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Growing Concern

The

F EBRUAR Y 2 0 1 8

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

Landscape Business Legal Clinic

February 15, 2018 / Crown Center in Independence, OH PAGE 7

Landscape Business Bootcamp

February 22, 2018 / Indiana Wesleyan University PAGE 18

SketchUp Design Workshop

March 1, 2018 / Indiana Wesleyan University PAGE 13


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

BE THE LEADER YOU NEEDED As I wake up this morning, I have many blessings to count: my family, my friends, my health and my career – only to name a few. I have always worked for a green grower and thought the work I accomplished was very similar to that of the landscape professional’s. Both business models rely on each other, we are busy year round with projects, we both use plant materials, and snow can be a benefit to – or the demise of – our client base. That’s probably where the line stops, though. Or, is it? Green Professionals also draw people from the same pool of employees. Unfortunately, that pool is getting smaller every year. We rely on the person who doesn’t want to sit behind a desk, loves the outdoors and doesn’t mind getting their hands dirty. We also want them to have a valid driver’s license, be able to do simple math and have good communication skills. In the end, we all just really want to hire qualified employees. Sounds easy enough, right? Ahhh, reality. So, who are these employees and how are they being properly trained? What if I told you that the average nursery employee is 60 years old? Yes, 60. They are Baby Boomers getting ready to retire. It’s pretty scary when you think about the years to come and where the plants will come from, right? Where are the GenXers? The Millennials? The GenZ’s? Well, some work in the landscape profession, but we keep hearing the complaints about their work ethic – legitimate, or not. And, many from these generations won’t pursue a career in our professions because their moms and dads frown upon it, feeling that the landscaper who cuts grass for a living won’t be able to feed his/her family. Last time I checked, many of us who have put our time in have luxury items and comfortable lifestyles, no? No matter what employment pool you decide to take advantage of we all need good people with great attitudes. We want them to treat our businesses as if they were their own. Not everyone hired feels that way. Many have learned

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

to take shortcuts that can be dangerous to themselves and/ or costly to our businesses. So the question is, “What have you done to train your employees to be the best they can be?” Have you worked beside them to learn more than you did in the interview process – to find out what attributes they REALLY possess? Many of us think we know what we are good at. Out of college, I thought I was going to be the best propagator around – possibly even do some research and development. And you know what? I was wrong. But, only one person ever looked at me and told me the truth. They said, “Marie, you talk too much. You are way too bubbly, and you are always looking to have fun. That is NOT what makes a good production professional. You should find a grower that needs a sales professional, so you can put those talents to good use and prosper.” At the time, I thought it was a slap in the face, but in reality – as I look back – he was the only boss who took the time to train me, work beside me, and to get to know what my strengths and weaknesses were. The only thing it cost him was time. Time to make sure he had me and my peers in the positions that best suited our abilities, which in-turn made his business more successful. An interesting side effect; his stress levels, along with the stress levels of all his employees, went down because we were placed in positions that we not only loved, but could succeed in. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr.

COVER: Landscape Ohio! Award Program submission from Jackie Ansara Landscape.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Be the Leader You Needed

9 PERENNIAL FOCUS

Jazzing Up the Perennial Garden: Variegated Perennials for Shade

14 FISCAL FITNESS

Where Should You Contribute? 401(k) vs. Roth IRA

19 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

4 CORE Elements to Business Success: Cash Flow Management

20 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Hypothermia and Frostbite

24 PLANT OF THE MONTH Crataegus Species: Hawthorn

28 FEATURE ARTICLE

How the New Tax Legislation May Affect Your Tax Bill

34 DIRECTIONS 35 ADVERTISING INDEX 35 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

FEBRUARY

MARCH

FEBRUARY 2 -11, 2018 GREAT BIG HOME AND GARDEN

MARCH 1, 2018 SKETCHUP FOR BEGINNERS

Explore this year’s music themed gardens, created by some of Northeast Ohio’s top landscapers. If you are interested in volunteering to help staff the garden during show hours, please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible. Spots fill up quickly.

Don’t have the time necessary to learn how to use complicated design software? SketchUp is hands-down the most intuitive, not to mention powerful, easy-to-learn 3D drawing tool on the planet. Join us as we cover the basic tools, their uses, and challenges associated with creating a finished landscape model. See page 13 for more details.

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 BUSINESS LEGAL CLINIC Contracts / Hiring & Firing Having solid contracts and understanding the laws when hiring employees are paramount to running a good business and avoiding devastating lawsuits. Join us and learn the elements of a good contract and how to avoid litigation. In addition, we will discuss the importance of a solid employee handbook and methods of fighting unemployment. See page 7 for more details.

FEBRUARY 22, 2018 LANDSCAPE BUSINESS BOOTCAMP Spend a day with business owners who have done it as they walk you through the core concepts of building a better business. This program is meant for business owners, managers, employees and anyone else seeking to improve their business expertise in the landscape industry. Held at Indiana Wesleyan University, 4100 Rockside Road in Independence, Ohio. See page 18 for more details.

MARCH 8, 2018 OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) Ultimate Networking – Learn From Your Peers When people gather together in-person to share ideas and learn from one another – the good, “old-fashioned” way – great things happen! Join us for a series of roundtable discussions covering various topics pertaining to your company and the betterment of the industry. See page 33 for more details.

MARCH 12, 2018 (NE OHIO) MARCH 13, 2018 (CENTRAL OHIO) FOREMAN TRAINING Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with employees while having to direct, motivate and critique them. In this seminar, they will learn how to more effectively handle tight deadlines, tight margins and increase customer satisfaction. See page 23 for more details.

MARCH 22, 2018 21st ANNUAL LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA Join Ohio’s landscape community for an elegant, fun evening of celebrating as we reveal the 2017 Landscape Ohio! award winners. Held at the Cleveland Botanical Garden. Includes dinner and awards presentation. Call 440.717.0002 for more info.

MARCH 22 & 23, 2018 LMN BUILD A BETTER LANDSCAPE BUSINESS SEMINAR Bring your numbers (all financials are kept confidential) and learn the simple systems proven to build more efficient, more productive landscape companies. It couldn’t be easier. In just 2 days, you’ll create real planning & estimating systems for your company, ready to be used the very next day. Use the discount code: OHAMAR2018 to save on admission. Visit www. ohiolandscapers.org/education/ lmnevent for more info.

MARCH 28, 2018 CENTRAL OHIO SPRING MEETING Drones & the Landscaping Industry Videography for promotional purposes seems to be the fastest-growing use for small unmanned aircraft in the landscape industry. Businesses typically hire an FAA-certified company, specializing in aerial photography, on a project-byproject basis, and there are good reasons for doing so. See page 30 for more details.

APRIL APRIL 5, 2018 CDL TRAINING Join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training and learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. Taught by former truck driver and state test examiner, Daryl Lengyel. See page 29 for more details.

The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3 Taking the time to know every one of your employees, personally and professionally, and giving them the opportunity to attend classes, or evening meetings, or facility tours can help keep your company psychologically fit! These opportunities shouldn’t be limited to management only, either. Isn’t the person doing the labor just as important to your company as the accountant – perhaps more? He/She is the face of who you are to your clients, and with access to the proper training – and an understanding that you care about their needs – you may be able to attract their children and friends into the green profession, if not as an employee, at least as a client. In closing, we need to make our jobs look like careers and our industry look like a profession – make our lifestyles more desirable. That starts with all of us treating it as such, and often begins with a clear path to professional development for those we intend to hire. It’s a shame that, in general, people look down on what we do for a living. No one can change that perception, but us.

On a side note, in 1964, February was proclaimed American Heart Month by Lyndon Johnson. The goal of which is to bring more awareness to heart-related diseases. Heart disease remains the number one killer in the world – yes, the world. We are an active group of people, but our lifestyles are very stressful; poor eating habits, lack of sleep, and the list goes on. Please, take the time to promote a less stressful lifestyle to your employees. Just one hour of extra exercise can reduce their – and your – risk of heart disease. Also, think about becoming a tissue/organ donor. My late husband, Darrell, gave everything he could when he was alive to better others’ lives, so it only seemed appropriate that, in the end, he would be a tissue/organ donor. He was able to better over 100 lives with this thoughtful act. I encourage you to think about doing the same.

Always, Marie McConnell

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6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


PL A N T O F T HE

OLA EDUCATION SERIES

MONTH

Sponsored by

BL BARONLAWLLC CLINIC DATE FEBRUARY 15, 2018 LOCATION CROWN CENTER 5005 ROCKSIDE ROAD LOWER LEVEL AUDITORIUM INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131 AGENDA 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM REGISTRATION 1:15 PM – 3:30 PM PROGRAM

Landscape Business Legal Clinic

CONTRACTS & HIRING AND FIRING

Having solid contracts and understanding the laws when hiring employees are paramount to running a good business and avoiding devastating lawsuits. Under Ohio law, you may be personally subjected to 3x damages for failing to include the right consumer language in your contract. Join us February 15, 2018 and learn the elements of a good contract and how to avoid litigation. In addition, we will discuss the importance of a solid employee handbook and methods of fighting unemployment. Contracts • Understanding Consumer Law • Avoid Potential Lawsuits • Structure of Good Contracts

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 02/01/18 – $50 AFTER 02/01/18 – $65

PRESENTER DAN BARON ATTORNEY

Dan A. Baron is an estate planning and business attorney practicing in the greater Cleveland area. He is a member of the Ohio Bar Association, West Shore Bar Association, and Cleveland Metro Bar Association. Dan’s passion for helping individuals and business owners plan for the future has stemmed from owning a landscape construction company for over 15 years. As an active member of the Green Industry, Dan has learned first-hand the importance of asset protection and succession planning. Dan also holds a five star rating on Avvo and has written articles of legal scholarship.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/01/18 – $65 AFTER 02/01/18 – $80 GUESTS – $25

Clinic attendees are permitted to bring guests with them at the cost of $25 per guest. All guests must be employed by the same company as the primary attendee.

Hiring and Firing • Discrimination Laws • Beating Unemployment • Employee Handbooks

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 LANDSCAPE BUSINESS LEGAL CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 02/8/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S) AND GUESTS

FEE

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Unilock/Uvision 3D Landscape Creator Software INTERMEDIATE to ADVANCED Workshop Go more in depth with UVision 3D Landscape Creator and learn how to fully utilize the software to it’s capabilities. This seminar is for users that are at an intermediate to advanced skill level and have completed at least 3 to 4 designs with the software.

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8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Otherwise known as ‘Lord and Ladies,’ Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ is a fascinating plant in that it is summer dormant and waits until cool weather to emerge.

JAZZING UP THE PERENNIAL GARDEN VARIEGATED PERENNIALS FOR SHADE

As I mentioned last month, now is a great time to start thinking about changes to make in the garden. Depending on the weather, you may or may not be able to see the ground and the dormant plants, assuming that you did not cut everything down. This month, I am continuing the discussion by featuring perennials with variegated foliage for shade. There are so many that I’ll only be able to tell you about some of my favorites. I’ll begin with Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ (Variegated Italian Arum), with its unusual life cycle. It has beautiful leaves, a different flower, and fantastic fruit. It is a clumper that increases slowly. It’s definitely hardy to zone 6 and probably to zone 5.

Let’s start with the life cycle. Unlike most herbaceous plants, Arum italicum foliates in early fall. The leaves are quite visible during the winter (unless covered by snow) and spring. In May, a creamy-yellow spadix cupped by a spathe of green, quite similar to that of Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-Pulpit), appears. After flowering, the leaves disappear, leaving only the flowering stalk which is relatively inconspicuous. Do not deadhead the spadix or you will miss the show. Gradually, the stalk develops large green berries. Then, suddenly, in late July continued on page 10 The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 9


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and early August, there is an orange-red, large berried “stick.” Normally, the berries last well into the fall but unknown creatures that inhabit my garden have been surreptitiously eating the berries, leaving only a yellow stick. I may have to surround the berries with chicken wire! The leaves are large and triangular. There are several cultivars with mottled, spotted or white-veined foliage. I am a great fan of the cultivars with white veins because they illuminate the shade and provide contrast to those plants with green foliage. Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ is a tuber that can be planted in fall or spring. It grows in partial to full shade in moist soil. With sufficient moisture, the stalks can grow 20” high but in my garden, it generally grows 12” high. This is an excellent plant to use with Hosta because the Arum leaves disappear just when the Hosta leaves are finally foliating.

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Asarum splendens (Chinese Wild Ginger) never goes dormant; it is, in fact, evergreen and rhizomatous. Its semi-shiny, arrowshaped, somewhat small leaves rarely grow taller than 6” and have silvery mottling. The dark purple, spring-blooming flowers hide in the leaves so are hard to see. That’s not a bad thing because, frankly, I think the flowers are nothing to write home about. Hardy to zone 5, this is another shade perennial that prefers moist soil but will survive quite well in drier sites. A third variegated perennial for shade is Polygonatum odoratum ‘Variegatum’ (Variegated Solomon’s Seal). It was the Perennial Plant Association 2013 Plant of the Year. This all-season perennial provides interest for the entire growing season. It has small, creamy white bells that dangle from the leaf nodes of arching, unbranched stems, variegated foliage that turns golden yellow in the fall, and small blue-black fruits that are charming but not spectacular. It requires at least partial shade and will tolerate heavy shade.


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

1

2

3

3 4 3

Hardy in zones 3-8, Polygonatum odoratum ‘Variegatum’ grows 24” to 36” inches tall. It is rhizomatous and forms colonies within a few years if ample moisture is supplied. Division will not be necessary for many years but I would plant at least three, spacing them a foot apart, since spread is slow. Last, but not least of the variegated perennials for shade, is Heuchera (Alum Root), hardy to zone 4. There are several cultivars, among them ‘Snow Angel’ (green sprinkled with white) and ‘Glitter’ (silver with dark veins). Morning sun is fine for these cultivars but afternoon sun will scorch them. Provide plenty of moisture for best success. Almost everyone has some shade perfect for these perennials.

6

VARIEGATED PERENNIALS FOR SHADE 1. When the cold weather has become too much your spring and summer beauties, Arum emerges to take over the show. Its beautiful arrow shaped leaves are mottled with white veins that seem to catch sunlight and reflect it back in the winter garden. 2. The elongated, heart-shaped, dark green leaves of Asarum splendens (Chinese Wild Ginger) look and feel as if they were made out of Naugahyde and splashed with metallic paint. 3. Polygonatum odoratum is a shade-loving perennial that typically grows 18-24” tall on low, gracefully arching, angled (as opposed to cylindrical), unbranched stems. It is native to Europe and Asia. 4. Heuchera ‘Blondie’ is considered a breakthrough because of its yellow flowers. But, do not be concerned lovers of foliage plants, it still has those colorful leaves that you have come to associate with this genus.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD).

The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 11


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COURSE DATE MARCH 1, 2018

Introduction to SketchUp: Design Workshop

LOCATION INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

SketchUp is a 3D modeling computer program for a wide range of drawing applications such as architectural, interior design, landscape architecture, civil and mechanical engineering, film and video game design.

AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM INSTRUCTION 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM LUNCH (PROVIDED) 12:00 PM – 12:45 PM

LEARNING THE BASICS

This class will focus on introducing new users to SketchUp with the idea of using it to model landscapes. We will cover the basic tools, their uses, and challenges as well as walking through the steps to create a finished landscape model, complete with a house, landscape features, and plants. We will also touch on setting up the model to export as an image. Participants will be required to bring their own laptop computer with a wired or wireless mouse with scroll wheel and will need to download the free version of SketchUp prior to the class. Full instructions will be provided when you register.

INSTRUCTION 12:45 PM – 4:00 PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 02/15/18 – $129 AFTER 02/15/18 – $159 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/15/18 – $159 AFTER 02/15/18 – $189

PRESENTER

Josh has been a vital part of the Pattie Group design team for over 15 years. He utilizes a technical knowledge of AutoCAD and 3D modeling, as well an ability to create elegant and dynamic landscapes. With an approach to design that balances aesthetics and sustainability, Josh has transformed many properties in northeast Ohio into distinctive living spaces.

JOSHUA TOOKER, ASLA SENIOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

Sam Randall is a Junior Landscape Designer with The Pattie Group. Sam holds a B.S. in Landscape Management from Brigham Young University and an M.A. in Landscape Architecture from the University of Illinois. He is an Eagle Scout and an NALP Landscape Industry Certified Manager. Sam enjoys spending time with his wife and three young children.

PRESENTER

SAM RANDALL JUNIOR LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SKETCHUP CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 02/22/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

6

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card CEU’S

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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

WHERE SHOULD YOU CONTRIBUTE? 401(k) vs. Roth IRA

Here is a question I have been asked many times in the past couple years… “I contribute 10% to my 401(k) and my employer matches the first 4%. I also contribute to a Roth IRA. Should I just contribute to one or the other?” 401(k)s and Roth IRAs each offer something worthwhile, but slightly different and having both in your retirement-planning might be better than having just one. Among the many advantages 401(k)s offer is that they make saving for retirement easy. The money comes right out of your paycheck. You also get an immediate tax break in that the money you contribute isn’t taxed until you withdraw it, preferably during retirement. Most employers match funds, perhaps the first 4% of what you contribute. Finally, 401(k)s have relatively high contribution limits. Federal law allows you

to contribute up to $18,500 in 2018, plus up to an additional $6,000 if you’re 50 or older. So a 401(k) clearly should be a cornerstone of your retirement planning. On the other hand, a Roth IRA has some great features too. You don’t get a tax break upfront since you’re investing aftertax dollars, but you do get one at the end. You can withdraw your contributions and earnings tax-free provided you meet the withdrawal requirements. continued on page 17

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 15


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FI SCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 14 The Roth IRA contributions limits are lower than those in a 401(k) – $5,500 this year, plus another $1,000 if you’re 50 or older. Of course, you’ve got to meet the eligibility requirements (phased out at $135,000 Adjusted Gross Income if single: $199,000 AGI if filing married) to contribute. Conversion from an existing Traditional IRA is another idea. But as attractive as these plans are individually, they work even better as a pair. With a 401(k), you’re avoiding tax on your contribution today, but paying tax on withdrawals in the future. That means a 401(k) works best if you think your tax rate is higher today than it will be in the future. You’re avoiding taxes at a higher rate and paying them at a lower one. The reverse is true of a Roth, where you’re paying tax on your contribution today and avoiding taxes in the future. Thus, a Roth is a better deal when you expect your taxes will be higher in the future since you’re paying the lower tax bill today instead of tomorrow’s higher one. We can never be certain whether our tax rate will be higher or lower in the future. Even if you expect that your income will be lower in retirement, you may also lose lots of deductions (mortgage interest, retirement-plan contributions) that could result in a higher rate. But by putting money in both a 401(k) and a Roth IRA, you’re hedging your bets. Having different pots of money taxed different ways gives you more flexibility in managing your income in retirement. If, for example, withdrawals from a 401(k) combined with Social Security and other income are about to push you into a higher tax bracket in a given year, you can always dip into your Roth. So how can you maximize the advantages of both savings plans?

Start by contributing enough to your 401(k) to get the full employer match. This will give you the biggest bang for your 401(k) bucks: the convenience of payroll deductions, the upfront tax break and your employer’s matching funds (free money). Next, contribute as much as you can to a Roth IRA, up to the limit. By taking this step, you get the advantage of tax-free withdrawals down the road, plus you get the tax diversification. If you still save more money after this, then funnel your additional savings into your 401(k) until you reach the contribution limit. You won’t be getting the bonus of an employer match, but you’ll still get the convenience of payroll deductions, plus your money will grow without the drag of taxes until you withdraw it. In any case, that’s the strategy in a nutshell: do the 401(k) to the full match, then the Roth, back to the 401(k) and, if you can save still more, look for good options in taxable accounts. If you do this on a regular basis, you should not only have a nice fat nest egg when you retire, you should also gain some decent maneuvering room for reducing the tax bite on withdrawals from that nest egg during retirement. Consult with your financial and tax advisors for information specific to your individual situation. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office. 7601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370

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The Growing Concern | Febru- The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 17 ary 2018 | 17


BootCamp Introduction GREENMARK L A N D S C A P E

S N O W

I R R I G AT I O N

N U R S E R Y

PL ANT O F TH E MEDUCATION ON TH OLA SERIES GMCG developed a proprietary Landscape Business BootCamp Platform which offers a combination of business and

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LANDSCAPE BUSINESS BOOTCAMP

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GREENMARK B U S I N E S S

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L A N D S C A P E

• Increase your customer loyalty

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• Expand your market or service offerings

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• Define a branding strategy, market position and sales pipeline

GUIDE IT • RUN IT • GET IT •DO IT • Manage the internal & external customer delivery experience

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GreenMark Consulting Group has developed a proprietary Landscape Business BootCamp Platform based on 7 decades of business and industry experience. Instead of theory, spend a day with business owners who have done it. This program is built for business owners, managers, employees and anyone else seeking to improve their expertise in the landscape industry. The day is based on GreenMark’s 4 Cores of Landscape Business Success.

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CORE 1: GUIDING THE BUSINESS

The power of purpose, creating smart metrics & the law of the good deal. AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST CORE RUNNING THE BUSINESS Steven A.2:Cohen 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

LUNCH 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM BOOTCAMP 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Standardizing processes to run at capacity & managing sustainable growth. Chief Innovation Officer 3: GETTING THE BUSINESS GreenMarkCORE Consulting Group Defining a brand that surrounds prospects with marketing and drives the sales pipeline. scohen@greenmarkgroup.com 4: DOING THE BUSINESS Direct:CORE 610.905.3637 Managing the internal and external customer experience to become top of mind.

COST w w w. gre e n m a r k b o o tc am p. com Each core includes landscape business courseware & GreenMark’s Landscape Business Success Toolkit ™ MEMBERS BEFORE 02/08/18 – $199 Bill Eastman is GreenMark’s Growth Steven Cohen, Principal of GreenMark AFTER 02/08/18 – $249 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/08/18 – $249 AFTER 02/08/18 – $299 SPONSORS PRESENTER

Consulting Group, is a business management and operations consultant with more than 25 years of landscape & snow industry experience. He has an extensive background in managing crossfunctional business operations, business strategy and market growth projects.

Consultant. He has spent over 3 decades working with the Fortune 500 building a library of best practices for fast and sustainable growth – the secret behind how small businesses became market leaders.

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STEVENConsulting COHEN Group © 2016 GreenMark

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4

THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #2 / RUNNING THE BUSINESS

CASH FLOW MANAGEMENT

This is the third of four articles on CORE 2 – Running the Business. When my company started doing business turnarounds, I was amazed how much money people had lockedup in items like inventory, accounts payable, accounts receivable, and lines of credit. These companies were literally broke, and all because they couldn’t figure out how to manage their cash flow so that they had a sufficient amount of cash-on-hand.

WILLIAM EASTMAN GreenMark Consulting Group

Jumping right in, each of the turnarounds started with these three cash flow problems: They all had inventory that was just cash collecting dust; They were all paying their suppliers either at the last minute, or immediately; They were all owed money that was at least 30 days past-due. So, let’s look at these issues on an individual basis.

Paying at the Last Minute, or Immediately Keep your cash velocity positive by negotiating smart terms with your suppliers. Start with gaining quick pay discounts with two objectives: You want the largest discount for the longest period. You will be surprised how many suppliers will negotiate for predictable payments.

with customers and have several conversations before the due date. For those recurring customers that slow pay – have you considered factoring?

Inventory is Cash Collecting Dust When you pay cash upfront, then all inventory is unavailable cash. The less you hold, the better your cash position. Ensure you understand minimum replacement levels to prevent work stoppages.

Smart management of accounts payable requires balancing several issues at once, such as:

• Ensure your invoices are accurate. Inaccurate invoices provide customers with a legitimate reason to avoid payment. • Follow-up your initial invoices. Establish a follow-up date to review the invoice to ensure that there are no obstacles to on-time payment. • Factor your “loans.” Based on historical records, you may sell the AR of any customer habitually late over 45 days to a factoring company and receive 93% of the total within 24 hours.

When you buy raw materials the clock ticks. The goal is to base inventory purchases and levels on the JIT (Just In Time) demands of customers. • Base purchases on demand, not on a historical schedule. Never order raw materials until a purchase order is created from a closed deal. • Increase your “turns.” Make it priority to double the number of times you turn over inventory per year. • Order in the smallest lots possible, without sacrificing discounts. Supply your projects with multiple deliveries per week.

• Receiving Quick Pay Discounts: Arrange for a quick pay discount that makes it worth your while to pay early. • Managing Cash Velocity: When discounts are not available, or are too small, slow down the outflow of cash to match your inflow. Your AP cycle should equal your AR cycle. • Using Commercial Credit: Use a line of credit to smooth out cash flow during slow sales periods. Pay it down during good ones. Money Owed Over 30 Days is a Loan View accounting as a source of cash. The quicker you are paid, the less cash you have to hold on hand, or the less credit you have to use. Establish a process where your staff are on a first name basis

You are not a bank. When customers don’t pay within the agreed terms you are loaning them money. That has to stop.

You cannot survive and grow without cash on hand. Most small businesses are losing 15% of their available cash because of inadequate attention and management. Get cash flow positive by reducing inventory, negotiating better terms with fewer suppliers, bring AR under 30 days, and factoring late payers. Next Month: Building Your Back Office.

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FOR SAFETY SAK E

HYPOTHERMIA AND FROSTBITE Landscapers, snow removal personnel, gardeners and farmers work long hours in a wide range of environmental conditions. As temperatures decrease and wind speeds increase, heat more readily leaves the body and can lead to cold-stress and even more serious health problems. Cold and wet conditions can lead to health risks associated with hypothermia and frostbite. Recognizing symptoms and minimizing exposure risks are key steps to preventing injury or life-threatening conditions.

HYPOTHERMIA Hypothermia is a reduction of body temperature. If body temperature drops far below normal (98.6 degrees Fahrenheit), serious motor and memory problems can arise. Check for signs of hypothermia. If body temperature is below 95 degrees, the situation is an emergency and medical assistance should be sought immediately. Severe hypothermia is a serious condition and can even lead to death. Symptoms of Mild ​Hypothermia • Uncontrollable shivering. • Numbness of hands, feet and/or face. • Inability to complete simple tasks like holding a spade or picking something up without fumbling.

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Note: Even with mild hypothermia victims are still able to walk and talk. Treatment o​f Mild Hypothermia • Take off any wet clothing and replace with dry clothes and blanket. • Take the person to a warm area. • Encourage physical activity to generate muscle heat. • Give the person hot drinks that are caffeine and alcohol free. • Rewarm them by applying hot-packs or water bottles wrapped in hot towels.

continued on page 22


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F OR SAFETY SAK E continued from page 20

Symptoms of Severe Hy​pothermia • Violent waves of shivering. Pauses between waves grow longer as hypothermia become more severe. • Inability to generate heat. This occurs when the shivering has stopped. • Poor muscle coordination and inability to walk. • Decreased pulse and respiration rates. • Irrational behavior and incoherent speech. Treatment of​Severe Hypothermia • Treat a person with severe hypothermia as a medical emergency: • Seek medical attention immediately! Initiate field treatment until medical attention can be obtained. • Remove any wet clothing and cover the person in a dry sleeping bag or blankets. Hug the person or lie next to him/her to keep him/her warm. • Apply hot-packs to neck, armpits, chest and groin. Use an electric blanket, if available. • Offer warm beverages to help increase body temperature. Do not offer alcoholic beverages, and do not offer beverages to an unconscious victim. • Offer CPR to an unconscious victim, even if he/she appears dead, as successful resuscitation is possible.

FROSTBITE Frostbite is a condition when tissue and/or body parts freeze. Ice crystals form inside the skin and can destroy tissues, which could lead to permanent damage and the loss of the frozen body part. The most susceptible areas are the ears, nose, fingers and toes.

• Move the person to a warm area and replace wet clothing if possible/applicable. • Immerse the affected area in warm (not hot) water to help increase blood circulation. You may also warm the affected area with body heat by placing the affected area under clothing or next to warmer body parts, such as an armpit. • Do not allow the affected area to refreeze. Do not rewarm the area until it can be kept warm. • Do not rub. Damage to underlying tissue raises the risk of subsequent infection in the affected body part. • Do not use a heating pad, a heat lamp, a stove or any other heating device for warming, as burns can result due to numbness and lack of sensitivity.

FROSTNIP Frostnip is a condition when tissue on smaller, exposed body parts starts to freeze. The most susceptible areas are the cheeks, earlobes, fingers and toes. This condition is usually reversible. Frostnip Sympt​oms • Blood vessel constriction caused by numbness. • Pale appearance of skin. • Pain in the affected areas as they warm up.

Frostbite Sym​ptoms • Complete numbness or loss of feeling. • Swelling in joints or paralysis of the affected body part. • Turning of skin to white, yellow or gray. • Woodlike texture of affected body part.

Fro​stnip Treatment • Rewarm the affected area gently by putting it next to a warm body part or breathing on it. • Move the person to a warm area and replace wet clothing if possible/applicable. • Immerse the affected area in warm (not hot) water for approximately 30 minutes to help increase blood circulation. • Do not rub, as rubbing may cause damage to underlying tissue. • Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.

Frostbite Treat​ment • Seek medical attention! • Confirm there are no signs of hypothermia (requires emergency medical assistance).

Cold weather can be dangerous for anyone who enjoys being outdoors in the winter, but especially so for those who are working in it. It is in those cases that everyone needs to be particularly mindful of the risks.

Found on the Ohio State University Extension website at https://ohioline.osu.edu. Credit to S. Dee Jepsen, Associate Professor and State Safety Leader, Agricultural Safety and Health, Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Jeffery Suchy, Graduate Student and Lecturer, Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering.

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA EDUCATION SERIES

COURSE INFO MARCH 12, 2018 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131 MARCH 13, 2018 WOLF CREEK COMPANY 6700B HUNTLEY ROAD COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM – 8:30AM CLINIC 8:30AM – 4:30PM LUNCH 11:30AM – 12:15PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 02/26/18 - $159 AFTER 02/26/18 - $189

Foreman Training

Production and maintenance landscape foremen have unique needs as they have to wear two hats: a worker and a leader. Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with the employee and having to direct, motivate and critique at the same time. Managing former peers and friends can be especially difficult, dealing with problems and obstacles can take skills that can only be developed by stepping out of the work environment for a few days, learning best practices, applying it in a learning environment through role play, and then going back and applying it on the job. In this dynamic seminar, foremen will learn: • The central role of the “worker-leader” • How to supervise friends, peers, and former equals • How to communicate with their superiors • How to generate accountability from their team • How to motivate and delegate at the same time

INSTRUCTED BY

ARMANDO ACTIS / PROFESSOR Professor Actis provides management, inside sales & public relation training based on his education & experience in the landscaping & construction industry at Rendel’s Inc, where he is currently the Training & Project Manager for the Joliet Branch. He provides end user operation, application and maintenance training – training anyone from the casual user to the professionals in OSHA, safe & correct usage of landscaping and construction equipment He was Equipment Manager and judge for ILCA’s (Illinois Landscape Contractors Association) Certified Landscape Technician exams at Joliet Junior College.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/26/18 - $189 AFTER 02/26/18 - $219 SPONSORED BY

• How to implement and follow work schedules • How to budget and complete jobs on time • How to manage problem behavior • How to produce client focused work • And more....

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Crataegus, from the Greek kratos “strength” and akis “sharp,” refers to the thorns of some species. Commonly called Hawthorn, it is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia & North America.

CRATAEGUS SPECIES HAWTHORN Few small ornamental trees are as recognizable across most of the Northern Hemisphere as the Hawthorns. While the genus, Crataegus, contains well over 200 plants that are recognizable and common, getting down to the species identification can be a much bigger challenge. You’ll know it is a Hawthorn. The question is – which one? We debated covering just one species of Hawthorn vs. treating them as a group for this month’s article. We settled on discussing the genus as a whole, as well as the long-storied past it holds in human folklore. Then, we’ll share a number of great species and cultivars that have a long-standing tradition of use in our ornamental landscapes. To begin, we’ve discussed use of the word “Haw” in common names in the past, sharing that it is from Old English and is in reference to small round fruit. In common name use, the word Haw describes something about the fruit, such as Blackhaw (Viburnum prunifolium) and Possum-haw (Ilex decidua). In

the case of Crataegus, it is pretty clear there are two distinct features in front of you – fruit and thorns. The “Haw Thorn” can be a wicked beast of thorns, cleverly decorated with beautiful red fruits in the fall. In the southeast of the United States, Crataegus aestivalis, locally called Mayhaw (fruit ripens in May), is a large fruited species utilized in jelly production. Colquit, Georgia, selfproclaimed “Mayhaw Capital of the World,” holds a festival every May, after the local species produce millions of olivesized fruits that are boiled down by locals into a rose-colored, sweet jelly. continued on page 26

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

The interesting part of this lore is the belief that cutting down a faery tree would result in a lifetime of bad luck. Thus, many trees were left to grow, and a great number of streets, villages, and historic sites contain a version of ’Thorn in their name.

continued from page 24 Today, we are able to identify the many benefits of this fruit. They are high in potassium, calcium, Vitamin C, and Beta Carotene. Through human history though, the benefits of these fruits were more a kin to “folk medicines.” In both Chinese and Japanese traditional medicine, the dried fruits of C. pinnatifida (China) and C. cuneata (Japan) were eaten to aid in digestion. We found similar uses by Native American tribes, utilizing the fruits of North American Hawthorns to provide other beneficial health effects. Shifting to Europe, namely Scottish and Irish lore, the tree takes on a much different role in use, primarily in storytelling. While they acknowledged the health benefits of eating the fruits, with some even eating the young spring leaves, the trees themselves have a mixed history of menace. Hawthorns were believed to be inhabited by faeries (fairies), which contrary to the current fairy garden trend, these faeries weren’t exactly kind. Most stories held a theme of someone being lured in to the tree by a faery, taken into a faery underworld, and then being released thinking only a small amount of time had passed – while in reality years had gone by. If you ask us, that sounds like a pretty solid excuse for getting a little too drunk and lost on one’s way home, “You see, what happened was…”

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

One of our favorite descriptions of scents in the Dr. Dirr manual is when he refers to the “smell of a flower as disagreeable as the Hawthorn’s.” Once you smell one in bloom, you too may disagree with them, as they are not too pleasant. Turns out, the flower of Crataegus emits trimethylamine in bloom. This organic amine has a somewhat “fishy” smell in low concentrations and strong “ammonia-like” scent in higher ones. Trimethylamine is also one of the first chemicals given off by a decomposing body. During the Great Plague, people became familiar with the “scent of death” and associated that same scent with the bloom of the Hawthorn. This association undoubtedly gave rise to many of the negative stories surrounding the plant. To this day, a longstanding tradition exists that bringing the flowering branch of Hawthorn into the house will bring bad luck and/or death. The stories of our plants are important, but hopefully the lore won’t scare you away from such a versatile and functional tree. While there are a number of great Asian and European species of Hawthorn for the collectors, we will focus on a few Ohionative species that offer great value to our urban landscapes. Crataegus crusgalli – Cockspur Hawthorn This native ornamental tree typically reaches into the 20’ to 30’ rounded range. Pure white “disagreeable” scented flowers are in mid-May followed by clusters of bright red fruits ripening in October that look like tiny apples. While the scent is not overly pleasant, it isn’t as bad as taking a nose full of flowering pear. The common name refers to the wicked spur on the back of a rooster’s foot. Thorns on this tree are up to 3 inches long and are very strong and very sharp. There are few things worse than trying to put this plant into a chipper, you’ll believe the faery is out to get you that day. For all the benefits of this plant, try the Lake County Nursery introduction of ‘Crusader’. This is a cultivar of the plant that is essentially thornless and performs quite nice in our landscapes, holding a much smaller stature – closer to 15’ – making it an ideal under-the-wire tree.


Crataegus phaenopyrum – Washington Hawthorn The leaves of Washington Hawthorn are uniquely split into five lobes. In its native setting the tree is typically a multi-stem to low branched tree of about 20’ found in full sun. Some nurseries will offer a single stem trained plant as well as multi-stemmed offering options depending on design intent. This tree is very urban tolerant and should be considered a great option for those troubling commercial sites where solid performance outweighs the need to be the most unique design on the planet. White spring flowers in abundance followed by a more orange-red smaller fruit in the fall holds the same great benefit to birds as the other Hawthorns. Crataegus punctata – Thicket Hawthorn This is a very scrappy tree found in our woodlands that emerged in 1962 out of the Seacrest Arboretum with a cultivar, ‘Ohio Pioneer’ that is also essentially thornless. This cultivated variety of the native offers a solid native ornamental tree in the upper 20’ range with deep red ¾” fruits in fall. White flowers are abundant in spring and the leaves have an interesting dusty gray-green that is in stark contrast to the shiny deep green gloss of C. crusgali. This is a tough tree that can be used in mass screening or in areas needing a more naturalized landscape. This is another tree offering great food source to our birds.

Crataegus viridis – Green Hawthorn Another tree that is best used as a cultivar, ‘Winter King’ is a version of this plant that is perfectly named for the ability to hold on to the deep red fruits well into the winter season. Reaching into the lower 20’ range, the silver bark and very angular attachment of the branches offer a strong winter outline. Coupled with fruits lasting into January it is clear to see how it is the king of the winter landscape. While you may read caution about issues with cedar-hawthorn, cedar-apple, and cedar-quince rust (Gymnosporangium spp.) fungal infections, we don’t see that as a major concern. This unique disease needs alternate hosts and will manifest on the Hawthorns alternating with Juniperus virginina, eastern red cedar. This is rarely a major concern for the plant and should not be a reason to withhold such a great set of trees from our urban landscapes. Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

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www.masonsteel.com The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 27


FEATURE ARTI CLE

GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS: How the new tax legislation may affect your tax bill By Gregg Robertson / Landscape Management’s Government Relations Blogger

Fulfilling his promise to give Americans “an incredible Christmas gift,” President Trump signed a $1.5 trillion tax bill on Dec. 22. What this tax bill will mean to you and your company may take some help from your tax adviser. While one of the goals at the outset for this tax reform bill was to simplify the tax code, the bill may make things a bit more complex, especially for socalled “pass through” companies (sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLCs and S corporations). But your tax savings will help you pay for the extra accounting help you’ll need. The first thing to hit employers as the new year begins is what the withholding rates should be for employee paychecks. The new law does away with personal exemptions, the current basis for determining withholding. The IRS has set February as its goal for issuing the new withholding guidance. If you have a third-party payroll company, it will be sure to figure it out in time for your first payroll in February.

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Here is the rundown of the major provisions of the new tax bill. This list is based on an analysis of the tax bill done by AmericanHort, but any errors or omissions are strictly mine. Please realize that this is a broad summary of the 500-page bill. How it will affect your company’s or your personal tax liability will require the assistance of a tax professional. continued on page 31


PL ANTOLA OF TH E M ON TH SERIES EDUCATION

COURSE DATE APRIL 5, 2018

CDL Training

LOCATION INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

Join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training and learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. Back by demand, and instructed by a former truck driver, this interactive course will include videos and handouts that will cover:

AGENDA 8:30AM – 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

• • •

9:00AM – 3:00 PM CLINIC

A truck and trailer will be on site so that attendees receive a hands-on, pre-trip training session. All registrations include continental breakfast and lunch. Attendees will need to come prepared for both indoor and outdoor classroom. Please note: This course is not intended to teach anyone to back a trailer, or drive on the road.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 03/22/18 - $129 AFTER 03/22/18 - $159 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 03/22/18 - $179 AFTER 03/22/18 - $209

GET HELP PASSING THE STATE CDL TEST

State Pre-Trip Inspection State Yard Skills State Road Test

Daryl Lengyel is a former truck driver and the owner/president of CDL Training Consultants. CDL Training Consultants has been in business since 1990 and Daryl has been a valued member of the OLA for over 18 years. He is a former state test examiner who has been helping train employees on the steps to obtaining their CDL license for many years, specializing in commercial drivers license training and driver’s safety training. CDL Training Consultants is located in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.

INSTRUCTED BY DARYL LENGYEL Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 CDL TRAINING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 03/29/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

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REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/CDLTRAINING


PLA N T O F T HE

MEETING DATE MARCH 28, 2018 HELD AT WOLF CREEK COMPANY 6700B HUNTLEY ROAD COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 AGENDA REGISTRATION NETWORKING & FOOD 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM MEETING & PROGRAM 7:00 PM TO 8:30 PM COST TO ATTEND OLA MEMBERS: FREE NON-MEMBERS: $30*

CENTRAL OHIO MEETING

MONTH

Drones & the Landscaping Industry In late 2014, Green Scene Landscaping & Pools, a Los Angeles-based design and construction firm specializing in high-end landscapes, announced that it had begun using a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) equipped with a high-resolution camera to capture aerial landscape images. Fast forward to 2018 and videography for promotional purposes seems to be the fastest-growing use for small unmanned aircraft in the landscape industry. Small landscape, tree care or irrigation businesses typically hire an FAA-certified company specializing in professional aerial photography on a project-by-project basis. There are good reasons for doing so, liability being a big one since these professionals typically have property and casualty insurance. Our guest speaker will discuss: • •

Rules for flying drones commercially Barriers to entry for flying drones

• •

Recommended drones & technology Other uses for drone technology

PRESENTER

* FIRST TIME NON-MEMBERS MAY ATTEND FOR FREE

ZACHARY ELLIOT CO-OWNER OF LOSTPEAK MEDIA / FAA CERTIFIED DRONE (UAS) PILOT

SPONSORED BY

LostPeak Media is a Drone Services Company (DSC) based out of Cincinnati, Ohio, focused on providing aerial solutions to their client using drone technology and software applications. With a background in aviation & law, Zachary’s diverse experience allows him to bring a new perspective to the DSC table. Building a business in the burgeoning drone/UAS industry has given him a new respect for the need to have regulatory compliance alongside the ability to provide nimble and flexible services to clients.

PRESENTED BY

FOR PAYING NON-MEMBER ATTENDEES: Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the meeting will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the meeting, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the meeting. If, for any reason, the meeting is cancelled, paying non-members will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 CENTRAL OHIO SPRING MEETING / REGISTER BY 03/21/18 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S) * FIRST TIME NON-MEMBERS MAY ATTEND FOR FREE

NON-MEMEBER FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

1.5

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/COLUMBUSSPRINGMEETING


FEATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 28

BUSINESS CHANGES C Corp Rates: The rate is reduced from 35 percent to 21 percent for C corps and personal service corps. This rate is effective for tax years after 2017 and is permanent. Pass-Through Provisions: Here is where things get complicated. If the individual makes $157,500 or less (or $315,000 or less in the case of a joint return), indexed, the individual taxpayer would receive a 20 percent deduction on “qualified business income” from a partnership, S corporation or sole proprietorship. If the individual makes more than $157,500 (or more than $315,000 in the case of a joint return), then the deduction from “qualified business income” is the greater of: 1. the sum of 25 percent of the W-2 wages with respect to the trade or business plus 2.5 percent of the unadjusted basis, immediately after acquisition, of all “qualified property,” or 2. 50 percent of the W-2 wages with respect to the trade or business. Once the $157,500 (or $315,000) threshold is hit, a “qualified trade or business” does not include service businesses. “Qualified business income” would not include reasonable compensation paid to the taxpayer by any qualified business for services rendered with respect to the business. “Qualified property” is defined as tangible property subject to depreciation, held by a qualified trade or business and used in the production of qualified business income. It is the first alternative for calculating the wage limit, which is helping real estate businesses with large capital investments but few employees to qualify under the pass-through provisions. There is a phase-in of $50,000 for individuals or $100,000 for joint returns.

Bonus Depreciation: Companies can immediately write off the full cost of investments in their businesses, starting with assets purchased and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017 and before Jan. 1, 2023. Thereafter, the deduction will phase out by 20 percent each year through 2026. Section 179: Section 179 deduction is increased from $500,000 to $1 million with an increased phase-out threshold at $2.5 million. These amounts are indexed for inflation starting in 2019. The definition of qualified real property is also expanded to include improvements made to nonresidential real property including roofs, heating and air-conditioning equipment. Cash Accounting: The average gross receipts threshold for using the cash accounting method is permanently increased from $5 million to $25 million. Credit for Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA) Costs: A new credit would be added for 2018 and 2019 for wages paid to employees who are on family and medical leave if certain conditions are met. Interest Deductibility: Businesses will be able to deduct net interest expenses up to 30 percent of their adjusted taxable income. For taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2022, adjusted taxable income is computed without regard to deductions allowable for depreciation, amortization or depletion or the Section 199 deduction (domestic manufacturing deduction, which is repealed in the bill). Businesses with annual gross receipts of $25 million or less would not be subject to the 30 percent limit.

continued on page 32

A specified service means those performing services in the fields of health, law, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services or where the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees or owners or dealing with investing and investment management trading or dealing in securities, partnership interests or commodities. Note that this definition excludes engineers and architects. The deduction would be allowed to nonitemizers as well as those that itemize. Trusts and estates would be eligible for the 20 percent deduction. These provisions would all sunset in 2025. The The Growing Growing Concern Concern || February February 2018 2018 || 31 31


F EATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 31 Contributions to Capital: Capital contributions aren’t excludable from taxable income unless they are made by a shareholder, potential customer or government entity.

INDIVIDUAL CHANGES Estate & Generation Skipping Transfer (GST) Tax: From 2018 through the end of 2025 estate and GST exemptions will double. In 2026, the exemptions revert to the current levels, indexed for inflation. Gift Tax: From 2018 through the end of 2025 the gift tax exemption will double. In 2026, the exemption will revert to the current levels, indexed for inflation. Affordable Care Act: The individual mandate and the tax penalty for not having health insurance is repealed. Mortgage Interest Deduction: The deduction limit is reduced from $1 million to $750,000 and limited to debt incurred on the principal residence or a second home. Starting next year, no deduction will be allowed for interest on home equity loans. This could affect people’s willingness to use their home equity to invest in landscape projects. These provisions also may have a negative impact on home values. These changes would sunset in 2025. Taxpayers could continue to exclude sale proceeds from the sale of a principal residence as under current law. Standard Deduction: It is increased to $24,000 for joint, $18,000 for unmarried with at least one child, and $12,000 for single filers. These increases would sunset at the end of 2025 and revert to current levels. Personal Exemptions: The personal exemption of $4,050 per person has been eliminated starting in 2018 until 2025.

Child Tax Credit: Increased from $1,000 to $2,000 with an increased phase-out of up to $400,000 for married taxpayers. The amount of the credit that is refundable increased from $1,000 to $1,400. These provisions will sunset at the end of 2025. Tax Brackets and Top Rate: The number of tax brackets stays at seven. The top tax rate is lowered from 39.6 percent to 37 percent.

CHANGES THAT APPLY TO BUSINESSES AND INDIVIDUALS Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT): The corporate AMT is repealed. The individual AMT is retained with a higher AMT exemption (starting at $109,400 for joint and $70,300 for single) for the years 2018 through 2025. The phase-out of exemption amounts are increased to $1 million for married taxpayers filing jointly and $500,000 for single taxpayers. This means that the exemption amount is not phased out until the alternative minimum taxable income exceeds these phase-out amounts. The increase in the individual AMT exemption sunsets in 2025. The repeal of the corporate AMT is permanent. State and Local Tax Deduction: Deduction for state and local income, sales and/or property taxes is capped at $10,000. This provision sunsets in 2025. It’s not clear if property taxes can be prepaid in 2017 for 2018. State and local tax deductions are maintained for corporations and pass-throughs. This provision will have a negative impact on housing values in some higher tax states. It’s important that business owners sit down with their tax advisers early in 2018 to begin planning to make the most of these new tax provisions.

Gregg Robertson, Landscape Management’s government relations blogger, is a government relations consultant for the Pennsylvania Landscape & Nursery Association (PLNA) and president of Conewago Ventures. From 2002 until May 2013 he served as president of PLNA.This article originally appeared on LandscapeManagement.net.

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

MEETING INFORMATION HELD AT ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA (MARCH 8, 2018) REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM MEETING & PROGRAM 7:00 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND OLA MEMBERS: FREE NON-MEMBERS: $30

SPONSORED BY

EMERALD SPONSORS

Ultimate Networking

LEARNING FROM YOUR PEERS: A SERIES OF ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS March 8th, 2018 Social networking. Online education. Webinars. Forums. On-line meetings. LinkedIn. Virtual conferences. The opportunities for professionals to meet, learn and network have increased exponentially. The Internet creates a time-saving and cost-efficient medium for busy professionals and the firms for which they work. It is important to remember though, the value provided when people gather together in-person to share ideas and learn from one another – the good, “oldfashioned” way. The purpose of our Ultimate Networking Roundtable Meeting is to bring our industry together – as a group of forward-thinking companies and individuals – to actively discuss, share opinions on, and strategize towards solving the issues currently facing our profession. This year, our (3) sessions will focus on the following topics, among others:

GOLD SPONSORS BOTSON INSURANCE SILVER SPONSORS EMMETT EQUIPMENT CO. BRONZE SPONSORS DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY EN GARDE DEER DEFENSE HEARTLAND KURTZ BROS., INC. SHEARER EQUIPMENT VALLEY CITY SUPPLY ZORESCO

Recruiting & Retaining Employees

Money Management

Equipment Acquisition

Supplier/Buyer Relationships

Project Planning

Training / Safety / Insurance

Customer Service

New Trends

Join your peers, March 8th at St. Michael’s Woodside, for this unique opportunity to sit across from your employees, vendors, industry experts and even competition as we continue the process of bettering the profession of Landscaping. Who knows better than someone who has walked in your shoes? IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN MODERATING ONE OF THE TABLES AT THIS YEAR’S MEETING, OR HAVE SUGGESTIONS FOR TOPICS YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE COVERED, PLEASE CONTACT THE OLA AT 440.717.0002, OR EMAIL US AT INFO@OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG PRIOR TO MARCH 1st.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR OLA MEETING’S ARE AVAILABLE! CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 2

CEU’S

REGISTER ONLINE AT

OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/MARCH2018


D I RECTI ON S

WORKFORCE SHORTAGE We’re in the midst of a huge labor shortage and it doesn’t look like there is any relief coming soon. As a matter of fact, it may get much worse this coming spring. The landscape community in Ohio relies heavily on the H2B visa program for their field staff. Maybe your company uses the program, maybe it doesn’t, but either way – there are currently more positions open than there are people available to fill those positions.

There are a total of 66,000 H2B visas made available each year. Those 66,000 visas are for ALL seasonal service industry businesses including forestry, construction, hotels, restaurants, amusement, ski resorts, fisheries, swimming pool care, landscape and more. That is not very many visas when you consider we’re talking about all of those industries across the entire United States. These visas are split into two sections – those requested for the first half of the federal fiscal year (October 1 to March 31) and those requested for the second half (April 1 to September 30). The visa “cap” was hit a couple weeks earlier for the first half of the year than it was last year. That announcement came on December 21, 2017. And the Department of Labor’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification announced on January 3rd that on January 1, 2018, (the earliest date on which an employer seeking an employment start date of April 1 may file an H2B application requesting temporary labor certification), OFLC received approximately 4,500 applications requesting more than 81,600 worker positions.

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

from the visa program because of the cap. A returning worker exemption increases the number of visas in a given year by not counting workers who have used the visa program in a designated previous year. In order to not be counted, those workers also had to have followed all the rules during their previous stay. This is a concern for companies that are lucky enough to be able to staff their company with local workers, because all companies will be competing for those few local workers that are out there. And, it’s is a concern for companies that rely on H2B to staff their companies, because they’ve already proved they couldn’t find workers! If companies cannot find workers to get their jobs done, then they could be forced to lay off supervisory and support staff. Suppliers should be concerned as well, because without anyone to do the work, landscape companies will not be buying equipment, vehicles, plants, materials, etc. Worst case scenario, some companies may be forced to shut their doors.

This demand is higher than we have ever seen. On one hand, it is a good sign that the economy is doing well because there are a lot of jobs available, but the flip side to that is that there is a huge workforce shortage! Companies have to advertise the jobs through the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services AND fill their openings with Americans first BEFORE they can qualify for visas.

Now is the time for us all to work together and contact our legislators. Let them know how important the H2B Visa program is to the landscape companies and their suppliers in Ohio. Tell them your story and how it could affect your company, your job, your income. Tell our legislators that we need a Returning Worker Exemption included on the next piece of “must pass” legislation. Historically, this type of relief has come on a Continuing Resolution, or Omnibus Appropriations bill.

Without a legislative fix, such as a Returning Work Exemption, many landscape companies in Ohio will not get their workers

Please call me if you have questions. I will do my best to answer your concerns.

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

21 6

All Organic Mulch, LLC

2

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

15 8

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS: Greensman, Inc. 3320 E. Waterloo Road Akron, Ohio 44312 330-784-9655 Doug Tronge Jimmy’s Lawn Care 1635 Fairfax Road Akron, OH 44313 330-338-1874 Jimmy Matweyou

Abraxus / Royalton Supply

Briar Rose Nurseries, Inc.

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

27

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

35

Medina Sod Farms, Inc.

12

Premier Plant Solutions

10

Shearer Equipment

21

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

16

Unilock

8

Valley City Supply

25

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

15

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | February 2018 | 35


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

02/18

n d Technicia e fi ti r e C y str scape Indu ates 2018 Land Test D Certification is an important tool for all landscape companies and individuals in the landscape field. That’s why the Landscape Industry Certified Technician program deserves your attention. A Landscape Industry Certified Technician is a proven landscape professional who has been certified through an internationally supported testing program that is administered by the National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) and licensed to Ohio – a partnership of The Ohio State ATI, Ohio Landscape Association and Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association.

ster ST DATES e ATI/Woo WRITTEN TE , Ohio Stat 1/18 Oct. 2, 9AM /1 r 09 ste e: lin oo n Dead ate ATI/W Applicatio PM, Ohio St Aug. 8, 2:30 06/08/18 e: lin d ea D n ew Hts. Applicatio LA/Broadvi . 9, 9AM, O ct O /11/18 09 ster n Deadline: e ATI/Woo Applicatio , Ohio Stat M 7A 9, . 18 ug A 06/08/ n Deadline: Applicatio TEST DATE HANDS-ON ster ate ATI/Woo St o hi O M, Aug. 9, 7A /08/18 06 e: lin d n Dea Applicatio

By earning your Landscape Industry Certified Technician certification, you send a message to clients and employees that you meet, or exceed the industry standard. For additional Information about testing, registration, or to obtain study materials, please visit LandscapeCertifiedOhio.org, or call the Ohio State ATI at 330.287.7511, or 330.287.0100.

STAND OUT! Encouraging Professional Standards and Promoting the Green Industry

The Growing Concern February 2018  
The Growing Concern February 2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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