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Growing Concern

The

JU L Y 2 0 1 8

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

Plant I.D. Clinic

NE Ohio: July 12, 2018 / Davis Tree Farm & Nursery / PAGE 7 Central Ohio: July 19, 2018 / Premier Plant Solutions / PAGE 12

OLA Scholarship Golf Classic August 2, 2018 / Mallard Creek Golf Course / PAGE 18-19

Annual Snow & Ice Clinic

August 23, 2018 / St. Michael’s Woodside / PAGE 24-25


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

TOGETHER EVERYONE ACHIEVES MORE The Cleveland Cavaliers made it to the finals again! And again, unfortunately, they weren’t quite able to seal the deal. Like it or not, one would have to admit that Golden State was just the better team in 2018… Whether or not you are a basketball fan, it’s pretty cool to have the eyes of the entire world focused on Ohio, the Cavs and LeBron James. And while LeBron continues to set records on the court and in his personal life, it’s pretty clear that this time around he couldn’t do it all by himself. The truth is the “team effect” has a much bigger scope than one could imagine – even when you’re LeBron. As we move into summer facing a labor shortage, higher expenses and material shortages, have you thought about your “team effect” and how it could affect your business? More importantly, do you have a good understanding of EVERYONE who is on that team?

YOUR EMPLOYEES Employees are the most obvious members of your team. Most companies will agree that they are the main component of any business, as they are always the largest overhead expense. Hiring the right person for the job, providing them the tools

to complete the job correctly and training are the primary lines of defense towards keeping them safe and productive – and in turn – your company profitable. One unhappy employee can prevent your company from reaching its intended goals. On the other hand, the right superstar can be the glue that holds it together – making everyone a star! Superstars are rare, but when you find one, look for ways to keep them motivated.

YOUR CUSTOMERS In basketball terms, the sixth man usually refers to the first guy off the bench, but it can also refer to the part the home crowd plays. When you think about the outreach of your businesses, I think we can all agree that our customer base can make or break us. In the right situation, they can be our biggest cheerleaders. Repeat business, referrals and cross-selling keep a business growing. Word of mouth really is the best advertisement and first impressions are everlasting. That is why it is so important continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS J U L Y 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr.

COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards Merit Award winner, Exscape Designs, for their entry in the category of Garden Structures & Pavements.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

Together Everyone Achieves More

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org.

20 FOR SAFETY SAKE

DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

27 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

28 PLANT OF THE MONTH

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Agastache: Anise Hyssop/Hummingbird Mint

14 FISCAL FITNESS

Roth IRA Conversion It’s Tick Season

4 CORE Elements to Business Success: The Customer’s Experience Leucothoe: Dog-Hobble

32 FEATURE ARTICLE

Ways to Reduce Your Chances of Equipment Theft

37 DIRECTIONS 38 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 38 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS U P CO M I N G O L A MEETINGS , EDUC ATION SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R GREEN INDUS TR Y EVE N T S

JULY

SEPTEMBER

JULY 12, 2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (NE OHIO)

SEPTEMBER 13, 2018 OLA FACILITY TOUR

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 7 for more details.

Join us for our annual Landscape Facility Tour, hosted this year by Exscape Designs in Newbury, OH. Exscape Designs is a full service design/ build company that attributes its success to upholding and operating by a set of core values that ensures their team acts with integrity, professionalism, and accountability every single day. Call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002 for more info.

JULY 19, 2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (CENTRAL OH) This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Sponsored by Premier Plant Solutions. See page 12 for more details.

AUGUST

OCTOBER OCTOBER 11, 2018 (TENTATIVE) OLA MEETING (Cental Ohio) Subject matter and location TBD.

AUGUST 2, 2018 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

NOVEMBER

Join us at Mallard Creek Golf Club in Columbia Station for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. See page 18-19 for more details.

NOVEMBER 15, 2018 OLA ANNUAL MEETING Subject matter TBD. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

TEST DATES & APPLICATION DEADLINES AUG. 8, 2018 WRITTEN TEST 2:30pm @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

AUG. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

AUG. 9, 2018 HANDS-ON TEST & RETAKES Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

AUG. 10, 2018 HANDS-ON TEST RETAKE DAY Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

OCT. 2, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM 9:00am @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

OCT. 9, 2018 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM 9:00am @ OLA Offices, Broadview Hts. 9240 Broadview Road, Broadview Hts., OH 44147

AUGUST 23, 2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, Roundtable Discussions with your peers, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration and Sponsorship Opportunities are available. Register online, or call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002. See page 24 – 25 for more details. The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3 to take advantage of these opportunities by under promising and overdelivering. While your relationship with customers will vary based on their expectations, it’s important for owners and managers to share the company’s value system with supervisors, crew leaders and crew members so that they may personalize the experience for every customer. Every customer wants to feel like they are your MVC (Most Valuable Customer).

YOUR VENDORS This is the part of the team that is often overlooked till something doesn’t happen in a timely manner that the customer may be expecting. They are the people behind the scenes. Sharing your timeline, expectations and plans ahead of time can “Help them, Help You” achieve the final results that make you the hero in the customer’s eyes. It’s especially important to keep in mind that in our instant gratification society, shortages in the market place are causing prices to rise. Being up-front with your vendor about possible delays due to contractor’s schedules and customer expectations will assist vendors in giving you the best price possible.

All Time), or as the fall-guy who’s responsible for the entire teams’ demise. Have you ever looked online to see what the community – places like Houzz, Angie’s List, BBB, etc. – has to say about your company? How are you rated? If there is no rating, why not? You should view this “community” as your very own PR firm. If there are negative comments, be sure to take actions that will change the public perception. For example, many companies will improve their image by performing volunteer work – something that can bring the rest of your team (employees, vendors and customers) that much closer together. In the end, the outcome from joining these forces will benefit all those involved and create a positive atmosphere for everyone! When I look back over where time has taken our industry, I can truly say I miss the old days! That said, I still appreciate the simplicity of what we do and what we create on a daily basis. As society forces us to evolve, let’s embrace the challenge, keeping in mind that only as a team will we be triumphant.

THE COMMUNITY

Enjoy your summer!

The community is to your company what ESPN is to sports. They can portray you as the G.O.A.T. (Greatest of

As always, Marie

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

COURSE DATE JULY 12, 2018 LOCATION DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY VALLEY CITY, OHIO 44280 AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM - 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 06/28/18 - $79 AFTER 06/28/18 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 06/28/18 - $109 AFTER 06/28/18 - $139 A P P R O V E D

PLANT I.D. (NE OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen and deciduous. Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Wendy Moore Davis Tree Farm

Bridget Comes Portage Lakes Career Ctr.

Russ Luyster, OCNT Impact Grounds Maint.

2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/05/18 (NE OHIO)

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PLANTID


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Massed Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ is featured in a Floriade garden with masses of Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’.

AGASTACHE

ANISE HYSSOP/HUMMINGBIRD MINT I’m in love with Agastache. There are so many different ones. I want them all but have to be selective since my space is limited. The crucial piece of information that anyone planting them needs to know is that most of them require perfect drainage for them to survive our wet winters. That is why I add lots of Turface to any space in which I am planting Agastache. The exception, in my experience, is A.foeniculum ‘Blue Fortune’ which seems perfectly happy in virtually any soil. Its cousin, ‘Golden Jubilee’, performs similarly and adds another element of interest to the garden with its golden yellow foliage. Both grow approximately three feet tall and keep blooming throughout the summer and into the fall if deadheaded. I’ve recently become acquainted with a shorter cousin ‘Blue Boa’ that only grows two feet high and has fluffier spikes.

Five years ago, Coen Jansen, a Dutch nurseryman, selected ‘Black Adder’, a cross of A. rugosa and A. foeniculum, for its black buds, slender spikes that are a blend of dark purple and pale purple, and dark green foliage. In 2015, a shorter cousin named ‘Little Adder’ was introduced; it only grows fifteen to eighteen inches high. All of these are hardy to zone 5. I’ve been growing Agastache rugosa ‘Alabaster’ since 1996. It seems to be satisfied with strong morning sun and afternoon continued on page 10

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’

Agastache rugosa ‘Alabaster’

Agastache ‘Black Adder’

continued from page 8 shade and grows about four feet high; it might be shorter in full sun. The butterflies love it. It does seed a bit but not outrageously. Long before I became acquainted with the blue hyssops, I saw Agastache rupestris (Sunset Hyssop)on a garden tour and was entranced by its delicate silver foliage and rosy-salmon tubular flowers. This hyssop loves it hot and dry but, again, drainage is crucial. It will grow three feet high and wide.

We can thank David Salman of High Country Gardens for introducing us to many of the hyssops that are well known in the Southwest. We in the Midwest discounted them for many years, assuming that they wouldn’t be hardy here, but they are hardy to at least zone 6 and many are hardy to zone 5. I can’t emphasize enough that drainage is the key to survival. David’s catalog lists several other species and cultivars, many of which are pink, some short and some quite tall. These North American natives will make any environmentalist happy.

The Kudos Series has three colors so far: peachy pink, strong coral, and orange. They are supposedly hardy to zone 5 and I’m keeping my fingers crossed but don’t have experience with them yet although I have installed them in a few gardens. The flowers are tiny tubes but there are so many on a stalk that they will make an impact once they are mature. They are short, growing only fifteen inches high.

Agastache are showy, fragrant, and long blooming through summer and early fall. Although supposedly adaptable to partial shade, I find that full sun is better. These perennials belong in a pollinator-friendly garden. They are attractive to hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. Because of the anise and mint-scented foliage, deer and rabbits are not attracted to them. Where are you going to find space for them?

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 11


PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

COURSE DATE JULY 19, 2018

PLANT I.D. (CENTRAL OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover

the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be LOCATION PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: 6981 SCIOTO DARBY CREEK RD. perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen HILLIARD, OH 43026 and deciduous.

AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM - 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 07/05/18 - $79 AFTER 07/05/18 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 07/05/18 - $109 AFTER 07/05/18 - $139 A P P R O V E D

Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Jack Johnston Premier Plant Solutions

Robin Knaup Premier Plant Solutions

Jason Veil Secrest Arboretum

2018 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/12/18 (CENTRAL, OHIO)

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PLANTID


Pre-pulls Deliveries  Plant Sourcing   Online Ordering

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HILLIARD 6981 SCIOTO-DARBY RD. HILLIARD, OH 43026 888-593-5999

ADEQUATE PLANT MOISTURE IS CRITICAL IN SUMMER HEAT


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

ROTH IRA CONVERSION Clients often consider whether it’s wise to convert their individual retirement accounts to Roth IRAs. There are pros and cons to doing so. But, for some clients, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 may tip the scales in favor of converting substantial amounts now.

BENEFITS OF ROTH CONVERSION

LOWER INCOME TAX

There are several benefits to converting to a Roth IRA. Principal among them is that, assuming the IRA owner has other funds to pay the tax on the conversion, the IRA owner is effectively shifting additional wealth into the IRA.

There’s often an income tax tradeoff in converting to a Roth IRA. As a general rule, the Roth conversion makes sense to the extent the tax rate on the conversion is less than, equal to or not “too much” higher than the tax rate that would otherwise apply to distributions from the IRA at retirement. That’s why many IRA owners spread the conversion out over a number of years or wait until they retire to convert or to begin to convert. By reducing tax rates basically across the board, The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act may greatly simplify this decision for many IRA owners.

Example: Assume a constant 25 percent income tax bracket. IRA owner, Bob, has a $1,000 traditional IRA and $250 in a taxable account. If he converts, he has a $1,000 Roth IRA and he used the $250 in the taxable account to pay the conversion tax. Over some period of time, the Roth IRA grows to $2,000, all of which is tax free. Over the same period of time, if he doesn’t convert, his traditional IRA will grow to $2,000, or $1,500 after income tax. His $250 taxable account will grow to less than $500, because the income and gains on that account will be taxable each year. Another huge benefit is there are no required minimum distributions (RMDs) during the IRA owner’s lifetime or the lifetime of the beneficiary spouse.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

WIDER TAX BRACKETS FOR JOINT RETURNS In addition to reducing the tax rates, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act also widened the tax brackets on joint returns to double the width of those for singles in every bracket. For single individuals, the regular income tax rates in 2018 are: 10 percent up to $9,525, 12 percent up to $38,700, 22 percent up to $82,500, 24 percent up to $157,500, 32 continued on page 16


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continued from page 14 percent up to $200,000, 35 percent up to $500,000 and 37 percent over $500,000. In comparison, for joint returns the rates are: 10 percent up to $19,050, 12 percent up to $77,400, 22 percent up to $165,000, 24 percent up to $315,000, 32 percent up to $400,000, 35 percent up to $600,000 and 37 percent over $600,000. Under the new rates, many IRA owners will convert each year to the extent they can do so in the 10 percent or 12 percent income tax bracket. Other IRA owners may convert each year to the extent they can do so within the 22 percent or 24 percent bracket. IRA owners who expect that they and their beneficiaries will always be in a very high tax bracket may convert their entire IRA as quickly as they can.

This conversion is especially attractive to many IRA owners who’ll always be in at least the 22 percent bracket as a result of pensions, Social Security, RMDs and investment income. You can still make your annual contribution if you also convert money from a tax-deductible account (like a Traditional IRA) to a Roth in the same year. Also, you can contribute to a Roth IRA even if you participate in a retirement plan through your employer. Of course, you have to meet eligibility requirements on Modified Adjusted Gross Income.

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370

Of particular note are the 22 percent and 24 percent brackets. Since on a joint return these brackets are now twice the width of the corresponding single brackets, this newfound breadth offers a window for many middle- and upper-middle-income IRA owners to convert substantial amounts to a Roth IRA within the 22 percent or 24 percent brackets.

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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REGISTRATION PL ANT GOLFER OF TH E M ON TH

August 2, 2018

Mallard Creek Golf Club Columbia Station, OH 4-person Scramble Shot gun start 9am

Each Golf Registration Includes: • • • • • •

18 Holes of Golf Golf Cart Mobile Scoring Live Leader Board Game Day Contests Driving Range

• • • •

Continental Breakfast Lunch Dinner Beverages

18th Annual OLA Scholarship Golf Classic 2018 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/19/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Firm _______________________________________________________ Contact ____________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________________________________ State ___________ Zip _______________ Phone (______)____________________ Fax (______)____________________ Email ___________________________________________

NAME OF GOLFER (Correct Name is Mandatory or Forfeit Shall Occur)

COMPANY

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

2

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

3

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

4

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

wName of Team Captain _____________________________

Email Address of Team Captain __________________________________

1

PAYMENT INFORMATION

Register Today!

...

On or Before July 12 – $100 per person After July 12 – $110 per person

Number of Golfers

____

X $ ___

= $ ______

Don’t Golf? Join us for dinner!

...

$30 each

Number of Dinner Only

____

X $30

= $ ______

Tee Sponsorship (includes signage)

...

$100

Number of Tees

____

X $100

= $ ______

TOTAL

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

REGISTER ATof The Ohio Landscape Association 18 | OfficialONLINE Publication OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/OLAGOLF

$ ______


GOLF SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES DINNER SPONSOR

TROPHIES SPONSOR

CLOSEST TO THE PIN SPONSOR

LUNCH SPONSOR

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST SPONSOR

CORNHOLE SPONSOR

POKER TOURAMENT

HOLE-IN-ONE SPONSOR

LONG PUTT CONTEST SPONSOR

LONG DRIVE CONTEST SPONSOR

DRIVING RANGE SPONSOR

BEVERAGE CART SPONSORS

AVAILABLE AVAILABLE

Thank You

TO OUR MAJOR AND CONTEST SPONSORS Sponsorship Opportunities We are excited to be holding our 18th annual golf outing at Mallard Creek Golf Club on August 2, 2018. But, we need your help to make it a success! This event helps to generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call us to find out more about sponsorship features and benefits. Tee Sponsorships

(Your company name will appear on a sign at your designated tee)

Door Prize(s) Please Specify: Item(s) will be:  shipped to OLA

Beverage Cart

$100

(Your company name will appear on a sign on cart)

$500

 dropped off at OLA

Cash Donation $ Let us shop for you!

CONTACT INFORMATION Name Company Address City State

Zip Code

Phone Email Address

Payment Information

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


FOR SAFETY SAK E

IT’S TICK SEASON HOW TO PROTECT WORKERS FROM LYME DISEASE As you send workers out to a lawn care landscaping job, it is important to make sure they are mindful of ticks—little critters found in grasses and wooded areas that can carry bacteria that cause potentially debilitating conditions including Lyme disease. Just last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said there were about 300,000 new cases of Lyme disease each year in the U.S., more than 10 times previous estimates. Lyme disease is rapidly growing and expanding its reach, and has been reported in all states except Hawaii. Initially, Lyme disease may cause headaches, flu-like symptoms, joint pain, fatigue and sometimes, but not always, a skin rash. Symptoms can progressively worsen as there are typically three stages of the disease. Unfortunately each progressive stage becomes more and more difficult to treat. People with late stage Lyme suffer for years with symptoms that can include paralysis; agonizing joint pain; nervous system problems; severe headaches; problems with memory, hearing and vision; inflammation of the brain; and inflammation of the heart. Last year, the CDC reported three deaths directly attributed to Lyme disease. However, Lyme disease is treatable in most cases, if caught early.

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Because ticks that spread Lyme are typically no larger than a sesame seed (or even the size of a period at the end of a sentence), it’s important not only to look for ticks but also to know the early symptoms of Lyme disease. Diagnosis can be challenging. The current “gold standard” test for Lyme disease misses up to 60 percent of cases of early stage Lyme, leaving at least 440,000 Americans suffering from its debilitating later stage symptoms, according to Bay Area Lyme Foundation estimates. One of the biggest myths of Lyme disease is that it’s easy to diagnose because of the tell-tale bull’s eye—but, in some states less than half of people with Lyme get a visible rash, and only some of those rashes resemble a bull’s eye.

continued on page 22


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FOR SAFETY SAK E

continued from page 20 So, what can you do to protect yourself and your employees? Fortunately, there are several tactics to prevent ticks from latching on and reduce the risk of Lyme disease on the job: • Wear lighted colored clothing that makes it easier to spot ticks. • Cover up as much as possible—wear long sleeves, tuck pants into socks and wear a hat. • Consider using insect repellent with DEET on your skin and permethrin on your clothing. Permethrin lasts up to six weeks, even after several washes. • Do regular tick checks of your body, especially common areas where ticks tend to hide, including under arms, around ears, inside belly button, behind knees and especially in your hair. • Check clothing and any gear, as ticks will catch a ride on equipment and clothes to make their way into homes. • Redo tick checks after three days. If you’ve missed any ticks the first time around and they’ve had a chance to feed on you, they will be bigger and easier to spot.

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

If you find a tick that has latched on, remove it carefully: • Use tweezers and gently tug straight up from skin – it may take two or three tries. • Save the tick in a plastic bag and store in the freezer to have it tested in case you develop symptoms of Lyme. Keeping tweezers, DEET, and permethrin on hand at a job site; encouraging workers to do tick checks and know the symptoms of this condition; and offering light-colored uniforms are some of the ways employers may be able to help prevent Lyme disease.

This article was written by Ana Thompson and had originally appeared on LandscapeManagement.net. At the time, Thomson was the executive director of the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, a national non-profit organization dedicated to making Lyme disease easy to diagnose and simple to cure. Visit them online at https://www.bayarealyme.org/ to learn more.


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SN OW & ICE M A NAG E M E N T

SP O N S O R S HI HIP EVENT SPONSORS A & A HYDAULIC EQUIPMENT

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT OPPORTUNITIES

ABRAXUS SALT

The OLA would like to invite you to participate in our 2018 Snow & Ice Management Clinic! Our Snow & Ice Management Clinic is a can’t miss event for anyone in, or thinking about being in the snow and ice business. Designed for both business owners and employees, the clinic will include group discussions and great information from snow and ice industry experts.

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Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties are available to ALL Green Industry suppliers, including non snow and ice related businesses. All Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunities opportunties include: include:

• • • • • •

Your choice of exhibit size. (Subject to availability. See below for more details.) Your company name displayed on signage at the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on all email communications promoting the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on the Snow & Ice Clinic landing page of our industry website. Your company will be recognized at the event and will have the opportunity to pass out marketing materials to attendees. A complimentary copy of the event attendee list, including attendee’s company name, contact person, mailing address & phone number. BOOTH/EXHIBIT SIZES

Booths will be sold on a first-come, first serve basis. Exhibitors may set up their booths beginning August 23 at 7:00 am. and have until 8:00 am to complete set-up. All exhibit spaces will be located outdoors on pavement and should be interactive for attendees.

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Includes: • 10 x 10 Exhibit Space • 2 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 20 x 30 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 30 x 40 or 20 x 60 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

SPOTS REMAIN

PLEASE NOTE: 10 x 10 booths are for TABLETOP DISPLAYS ONLY. Absolutely no equipment will be permited in a 10 x 10 booth. 20 x 60 booths will be created by combining (2) 20 x 30 booths. The same can be done for extra 30 x 40 booths.

2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / BOOTH SPACE IS LIMITED

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

BOOTH SIZE REQUESTED REQUESTED

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 20x30 Outdoor Exhibit Space Space

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SN OW & IC E M A NAG E M E NT

R EG IS T R ATI O N SNOW BUSINESS SUCCESS

Whether you’re an owner, operations manager, dispatcher, or anyone in between, this is a can’t miss event for any company focused on improving how they handle the “white side” of their business. Attendees will be treated to a diverse and interesting range of speakers, a mini trade show, roundtable discussions with their peers, a drawing for prizes and more. REGISTER NOW!

PRESENTERS Kevin Gilbride / Accredited Snow Contractor’s Association (ASCA)

EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 23, 2018 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

The Accredited Snow Contractors Association is a trade association with the purpose of advancing the professional snow and ice management industry. Kevin will be discussing the benefits of ASCA certification and ISO certification and what it can do for your company.

9:00AM - 5:00 PM CLINIC

Dale Keep / Ice and Snow Technologies, Inc. (IST) Dale’s consulting and training experience includes subjects of; bidding methods, overall operations, equipment operations, routing, priorities, and chemical deicers. He will be discussing how liquids work, when to use them, what equipment is needed and how to manage them.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 08/09/18 - $99 AFTER 08/09/18 - $129

Christopher Matta / Deputy Chief Engineer at Ohio Turnpike

NON MEMBERS

Chris directs the major civil engineering, maintenance activities and associated personnel for the Ohio Turnpike’s Engineering and Maintenance Department. He will discuss why the Turnpike Commission uses liquids and what they have found to be their primary benefits.

BEFORE 08/09/18 - $149 AFTER 08/09/18 - $179 Special Price!

Register one person from your company and each additional person from the same company is only an additional $69!

Speaker TBD / EnviroTech Services A speaker from EnviroTech Services will provide a scientific presentation concerning the use of liquids with rock salt and how it will reduce materials consumption. They will be providing live demonstrations on how liquid works with ice.

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 08/16/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

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4

THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #4 / DOING THE BUSINESS

The Customer’s Experience

This month’s article closes out the discussion on CORE 4 Doing the Business. Last month we covered the tangible part of the customer’s experience – delivering what you promised and maintaining a healthy margin. This month we deal with the other side of the issue – how did the customer experience working with you. In fact, it is about their entire experience – from seeing your marketing materials on the web to dealing with sales and having services performed. One of our maxims about customer service is “the right customer is always right.” Don’t misunderstand what we are saying – all customers are to be treated with dignity and respect – but sometimes you take on business to fill holes in the schedule. The challenge is most are not good fits. The perfect customer is someone making a buying decision soon, has the financial ability to afford you, and most importantly creates little friction in your system. What is the friction? Friction are requests that require your crews do it differently than the processes built in CORE 2. Every time you do something special, the chances for mistakes increase – leading to complaints, rework etc., and decreased margins. As much as possible, define your perfect customer, build processes around them, and put all of your marketing and sales efforts into closing just them. Both your service reputation and profitability will increase. The second part of the customer experience is understanding installation or servicing of the account is only half the battle. How your crews treat customers and their property will have an enormous impact on perception. This ranges from how crews are dressed, how busy they appear to the untrained

eye, and how they leave the property at the end of the day. There is an old saying in the customer service business, “coffee stains on the flip down tray means poor engine maintenance.” Sounds crazy, but as a passenger on an airline you lack the ability to judge how well the turbines are maintained, so you look for examples of how the business is run. You don’t think it impacts perceptions? Review the last time you went out to a good restaurant and visited the restroom. If the place is a pigsty what are you imagining about the kitchen? Most of the better service companies achieve the title because they are better at avoiding the coffee stains that lead to unfair judgments. The third part of the equation is understanding the different levels of expectations. There are 3: Assumed, Expected, and Wow. Assumed are the things not discussed and you don’t get credit for doing, just hammered when you don’t. Imagine marketing materials for a restaurant touting clean knives and forks. What do you assume when you sit down for a meal? The expected is what you sold. At some point in the sales process it is all about features and benefits. If you sold it, they expect it.

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You get credit for delivering on promise and that is why it is essential notes from the sale are provided to the crew leader running a job. This leaves us with the wow. That is something the customer doesn’t expect, was not promised but is done to show how much you value their business. When we put together the book Raving Fans a few years ago, it was called Plus 1. It is not giving away something tangible, it is all in the treatment customers receive. If everybody who touches a customer looks for opportunities to PLUS 1 the experience it adds up to a 10 or 20% improvement over the competition. My last point is a recommendation – pick up the book Raving Fans and make it part of how you do business. There is more to it than what we can cover in such a short article. That said, the team at GreenMark have a passion for project management. If you want to get scheduling, job efficiency, and waste under control – reach out and we will take you through our process. There are many things you can do to improve profitability; however, if you wanted a place to start, it is here. Call us @833.RUGREEN or email greenmarkcoaching@gmail.com. Looking forward to talking with you.


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Leucothoe

LEUCOTHOE DOG-HOBBLE

Join us now, as we journey back to antiquity in search of the origin of this month’s plant name. Truth be told, many plant names come from Greek and Roman mythology – not because the ancient Greeks were naming plants – but because Greek mythology played such a major role in the educational curriculum of 18th century plant explorers. These mythological stories of gods and mortals, though more complicated than an episode of Jerry Springer, seem to have inspired explorers such as Linnaeus and Thunberg to honor the gods through the naming of plants. Children of Zeus, Apollo and his twin sister Artemis (plant genus: Artemisia) play major roles in Greek mythology. And anyone who knows anything about Apollo knows he had enough lovers to fill a whole month on Springer shows. One of these lovers, Acantha, died unexpectedly. As tribute, Apollo turned her into a sun loving plant – the origin of the genus Acanthus. Another, Daphne (plant genus: Daphne), grew tired of Apollo chasing her, so her father turned her

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

into a Laurel Tree (Laurus nobilis). This is why Apollo is always shown with a crown of Laurel around his head. Yet another, Coronis, gave birth to one of his sons – Asclepius – which is now a plant genus. One final member in Apollo’s little black book gives us the name for this month’s plant. Leucothoe, who didn’t exactly have her father’s permission to be with Apollo, was buried


alive for her actions. Leucothoe is a genus with 10 species, two of which you are most likely to see in the trade, Leucothoe fontanesiana and Leucothoe axillaris. These two species are both native to the southeastern U.S. and can be fairly difficult to tell one from the other. If anything, L. axillaris tends to be more dwarf in habit – slightly smaller leaves, smaller flowers, and smaller in overall size. Typically found in forested areas, on slopes, in very well drained soils, these plants can form solid thickets and are quite beautiful. As members of Ericaceae, these plants follow the familial traits of needing well drained, but moist soils with lower pH (closer to 5.0). There are a number of cultivars for these plants – watch the overall size by cultivar – but these tend to be compact, dense, broadleaf evergreen shrubs. In winter, the leaves take on a burgundy color, greening up in spring. New growth usually has blushes of red/pink and has a zig-zagged stem, arching out to display the foliage contrast perfectly. Flowers are white for both species. Blooms are in 2 to 3 inch long racemes that emerge from the leaf axil – where the leaf meets the stem – and hang down with many small upside down urn shaped flowers. While very attractive, they don’t jump out at you, begging for attention. They really need to be appreciated up close. These evergreen shrubs are picky about cultural conditions, and while they look beautiful in the container at the nursery, we have to be deliberate about where and how we plant them to ensure that beauty continues. They can handle full sun if everything else is perfect, but we would suggest this plant be reserved for the shade. It would be wise to amend the soil where they will be planted, to be certain there is high organic material and excellent drainage. Planting these in heavy clay will likely cause enough stress to put them in the death spiral. Leucothoe fontanesiana ‘Girard’s Rainbow’ (sometimes listed as just ‘Rainbow’) has a mixture of creamy white, pink, and copper-red new growth, which makes is very useful in a shady border, adding a pop of color in the spring. An introduction from Lake County Nursery, Leucothoe axillaris ‘Squirt’ is a neat little shrub, perfect for low maintenance clients. The dwarf habit stays under 2 feet tall and will slowly spread to maybe 3 to 4 feet wide. It has deep, glossy, green leaves that turn a deep-burgundy for the winter continued on page 30

The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 29


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 29 and mahogany-red new growth in spring. Sited in welldrained soil, this shrub should be a plant to enjoy, as it never needs pruning. It’s a perfect addition to the shrub border. The common name, while odd, is in reference to an unfortunate trait of these plants. Dog-hobble comes from the circumstance that this plant is poisonous to mammals and when eaten causes a number of issues, including loss of balance. The toxin is found in the leaves, stems, flowers, and nectar and can be fatal, if enough is consumed. That said, for clients who have dogs that have a bad habit of eating plants in the landscape, this isn’t the plant for them. We have about a dozen of ‘Girard’s Rainbow’ at home and have never had any issues with our dog or cat in over 10 years. Conversely, the toxicity of these plants has an upside, as deer tend to leave them alone for the same reason that we don’t want to eat them.

A perfect place for this plant would be on the north side of a house where it will be in constant shade. Just be sure it doesn’t get too much wind. Once cultural conditions are ideal for this plant, there should be little issues with pest or disease. In the south, they get a fungal infection that causes spots on the leaves, but doesn’t seem to be as much of an issue in zone 5. Give this unique, broadleaf evergreen a shot in one of your upcoming jobs. If you pick the right spot, it will reward clients with year round beauty and zero maintenance needs. Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in horticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES OF

Equipment Theft BY ANNE MICHELSON

Theft is an inevitable part of the landscape industry—from the occasional loss of a piece of equipment left unattended to a break-in at a maintenance yard. Contractors are enticing targets for theft because they have a lot of valuable equipment that is easy for thieves to move. There is typically little documentation available on landscaping equipment, and unlike cars there is no registry for people buying equipment to check with. While theft rates are higher in large cities, equipment theft can happen anywhere, even in the smallest community, and at any time of day or night. Equipment can be stolen from the job site or from your office or garage, by strangers or by your own employees. And while it is impossible to eliminate equipment theft entirely, there are many things companies can do to reduce the likelihood of theft occurring.

SECURE YOUR YARD The first line of defense against theft is to install and use adequate security devices and systems. Your own property is a prime place for theft to take place, so be sure to secure it as tightly as possible. When possible, keep equipment in an area that is well lit and easily seen from the road. Avoid privacy fences. “I know a lot of people think that privacy fences and bushes make it less likely for a thief to come onto the property, but in reality this just gives thieves cover to get to work,” says Zachery Bruce, Assistant VP of loss control at Hortica Insurance & Employee Benefits.

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Some quick tips: • Install security fences around the area where equipment will be located. • Install motion-censored security lights. • Install a security system that sends messages when motion is detected. These systems can be set up to send notifications to key employees who can act on them appropriately. If located in a high-theft area or for a company that has been hit multiple times, there are also companies that provide live video monitoring and can call the authorities immediately. Authorities may be more likely to respond quicker if they know a crime is in progress.


• If practical, consider keeping a watch dog inside your yard. Just the presence of a dog will deter most would-be burglars. Even a small dog can be effective if it is noisy enough. Rent-a-dog services are available in some areas, for business owners not willing or able to take care of a dog themselves.

SECURE YOUR LARGE EQUIPMENT Next, take steps to secure your trucks, trailers and other large equipment. Even very large, heavy equipment like backhoes and front-end loaders are stolen routinely. Sometimes this type of equipment is stolen outright. At other times, thieves use it to assist in stealing other valuable items, such as ATM machines. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that no one would steal a vehicle as conspicuous as a truck and trailer emblazoned with your company name. They will, if only because it’s a convenient way to steal the thousands of dollars worth of equipment inside. Very typically, thieves will empty out the contents and abandon the truck. However, don’t count on your equipment being returned. In 2014, only 23 percent of stolen heavy equipment was recovered, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau 2014 Heavy Equipment Theft Report. Take these steps to keep your large equipment secure: • Always lock your vehicles, even if you are working nearby. • Install hitch locks on your trailers to prevent unauthorized people from hitching up and hauling a trailer away. • Install steering wheel locks or similar specialized locking devices that can be used to make equipment more difficult to drive away with. • Install hidden shut-offs to prevent the equipment from starting up. • Rekey high-value equipment. “Almost all equipment is sold with generic keys that can be obtained easily by thieves,” says Bruce. “Then all they have to do is take the keys and drive away with the equipment. Thieves can buy a set of equipment keys from Ebay for $30 to $200 and start just about any piece of equipment on the market. For a little under $200 you can get 181 equipment keys.” • Another option is to install a keyless ignition device that requires a passcode. • Install a GPS tracking device on valuable large equipment. • If you have to leave equipment unattended for several days (for instance, over a long holiday weekend), consider removing vehicle batteries and/or wheels.

SECURE YOUR SMALL EQUIPMENT Securing your trucks and trailers is also the first step to small equipment loss prevention. Small equipment such as trimmers, blowers, chainsaws and gas cans are prime targets for thieves. Such items are easily carried away, easy to hide, easy to sell and once gone are very difficult to track. In fact, small equipment theft may be more common than anyone knows. Small-value theft often goes under the radar because it isn’t typically something that is turned in to the insurance company. Most losses go unreported unless there are multiple pieces stolen, because the value of many small equipment pieces frequently is less than the insurance deductible. Even if it is insurable, many owners don’t think to take advantage of the insurance for a small item. The key to protecting your small equipment, says Bruce, is to do whatever you can to make it difficult for an unauthorized person to get anywhere near it. “All too often when we perform loss control site visits or receive claims it’s due to a crime of opportunity,” he says. “This means equipment is left in the open at a jobsite, or trailers and vehicles have not been continued on page 34 secured.” The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 33


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 33 Consider the following tips to protect your small equipment: • Whenever possible, store equipment inside a building. This may mean taking it out of the trailer or sometimes the trailers can be parked in a building. • If you have to leave equipment in a vehicle, try to strategically park your truck or trailer to make it harder to access the equipment. • Mark or paint your equipment with distinctive colors. “I just visited a landscaper that had painted blue and red strips on all of their equipment and they told me how they ran across a truck on the side of the road that had their equipment markings,” he says. “They called the police and arrested the person (who turned out to be a prior employee). After the arrest they searched the employee’s home and found even more stolen equipment.” • Keep your small equipment in locked boxes or cages inside your secure areas. • If smaller pieces such as generators or compressors have to be left unattended on site, consider leaving them close together inside a ring of larger equipment. This type of “wagon wheel” configuration makes the equipment less accessible and more difficult to remove. • You might also consider locking pieces of equipment together and/or to larger equipment or to a building, fence or tree.

RECORD/REGISTER YOUR EQUIPMENT Besides physical measures, one of the most prudent things you can do is to keep an accurate, up-to-date inventory of every piece of equipment you own. Keeping a written record of equipment and its corresponding serial numbers pays off in multiple ways. It simplifies the question of what equipment is where and who has it. It allows the company to verify ownership of stolen equipment should it be recovered by authorities. As an added bonus, it also helps to make sure that the company is not repairing equipment that may still be under warranty. Some of the things you should keep records of include: • Make and model number • Serial number • Date and location of purchase • Photograph(s) of the item • A list of authorized users • Warranty information Many smaller pieces of equipment do not come with serial numbers. In this case, you can create your own by engraving an

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

identifying number on them. Be sure to list in your inventory where this number can be found if it is not obvious by looking at the equipment. It is also a good idea to register whatever equipment you can with the National Equipment Register.

CHOOSE YOUR JOBS CAREFULLY While criminal activity can occur anywhere, it tends to be more prevalent in some neighborhoods than others. If a customer is located in a bad part of town, think twice before accepting the job. By the same token, if you start noticing a missing equipment trend for accounts in a particular area, consider whether it might be better to drop those accounts. No one likes to lose or turn down business, but if the risk is too great you may be better off without them.

CREATE A THEFT PREVENTION PLAN Ultimately, the effectiveness of most anti-theft precautions depends on how well they are used/followed. Training your employees in theft prevention best practices is critical. Many companies find that having a written protocol helps keep employees on track. If you already have an employee manual, you can easily incorporate your anti-theft measures into it. Otherwise you can create a manual just for this purpose. Some of the things you may want to implement include: • Determine who is responsible for what. For example, you might want to require that every employee lock down their equipment inside the truck when they are not using it. Supervisors may be held responsible for making sure all equipment is returned and locked up at the end of the day. • Use sign-out sheets. These not only allow you to track who had a piece of equipment last, but signing their names to an article can also make picking up a piece of equipment a conscious act. • Systematize inventory records. Have a system for keeping and updating equipment records, including serial numbers and locations. You might want to take advantage of one of the several tool and asset management software packages on the market. • Implement equipment security training. Make sure every employee is aware of the danger of equipment theft, and inform them of the best practices for preventing it. • Require employee uniforms. If your employees always wear distinctive clothing it is harder for unauthorized personnel to approach your equipment unnoticed. continued on page 36


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F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 34

RALLY YOUR ALLIES Theft doesn’t just affect your business, it affects your entire community. Don’t hesitate to ask others in your community to help you prevent criminal activity. In particular, you will want to cultivate a good relationship with local law enforcement. Be sure that if and when a theft is discovered, you notify the police immediately. The longer a theft goes unreported, the less likely that you will recover your assets. You can also include your clients and/or their neighbors in your theft prevention plan. Inform them when you will be servicing their properties, as well as the appearance of your trucks and employees. Provide them with the appropriate numbers to call if they notice anything suspicious. They will appreciate your concern about security, as they also own valuable property that is subject to theft.

COVER YOUR ASSETS Finally, no discussion of equipment theft would be complete without mentioning insurance. The time to think about coverage is before you have equipment stolen, not after. Too often, a contractor reports missing equipment only to find that his insurance won’t cover the loss.

36 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

When shopping for insurance, compare the details of different policies. What categories of equipment are covered? Does the policy you are considering cover full replacement costs or depreciated value? What about leased, borrowed or rented equipment – whether it’s equipment you are renting or items you might rent out to third parties? Ask, too, about the insurance company’s average response time to claims. Missing equipment can cost valuable time on the job, and it may be worth slightly higher rates in exchange for quick replacement coverage. You may even consider business interruption coverage. This will reimburse you for lost profits in the event that stolen equipment prevents you from earning the income you expected. Equipment theft is, unfortunately, a fact of life in the landscaping business. But you really can stop most theft before it happens. It just takes smart planning and constant vigilance.

This article originally ran in the April 2016 issue of Turf Magazine (https:// www.turfmagazine.com). Anne Michelsen is a freelance writer based in the Midwest. She has been writing for the landscape-related topics since 2011.


D I RECTI ON S

THE LABOR SHORTAGE IS TAKING ITS TOLL

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

I am pretty sure that all of you would agree that it isn’t easy to find good employees, especially this year. Unemployment is lower than it has been in almost 50 years – at 3.8% – leaving more job openings than there are unemployed people to fill them. To make matters worse in the landscape profession, our government has failed to provide a sufficient number of H2B Visas to meet the needs of ALL seasonal service industry businesses. While some of you may use the H2B program, and others of you may not, we are all affected by the supply and demand issues caused by the lack of an available, legal workforce. It begins with contractors who only hire locals having a drastically lower pool to choose from, which in-turn can lead to employees migrating from one company to the next. And if there are less employees out there doing the work – the mulching, planting, building and mowing – then there are less supplies and equipment being purchased. It is a vicious circle where many of you who sell products and/or services to landscape companies have probably already noticed you’re not getting as many orders as you normally would. My heart breaks for companies that have worked for so many years to develop a good book of business and a great reputation, only to be punished for trying to follow the law. At OLA, we have continued to speak to our legislators to drive home the message of the irreparable harm being caused by the lack of visas. We have also been working with media outlets to get our story out. On June 3, we were featured as the front page story in the Akron Beacon Journal, which was then picked

up the next day by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Elyria Chronicle, and online at U.S. News. The following day, June 4, our local ABC affiliate – News Channel 5 in Cleveland – ran a story about the labor shortage. On June 5, The Canton Repository interviewed a couple of our members on this same topic and on June 7, Channel 5 did a follow up story about the trickle-down effect of the lack of seasonal workers. Here is what a few of our legislators had to say in the June 7 story, by Homa Bash of ABC News 5: In a statement, Ohio Senator Rob Portman’s spokeswoman, Emily Benavides, told News 5 that the senator supports the visa program. Portman supports the H2B visa program and has been pushing the Trump administration to utilize the authority granted to DHS to issue H2B visas above the cap. Since Portman’s questioning of Secretary Nielsen last month, DHS has allowed an additional 15,000 H2B visas to be issued. Portman believes this is a step in the right direction, but would like to see more H2B visas issued in a safe and secure manner. continued on page 38 The Growing Concern | July 2018 | 37


F TH E M O N A TDH V ER T IS ING INDEX

23

Abraxus /Royalton Supply Landscape Center

15

All Organic Mulch, LLC

6

Bernie Credon Property

35 9

Botson Insurance Group, Inc. Cascade Lighting Inc.

21

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

31

Fairlawn/Medina Landscape Supply

26

John Allin Consulting, Inc.

9

Klyn Nurseries, Inc.

15

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

23

Medina Sod Farms, Inc.

31

Millcreek Gardens

39

NGLCO

33

O’Reilly Equipment, LLC.

13

Premier Plant Solutions

23

Shearer Equipment

17

Snowfighters Institute

31

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

2

Unilock

21

Valley City Supply

11

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

29

Zoresco Equipment Company

38 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

DI RECTI ON S Sen. Sherrod Brown’s spokeswoman, Jennifer Donohue, sent News 5 the following statement: Senator Brown believes this visa program should be examined as part of an overall fix to our broken immigration system. He understands that some employers have a legitimate need for seasonal workers, and he also believes reforms are needed to make sure these programs are structured in a way that doesn’t bring down wages for all workers. Congressman David Joyce sent the following statement: Our nation’s immigration system is broken, there is no denying that, and it is wrongfully punishing employers who want to hire those who can come to this country legally to work hard and contribute. There is an increasing need for the H2B visa program in our communities across the country, yet the visa cap has not increased with that growing demand. For the first time ever, there are now more job openings in our country than job seekers, so the demand for qualified and determined employees is even higher now. The opportunities are out there, but per usual, the federal government is standing in the way of good programs that work. We will continue to advocate on behalf of the green industry and our suppliers. I will be attending the NALP Legislative Day on the Hill and invite anyone and everyone to participate. I will help you set up your appointments with legislators and will personally attend as many of those appointments as possible.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS Caines & Associates Landscape Management 3300 Talbot Place Columbus, OH 43223 614-824-0333 Nicholas & Alexis Caines Paradigm Property Enhancements 5161 W. 161 Street Brookpark, OH 44142 216-801-0236 Todd Bates


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RULES, REGULATIONS & ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE @ OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG

The Growing Concern July 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern July 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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