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Growing Concern

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

Tour the ‘Shoe

June 12, 2018 / The Ohio State University / PAGE 7

Plant I.D. Clinic

NE Ohio / July 12, 2018 / Davis Tree Farm & Nursery / PAGE 27 Central Ohio / July 19, 2018 / Premier Plant Solutions / PAGE 35

OLA Scholarship Golf Classic August 2, 2018 / Mallard Creek Golf Course / PAGE 14-15


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

OUR FUTURE... Is it really June already? I swear, the older my kids get the quicker the year seems to fly by – though I myself refuse to age! But alas, the sun is shining, summer is in full swing, and I think we can all agree that it is a welcome sight, in comparison to the crazy spring we just endured. To that end, it is also the time of year when many of us will be preparing to celebrate the graduations of friends and family members from high schools and colleges. It’s an exciting time, during which we will undoubtedly listen to their aspirations and goals for what they plan to achieve in the years to come; future pharmacists, engineers, educators, aspiring sports professionals – just to name a few. But wait… I feel like something’s missing. Where are the landscape architects, nursery professionals, turf management and greenhouse managers? Why is no one talking about our profession? As I’ve mentioned before, I had the good fortune of being born into the green profession. And while many of my siblings chose other career paths, I decided to stick in this industry for life! As it applies to my girls, I am 100% proud of what they are doing, but couldn’t help asking why they didn’t follow in their father’s, or mother’s footsteps. They replied that while they loved growing up in a “green” family, they chose other career paths based on what they thought would provide success for them.

The more I talk to others in our great profession, the more I find this story to be true for many families. Kids are choosing to go in other directions, and the family business is not as much “in-the-family” as it used to be. So what do we do to attract the younger generation to be more active and look towards the green profession? For me, there are a few things that come to mind. First off, we need to ask ourselves just how engaged we are with the youth in our lives. I’m a firm believer that we can’t start talking to kids early enough. Take my four-year-old granddaughter, for example. She loves to explore the outdoors and I can’t help but think that part of that is due to the fact that she visits me at work often. We talk about the cute flowers, adorable bugs and the pretty mud pies. And while this may seem like crazy talk, she understands and interacts with me like an adult, as we discuss what’s in front of us at the moment. She is four and completely understands the concept of recycling as a means of not causing harm to our environment. And the best part about these conversations, they continue at home with her continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS J U N E 2 0 1 8 W WW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr.

COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards Merit Award winner, KGK Gardening & Design Corporation.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Our Future...

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org.

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE

DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

25 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Allium ‘Millenium’: Millenium Ornamental Onion

12 FISCAL FITNESS

The Cost of Social Security Operators Hold the Keys to Backhoe Safety 4 CORE Elements to Business Success: It’s Not What You Make, It’s What You Keep.

28 PLANT OF THE MONTH Prunis Virginiana: Chokecherry

32 FEATURE ARTICLE

A New Opportunity for Landscape Designers : Petscaping

36 DIRECTIONS 38 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 38 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS U P CO M I N G O L A MEETINGS , EDUC ATION SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R GREEN INDUS TR Y EVE N T S

JUNE

AUGUST

JUNE 7, 2018 CDL TRAINING)

AUGUST 2, 2018 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

Join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training and learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. Taught by former truck driver and state test examiner, Daryl Lengyel.

Join us at Mallard Creek Golf Club in Columbia Station for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. See page 14 – 15 for more details.

JUNE 12, 2018 OLA/CLA TOUR THE ‘SHOE Join the OLA and CLA (Columbus Landscape Association) for this joint organization event as we tour The Ohio State University’s Chadwick Aboretum and Ohio Stadium, a.k.a. The Horseshoe. Guest speakers will include Pamela Bennett, Associate Professor, and Dr. Steven Still. $10 for members of either association. $35 for non-members. Register online, or call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002 for more information. See page 7 for more details.

JULY JULY 12, 2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (NE OHIO) This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 27 for more details.

AUGUST 23, 2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, Roundtable Discussions with your peers, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration and Sponsorship Opportunities are available. Register online, or call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002. See page 22 – 23 for more details.

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 (TENTATIVE) OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) Our annual Landscape Facilities Tour. Location TBD. Call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002 for more info.

OCTOBER

JULY 19, 2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (CENTRAL OH)

OCTOBER 11, 2018 (TENTATIVE) OLA MEETING (Cental Ohio)

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Sponsored by Premier Plant Solutions. See page 35 for more details.

Subject matter and location TBD.

TEST DATES & APPLICATION DEADLINES AUG. 8, 2018 WRITTEN TEST 2:30pm @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

AUG. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

AUG. 9, 2018 HANDS-ON TEST & RETAKES Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

AUG. 10, 2018 HANDS-ON TEST RETAKE DAY Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 06/08/18

OCT. 2, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM 9:00am @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691 Application Deadline: 09/11/18

OCT. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM 9:00am @ OLA Offices, Broadview Hts. 9240 Broadview Road, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Application Deadline: 09/11/18

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 15, 2018 OLA ANNUAL MEETING Subject matter TBD. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3 parents, teachers and classmates. Interactions with youth, and their networks, will carry on far beyond our beliefs. Don’t let age be a factor, because you never know when it is going to make a difference and possibly influence the next generation to look at the opportunities we have to offer. Next, what schools and other learning institutions are we involved with? Career days may not be what they once were, or produce as large of groups as they once did, but I challenge all of us to think about the networking effect they might have before discounting our efforts. Also, in that same vein, I find it helpful to meet the science teachers to explain just how much science/technology is used in our field. This concept applies across the board. We need students from all ends of the spectrum: managers, sales leaders, designers, etc., all the way through to the laborers. A side note: Recently, I was invited to a local middle school to work with a team of boys developing their Lego Robotic Projects. The team developed a computerized watering system for field and greenhouse production; needless to say I was impressed with what they put together. They began with using a drone to make a diagram of the area and proceeded from there. I literally learned more from their efforts than I gave back to them! And YES, I took full advantage of the opportunity to

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talk with these boys about job opportunities that are available to them as they are thinking of career paths. Finally, outside of schools, there are plenty of youth programs that are looking for leaders to get involved. Advisory board members are needed for many technology based programs; there’s 4-H, FFA, YMCA, Boy/Girl Scouts, Big Brother/Big Sister programs… and the list goes on. These organizations are all looking for guest speakers, group leaders, and/or sponsors. Any time one of these groups calls for a tour, or a speaker, it is an opportunity to educate them about what the green profession has to offer. The current labor situation being what it is, I know most of us are thinking, “But we need people TODAY so that we will be in business 10 years from now.” The way I see it, we can look at it two ways. We can look at it from the perspective of what we don’t have, or we can look at it from the perspective of all the possibilities that lie ahead. Developing youth interest is like planting a tree, slow to grow but mighty in the long run. Plant that seed today so your company can reap the benefits for many years to come! Enjoy your summer! Marie

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PL ANT OF OLA TH E EVENT M ON TH ANNOUNCEMENT

LA & C O

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SPONSORED BY

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EVENT DATE JUNE 12, 2018

TOUR THE ‘SHOE

LOCATION (PARKING) SCHOTTENSTEIN CENTER 555 BORROR DRIVE COLUMBUS, OH 43210

Join the Ohio Landscape Association and the Columbus Landscape Association as we come together to tour The Ohio State University’s Chadwick Arboretum, with the added bonus of a private walking tour of The ‘Shoe.

* Park in Gray lots 3-7. Follow signs.

AGENDA 9:00AM – 9:30AM REGISTRATION 9:30AM – 11:30 AM ARBORETUM TOUR 11:30AM – 12:30 PM LUNCH (PROVIDED) 12:30PM – 2:30 PM STADIUM TOUR COST OLA/CLA MEMBERS MUST REGISTER BY 06/05/18 - $10 NON MEMBERS MUST REGISTER BY 06/05/18 - $35

AN OLA/CLA CO-SPONSORED EVENT

While in the garden, we will focus on identifying different insects, diseases, weeds, and other problems we come across, offering insight as to why these issues are occurring, and management strategies. Pam Bennett from NLTT, along with special guest, Dr. Steven Still, will lead the plant walk.

INSTRUCTED BY

PAMELA BENNETT – Pam Bennett is an Associate Professor with The Ohio State University and serves as the Horticulture Educator and Co-Director for OSU Extension in Clark County as well as the State Master Gardener Volunteer Program Director. Pam specializes in herbaceous ornamental plant trials and presents programs on annuals and perennials as well as other landscape topics locally, statewide, and nationally. DR. STEVEN STILL – Dr. Still is an emeritus professor at The Ohio State University. During his 25 years at Ohio State and 5 years at Kansas State University, he mentored, lectured, advised, and nurtured more than 4,000 students. Last year, Steve retired from his 35 year role as Executive Director of the Perennial Plant Association, an association he founded to represent the emerging perennial industry. He has significantly contributed to the world of horticulture as a professor, author and industry spokesman.

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the meeting, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the meeting is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 TOUR THE ‘SHOE MEETING / REGISTRATION CLOSES 06/05/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No.

Name on Card

Exp. Date

PESTICIDE RECERTIFICATION CREDITS

1hr. CORE / 1 hr. CAT 6A

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 3.5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/TOURTHESHOE


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb The genus Allium contains over 700 species of bulbous or rhizomatous plants. All possess oniony smelling flowers and foliage. Some are grown for culinary purposes and others for ornamental purposes.

ALLIUM ‘MILLENIUM’ MILLENIUM ORNAMENTAL ONION

When the word Allium is spoken, the first image that comes to mind is a big purple ball that towers over a little child but there are hundreds more species, hybrids, and cultivars in existence, from short to tall and bloom time from spring through fall. The most important thing to remember, if you want Allium to recur from year to year, is the nature of their natural habitat: sunny sites with well-drained soil. Heavy clay soils, like the ones in Northeast Ohio, increase susceptibility to root rot organisms; therefore, it is incumbent upon us to amend the soil with a product like Turface which is an enlarged aggregate. Allium ‘Millenium’, the result of a multi generational breeding program, is an asset to any type of perennial garden, or as a border in a landscape bed, but it is particularly useful in a pollinator garden because it is especially attractive to butterflies and bees.

This relative of the common onion has been named the 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year by the Perennial Plant Association. ‘Millenium’ was selected for its mid-summer flowering, with masses of rosy-purple, spherical blooms that last at least a month, and its uniform habit of neat, shiny green leaves that remain attractive all year. Even when the color is gone, the beige balls are still attractive. In addition, it is drought tolerant, deer and rabbit resistant (as is any member of the onion family), and hardy in zones 4-9 and possibly to zone 3. Although many Allium seed heavily, ‘Millenium’ does not. continued on page 10

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

continued from page 8 Since this Allium has a fibrous root structure, it is easily divisible in early spring or fall. This lovely perennial partners well with short Goldenrods such as Solidago ‘Little Lemon’ that will be a bit taller and bloom slightly later, thus extending the food season for pollinators. I have planted mine in front of a Dwarf Pink Rose and next to a Yellow Sedge. The color echoes that of the flowers of Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’. At the Des Moines Botanical Garden, a mass of it is planted in front of one of the tall Liatris but it would also look great in front of the shorter Liatris ‘Kobold’. This virtually no-maintenance perennial takes center stage during the summer when many gardeners are reluctant to venture out. However, its breath-taking beauty may entice them into the garden in spite of the heat.

‘Millenium’ with Liatris at the Des Moines Botanical Garden, late July.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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AVON  |  BROADVIEW  |  HILLIARD W W W . P R E M I E R P L A N T S O L U T I O N S . C O M


FI SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

THE COST OF SOCIAL SECURITY Social Security benefits are increased most years based in part on the Consumer Price Index, but in reality the Cost Of Living Adjustments (COLA) have not begun to keep pace with inflation in recent years. Some years, like 2016, had no increase. This year it is slightly more than 2 percent, compared to increases in the early 1980s of 14 present and 11 percent. The rate of inflation is currently 2.4 percent. The method of calculation skews the process even further. The general Consumer Price Index (CPI), which is used to determine COLA increases, has two sub-categories: CPIWorkers (CPIW), which measures the basket of goods workers buy including transportation costs, and the CPI-Elderly (CPIE), which overweights health-care and housing costs, the two biggest expenses for the elderly. Medicare covers only about 51 percent of health care costs in retirement. Retirees are essentially getting a pay cut every year they receive Social Security benefits, and they need to realize that fact in order salvage their retirement years. A 2 percent raise in the COLA is not enough to offset the rise in the main expenditures they face. In addition, longevity and inflation are two other factors that many do not consider as much. People on a fixed income are hit hardest by inflation. Retirees

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

may have to scale back on their expectations, do better planning or look for other income options. Social Security benefits are going to pay for a smaller percent of retirees’ needs each year. Pre-retirees are going to have to better prepare or retirees are going to have to cut expenses. The earlier a person talks to someone who understands this issue the better. We’ve been advising clients to invest for retirement needs as soon as they can. We don’t want clients having to dial back the projections on what they will receive from Social Security so they do not get a false sense of security. People are living longer than ever. The average life expectancy for a 60 year old man is currently 86 years old. And for a female it is 88 years old. That means the dollars have to stretch even further.


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Retirement accounts, such as 401(k)s, IRAs, 403(b)s, Simple or SEP Plans are the most popular ways for individuals and small businesses to help save for retirement. Many businesses have begun to offer Roth components to their plans. We have been recommending Roth contributions to most clients that have the ability to contribute. A Roth differs in the way the contributions and distributions are taxed. Roths do not provide the tax benefit on the contribution, instead the earnings and withdrawals are generally tax-free. Everyone should speak with an advisor to put together a balanced plan that creates income above what Social Security pays. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at: 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

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18th Annual OLA Scholarship Golf Classic 2018 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/19/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Firm _______________________________________________________ Contact ____________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________________________________ State ___________ Zip _______________ Phone (______)____________________ Fax (______)____________________ Email ___________________________________________

NAME OF GOLFER (Correct Name is Mandatory or Forfeit Shall Occur)

COMPANY

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

2

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

3

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

4

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

wName of Team Captain _____________________________

Email Address of Team Captain __________________________________

1

PAYMENT INFORMATION

Register Today!

...

On or Before July 12 – $100 per person After July 12 – $110 per person

Number of Golfers

____

X $ ___

= $ ______

Don’t Golf? Join us for dinner!

...

$30 each

Number of Dinner Only

____

X $30

= $ ______

Tee Sponsorship (includes signage)

...

$100

Number of Tees

____

X $100

= $ ______

TOTAL

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

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$ ______


GOLF SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES DINNER SPONSOR

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BEVERAGE CART SPONSORS

AVAILABLE AVAILABLE

Thank You

TO OUR MAJOR AND CONTEST SPONSORS Sponsorship Opportunities We are excited to be holding our 18th annual golf outing at Mallard Creek Golf Club on August 2, 2018. But, we need your help to make it a success! This event helps to generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call us to find out more about sponsorship features and benefits. Tee Sponsorships

(Your company name will appear on a sign at your designated tee)

Door Prize(s) Please Specify: Item(s) will be:  shipped to OLA

Beverage Cart

$100

(Your company name will appear on a sign on cart)

$500

 dropped off at OLA

Cash Donation $ Let us shop for you!

CONTACT INFORMATION Name Company Address City State

Zip Code

Phone Email Address

Payment Information

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

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Signature

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OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


FOR SAFETY SAK E

OPERATORS HOLD THE KEYS TO BACKHOE SAFETY THE MOST IMPORTANT BACKHOE LOADER SAFETY DEVICE SITS IN THE OPERATOR’S SEAT.

The backhoe-loader is one of the most popular pieces of construction equipment in the world, which should place safe operation as a top priority. Because the person in the operator’s seat is the one responsible for what the machine does, responsibility for safety largely rests on that individual’s shoulders. Ironically, accidents often involve experienced operators. One reason is the overconfidence that comes with years of experience without an incident. According to VISTA Training, a firm specializing in heavy equipment operator training, working too close to an edge and operating on steep or uneven grades are the leading causes of accidents.

SAFETY FIRST

Clearly, operators need to think about every single move they make before they make it. But some loads change the center of gravity and affect machine stability. Slow, steady movement

Safe practices should begin before the machine is even started. First, perform a walkaround inspection. Next, make sure all functions are operating properly and the machine is set for safe, comfortable operation.

is the safest way to maintain control. If the machine starts to feel unstable, stop everything until you regain control. Always keep the load as close to the ground as possible and don’t raise it until you arrive at the spot where you are going to set it.

continued on page 18

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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FOR SAFETY SAK E

continued from page 16 “After crawling into the cab, make sure the parking brake is engaged,” says Jim Blower, JCB. “Then make sure all of the controls are moving free. Get the seat into a position where you can reach all of the controls that you need to reach.” Then fasten the seat belt. “The machines are rated to be able to roll over, and the safest place for the operator in the event of a machine rollover is sitting in the seat.” Greg Worley, marketing development engineer, Caterpillar, echoes the importance of fastening the seatbelt, adding, “Make sure you are familiar with all the controls. If you are going to road the machine, make sure your independent brake pedals are locked together. Then, adjust the seat and the steering wheel into the correct position for comfort and for being able to reach all controls safely. “Make sure the boom is locked and the swing lock is in place if you are going to road the machine,” he continues. “Survey your surroundings once again before moving the machine, and sound your horn before moving off. Before you start to

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

dig, make sure you are aware which control pattern has been selected for your machine (backhoe or excavator pattern).” One of the biggest dangers of using the loader is vehicle and pedestrian traffic around you. Checking to ensure the backup alarm is working must be part of your routine daily inspection.

CREATE A STABLE DIGGING PLATFORM Backhoe-loader stabilizers serve two purposes. “You want stability over the side and you also want to stop the machine from sliding around when you are digging a trench,” says Blower. According to VISTA Training, the best setup for backhoe work is when the stabilizers are spread to their full width and the loader bucket is in solid contact with the ground. If the tires are carrying the weight of the machine, it will bounce slightly, transmitting vibration to the operator and into the controls. This causes the machine to shake even more. For extra holding power, roll the bucket all the way over and dig in the cutting edge and sill plate.


“You really should not ever use the backhoe without the stabilizers down,” Blower emphasizes. “You will pick them up to move a machine when repositioning for trenching, but you really need to have the most stable platform you can get for digging and lifting purposes. The only way to stabilize a backhoe is to put those stabilizers down on firm ground.”

SAFELY LIFT HEAVY LOADS

Sometimes the ground conditions are too soft, causing stabilizers to sink in. “In this case, you should use blocks or cribbing so you can get a good footing for the stabilizers,” says Blower.

Backhoe lifting operations require extra care. “It is not just the lifting strength of the backhoe, it is the stability of the machine,” says Blower. “We pride ourselves on having a stable machine. We have a very wide stabilizer stance to get that stability even higher.”

PREPARE FOR EXCAVATIONS Digging a trench or excavation takes proper preparation. Whenever you go to a new jobsite, walk it with someone who is familiar with it, advises VISTA Training. Ground depressions can be clues to things like old, buried storage tanks or a drain tile that has been caved in. You need to know everything you possibly can about what is down there before you stick that bucket in the ground for the first time.

Always call before you dig to have the local buried utility locator service mark buried utilities. There can be everything down there from telephone and electrical transmission cables, to natural gas and liquid petroleum gas lines.

“A best practice for heavy lifting is to have the machine as stable as possible,” says Worley. “The machine should be level with the front and the rear tires raised clear of the ground by around 6 inches. Keep the stabilizers spread as far apart as possible without letting any tires touch the ground. Beware of the ground conditions under your stabilizers.” Flip stabilizers to get maximum flotation in soft underfoot conditions. continued on page 20 The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 19


FOR SAFETY SAKE continued from page 19

continued from page 19

The operator needs to know how much the load weighs and how much can be safely picked up at a given angle. “Before you lift, check the spec sheet so you know what the machine is capable of lifting — the distances and heights, etc.,” says Blower. “All of those specs are done with the boom straight off the back of the machine, and typically you are lifting over the side to pick something up. Perform a test lift to make sure the machine is stable before you start moving the [object] around.” “Keep the weight as close to you as possible by keeping the boom close in,” adds Worley. “Use the stick function for maximum capability, and use your extendible stick if needed to move the weight outward. And be sure any laborers are well clear of the object being lifted.” Don’t use homemade rigging. “Lift using proper lifting equipment and use the integrated lifting eye on the power link of the backhoe,” Worley stresses. “Use the shortest chain possible so you are not lifting the dipper all the way up to get the load off the ground,” Blower recommends. “Have the chain strapped as short as you can.” Worley also advises, “Lift at low idle for maximum control and for being able to communicate to your ground workers.” Lowering the engine rpm reduces the flow going through the hydraulics. “The backhoe will move slower,” Blower explains. “You still have all of the power there because power is pressure. You just slow the engine down and move nice and steady, so the load is not swinging around on the end of the chain.”

TRANSPORTING MATERIALS You will often see operators move a bucket full of material around with the bucket too high in the air. “When you lift the bucket way up in the air, you lose your visibility and you raise the center of gravity so you have a more unstable machine,” says Blower. “The most cautious thing to do is to keep the bucket as low as possible — a foot off the ground, depending upon the terrain.” Also be cautious going up and down hills. “Avoid going across the hill with a loaded bucket,” says Blower. “Make sure the bucket is pointing up the hill to keep the machine

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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balanced. If you have to come down the hill, reverse down it... The last thing you want to do is come down the hill with a fully loaded bucket, hit the brakes and all of the weight goes toward the loader.” Understand the limits of the backhoe-loader you are operating. “Do not carry more than the machine can safely handle,” Worley stresses. “Depending upon what materials you are handling, carry them in a level or racked-back position. Use ride control, if equipped, and keep loads as close to the ground as possible until you have to raise them up to load or dump.”

OPERATION ON SLOPES Slopes present challenges for almost any type of construction equipment, including backhoe-loaders. “The stability of a backhoe-loader is at its greatest risk on a hill when it is being driven, not operated,” says Worley. “When you are in operating position, you should try to level the machine as much as possible using the independent stabilizers and your front bucket.”

When operating on a hill, take special precautions. Swinging a bucket of dirt downhill changes the center of gravity in a negative direction. “You should always push a bucket up the hill and dump the spoil on the uphill side of the trench at a distance where it doesn’t roll back into the trench,” says Blower. “We all realize in real-world applications that is not always possible. If you do have to swing the loaded bucket downhill, be very slow and keep your bucket low to the ground.” Pay careful attention when repositioning on a slope. “If you are trenching, the machine is facing uphill and you are ready to move, you should put the hoe into its tucked, stored position,” says Worley. “Turn your seat to the forwardfacing, ready to drive position before you raise the stabilizers. This will give you control over the brakes and transmission, preventing the machine from rolling backwards.” This was written by Curt Bennink and originally ran on ForConstructionPros. com at www.forconstructionpros.com. Curt is senior field editor of Equipment Today magazine and a contributing writer for the ForConstructionPros.com web portal.

The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 21


SN OW & ICE M A NAG E M E N T

SP O N S O R S HI P EVENT SPONSORS ABRAXUS SALT BAKER VEHICLE SYSTEMS, INC. BOTSON INSURANCE GROUP BURNS JCB OF OHIO CENWELD TRUCK BODIES & EQUIPMENT CHARDON WELDING CLASSIC AUTO GROUP FALLSWAY LEPPO RENTS OHIO CAT O’REILLY EQUIPMENT SHEARER EQUIPMENT SOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT VERMEER MIDATLANTIC ZORESCO EQUIPMENT

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT OPPORTUNITIES

The OLA would like to invite you to participate in our 2018 Snow & Ice Management Clinic! Our Snow & Ice Management Clinic is a can’t miss event for anyone in, or thinking about being in the snow and ice business. Designed for both business owners and employees, the clinic will include group discussions and great information from snow and ice industry experts.

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT INFORMATION

Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties are available to ALL Green Industry suppliers, including non snow and ice related businesses. All Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties include:

• • • • • •

Your choice of exhibit size. (Subject to availability. See below for more details.) Your company name displayed on signage at the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on all email communications promoting the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on the Snow & Ice Clinic landing page of our industry website. Your company will be recognized at the event and will have the opportunity to pass out marketing materials to attendees. A complimentary copy of the event attendee list, including attendee’s company name, contact person, mailing address & phone number. BOOTH/EXHIBIT SIZES

Booths will be sold on a first-come, first serve basis. Exhibitors may set up their booths beginning August 23 at 7:00 am. and have until 8:00 am to complete set-up. All exhibit spaces will be located outdoors on pavement and should be interactive for attendees.

OPTION #1 10 x 10 BOOTH OLA Member – $400 Non Member – $600

OPTION #2 20 x 30 BOOTH (NEW THIS YEAR!) OLA Member – $500 Non Member – $700

OPTION #3 30x40 or 20x60 BOOTH OLA Member – $600 Non Member – $800

Includes: • 10 x 10 Exhibit Space • 2 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 20 x 30 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 30 x 40 or 20 x 60 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

PLEASE NOTE: 10 x 10 booths are for TABLETOP DISPLAYS ONLY. Absolutely no equipment will be permited in a 10 x 10 booth. 20 x 60 booths will be created by combining (2) 20 x 30 booths. The same can be done for extra 30 x 40 booths. 2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / BOOTH SPACE IS LIMITED

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

BOOTH SIZE REQUESTED

 10x10 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 20x30 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 30x40 Outdoor Exhibit Space  20x60 Outdoor Exhibit Space

CONTACT INFORMATION

Sponsor Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

PAYMENT INFORMATION

 Please send invoice  Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

FOR A LIST OF AVAILABLE BOOTH SPACES CALL THE OLA OFFICE AT 440.717.0002

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover


SN OW & IC E M A NAG E M E NT

R EG IS T R ATI O N SNOW BUSINESS SUCCESS

Whether you’re an owner, operations manager, dispatcher, or anyone in between, this is a can’t miss event. You will be treated to a diverse and interesting range of topics, with opportunities to interact with both the presenters and your peers. Focus on making your company even better when handling the “white” side of your business. REGISTER NOW for a fun, informative day!

PRESENTERS (MORE TO COME) Kevin Gilbride / Accredited Snow Contractor’s Association (ASCA)

EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 23, 2018 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 AGENDA 8:30AM – 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

The Accredited Snow Contractors Association is a trade association with the purpose of advancing the professional snow and ice management industry and to promote its role in performing high-risk services to society. Kevin will be discussing the benefits of ASCA certification and ISO certification and what it can do for your company.

9:00AM – 5:00 PM CLINIC

Dale Keep / Ice and Snow Technologies, Inc. (IST)

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 08/09/18 - $99 AFTER 08/09/18 - $129

Dale’s consulting and training experience includes subjects of; bidding methods, overall operations, equipment operations, routing, priorities, and chemical deicers. He will be discussing the use of liquids as part of your arsenal in fighting snow and ice.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 08/09/18 - $149 AFTER 08/09/18 - $179

ALSO FEATURING Presentation: The advantages to using third party weather forecasting companies. (Speaker TBD) Presentation: General snow and ice operations. (Speaker TBD) Mini Trade Show: Visit industry vendors. See what’s new. Displayed equipment, products & services. Roundtable Discussions: Pertinent industry topics. Always a favorite! Drawing for Prizes: You MUST be present to win!

Special Price!

Register one person from your company and each additional person from the same company is only an additional $69!

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 08/16/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

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Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5.5 CEU’S

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REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SNOWANDICE


SNOWFIGHTERS INSTITUTE

EVENT DATES SALES STRATEGIES July 16 - 19, 2018

How to successfully bridge the gap of turning suspects into prospects is one of the focal points of this event. Attendees will learn how to successfully navigate all the excuses various prospects have to avoid making a decision. The role play exercises are designed to force you to “think on your feet” in order to achieve a successful conclusion to your quest to bring more business to your company.

ISO PRE-AUDIT PREP

ISO INTERNAL AUDITOR

You have worked hard to get your company to where it is today. Looking to set yourself apart from your competitors? Consider pursuing your ISO certification. ISO9001/SN9001™ are internationally recognized process certifications. This event will provide your designated ISO manager with the tools necessary to put together a set of processes necessary for ISO certification and will help you prepare for the pre-assessment audit.

As part of the ISO requirement, companies will need to conduct internal audits of their processes. Multiple internal auditors may be necessary as an auditor is not permitted to audit an area of their responsibility. To prepare for this new role, a strong base of knowledge and an understanding of basic audit skills are essential. In this Internal Auditor training event, you can learn the ins-and-outs of an audit from beginning to end.

June 4 - 5, 2018

June 6 - 7, 2018

For more information call us, visit our website, or email us at: www.snowfightersinstitute.com (814) 455-1991 info@snowfightersinstitute.com *All OLA members receive $500 off our Sales Strategies event. Put in code: OLA when registering online or call (814) 455-1991. *Cannot be combined with any other offers. *Please call (814) 455-1991 when registering multiple attendees.


4

THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #4 / DOING THE BUSINESS

It’s Not What You Make, It’s What You Keep. I cannot believe we have completed 3 of the 4 CORE’s of Landscape Success. So far we covered Guiding the Business, Running the Business, and Getting the Business. What’s left? Oh yeah… now we have to deliver, in order to get paid. This brings us to the subject of Project Management. No matter how you cut it, landscape businesses are profitable because of their ability to schedule and manage work. In fact, our experience has been that 80% of your margin is based on the ability to maximize resources. My intention is not to cover how to plan a design build project. It is to give you the tools necessary to improve your overall project management. One quick side note: In manufacturing, everything is based on standardizing processes and products, with no customization to please customers. They buy what you sell. Landscaping is the complete antithesis of this. Everything is custom, and everything hinges on the customer receiving what was promised. What does this mean? It means you need a standard process for making customers happy and your project management is that tool. So, let’s start with the Key Rule, which is this: Every job you take on needs to be scheduled into the overall workflow that maximizes the use of your resources. One of the prime roles of Landscape Managers is scheduling work that places the right people, with the right materials, and the right equipment, at the right place, at the right time… and not a moment longer.

Scheduling that drives good margins can be achieved on many of the current Project Management Software (PMS) packages, like LMN. If a PMS package is out of your current budget, this may also be accomplished using a large planning board. Now, you have the 80% of the margin right (you should be at breakeven), the next critical person is the supervisor. Whether you call them a Foreman, Crew Leader, Team Leader – whatever – their job is simple; Bring the job in on budget. When the job was sold, the sales person estimated its requirements: materials, labor hours, equipment, and so on. Our experience at GreenMark is this information never makes it to the supervisor. And if there is one thing you take away from this entire article, it should be this: Every job must have a budget and your supervisors need to be aware of it. How can they keep your job(s) profitable if they don’t know the standard – on, or under budget? There are two other important impacts on running the business. First, you can check your estimates against reality. If you are underestimating jobs, the information is now available to sell better deals. If the estimates are right, then the cause for unprofitable jobs is how the crews are being run.

WILLIAM EASTMAN GreenMark Consulting Group Do you have the right supervisor? Do you have the wrong people on the crew? Do you have all the resources available when needed? About 15% of your margin is determined on how the job is managed and most, if not all, of that margin goes to the bottom line. I know all of this makes it sound as if your landscape technicians have no part in this. Certainly they are responsible for following instructions, but I want to elevate their role. Quality of work is not something YOU can inject into a job. It must be built in by the people doing the work. Training your crews on how to eliminate waste (doing things over, doing things wrong, wasting materials, or damaging equipment) has two payoffs. First, it raises their level of professionalism and second, the remaining 5% of your margin comes from doing the job right the first time. By the way, this 5% is pure profit. There is more to it than what we can cover in such a short article. That said, the team at GreenMark have a passion for project management. If you want to get scheduling, job efficiency, and waste under control – reach out and we will take you through our process. There are many things you can do to improve profitability, however, if you wanted a place start, it is here. Call us @833.RUGREEN or email greenmarkcoaching@gmail.com. Looking forward to talking with you.

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26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PLANT I.D. (NE OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen and deciduous. Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

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Bridget Comes Portage Lakes Career Ctr.

Russ Luyster, OCNT Impact Grounds Maint.

2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/05/18 (NE OHIO)

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Linden Viburnum

PRUNUS VIRGINIANA CHOKECHERRY

If you’ve ever been around for the aftermath of someone – perhaps yourself – tasting an unripe Persimmon (Diospyros) fruit, you certainly know the hilarious faces one makes as the agony of bitterness engages their unsuspecting taste buds. With that in mind, it’s important to remember that while there are a number of fruiting plants in our landscapes which are edible and tasty, there are also a number that are either poisonous, or edible, but outright mean. These mean ones, or as we like to call them “Taste Bud Attackers,” can sometimes be hidden behind innocent sounding names, like Persimmon. Other times, someone had such an unpleasant tasting experience that they named it “Chokecherry.” And true to its name, the Chokeberry (Aronia spp.) is a very astringent fruit that can turn your mouth inside out in disgust. If you aren’t careful, and you pop, quickly chew and swallow a few, you are almost guaranteed to choke. Now, we all know there are a number of Cherry trees (Prunus spp.) out there that we simply refer to as an “Ornamental Cherry” because they have some of the best spring flower shows, yet don’t follow up with an edible fruit. Ornamental Cherries are great

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

for the flowers, and as long as you’re OK with them having a somewhat truncated life span (20-30 years, maybe.) In that case, they are great for the joy they bring to the landscape each spring. On the flip-side, there is good old Prunus serotina, the Wild Black Cherry. It is a large (up to one-hundred foot) deciduous native of our landscape that has less-ornamental clusters of flowers. These flowers are followed by a barrage of small purple fruits, which generally end up as purple bird poop on car windshields and popped seedlings throughout the landscape. Many people tend to be quite familiar with this native Cherry tree, but seem to less familiar with another native Cherry tree out there, called the Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana).


The reason we chose to share this plant in this month’s issue is because, at the time of writing (beginning of May), they’ve begun to pop their flower clusters in the nearby wooded areas and look beautiful. They are really a welcomed sight to anyone who’s still jaded by this year’s weather. ANY sign of spring was a welcomed one, given the cold weather that had lingered a little too long for most of our tastes. In truth, the blooming of the Chokecherry in the woods is always a welcome sight. Sometimes, we get so wrapped up in creating our ornamental horticultural masterpieces that we forget to enjoy the nature around us. This is a great reminder of that. Prunus virginiana is native in almost every state and province in North America, which tells you something about its ability to adapt to various conditions. While it is typically found in dryer, or at least very well drained soils, it can also be found in heavier, clay soils. One of the most impressive feats of adaptation is the wide range of heat and cold it will tolerate (think Northern Canada to Southern Tennessee into Georgia). Though not as tall as P. serotina, Chokecherry can reach into the fifty to sixty foot range, in a woodland setting. If acting as a pioneer species in a more exposed site, it tends to stay in the twenty to thirty foot range, becoming a multi-stem, giant shrub. When looking at more mature Cherries in the woods, there is a distinct difference between that of Chokecherry barks and that of Wild Black Cherry. Wild Black Cherry tend to be blocky, chunking off to show orange highlights below, while Chokecherry is much smoother, sometimes a shiny, deepbrown with incredibly prominent white horizontal lenticels. Like all members of the Roseaceae family, Chokecherry can be equally plagued by disease and insects/pests including Black Knot, Fireblight, a number of leaf feeding pests, and the occasional, heavy infestation of Eastern Tent Caterpillar. But, before you go scratching your head trying to figure out why we would spend an entire article talking about a neat woodland tree that may perform poorly as a landscape plant, rest assured, there is hope! Sometimes, plants develop genetic variations that change the way the plant appears, or grows. Many of those times, we plant nerds relish these abnormalities as prized cultivars – even if we can’t explain why the plant behaved this way. Like Maples, members of Roseaceae will every now and then have a seedling that produces heavy amounts of Anthocyanin. Anthocyanin is a molecule used in defending pest attacks and is produced by nearly all plants, but rarely seen by our eyes as continued on page 30

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The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 29


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 29 it is outnumbered by Chlorophyll. Since Chlorophyll absorbs blue and red light waves – reflecting the green spectrum – most leaves appear as green to our eyes. In the case of plants with an abundance of Anthocyanin – which absorbs green light waves – the leaves appear as a deep-purple, sometimes coppery color. There is still plenty of Chlorophyll at work in these leaves; just not in the same ratios. Enter the beautiful ‘Canada Red’ Chokecherry cultivar. Originally, this cultivar was – and for some growers still is – named ‘Schubert,’ or Schubert Chokecherry. Bailey Nurseries of Minnesota claims they found a branch sport on a Schubert in production, and upon propagating this sport, believe it had a faster growth rate, straighter trunk, and brighter red leaves. While there is much debate over the two being separate plants, it seems most nurseries sell the plant under the name ‘Canada Red’. What ‘Canada Red’ lacks, compared to the flower power of other Cherries, it makes up for in leaf color. As the name fails to imply, the leaves emerge a nice green, fading to a deeppurple color for the summer months. These plants inherited all the toughness of their parents, are quite salt tolerant, and have incredible winter-cold hardiness. No winter in Ohio should be able to harm them.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

‘Canada Red’ should stay in the ornamental tree range, again, perhaps hitting in the mid twenty foot range. It may form some root suckers that should be removed immediately. Like the species, it will perform much better – fighting off disease and pest issues – given a well-drained, highly-aerated soil. It would make an excellent street tree, if you take the time to amend the devil strip area it will be planted in. At minimum, make sure the soil is well aerated. Unlike the species, we find that ‘Canada Red’ does not fruit as heavily, and most will be taken by birds. If you’re in the market for a nice, native, small tree that can add a punch of leaf color to the landscape, consider a Prunus virginiana ‘Canada Red’ in your next planting plan. Enjoy!

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

A NEW OPPORTUNITY FOR LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

PETSCAPING BY TOM CRAIN

While a third of homeowners will make updates to their yards to accommodate their kids and grandkids, pets are now getting even more attention. Knowing that more than two-fifths of homeowners will make pet-related upgrades to their outdoor spaces, there’s no denying that dogscaping is a new trend in landscape design requiring designers to plan their clients’ backyards based on their dogs’ habits. “The best way to go about setting up a pet-friendly landscaping plan with your customer is to first lay down the fundamentals, get paid for that on first installment and, later, add the gravy, which would be plant material, special hardscapes such as boulders and other decor,” says Elizabeth Bublitz, Paw Friendly Landscaping, Denver. The cost for her services ranges from $1,000 for smaller projects to more than $50,000 for high-end landscape makeovers. Over the years, several landscapers have joined Paw Friendly in this specialized niche, including Lazar Landscape Design

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

and Construction in Oakland, California; Landscape Design in a Day in Portland, Oregon; and Sublime Garden Design in Snohomish, Washington. When it comes to the top considerations for designing pet-friendly landscapes for clients, Bublitz identifies the following: placing paths, structures and barriers for animals’ running, patrolling and observing habits; providing the right items and places for nature’s call to be answered; adding proper shading and sheltering; using safe and practical hardscape, mulch and planting materials; and including high-functioning, low-maintenance lawns.


A PET-FRIENDLY PRESENTATION Bublitz only sees the upsides of presenting her landscaping business as pet-friendly. “It sets you apart,” she says. “You can work with so many good-hearted people because so many either own rescue dogs or are crazy about their pedigreed pooches. They are fun, happy people who have their priorities straight. They look at their yards as also belonging to their dogs and are open to solutions that involve compromise. Another great thing about landscaping for dogs is that your designs will be more organic and natural in shape as opposed to the typical symmetric and geometric style.” When Bublitz meets with clients, she focuses on the dog’s habits first. “They’re all habitual, so you can identify solutions to such things as their eliminations (aka, urinating and defecating) and habitual movements. Some are escape artists. Others are diggers. Some are active, constantly running around and chasing squirrels. There’s design variations to accommodate all types.” Carol Lindsay, owner and landscape designer of Landscape Design in a Day, believes any dog-friendly landscape designer needs to convey that they are well-rounded. “You want to go in as a landscaper who sees the whole picture, and dog-friendly just happens to be an integral part of it, certainly,” she says. “You also have to let customers know that they will have to compromise. You want to present cold, hard facts about what it takes to accommodate their dogs.” When going in for a first meeting with clients to check out their landscapes, Bublitz requests they not clean or pick up anything from their yard so she can study the pet’s elimination behaviors before designing any new landscapes. “Instead of removing the urination area, you need to accentuate it,” she says. “If the dog lifts his leg on a shrub killing it, as a designer I would opt to leave it there but place a really beautiful statuary bird bath or boulder next to it.” When the dog identifies a favorite spot to eliminate waste, Bublitz will tear out the sod there and replace it with safe, decorative rock and possibly a major hardscape accent feature. Headquartered in Denver, Bublitz advocates for Dog Tuff Turf, a specially developed variety of a drought- and dog-spot-resistant African grass developed by a collaboration between Colorado State University and Denver Botanic Gardens. Lindsay says that in some lawn areas where dogs eliminate, clients must know that grass just will not grow. “In cases like this, I tell my clients to get real and accommodate synthetic.” continued on page 34

The Growing Concern | June 2018 | 33


F E AT UR E AR T IC L E continued from page 33

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS Bublitz observes that when dogs run around yards, they typically like to do figure eights. “To accommodate this habit, designers should design paths with this pattern in mind,” she says. “The great thing about this is that you have a built-in interesting design feature that is also practical.” According to Heidi Skievaski, owner and landscape designer of Sublime Garden Design, a pebbled walkway may look great, but with those rounded edges, pebbles will fly into garden beds as dogs race down the paths. “I opt for crushed gravel, concrete, pavers or brick instead,” she says. “I also don’t choose materials that will get too hot and potentially burn the pads of dog’s feet. Lighter surfaces are better than dark surfaces for this.” Bublitz places stepping stones in gardens to keep pets off plants. “I use large cobblestones versus pea gravel that has shards that could injure dogs’ paws,” she says. “And dogs love wood, so they like to play with sticks and bark, and sometimes will even eat it. So, I shy away from wood mulch altogether.” “For all dogs, never use cocoa mulch even though it’s in high demand as it has proven fatally toxic to some dogs,” adds Pam Cosce, owner and design director at Lazar Landscape Design and Construction. “When identifying plant materials, try to plant larger-sized container plants in masses, ensuring they are sturdy.” Cosce selects ornamental grasses and phormiums especially along borders for her pet-friendly landscapes. Skievaski tells her clients that instead of trying to stop their dogs from chewing plants, it’s critical that the pet-friendly landscapes she designs should not only protect plants but also be toxin-free if consumed. There are many plants, that can be harmful to dogs if ingested, she says, including azaleas, foxgloves, hemlocks, poinsettias, yews, lilies, mums and daffodils.

FENCING, FOUNTAINS & OTHER IDEAS When it comes to fencing, which nearly all pet-friendly designers agree is one of the single most critical elements in design, Bublitz advocates for roll-top edging for those dogs who jump over fences. While a roller is great for the top of a fence, she uses chicken wire at the base. “Particularly when installing new plants or fences, I place chicken wire a few inches under the surface of the ground, so Buster can’t dig very far,” she says. “When the chicken wire texture hits his paws, it discourages him from digging.”

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Lindsay finds that some dogs like to be up high to see who is coming or going. “We added a couple of boulders to a petfriendly landscape complete with plantings to creep between the boulders to add beauty,” she says. “The dog used to clamber up and down on his very large doghouse roof that he often jumped off. The connected boulders provided a gradual climb up and down for the dog, knowing it’s not only dangerous, but unhealthy for dogs’ joints to repeatedly be subjected to the ups and downs of jumping from a high place.” Cosce often installs extra drainage to her pet-friendly landscapes and considers odor-reducer add-ons. “If you have a male dog fond of marking, I consider a marking post,” she says. “When I add a marking post, I advocate for placing a water source close by to keep smells from building up. It also helps if you have good drainage underneath.” Keeping pooches cool in summer is also a key design element for most climates. “I provide shade through strategically planted trees and shrubs or use shade cloth that stretches over a designated area if plant material just won’t work,” says Skievaski. She also likes to add water features to pet-friendly landscapes. “A fountain for drinking or a stream for wading is ideal. If you decide to add a pond or pool to your designs, make sure it’s shallow enough for the dog, especially a small dog, to readily get out of it.” This article originally ran in the November 2016 issue of Turf Magazine (https:// www.turfmagazine.com). Tom Crain lives and works in Akron, Ohio, and is a regular contributor to Turf. Contact him at tecrain@goingreenguy.com.


PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

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CHANGES ARE COMING LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFIED TECHNICIAN’S TEST UPDATE In Ohio, the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s test is offered through the partnership of OLA, ONLA and The Ohio State ATI. The test itself is the property of the National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP), who licenses the test to state associations to administer in their state. Each licensee pays fees to NALP for the privilege of offering the test. NALP has recently made the decision to eliminate the hands-on test and plans to replace it with a new written test that will be taken on a computer. Successful candidates will receive the same designation as those candidates who have earned their LIC Technician Certification by taking the hands-on test. NALP has made it clear to all licensees that they will not be able to administer any portion of the current test after April 30, 2018. Furthermore, NALP is requiring any candidate who is currently in the process of working towards their certification to successfully complete all parts of the test by April 30, or they will be forced to start over and pay the full fee to take the new online test, when it comes available.

36 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Unfortunately, the Ohio Certification Partnership does not have control over this change, but we have made it clear to NALP that we do not feel a written test is equivalent to the current test that includes hands-on skills assessments. In an effort to best help those currently in the process of completing the test, we have asked for more time for those candidates to complete their testing. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you. Our 2018 hands-on test is scheduled for Thursday, August 9. We strongly recommend that everyone who needs to complete any of the hands-on sections sign up for the August test by the cut-off date of June 8. We will gladly accept new test


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In order to give our candidates the best possible opportunity to complete their testing, we will be scheduling same day retakes on August 9 where possible. Also, if you are scheduled for testing on August 9, we will allow you to retest on August 10, but you MUST be registered for the August 9 test to take advanatge of this opportunity. With that in mind, we do recommend you make arrangements to use both days for testing, if need be.

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To recap, our plan going forward is to: • Provide a full test on our original test date, Thursday, August 9, allowing for retakes that same day where/when we can make it work. • Provide for a second retake test day on Friday, August 10 for those who tested on August 9, while we are all on campus with the equipment and the test-site already set-up. • Tentatively plan for another retake test day in the fall, offering only those test problems needed. The OLA is extremely saddened by this change. The handson test was a wonderful opportunity each year for the staffs at OSU/ATI, ONLA and OLA to work together in effort to elevate the profession. We have consistently held one of the best attended and most accurately administered tests in North America. The hands-on testing is a true measure of not only knowledge, but skill. Simply put, you cannot “fake it” to pass the hands-on test. Our test not only gave candidates the opportunity to prove their skills...it built a wonderful camaraderie amongst the team of judges, volunteers, staff and test takers. As they say, change is hard. I know this change will be painful to many dedicated volunteers and men and women who hold the Landscape Industry Certified Technician credential. That said, we are a stoic group and I feel certain we will come together to find another initiative where we can all work together and continue to raise the bar.

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F TH E M O N A TDH V ER T IS ING INDEX Abraxus /Royalton Supply Landscape Center

18

Boyas Excavating

9

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

29

Fairlawn/Medina Landscape Supply

39

John Allin Consulting, Inc.

13

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

33

Medina Sod Farms, Inc.

29

Millcreek Gardens

6

MRLM / JTO, Inc.

33

O’Reilly Equipment, LLC.

37

Oliger Seed Co.

11

Premier Plant Solutions

37

Shearer Equipment

24

Snowfighters Institute

26

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

13

Three-Z Supply, Inc.

2

Unilock

9

Valley City Supply

17

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

20

Zoresco Equipment Company

38 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

L

S

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

SCA

A

D

31

ND

PE

All Organic Mulch, LLC

A

C

26

L

21

S S I F I E

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Classified and Help Wanted ads? Want to post one of your own? You’ll find them at ohiolandscapers.org or myohiolandscape.com. HELP WANTED ADS Help Wanted ads are posted on both our industry website and our consumer website, along with bi-monthly postings via social media. CLASSIFIED ADS (I.E. Equipment for sale) Classified ads are posted on our industry website ohiolandscapers.org COST MEMBERS: $35 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. NON MEMBER: $70 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. Please send all inquiries and ad content to: info@ohiolandscapers.org or call the OLA office at 440-717-0002.

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REGULAR MEMBERS

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ASSOCIATE MEMBER

Kurtz Bros. Central Ohio LLC PO Box 207 Westerville, OH 43086 614-882-0200 Jerry Bennett

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All testing and retakes MUST be completed by April 30, 2019.

The National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) recently announced changes to the Landscape Industry Certified – Technician Exterior (LIC-T) program that will significantly influence the LIC-T testing options in Ohio. As of May 1, 2019, the hands-on components of the technician certification exam will be eliminated and the exam will be revised and administered completely online and through remote proctoring. What this means for current Ohio LIC-T candidates is that you have until April 30, 2019, to complete any retake tests you need to pass in order to achieve your certification. After that date, if you have not passed any portion of the test, you will need to take the new online exam in its entirety in order to become Landscape Industry Certified through NALP. We apologize for this inconvenience. (Please see page 36 for more information) For additional Information about testing, registration, or to obtain study materials, please visit LandscapeCertifiedOhio.org, or call the Ohio State ATI at 330.287.7511, or 330.287.0100.

ician fied Techn ti r e C y tr s u scape Ind Dates 2018 Land S Test TEST DATE TES N TEST DA

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The Growing Concern June 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

The Growing Concern June 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

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