OPERATION OF HYDROSEEDERS Hydroseeding has become a popular alternative to installing sod or hand seeding, not only on hillsides where the latter methods are difficult or impossible, but also in traditional applications such as lawns and parks. While hydroseeding machines reduce labor and improve efficiency, it’s important for both management and crew members to recognize and respond to the dangers they present. Deaths and dismemberments have occurred when workers have fallen into hydroseeder tanks. Other common incidents involving these machines include slips and falls. It is imperative to follow the steps below to decrease the risks associated with both truck-mounted and tow-behind hydroseeding machines.

MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST Effective training consists of multiple phases: reading the operator’s manual, completing classroom or computerbased lessons, machine-walk-around instruction and jobsite observation and training. Don’t assume a new employee with previous experience using hydroseeders (or any other equipment) doesn’t need training, or doesn’t need full training. If an incident occurs, the only training that matters is the training you provided and documented.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

First, develop, implement and enforce written operating procedures, including safety precautions and hazard-mitigation techniques, which are specific to each hydroseeder your company operates. Make this writing part of your company’s comprehensive safety and health program. To develop training and written procedures, start with the owner/operator’s manual. Read the manual for every hydroseeder your company operates, paying special attention to safety instructions and prohibitions. Next, train and supervise employees in these procedures. Because every unit is different, you need a training module specific to each piece of equipment. Training should cover how to inspect, transport, load material into, operate and maintain the hydroseeding machine. Crews should be trained to keep hydroseeder platforms as clean and organized as possible and to continued on page 20


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FOR SAFETY SAK E

continued from page 18 remove unnecessary items, including material bags, that could become tripping hazards. They should properly store hoses and keep the platform dry. On some larger units, one misstep could mean a fall of 15 to 20 feet. Always keep a copy of the operator’s manual with every machine. Document all training and ensure employees understand it. Federal OSHA requires this. You can accomplish this by developing quizzes and sign-off sheets. For example, you could highlight key points in an operator’s manual, and then build a test based on that content. It could be a mix of multiplechoice, fill-in-the-blank and true/false questions. Sign-off sheets or quizzes could record on-the-job, machine walk-around and classroom training. Customized training software could deliver and document some training phases. All training records should include date, time and employee and supervisor signatures. Emphasize that employees should never place parts of their bodies inside the hydroseeder tank without first following lockout/tag-out procedures and OSHA guidelines for entering confined spaces. Crew members might be tempted to reach into the tank with their hands to retrieve dropped items or to use

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

their feet to push floating material into the augers. Make sure they know this exposes them to hazards that could kill them or amputate body parts. Finally, create pre- and post-trip inspection checklists for employees to sign off on each day. The checklists should include items such as a full machine inspection of safety guards and devices, railings and ladders. Hydroseeder tanks should be flushed and drained after each day of operation. All discharge hoses and hydraulic hoses should be checked for leaks, cracks, bulges, damage or excessive wear.

CREW MEMBERS’ DOS AND DON’TS In general, read the operator’s manual for every hydroseeder you operate or work near, in addition to receiving training from your employer on these machines. Understand how each machine operates and the hazards it poses. Always ask for clarification if you do not understand any portion of the manual or your training. Never place any part of your body inside the hydroseeder tank without first following lockout/tag-out procedures and OSHA


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guidelines for entering confined spaces. Do not reach into the tank to retrieve dropped or foreign objects or use your feet to push floating material into the augers. This exposes you to life-threatening hazards. The only time a crew member should enter a hydroseeder tank is when it is absolutely necessary and after all safety procedures have been followed. Don’t operate a hydroseeder, or any equipment for that matter, if you are fatigued, or under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs or medication. You must be in good physical condition and mentally alert to safely operate a hydroseeder. Often, when a safety-related device breaks or wears to the point of being inoperable, the machine itself will still function. Place out of service any machine with a missing or nonfunctioning safety guard or device, making sure to reinstall the part before placing the machine back in service. Never modify the machine or remove any part of it, except for service. This article was prepared by Olivia Grider for the NALP (National Association of Landscape Professionals). Since 2009, she has been a member of NALP’s Safety and Risk Management Committee & has served as the their safety research writer.

GENERAL OPERATING SAFETY TIPS • • • • • • • •

• • •

Use steps or ladders for reaching the machine’s platform. Never mount or dismount a moving machine. Put on all PPE required including; safety goggles, boots with slip-resistant soles, hearing protection, gloves, a hard hat and a dust mask or respirator. Remove watches, rings and other jewelry, tie back long hair and avoid loose-fitting clothing that could get caught in rotating machinery. Carefully look through the loading hatch to inspect the tank for foreign objects. Tidy the platform. Remove unnecessary objects or materials and make sure the surface is clean and dry. Wash material spillage from the tank top and platform Give a visual and audible signals and wait for a response, before starting the engine. Do not load the unit while it is moving. The driver of the carrying/towing vehicle is responsible for the safety of the machine operator(s). If you are driving, be aware of and avoid all possible hazards such as low tree limbs and power lines. Start and stop gradually. Never operate on a slope that could endanger the operator(s). Know the stop/start signals used by drivers, operators and other crew members. Do not stand on the platform during operation unless you are the operator. Do not ride on the platform if the machine is travelling at speeds faster than 5 mph. Schedule work so at least two crew members are present when a hydroseeder is in use. Some machines can be operated by one person, but for general safety and in case of an emergency, a crew of at least two people is necessary. The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 21


REGISTRATION PL ANT GOLFER OF TH E M ON TH

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Billing Address + Zipcode for Card OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


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THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #3 / GETTING THE BUSINESS

CLOSE THE DEAL

This is the last module in CORE 3. We started with building a unique brand identity and then, in the last article, focused on surrounding current and prospective customers with messaging. Both are required to improve the number of quality leads entering your sales funnel. It is now time to move them from being interested to under contract. First are a few rules we picked up selling: 1. Never underestimate seduction – only go for the close immediately if you are sure it will close immediately. Also, don’t take a quick close for granted – there will be buyer’s remorse. 2. Never accept the customers solution without doing your homework. If you build what they want and it doesn’t work – it is their fault and you will get the blame. Before delivering what they want – understand the why. 3. Go for multiple closes by gaining little yes’s along the way. That will flush out objections early and make saying no harder at contract time. Make it very difficult for the prospective customer to walk away from the deal.

generic solution requiring a subject matter expert to help define it. This approach fits many aspects of the landscape industry, like design build. Here is our 4 Step Consultative process to move prospects through the sales funnel. Opening the Sale, Investigating the Problem, Comparing Solution to Need, Closing the Deal.

I learned these rules from great salespeople and it has made a big difference in consultative selling.

OPENING THE SALE Opening the sale starts with rapport building. You need to establish a personal connection with the individual or the couple. It starts with validating their information and the current situation. Find something in common to learn more about them. The most important tool at this step is understanding. Avoid trying to impress with a solution no matter how clear it is to you. This can be a face-to-face meeting or by phone.

There are 3 sales approaches: transactional, relationship, and consultative. Transactional Selling is nothing more than order taking and fits when the buying decision needs little support, like with catalog sales. Relationship Selling is as implied – they buy from you because they like you. It fits when all the competing products and services are the same and the only difference is the sales person. Consultative Selling is when there is no

INVESTIGATING THE PROBLEM Investigating the Problem requires you to move from superficial information to details. Why do they need your services now? What problem will it solve? And most importantly what is the pain point. Expanding on pain points will help determine what it cost to leave it unresolved and you have an idea what they might pay to solve it. This can be a face-to-face meeting or by phone.

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COMPARING THE SOLUTION The next step – Comparing the Solution – can be performed in the same meeting, or as a follow up face-to-face meeting. One of our landscape clients moves from Investigating the Problem to Closing the Deal in one 90-minute meeting. They make this work because the Opening of the Sale is a combination of emails and phone calls that qualify the property owner. The biggest issue is to display an understanding of their unique situation and have a solution that solves their problem. Our advice is to break this down into small pieces and, after each, ask the following question: “Will this work for you?” You are looking for the incremental yes’s. After the 3rd or 4th yes, it is becoming progressively harder to back out. CLOSING THE DEAL The Close should be simple. You took the time to understand them and the situation. You built a solution that takes away the pain points and meets their requirements. You walked through each one asking for a yes before moving on to the next point. Getting pen to paper should not be difficult. If it is – you missed something.

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Linden Viburnum

VIBURNUM DILATATUM LINDEN VIBURNUM

Every month, as we talk about which plant is going to be featured, Jim’s go to genus is Viburnum. In truth, if Shelley wasn’t there to restrain him, we would end up with months upon months of Viburnum talk. Can you imagine the horror? Viburnums really are great flowering shrubs, and we know you know that because nearly every landscape across Ohio has at least one. For most of us, we have our tried and true species that never let us down. Doublefile viburnum (V. plicatum) and the many cultivars of it are staples. They have great structure, perfect flowering, and beautiful fruit changing from brightred into a deep, glossy-black. Arrowwood viburnum (V. dentatum) is also a go to for many with the arrow straight stems, fuzzy white flowers, strong fruit set and beautiful fall color. The only big drawback to the Arrowwood is the terrible smell of the flowers. This ain’t no Korean Spice Viburnum!

Around 2007, the sweeping invasion of Viburnum Leaf Beetle (VLB) entered the Northeast corner of our great state, working its way across our landscapes, devouring the native Viburnums. New York had been dealing with the invasion long before us, giving Cornell University, located in Ithaca, N.Y., an oppotunity to do some great research on the susceptibility of many different landscape Viburnums to this foreign beetle. Do a quick search online for Cornell and the VLB and you’ll find their site dedicated to the pest. Luckily, just as quickly as VLB moved into our state, it is moving on after eating all the good stuff. We’ve noticed over the past 3 or 4 years that our native Arrowwood, Trilobums, and Mapleleaf Viburnums are all making a strong comeback. continued on page 28

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 27


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 26 The beetle will still be a nuisance, but with proper IPM (Intergrated Pest Management) can be managed quite easily.

beautiful, with almost the entire crown of the shrub being covered in white.

Now, allow us to introduce you to a Viburnum that has very little problems with VLB and offers great ornamental value to the landscape. Viburnum dilatatum, the Linden Viburnum, is a native of Japan, Korea, and China, but has been part of breeders’ circles since at least the mid 1950s, working its way into the landscape in the ’60s.

Through summer, the deep-green leaves make an excellent backdrop to summer flowers. And, to someone, they must have looked similar to a linden tree (Tilia sp.), though we don’t quite see the resemblance. As summer fades into autumn, the plant prepares the most ornamental feature it will offer, even better than the explosion of flowers from spring. Fruit set on a happy Linden Viburnum offers clusters of bright, cherry-red drupes, exuding excellent color which usually lasts from October through November, and often into December. As the winter goes on, they appear as little, red raisins on the plant, until slowly picked off by overwintering birds.

In its native range, this Viburnum flourishes in mature forests, mostly along the margin near open fields, and is found just as often in lowland areas of poor soil. This wide adaptability from full sun to part shade, as well as perfect loam soils to lower oxygen heavier soils, is a major reason this shrub should be used more often in the Ohio landscape. A word of caution on location within the landscape however, be sure to keep this plant away from open windows on the house. While not as repugnant as Arrowwood Viburnum, the flowers of V. dilatatum should be seen and not smelled. The specific epithet of this species comes from the Latin word, dilated, which means open, or spread out, and is a reference to the overall effect of the flat topped cymes blooming for a few weeks in late spring. The visual effect is

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

To obtain the best fruit set, it is highly recommended to plant at least (two) different cultivars of this plant, to obtain better cross pollination. If self-pollinated, the fruit set is weak and not worth the garden space. There are a number of great cultivars of Viburnum dilatatum – several of them the result of the great Dr. Don Egolf, who introduced over 60 great cultivars of plants at the National Arboretum starting in 1958. continued on page 30


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continued from page 28 Viburnum dilatatum ‘Erie’ is a longtime garden performer released in 1970 resulting from seedlings of Japanese source. ‘Erie’ grows more upright, reaching around 10 feet tall and slightly less wide. Unlike the straight species, this cultivar usually has pleasant fall color in the oranges and reds. The fruit set is heavy and has a more coral color, lasting into December. Flowers are very prolific, and to us, don’t seem to be as malodorous. ‘Michael Dodge’ is named in honor of the horticulturist that helped discover this cross. While working at Winterthur Gardens in 1969, Michael crossed the straight species with a yellow fruited (though not the best fruit set) cultivar called ‘Xanthocarpum’ (which is Latin for yellow fruit). In spring of 1970, the seedlings were lined out and observed. This cultivar was found in the crop and has a strong fruit set of bright-yellow fruits. As we’ve learned many times from one of our horticulture heroes, Bill Hendricks, the yellow fruits have much more visual impact on our cloudy days than red. ‘Michael Dodge’ is a perfect way to introduce that brightyellow into the fall landscape.

For exceptional cold hardiness try ‘Cardinal Candy,’ which is a Proven Winners introduction, where only one seedling survived a deep -30 degrees freeze. That seedling has become ‘Cardinal Candy’ and should top out around 8 to 10 feet, like most, and seems to have the best fruit set without cross pollination. There are several other great cultivars of this plant, and while it can be somewhat difficult to find all of these great cultivars, we have to remember that nursery production is a result of demand. If we all start asking for more variety, we can make it worth the effort for the nurseries to grow more variety. If we all keep demanding Flowering Pear and Burning Bush, we’ll never get to see the myriad of options that far exceeds the landscape staples. Put some Viburnum dilatatum in your next plan and boost the demand for these great shrubs; you won’t regret their exceptional performance with minimal care in the landscape.

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

A GUIDE ON HOW TO FAIL T EN S UR E -FIR E WAYS TO GO B RO K E, LO SE CU STO MERS AND GO OUT O F B U SINESS The most and the least successful landscape contractors share one thing in common: the local dealer or distributor who supplies them. These vendors hear stories of both triumph and horror as customers divulge the ups and downs of business. They see what works and what doesn’t in the landscape industry – successes and failures walk through their doors just the same. We spoke with dealers and distributors across the country to see what they’ve learned from landscapers who rock and those who flopped. So, take it from them: If you want to succeed in the landscape industry, don’t make these 10 fatal mistakes.

NUMBER ONE

UNDERCUT AND UNDERBID A contractor’s most glaring error is undercutting price to nab the lowest bid without knowing if he can make a profit. “A lot of contractors don’t have the savvy to get paid what they’re worth, so they bid very cheaply,” says Lowell Kaufhold, president of CPS Distributors, a wholesale distributor of landscape and irrigation supplies in Denver. “They get the work without understanding what a job costs, and then they wind up not making any money.” Undercutting may win the project short-term, but it destroys a bottom line over time. Leading with low price leaves little room for profit. Smart landscapers know what their work is worth, and educate their customers to appreciate high quality over low cost. “You don’t want to be the cheapest because that’s going to attract accounts you don’t want. They aren’t going to pay, and it’s going to trickle down in your business,” says Jose Cantu, who founded Saw House with his brother Hector in their parents’ garage before becoming a STIHL dealer in Houston. “You’re not going to have enough profitability to maintain equipment or hire people.”

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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NUMBER THREE

IGNORE YOUR NUMBERS

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Undercutting is just one symptom of a larger problem: not understanding your costs at all. Dealers agree that financial acumen is the determining factor of a contractor’s success.

Of course, landscape contractors have to understand landscaping on a technical level. But owners can’t always be mired in details if they want to grow beyond the one-man crew mentality.

“A good landscape contractor really has a grip on what it takes financially to run his business, down to the penny,” Kaufhold says. “He understands what it costs to rent machinery, run trucks, win a customer, collect a bill – and consequently, the ones who don’t, fail. That’s the most glaring difference between winning and failing businesses.”

“The most successful contractors implement processes and structures within their company to free them up from the day-to-day operations, so they can spend more time working on their business than in it,” says Jason Lewinski, a former landscape contractor, now assistant field sales manager for Power Equipment Distributors in Richmond, Mich. “They’re focusing on the bigger picture, whether that’s implementing a new service or a strategy to increase sales and profitability of the overall business.”

Dale Fronheiser co-owns Passmore Service Center in Bechtelsville, Pa., where he sells, services and rents outdoor power equipment. Numbers come naturally to his most successful customers. “My best accounts have great mental math (skills),” Fronheiser says. “We’ll be working out the cost of a complicated purchase, and they’re a step ahead of me calculating payments and how it will make their business prosperous.”

Smart contractors build repeatable processes to create sales, perform work and get paid, while controlling schedules, expenses and resources. “The leading contractors create really good systems that they can consistently maintain and duplicate,” Kaufhold says. “That efficiency creates a profitable business.” continued on page 34 The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 33


FEATURE ARTI CLE “The organizations that keep (employees) are the ones that give them responsibility and provide them training to make it a career versus a job,” Stephens says. “One of the things that profitable, well-run organizations do really well is invest in education. Certainly, the good organizations cross-train so they’re not stuck with one individual who can drive the lawnmower.” NUMBER FIVE

PUSHING EQUIPMENT TO THE LIMIT Contractors who understand costs understand the cost of downtime, realizing that rundown equipment can cost much more than routine maintenance or monthly payments. “A lot of the successful contractors replace their equipment every two to three years,” says Barden Winstead, president of Land & Coates, an outdoor power equipment dealership with six locations around Hampton Roads, Va. “They run them while they’re under warranty, and then replace them before they get to 1,200-1,500 hours where they can start failing and costing money.”

continued from page 33 NUMBER FOUR

UNDERVALUE YOUR EMPLOYEES Finding quality employees is hard enough, let alone retaining them for seasonal work. Given the high cost of turnover, smart contractors are honing their hiring practices to secure reliable talent. “Labor’s always going to be an issue, so have you asked the right questions and hired the right people to reflect your brand?” asks Phil Stephens, director of sales for Horizon Distributors, a full-service distributor of irrigation and landscape supplies based in Phoenix. “One individual can have a bad attitude one day, and wreck a year’s worth of revenue at that property.” Some contractors are improving their health coverage, 401(k) options and other benefits to attract and retain high-caliber people. Many use job fairs to recruit young employees, or government programs like H-2B to employ temporary immigrant workers. But the difference between job-seeking applicants and career-minded professionals can be gamechanging.

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Top contractors explore payment and rental options, then care for equipment with regular maintenance to maximize investments. NUMBER SIX

GROW AS FAST AS YOU CAN One of the biggest mistakes a landscape company can make is overextending itself to grow too big too fast. Despite the appeal of large projects, smart contractors don’t hesitate to turn down work if they can’t do it well or turn a profit. “Bigger is not always better,” Stephens says. “I see some folks pursuing projects and properties that are beyond their ability to do profitably.” Cantu says taking out huge loans to build big fleets is a mistake. Start small with a dependable mower and work your way up, acquiring employees and equipment when you can afford them. “If you’re a one-man crew, you need to treat it like that,” he says. If you don’t have it in the budget, charging it on a credit card is one of the biggest mistakes in this industry.”


NUMBER SEVEN

NUMBER NINE

OFFER A SERVICE, NOT A SOLUTION

PRESENT A POOR IMAGE

Regardless of internal people and processes, contractors are only as good as their last job.

Dealers, like customers, can gauge the quality of a landscaping company by its trucks. If the fleet is dirty, in disrepair, with crooked magnetic signs or if employees jump out wearing unkempt, mismatched clothes, the firm’s overall image and brand suffer.

“Your product or service speaks for itself,” Lewinski says. “The more successful guys are focusing on the quality of their service, taking pride in that and having a customer-first mentality.” Contractors who partner with customers to solve problems build loyal, long-term relationships. “The ones that look out for the needs of the customer, keep them informed of products, how they work and how they save labor, time and resources – whether it be water, electricity, etc. – are going to do well,” NUMBER EIGHT

OFFER THE SAME SERVICE FOREVER There’s value in focusing on your core competencies, but the best contractors add new services when opportunities arise. Since CPS was founded in 1983 as Colorado Pump and Supply with a focus on irrigation, the distributor has expanded beyond sprinklers to provide landscape lighting, water features, fertilizers and fire-pits as contractors have diversified. “We keep adding product lines because customers keep adding product categories,” Kaufhold says.

“Creating and maintaining a professional image separates every (successful) landscaper,” Kaufhold says. “Whether it has to do with clean, labeled trucks or neat, uniformed employees – the top companies excel at that.” But contractors today have to look beyond branded trucks, uniforms and signs. An effective web and social media presence can strengthen a contractor’s professional image online. “If you don’t have a website, you’re in really big trouble,” Kaufhold says. “That speaks volumes to your inability to be professional. The first thing prospective customers do is go to the website, and the best companies have a lot of imagery to show off their work.” NUMBER TEN

DO IT ALL YOURSELF

“If a contractor’s not comfortable learning about those products, that’s certainly a problem. The more diversified you are, the more opportunity there is to grow.”

These failures can be tough lessons to learn the hard way – unless you learn from other contractors who’ve already faltered and prevailed. Education, training and idea-sharing are crucial to a landscaper’s success, whether it comes through industry associations like the OLA, trade publications, networking events or consultants.

Becoming everything to everyone can be a recipe for disaster, so diversification should be strategic and driven by profitable services. Contractors who successfully launch new offerings understand how to effectively allocate resources for maximum return.

“The guys that have been growing quickly, a common thread is their involvement with some type of outside guidance, whether that’s an industry group, a peer group, a consultant or a mentor,” Lewinski says. “Everyone needs to seek outside feedback or expertise on how to grow their business.”

When the housing boom dented new construction, for example, successful companies shifted away from installations toward maintenance.

Periodically take a step back from your business to tap into other examples of success in the industry.

“When that dries up, you have to be smart enough to say, ‘I’m going to focus on maintenance now because that’s steady,’” Winstead says. “I’ve seen landscapers shrink their organizations or cut departments when installation’s not going on.”

“You’re crazy not to use those resources if you’re struggling in your business,” Kaufhold says. “That’s absolutely key to running a business that will last.” This is reprinted with permission from the January 2015 issue of Lawn & Landscape Magazine. Visit them at http://www.lawnandlandscape.com

The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 35


SN OW & ICE M A NAG E M E N T

SP O N S O R S HI P EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 23, 2018 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 PRESENTED BY

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT OPPORTUNITIES

The OLA would like to invite you to participate in our 2018 Snow & Ice Management Clinic! Our Snow & Ice Management Clinic is a can’t miss event for anyone in, or thinking about being in the snow and ice business. Designed for both business owners and employees, the clinic will include group discussions and great information from snow and ice industry experts.

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT INFORMATION

Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties are available to ALL Green Industry suppliers, including non snow and ice related businesses. All Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties include:

• • • • • • TO REGISTER CALL THE OLA OFFICE 440.717.0002 EMAIL THE OLA OFFICE INFO@OHIOLANDSCAPERS. ORG VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS. ORG/EDUCATION/ SNOWANDICE

Your choice of exhibit size. (Subject to availability. See below for more details.) Your company name displayed on signage at the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on all email communications promoting the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on the Snow & Ice Clinic landing page of our industry website. Your company will be recognized at the event and will have the opportunity to pass out marketing materials to attendees. A complimentary copy of the event attendee list, including attendee’s company name, contact person, mailing address & phone number. BOOTH/EXHIBIT SIZES

Booths will be sold on a first-come, first serve basis. Exhibitors may set up their booths beginning August 23 at 7:00 am. and have until 8:00 am to complete set-up. All exhibit spaces will be located outdoors on pavement and should be interactive for attendees.

OPTION #1 10 x 10 BOOTH OLA Member – $400 Non Member – $600

OPTION #2 20 x 30 BOOTH (NEW THIS YEAR!) OLA Member – $500 Non Member – $700

OPTION #3 30x40 or 20x60 BOOTH OLA Member – $600 Non Member – $800

Includes: • 10 x 10 Exhibit Space • 2 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 20 x 30 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 30 x 40 or 20 x 60 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

PLEASE NOTE: 10 x 10 booths are for TABLETOP DISPLAYS ONLY. Absolutely no equipment will be permited in a 10 x 10 booth. 20 x 60 booths will be created by combining (2) 20 x 30 booths. The same can be done for extra 30 x 40 booths.

BOOTH SIZE REQUESTED

 10x10 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 20x30 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 30x40 Outdoor Exhibit Space  20x60 Outdoor Exhibit Space

CONTACT INFORMATION

Sponsor Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

PAYMENT INFORMATION

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

SNOW & ICE MANAGEMENT CLINIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


SN OW & ICE IC E M A NAG E M E NT SNOW

R EG T R ATI O N RE G IS TR SNOW BUSINESS SUCCESS

an owner, owner, operations operations manager, manager,dispatcher, dispatcher,or oranyone anyoneininbetween, between,this thisisisaacan’t can’t Whether you’re an will be be treated treated to to aadiverse diverseand andinteresting interestingrange rangeof oftopics, topics,with withopportunities opportunitiestoto miss event. You will both the the presenters presenters and and your your peers. peers.Focus Focuson onmaking makingyour yourcompany companyeven evenbetter better interact with both when handling the “white” side of your business. REGISTER NOW for a fun, informative day!

PRESENTERS (MORE TO COME)

Kevin Gilbride / Accredited Snow Contractor’s Association (ASCA)

EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 23, 2018 5:00 PM PM 8:30 AM -– 5:00 LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 AGENDA 9:00AM 8:30AM -– 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

The Accredited Snow Contractors Association is a trade association with the purpose of advancing the professional snow and ice management industry and to promote its role in performing high-risk services to society. Kevin will be discussing the benefits of ASCA certification and ISO certification and what it can do for your company.

5:00 PM PM 9:00AM -– 5:00 CLINIC

Dale Keep / Ice and Snow Technologies, Inc. (IST)

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 08/09/18 - $129 $99 AFTER 08/09/18 - $159 $129

Dale’s consulting and training experience includes subjects of; bidding methods, overall operations, equipment operations, routing, priorities, and chemical deicers. He will be discussing the use of liquids as part of your arsenal in fighting snow and ice.

NON MEMBERS $149 BEFORE 08/09/18 - $179 $179 AFTER 08/09/18 - $209

ALSO FEATURING Presentation: The advantages to using third party weather forecasting companies. (Speaker TBD) Presentation: General snow and ice operations. (Speaker TBD) Mini Trade Show: Visit industry vendors. See what’s new. Displayed equipment, products & services. Roundtable Discussions: Pertinent industry topics. Always a favorite! Drawing for Prizes: You MUST be present to win!

Special Price!

Register one person from your company and each additional person from the same company is only an additional $69!

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 08/16/18 Company Contact Address City State (______) Phone (______)

Zip

(______) Email Fax (______)

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5.5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SNOWANDICE


D I RECTI ON S

OLA AND CLA TO CO-HOST EVENT

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

We’re very excited to announce that The Columbus Landscape Association has asked OLA to co-host an event with them! Together, we are planning a unique, fun, and informative day on the campus of The Ohio State University. Mark your calendars for June 12, 2018, as we prepare to Tour the ‘Shoe! The day will begin with a plant-walk tour at The Chadwick Arboretum. It will be lead by Pam Bennett, from NLTT, along with special guest, Dr. Steven Still. While in the gardens, we will focus on identifying different insects, diseases, weeds, and other problems that we may come across, as the instructors offer insight as to why these issues are occurring, along with management strategies.

A SPECIAL THANK YOU

We will then enjoy lunch in a garden setting, near Kottman Hall, where we will have shelter in the event of rain. (Please note: The event is on, rain or shine, so dress appropriately.)

Because Auburn Career Center’s Plant, Turf & Landscape Management program resides in a separate building, we all drove over to meet inside their classroom. (Note: Most of the advisory meetings take place after school, so on occasion we are able to meet a student, or two.) This meeting was held during the day, so the entire junior class was present. The advisory members introduced themselves, then, the program instructor, Dave Richards, invited everyone to go outside to plant a tree.

Following lunch, we will then walk over to The Ohio State Stadium - a.k.a. The ‘Shoe - for a private tour! In order to keep the cost low for members of both associations, we have a couple of sponsors that have signed on to help defray those costs. As of this writing, Arborjet, Bobby Layman Chevrolet and Millcreek Gardens will be sponsoring. We hope to add a few more sponsors so if you are interested in information on sponsoring this event, please call the OLA offices. To register to attend, sign up online at www.Ohiolandscapers. org/tourtheshoe.

38 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Friday, April 20, 2018 was our regularly scheduled Auburn Career Center advisory committee meeting. It started off with the advisory groups from each program meeting for breakfast, along with a presentation by the Assistant Superintendent, Jeff Slavkovsky. After, each advisory committee went to meet in the classroom of their respective program.

I assumed with Earth Day (4/22) and Arbor Day (4/27) so close, Mr. Richards thought that planting a tree would be an appropriate activity. Secretly, I was also wishing that I had dressed for the weather; I didn’t know we would be outside. He instructed the students on how to proceed. Once a hole was dug to the appropriate depth, he asked Marie McConnell to explain why we were planting the tree.


ADVERTI SI N G I N DE X

Marie explained that it was a Celebration Maple, and they were planting it in celebration of my dad, Rich Hlaves’ life (He passed away in December), and to honor me for all I do for the industry. I was totally blown away, as I had no clue this was coming! Marie then went on to explain that each year, since the inception of the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic 18 years ago, my dad had been a volunteer. He was the guy with the big smile at one of our betting holes, trying to coax a little more money out of golfer’s pockets to help support the scholarship program. Marie and Dad worked the same hole for the last couple of years and Marie accurately described him as a “hoot,” who was very proud of his daughter. Needless to say, tears were shed and my heart was overwhelmed by such a wonderful gesture! A warm and heartfelt thank you goes out to the staff and students of Auburn Career Center, the advisory committee, and Lake County Nursery for donating the beautiful tree! Words could never express how much this means to me.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS

Blossom Earthworks and Design, LLC 442 South Green Road South Euclid, OH 44121 216-633-1669 Ben Kiss Clapper & Company, LLC 2751 Wisemill Circle, NE Canton, OH 44721 330-494-0712 Ron Clapper Division Landscaping PO Box 1695 Medina, OH 44258 330-242-3161 Albert Lapina

33

Abraxus /Royalton Supply Landscape Center

21

All Organic Mulch, LLC

25

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

27

Boyas Excavating

17

Cascade Lighting, Inc.

27

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

17

Fairlawn/Medina Landscape Supply

14

Klyn Nurseries, Inc.

9 34 6

Mason Structural Steel, Inc. Medina Sod Farms, Inc. Millcreek Gardens

31

MRLM / JTO, Inc.

17

O’Reilly Equipment, LLC.

19

Oliger Seed Co.

11

Premier Plant Solutions

9

Shearer Equipment

13

Snowfighters Institute

19

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

9

Three-Z Supply, Inc.

2

Unilock

31

Valley City Supply

29

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

14

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | May 2018 | 39


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

05/18

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TOUR OF CHADWICK ARBORETUM & THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY STADIUM

SAVE THE DATE 06.12.18 Encouraging Professional Standards and Promoting the Green Industry

The Growing Concern May 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

The Growing Concern May 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

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