Page 1

2018

Primary Voters Guide KANSAS POLITICS

The Kansas Senate debates former Gov. Sam Brownback’s tax bill last year. Brownback left Topeka in January after a revamped Legislature repealed much of what he referred to as his “real-live experiment” in supply-side income tax cuts, which he said would boost Kansas’ economy. [2017 FILE PHOTO/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL]

GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES SEEK ANSWERS IN POST-BROWNBACK ERA Former governor’s legacy influencing primary campaign

T

By Tim Carpenter | tcarpenter@cjonline.com

he man influencing the outcome of the 2018 campaign for governor in Kansas won’t be on the August primary or November general election ballots. Failures and successes of Gov. Sam Brownback, who escaped the limelight of state government in January for an obscure ambassadorship under President Donald Trump, will continue to receive attention from gubernatorial candidates on the right, center and left of the political spectrum. Brownback exited Topeka after a revamped Legislature repealed much of what he referred to as his “real-live experiment” in supply-side income tax cuts, which he promised to be an adrenaline shot to the heart of Kansas’ economy. It fell short of job projections, cratered tax revenue so deeply it nearly bankrupt the state treasury and led to historic sales and income tax increases to balance the budget. Gov. Jeff Colyer, Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Insurance Commissioner Ken Selzer will selectively tap into the Brownback legacy and offer perspectives on Brownback’s shortcomings in search of GOP votes in the Aug. 7 primary. They’ve echoed Brownback on abortion, gun rights and government efficiency, while making a case for why they’re not Brownback clones. Selzer said he wouldn’t have embraced Brownback’s 2012 program to slash state income taxes if he had realized Brownback didn’t have the courage to cut state government spending to match lost revenue. He said Brownback’s strategy was to starve state government rather than reform it. “Kansas needs change from the disastrous economic policies of the Colyer-Brownback era, which was marked by the woeful mismanagement of tax and spending policy, of major state programs,” Selzer said. “Kansas needs more accountability throughout state government.” Kobach said he would reverse the 2015 increase in the statewide sales tax to 6.5 percent signed into law by Brownback and strive to amend the Legislature’s decision to repeal much of Brownback’s income tax cuts. He’s criticized Colyer for not convincing the 2018 Legislature to pass along to Kansas taxpayers a state revenue windfall resulting from changes in federal tax law. “So far, the short post-Brownback era is a stunning disappointment,” said Kobach spokeswoman Dandri Herbert. “A strong leader would have encouraged lawmakers to return President Trump’s tax reform windfall to taxpayers, as occurred in other states. Instead, this weak administration encouraged lawmakers to pocket and spend even more money ripped from the pockets of

Kansans.” Bob Beatty, a political science professor at Washburn University in Topeka, said he anticipated the anti-Brownback and anti-Colyer messaging to be more intense. “Why isn’t Colyer getting hammered more for being Brownback’s lieutenant governor when Brownback was so unpopular? Two words: Kris Kobach,” Beatty said. “Without Kobach in the race, no doubt the Brownback legacy would be the focus point of this election.” Beatty said Kobach’s magnetic capacity to draw public attention, whether it’s losing a voting rights court case to the ACLU, riding in a parade next to a faux machine gun or running around with rocker Ted Nugent or presidential son Donald Trump Jr., has been beneficial to Colyer by dimming interest in his seven-year alliance with Brownback. “Even though Colyer has not broken substantively with Brownback on any major policy issue, he is not tied to Brownback as much as one would expect because of the Kobach factor,” Beatty said. Democrats and a couple of long-shot Republicans in the primary races have relentlessly dive-bombed Brownback’s record on tax, education, health and budget policy. They see no reason to holster that hostility. Topeka physician and former state Sen. Jim Barnett, a moderate Republican candidate for governor, said the electorate shouldn’t be lulled into voting for Colyer, whom he referred to as “Brownback 2.0.” Under Colyer, Barnett said, the state had raided the highway program for money, outsourced Kansas jobs, championed false ideas about benefits of privatizing Medicaid and sought to hire unqualified individuals to work in the foster care system. “He continues to oppose Medicaid expansion, even though supported by a majority of state legislators, including conservative Republicans,” Barnett said. “He has made a blanket statement that he will never support a tax increase, following the same kind of Brownback absolutism that brought Kansas to its knees.” Laura Kelly, a Topeka senator working for the Democratic Party’s nomination for governor, said questions about the direction of Kansas government in the post-Brownback era were fundamentally flawed. “Kansas is not in a post-Brownback era because his choice of lieutenant governor is still in charge and continuing with his agenda,” she said. “Kansas is still reeling from the cuts made by the Brownback-Colyer administration to schools, roads and other programs.” Democratic candidate Arden Andersen, a family practice doctor who resides in Olathe, said he supported the 2017 Legislature’s decision to override a Brownback veto to end the state income tax exemption for 330,000 business owners and raise about $1.2 billion over two years.

WHAT’S INSIDE The 2018 Primary Voters Guide is an opportunity for you to learn more about the people who are vying for your vote in the Aug. 7 primary. Forty-nine candidates responded to The Topeka Capital-Journal’s questionnaire. We present their answers here — unedited, except to conform to space limitations. Here are the races you can find inside: • U.S. House, 1st District, page 2 • U.S House, 2nd District, pages 3-5 • Kansas governor, pages 6-8 • Kansas secretary of state, pages 9-10 • Kansas insurance commissioner, page 11 • Kansas attorney general, page 12 • Kansas treasurer, page 12 • Kansas House, 47th District, page 13 • Kansas House, 53rd District, page 13 • Kansas House, 50th District, page 14 • Kansas House, 55th District, page 14 • Kansas House, 52nd District, page 15 • Kansas House, 54th District, pages 15-16 • Kansas House, 56th District, page 16 • Kansas House, 51st District, page 17 • Kansas House, 57th District, page 17 • Shawnee County Commission, 1st District, pages 17-18 Candidates who didn’t respond to The CapitalJournal’s survey, and thus are not included in this guide, are Jack Bergeson, Patrick Kucera and Joseph Tutera Jr., all vying for governor; Sarah Swain, attorney general; Noah Wright, Kansas House, 51st District; Joseph Stringer, Kansas House, 55th District; and Vic Miller, Kansas House, 58th District. The questionnaires in their entirety and additional election coverage can be found at cjonline.com.

He said Brownback’s philosophy about tax cuts driving economic growth was off base. “Education is really the economic generator, not tax cuts,” Andersen said. Carl Brewer, a two-term Wichita mayor and Democratic candidate, said Kansas went backward on civil rights in regards to rescinding protections for LGBTQ state employees under Brownback. Colyer declined to amend that policy while embracing a questionable bill that enables faithbased adoption agencies to discriminate against gay or lesbian couples, he said. “We need a leader representing all Kansans, a leader who recognizes discriminatory practices and works to protect individuals rather than supporting efforts, like the recent adoption bill, that harm any member of our communities,” Brewer said. Contact Statehouse bureau chief Tim Carpenter at (785) 393-2621.


C2  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

U.S. HOUSE — 1ST DISTRICT: ALAN LAPOLICE Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? The single greatest threat we face as a nation is Division! We’ve been divided by hyper-partisan politicians who’ve lost the concept of public service and patriotism. I haven’t. I believe in service to country regardless of party. I am running because I don’t see anyone else addressing this existential threat. I have a unique perspective having grown up a Fifth-Generation Kansas farmer, then serving in combat overseas, then attending U.C. Berkeley. I’ve lived in the world’s largest cities and its smallest towns. I’ve worked in the fields and on Wall Street. I can clearly identify with true-Conservatism just as I identify with honest Progressivism. Leaders are just us regular people who refuse to believe we can’t achieve greatness together. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? Not at all. I have no intention of ever supporting the infringement of a law-abiding American citizens’ right to bear arms. Being a highly trained infantry gunner, I would support far better training programs for new gun owners. Like most Americans, I would support universal background checks and closing loopholes in weapons transactions. I would lift the Dickey Amendment which prevents CDC research into what has become a national epidemic. I would also lift the PLCAA which removes all liability from gun manufacturers, something no other industry enjoys. Politicians who support changing nothing at all are not acting in the interests of our society. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? I have the greatest hope that he would never attempt such a violation. It is in everyone’s interest to see the inquiry through. I have faith in American law enforcement and intelligence agencies and now that the Senate has supported the notion that we were all victims of Russian meddling, I believe it’s in everyone’s interest to move swiftly to both stop further

meddling and sanction them for criminal actions. Every member of Congress is obligated first and foremost to defend the Constitution and this has been a grave violation. Russia is not now, nor have they been our trustworthy friend. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? NAFTA is unique. While it has done wonders for Kansas Ag producers, it has allowed for many domestic manufacturing jobs to leave our nation. It also displaced millions of Mexican farmers and so disrupted the Mexican economy that massive immigration, especially farm laborers have crossed our border as economic migrants. I would certainly support retooling NAFTA so that when we do have massive displacement in multiple countries, there are ample resources to deal with the fallout of Free Trade Agreements. I would also ensure that trade agreements benefit producers first and investors/traders second. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? House Republicans, true to their word, have all but gutted the ACA. The first thing that was truly wrong with it was that it never did a thing to curb rising costs. Pharmaceutical and Insurance companies were still in the driver’s seat. I would mandate that all government funded programs have the benefit of price negotiation. It is insane that the same American drugs are less expensive in other nations. To fix all of healthcare, there must be true competition. We now have consolidation, which hurts end-users. I would reignite the discussions around a “Public Option” to curb rising costs. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? It was no better than Brownback’s Tax Experiment — Trickle-Down misinformation. I’d have passed equal sized tax cuts but largely for working class Americans who’d then have more money which would increase consumption which fuels more production, justifying more new employment, garnering higher wages fueling more

consumption. This is a virtuous cycle and our economy would take off for everyone. What they did was the exact opposite, creating a vicious cycle of income inequality and massive revenue shortfalls. The GOP does NOT stand for fiscal discipline. Every single time Republicans are in power, deficits and debt increase dramatically. They are dishonest. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? Mr. Conservative, Barry Goldwater said, “You don’t need to be straight to fight and die for your country, you just need to shoot straight.” I’ll go one further, why should anyone care one bit how a soldier identifies themself, so long as they identify as a patriot. I served in combat and I’ll bet my last dollar some of those brave damned heroes were transgender. Integrate them just like every other soldier and ban them only if you don’t believe in liberty and freedom for all. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? Some political miscreants will always find some way of suppressing the vote of good Americans. Tell me the purpose of such a question. It’s veiled discrimination and not what this country is about. The Census is just a measurement of bodies in this nation. For a municipality or state to be treated equitably in Representation and in Government services, an accurate number must be garnered from the census and that question would seem to skew that number. I’m against the miscreants and I’m against intimidation so just administer the census and stop fooling with our empathetic, civilized society. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Nope. Planned Parenthood does more to prevent unwanted pregnancies and ultimately abortions than any other organization. I would certainly prefer that to continue receiving federal funds, they should divest themselves from the abortion services. They could simply split their organization and only the healthcare and family planning organization would benefit from taxpayer subsidies. This would complement the

ALAN LAPOLICE Town of residence: Clyde Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 46 Job: Educator Prior elected offices: USD 224 school board

Hyde Amendment nicely and end the controversy around the organization. The negative generalization around Planned Parenthood calls for some sort of compromise and this would be an appropriate course of action. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? I have always believed strongly that marijuana must be reclassified from Schedule 1 (with heroine) to Schedule 5 (with Robitusson). It is no more harmful than alcohol. Schedule 1 allegedly has zero medicinal benefits, yet for two decades doctors and obstetricians have prescribed opiates like they were candy. Evidence shows that marijuana might help us treat the opioid addiction pharmaceutical companies started. While I believe total legalization is a state’s rights issue, I would fully reschedule and decriminalize all marijuana and CBDs at the Federal level. As for pharmaceutical companies, I would completely dismantle their lobby, re-ban their commercials and end their stranglehold over America and American politics.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 1ST DISTRICT: ROGER MARSHALL Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? To continue to give the Big First District common-sense, conservative representation in Congress; continuing on the momentum of the greatest economy America has seen in decades. While we are wrapping up a final Farm Bill to get to the President’s desk, the historic Tax Cuts & Jobs Act is law, and fostered warp speed GDP growth, I believe there is still work to do to on fixing the out of control costs of healthcare and protecting our farmers from bad trade deals that could hurt the very markets they rely on to make a living. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? No. No. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? The entire spectacle has been a witch hunt from Day 1. Over a year later there’s zero evidence, zero leads, and zero credibility to the theory of collusion. The only facts that have come out of this have been an indictment on the past Administration using the FBI to spy on the Trump campaign and to use the FBI agents words “stop” Donald Trump from becoming President. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? NAFTA is the single most important pending issue for the Kansas economy, and it has tremendously helped maintain key trade

destinations for our commodities. Since its enactment ag trade with Canada and Mexico has increased more than six-fold and Kansas’ First District has become the most NAFTAdependent agricultural district in the country. Canada and now purchase more than $4.5 billion worth of Kansas’ goods each year. Kansas’ First District leads the country in agricultural production. Canada and Mexico lead the world in purchases of ag goods, including; wheat, sorghum, corn, pork, beef and dairy products. As Congress and the Administration work toward updating our trade agreements, we must make changes that INCREASE market access for American businesses. That means reducing tariffs and other trade barriers, as well as agreements that provide certainty for businesses. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? As a physician, hospital executive, and now your Congressman, I can say unequivocally that despite my voting for full repeal of Obamacare, I am still ashamed that the Senate did not have the political courage repeal and replace this awful piece of legislation. Congress needs to band together behind a plan — that includes key items such as risk sharing, HSA expansion and additional flexibility to states — in order to “stop the bleed” of this excessive cost of coverage since Obamacare. The (un)Affordable Care Act has forced extreme consolidation of insurance companies, skyrocketed the price of care for patients, and has limited the options of the patient. We must fix this one victory at a time — that is best approached by implementing policies that promote transparency, innovation, and consumerism, ensuring prices of care are easily

accessible to the public and that patients can be conscious consumers. More than ever, our healthcare debate needs to be framed around the patient and nothing else. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act is the single biggest accomplish of the the 115th Congress and I am proud to have supported it — the booming performance of this economy should suffice as an answer to its success. Record unemployment. Record wages. Record economic growth. Record stock market. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? Transgender individuals should not serve in the military. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? It was on every census since the 1960’s until the Obama Administration removed it in 2010. It’s a valid question and one that deems an answer. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Yes, and I have voted time and again to do so in Congress. This is a no brainer. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? As a physician, this hits close to home. 115 people die everyday from an opioid overdose in this country. Many of those addicted, started

ROGER W. MARSHALL (incumbent) Town of residency: Great Bend Party affiliation: Republican Age: 57 Job: Physician; congressman Prior elected offices: U.S. House, 1st District

with a legal prescription from their doctor — these drugs simply need far more monitorizaton. Physicians at the Hutch Clinic are actually leading the charge with their own plan of redeveloping patient-care protocols that have successfully moved many people off of opioids and onto better, more holistic treatment plans — including for acute post operative pain treatment, which is where many of the “hardest” medications are used. From a Congressional perspective, last week I was proud to have supported the authorization of some $5B in monies for new treatment and needed safeguards to combat over-access to addictive medications. I do not support the legalization of marijuana.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 1ST DISTRICT: NICK REINECKER Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? I am running because I am tired of RINO individuals playing politics with our national security that includes immigration, trade and our debt, our hard-working agricultural producers and our veterans. I desire not to be a politician seeking after money or a power grab from Agriculture to the Ways and Means committee. I desire to be a champion elected official and I pledge to be ever-vigilant to protect your God-given rights from all threats, both foreign and domestic and to pass laws that adhere to the constitution and provide tranquility for all. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? No. No. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russiaelection inquiry? If I have a moment to pause my advocating for the people of the Big 1st, I might talk to

AG Sessions to get his take on the situation. In general, I think it is a distraction to the real issue at hand. Making America Great Again. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? Not only do I think NAFTA as it stands has hurt the U.S. economy, it also has weakened our nation’s sovereignty and security. Trade is very important, but agreements must not take advantage of our nations exceptionalism, including intellectual property. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? No. It must be repealed and replaced. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? It is a bold tax cut, however we need more comprehensive tax reform that continues to put money back into the citizen’s pocket, where it belongs. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving?

I do not support the social experimentation of our military. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? I believe it is a reasonable question, even though it may skew the results if there is less participation. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Quick, fast and in a hurry. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? Alcohol, by constitutional amendment and tobacco, including engineered nicotine delivery systems, called cigarettes, that are fortified with ammonia and other harmful or potentially harmful constituents allowed by the FDA, are exempt from the Controlled Substances Act. The use, misuse and/or abuse of these fully legal and regulated substances are directly related to over 500,000 deaths per year. Nobody has ever died from cannabis, yet it remains in the top schedule of controlled substances. This is untenable, wrong and being

NICK REINECKER Town of residence: Inman Party affiliation: Republican Age: 40 Job: Manager at Inman Harvest Cafe Prior elected offices: None

conservative I side with individual liberty, limited government, and personal responsibility. I will take a hardline with synthetic drug dealers.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C3

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: PAUL DAVIS Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? The dysfunction of Washington has spiraled out of control, and I can’t sit back and do nothing. When bipartisanship becomes something that’s threatened by leaders as a last resort — rather than relied upon as the foundation for sound policymaking — the system has lost touch with America and no longer serves the public good. One person cannot change Congress alone, but every seat matters. I have a long history of building relationships across the aisle, finding compromise, and getting things done as an elected official here in Kansas. We need more with that mindset in the United States House of Representatives. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? I support the 2nd amendment and the individual right to bear arms. I’m also a dad, with a second grader who must practice “active shooter drills” with her classmates. Elected leaders have a responsibility to do more to keep our children safe, but they keep letting partisan politics get in the way. There are many commonsense, bipartisan ideas worthy of consideration to enhance gun safety without hampering constitutional rights. Some include strengthening the background check system so fewer violent criminals and domestic abusers get access to weapons, or laws to prevent individuals on terrorist watch lists from buying a gun. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russiaelection inquiry? Robert Mueller is a respected prosecutor and should be allowed to complete his investigation; I would be seriously concerned if any president intervened, regardless of party. I support bipartisan proposals in Congress to prevent this potential outcome, but I feel further politicization of the matter — before the investigation

concludes or evidence officially made public — is unhelpful. I’m focused on the issues I hear about every day in Kansas, which include the skyrocketing cost of healthcare, the rigged nature of our tax code to benefit corporations and the wealthy, and the dangerous stranglehold lobbyists and special interests currently have on Washington. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? I convened an agricultural advisory group early in my campaign, and I’ve hosted roundtable discussions with Kansas producers and suppliers throughout the district. Without question, they are more worried about the President’s trade war than anything else. I am very supportive of renegotiating NAFTA to protect Kansas jobs, with the caveat that it does not cost Kansas market access. Our state ranks seventh in the nation for agricultural exports, and we cannot grow if trade tensions continue to escalate. It is critical that trade policy protect Kansas producers, retain existing foreign markets, and develop new and emerging markets. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? A healthy America is a strong America, which is why access to healthcare is so vital to our prosperity. The ACA isn’t perfect, but we cannot fix its problems until the Republican Congress stops sabotaging the system. Allowing Medicare to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies would lower skyrocketing drug prices. Enforcing the law’s cost-sharing reductions would help stabilize the market and prevent massive premium spikes. Encouraging states like Kansas to expand Medicaid would give thousands more access to care. These are popular ideas that would tackle challenges I hear about most. Kansans are just waiting on Congress to stop playing politics. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? I support tax reform that helps middle class

Kansans who have been left behind as corporations raked in record profits. Instead, Congress passed a Brownback-style giveaway for special interests and campaign donors. It is exploding the national debt, stripping healthcare from 30,000 Kansans in this district, and ultimately raises taxes on Kansans earning less than $75,000 — all to pay for permanent corporate tax cuts. Under Brownback, Kansas learned the hard way that we couldn’t create jobs or move our state forward with a tax code that was upside down and backwards. The same holds true for our nation. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? I agree with John McCain, the Republican Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee: any American who meets current medical and readiness standards should be allowed to continue serving in our armed forces. All of our service members — and those who wish to serve — should be treated with dignity and respect. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? Former census bureau directors, census experts, and nonpartisan analysts have expressed grave concern about this issue and its impact on the accuracy of the next census. We should defer to the data experts. The Census is the foundation for nearly every policy decision because it shapes the redistricting process, ultimately determining who is elected to serve in Congress and state legislatures. It also impacts the distribution of billions of dollars in federal aide around the country. This is far too important to politicize. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? No. I have never politicized women’s health and I never will. Planned Parenthood is one of our nation’s largest healthcare providers for women. They provide affordable

PAUL DAVIS

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 45 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas House

birth control, vaccinations, lifesaving cancer screenings, testing and treatment for STDS, HIV screenings, miscarriage management, and other essential care to 2.5 million women each year. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? Washington’s gridlock hurts everyone, including state governments. In the last two decades, nearly 40 states have enacted some form of marijuana legalization — whether it be medicinal, recreational, or both. At the same time, pharmaceutical addictions have reached a level of crisis. Combined, this has created an increased urgency for federal policy change. States need both resources and guidance to respond to new crises and to regulate their own laws responsibly and safely. Instead, Washington does nothing, leaving states subject to the political whims of presidential administrations, which have tremendous leeway in how federal drug policies are enforced.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: VERNON FIELDS Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? It is my firm belief that the 2nd Congressional District of Kansas deserves a representative who will be held personally responsible for limiting the impact of government on our choices and freedoms, defending our great constitution, and improving the quality of life for all residents of Kansas. As this campaign continues to move forward, you will find my platform will always be grounded and guided by my faith in humanity, supporting the sanctity of life, encouraging personal responsibility, limiting government, and in support of our State and Federal Constitutions. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? I believe the 2nd Amendment is as important today as it was when it was first adopted. I do not believe the Amendment should be altered at this time. There are reasons that an individual may elect to bear Arms, which may include protecting their lives and livelihoods. Owning arms is a right afforded to Americans. I have avid family members who are hunters. I am a sportsman and enjoy safely participating in shooting activities. I truly believe our Second Amendment rights should not be infringed upon and I will work toward keeping any infringements from occurring for citizens of the 2nd Congressional District of Kansas. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry?

I believe it is important to continue the work of the special counsel. I also believe at the end of the inquiry, answers will be provided. At the end of the day, I believe the Russia-election inquiry will not result in a significant finding that will change the results of the election. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? Initially, NAFTA was helpful to the U.S. economy. While NAFTA was established (passed), time has evolved and demonstrated that NAFTA has not been a fair approach to keeping our U.S. economy strong and vibrant. The unintended consequences for our country must be addressed. Removing the restriction and tariff quotas on agriculture product would be a great start for Kansans. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? The overarching goal is to make health care available to individuals that need health care. As a health care provider, the Affordable Care Act could be improved by streamlining access to health care providers. As a Registered Nurse (RN), there is no doubt that healthcare is in bad shape in this country. We never know when we (or a person) get sick or will need health care services. I believe health care reform is important. With that being said, I believe any type of health care reform must include limiting governmental involvement in our (or your) health care choices. I want you to be in charge of your health care choices with the focus being on obtaining (and having) access

to health care services for all people. I will work toward improving access and more availability to health care facilities throughout the entire district and our great country. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? The Federal Tax Reform has been helpful in returning monies to citizens. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? I believe every American (if fit) can and should be able to serve. Serving in our great military services is an honor, keeping our military strong is important. Individuals serving in our military must comply with current military standards. Again, if the individual is fit for service, then they should be able to serve. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? Citizenship has always been important in determining if a person is a citizen of a specific country. If the intent is to measure (or count) the number of individuals living in this country, then the citizenship question is not necessary. However, if the intent is to measure (or count) the number of citizens, then the citizenship question is valid. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? I believe funding abortions is not a good use of federal funding. There are other

VERNON FIELDS

Town of residence: Basehor Party affiliation: Republican Age: 61 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Basehor City Council

valuable services (women’s health issues) that federal funding could be used, I do not believe using federal funding for abortion is a good use of federal funding. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? As a health care provider, I have been against the legalization of marijuana. While medical marijuana is appropriate for the treatment of some medical conditions, I do not support the overall legalization of marijuana.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: STEVE FITZGERALD Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? I am running to help implement the agenda that the American people approved in 2016. The United States must rebuild our military to restore American security and we must continue to grow our economy to ensure a secure and prosperous future for America. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? The 2nd amendment is a fundamental right guaranteed to all Americans, it should not be unjustly limited by the government. I’m proud to have been a sponsor of Kansas Senate Bill 45 that resulted in constitutional carry and to be a long-term life member of the NRA. Unfortunately, more work remains to be done as the federal government continues to exercise unwarranted and intrusive powers within the states. We need the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, so your right to self-defense is respected across state lines. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? So far, no compelling evidence of wrongdoing by the President has been introduced. Our elections must be secure, especially from foreign

and devious actors. If the President fired Robert Mueller, I would examine the evidence to ensure that it was on appropriate grounds. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you modify such trade agreements to protect the Kansas economy? Every trade deal can be said to hurt and help certain aspects of our economy. I am always open to ways to improve our trade deals, especially to protect the Kansas worker and farmer. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? Congress must use common-sense to reform our broken healthcare system. Obamacare has doubled premiums for many Kansas families, helped some, and hurt many small businesses. We need to restore our private market system of healthcare so that we can begin to lower barriers preventing high quality and affordable healthcare. What is your view of the federal tax reform bill signed in late 2017 by President Trump? The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is a great accomplishment of our current administration. Most families will be able to keep more of their money. Although I was concerned at first about the reports that the bill would raise taxes on the middle class, the bill lowers taxes, creates jobs, and grows the economy.

How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? Many medical and psychological conditions prevent citizens from serving in the military. I leave the decision of whether those suffering from such disorders are eligible to serve in active duty to the Surgeon General. Our military must be combat ready, not a place for social experiments. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? I fully support adding a citizenship question to the U.S. Census. “Sanctuary” states should not be rewarded with additional congressman for disregarding the rule of law. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Absolutely. The nation’s largest abortion provider makes its money from killing innocent children, at times selling their body parts. Instead, we should support local women’s health clinics that provide needed care. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? We need to make sure our laws distinguish between non-intoxicating medicinal use and recreational marijuana. I fought for industrial hemp here in Kansas. We need more

STEVE FITZGERALD

Town of residence: Leavenworth Party affiliation: Republican Age: 73 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate

research into cannabis’s effectiveness, impacts on patients, and side effects. The federal government has limited the ability of researchers to study medical cannabis. If the research shows it is effective I would fully support the ability of patients with a prescription from their doctor to receive medical cannabis from a licensed pharmacy. It should be treated as any other drug with the protocols that we have already.


C4  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: KEVIN JONES Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? I am running for Congress because I see a lack of true servant leaders in Washington, those focused on getting the job done, rather than pursuing a “career.” True service is not a career, it’s a deployment. You serve, and you return home. I have signed the term limits pledge that I will serve no more than three terms if voters choose to retain me for that time. My goals, if elected, are to work to bring jobs to the 2nd District of Kansas, curb our growing debt, and restore the Rule of Law in the administration of our government. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? The 2nd Amendment requires defending, not modification. Recent criminal activity would not be prevented by additional laws. Words in a statute will not cure evil lurking in a criminal’s heart, nor cure mental illness. Contrary to myth, background checks are already required of purchases at gun shows from federally licensed dealers. Federal studies show previous “black” gun bans did not reduce crime. Better would be to address the breakdown of the family, and a culture of permissive political correctness allowing indulgent behavior to escalate to destructive criminal behavior — and that is true of crimes beyond just those involving firearms. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? Given evidence of bias, criminal referrals of FBI personnel, and pending investigations of yet more FBI personnel revealed by the FBI Inspector General, the Mueller matter initiated by those now under suspicion, has become far too tainted to ever be fully trusted, no matter the result. If, after two years of investigation, Mueller has evidence of direct collusion between any American political campaign and a foreign power, he should present it or end his investigation. Important, however, is that those

now known to have abused their position, and possibly abused the civil rights of American citizens, must be held accountable. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you frame such trade agreements to better serve the Kansas economy? NAFTA helped and hurt our economy, crippling manufacturing, yet boosting agriculture. The US gained overall, but at a cost. Diminished manufacturing put the US at a competitive disadvantage and depressed wages. Both agriculture and manufacturing are critical to the 2nd District. Despite prior losses, Kansas manufacturing has had a modest rebound due to ample labor, welcoming communities, and geographic advantage. Rural opportunities for younger generations are fading. As agriculture advancements require fewer workers, manufacturing holds potential to rekindle communities. Trade deals must benefit Kansas agriculture, but hold promise for growing other opportunities, jobs and wages in the 2nd District. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Health Care Act? Obamacare should be repealed. For most Americans, particularly those on individual plans, health insurance premiums have skyrocketed, with choice virtually non-existent. Competition must be restored, allowing consumers, not government, to dictate the marketplace. Any portion of healthcare premiums paid by individuals should be fully tax deductible. Association plans should be encouraged, allowing Individuals to leverage better rates. Likewise, those with preexisting conditions should be provided high-risk pools to leverage better rates for their unique coverage needs. These are broad concepts. Fully addressing a complex matter affecting so many Americans will obviously require more discussion than the 100 words allowed here. What is your view of the federal tax reform legislation signed in late 2017 by President Trump? Recent federal tax reform has been positive — increased economic activity, job creation and

repatriation of capital previously kept overseas. The average American family is expected to save more than $2,000. However, congress failed to enact true tax simplification — there are still too many rules, too many gimmicks, and too many forms. Additionally, rate reductions for individuals should have been greater to fully offset eliminating personal exemptions and some itemized deductions. Most importantly, the reductions for individual taxpayers should have been permanent. Overall, the bill was a strong step in the right direction. Congress just needs to finish the job. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? As former Green Beret and Combat Medic, I don’t believe military service is an appropriate occupation for transgendered individuals, nor do I believe taxpayers should pay the medical bills for those serving to become transgendered or maintain their elective state. Long-term medical and psychological effects of transgenderism is still not fully known. Combat is a dangerous arena, it ain’t Hollywood. Introducing unnecessary variables is not wise and can jeopardize all involved. Focus is the key to a successful military. America is at war. Now is not the time to distract with issues not critical to our national security. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? It is appropriate to have a citizenship question on the census. The census is used to determine representation and aspects of governance at all levels, federal, state and local. It is absolutely appropriate that we know the distribution of citizens, not just merely those present, across our nation, for whom our government is to defend and benefit. Contrary to media hysteria, there is nothing invasive about this question, particularly when compared to current census questions regarding lifestyle, occupation, education, income, assets, vehicles, residence details, race, and marital status. I’m proud to be an American and will gladly check the box!

KEVIN JONES

Town of residence: Wellsville Party affiliation: Republican Age: 43 Job: Realtor Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Wellsville school board

Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Yes. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access of addictive pharmaceutical medicines? I would not favor legalization of marijuana for recreational use. As a former pastor, I counseled young people with addictions who naively began with recreational marijuana use and progressed to more powerful and addictive substances. Regarding pharmaceuticals, as a society, we must understand not every pain requires a pill. Prescriptions should have a purpose — sending people home with pills “just in case” is irresponsible. Medical practices must change, as should patient expectations. Current laws should be aggressively enforced, and stronger laws enacted to halt excessive prescription dispensing. However, we cannot credibly expect progress while at the same time legalizing marijuana.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: DOUG MAYS Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? I’m offering myself as an effective, experienced and proven leader who will represent the people of the second district and Kansas from day-one. As Speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives, I worked with all manner of Kansans with one goal in mind: to improve the lives Kansans. I’ve never been afraid to reach out to others who may have different philosophy or party. I am not a candidate because of an ego or a burning desire to build a political career. I got over that years ago. I simply want to find solutions to the many problems that currently afflict our beloved America. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? I do not favor modifying any of the amendments contained within this nation’s Bill of Rights. I would support more stringent background checks required to purchase firearms. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? In spite of the questionable existence of certain Special Council personnel and procedures involved in the Russia investigation, I do not believe the President should fire Robert Mueller. To do so would create a firestorm of condemnation that would further the divide us. So far as I can see, there has been no real evidence of wrong doing by this president. We must, however, let the process play out and the chips fall where they may (hopefully in our life time.) Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you frame such trade agreements to better serve the Kansas economy? In the 25 years since adoption, NAFTA has not

worked well for the U.S. economy. Job losses and wage stagnation have resulted largely due to competition from Mexican firms that has forced U.S. firms to relocate to Mexico. The U.S./ Mexico trade balance swung from a $1.7 billion U.S. surplus to a $71 billion deficit. The surge of imports from Mexico into the U.S. has coincided with the loss of over 1,000,000 U.S. jobs. We must tread carefully when considering tariffs. This is especially true with agriculture, where history has demonstrated that high tariffs can result in previously nonexistent competition from other nations. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? Health insurance needs to be portable and affordable. A good start would be setting a framework for associated health plans so that small businesses and individuals can join together to negotiate for cheaper health care premiums and keep costs low for employees and other participants. Health insurance companies should be allowed to cross state lines to give individuals more options and provide for more competition resulting in lower costs. They should also be able to offer basic health care coverage without federally imposed mandates that can drive up costs. What is your view of the federal tax reform legislation signed in late 2017 by President Trump? The tax reform package enacted by Congress in 2017 has already resulted in substantial growth in the U.S. economy. A GNP approaching 4.0%, significant job increases in all sectors, and a rapidly declining unemployment rate are positive results. This is encouraging, especially when it generally takes at least two years to see demonstrative results. The most promising outcome is the growing sense of optimism within the U.S. business community that leads to greater investment and job creation,

particularly within manufacturing. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? When it comes to national defense, we must trust Secretary James Mattis and Gen. Joe Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff regarding issues of the readiness of our armed forces. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? I believe that a reliable count of who among us are U.S. citizens, and who are not is legitimate. The information gathered by the census is vital for accurate drawing of representative districts. It is also an invaluable tool for assessment of population shifts and trends that can be used to plan for provision of transportation, schools, health care, utilities, etc. All information gathered from individuals, citizens or not, must remain absolutely confidential. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Congress is considering a plan that would impose a one-year freeze on federal funding for organizations that provide abortion services. Instead, the legislation will increase funding for Federal Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), which are community-based, patient-centered organizations that provide health services to medically underserved individuals. Unlike boutique clinics such as Planned Parenthood’s, FQHCs provide comprehensive medical, dental, mental health and other primary care services. These services also include STD testing and cancer screening. I would vote in favor of the proposed legislation. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines?

DOUG MAYS

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 67 Job: Investment management Prior elected offices: Speaker of the Kansas House, 2003-05; Topeka City Council, 1985-89

Legalization of marijuana is a state issue. Were I still in the Kansas Legislature, I would vote against it. Opioid addiction is a growing scourge in America. Opioid overdose deaths now outnumber those due to breast cancer. To date, there has been no national policy in response. There is a wide spectrum of suggested strategies from interested parties such as the AMA, DEA, FDA CDC, etc., but a compressive plan remains elusive. It is an epidemic that must be addressed on a national basis. At this time, all I can do is to pledge to support any and all efforts to gain control of the distribution, abuse, and treatment of opioids and other addictive drugs responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of individuals from all walks of life in America.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: DENNIS PYLE Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? Several years ago, when I ran for the Kansas legislature, I did so because I was frustrated with what was happening in Topeka, and I wanted a better Kansas for my young daughters. They are grown now, but I have that same feeling when I look at my granddaughters. Washington is broken. I applaud some of the changes President Trump has made (cut taxes, reducing regulations, etc), but there is more to do. We need all of the conservative voices we can get to grow our economy. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? I have always and will always support the 2nd Amendment. I don’t believe we should modify it. The right to bear arms should be protected in this country. We shouldn’t ignore mental health issues or the evils of our society, but punishing law-abiding citizens is not the way to go. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? It’s a difficult question to answer as someone who probably doesn’t have all of the facts

in front of me. I respect the rule of law, but I also respect the office of the President. The President has said that he has no intention of firing Mueller. The longer this goes on with no clear findings, the more I think the American people get fatigued by it. I would want there to be action taken sooner rather than later, or urge the investigation to come to a close. It is wasting taxpayer dollars if there is no substance. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you frame such trade agreements to better serve the Kansas economy? Trade agreements should be made with the US’s best interest in mind. Period. We’ve gone along with our trade deficit for far too long. I certainly believe this is a priority in making America great again. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? Well, first of all, I believe it needs to be repealed. We seem to have wandered away from this conversation, but it’s still what I believe should happen. Healthcare costs for the middle class in America have skyrocketed to unsustainable rates, and this can’t continue. Your healthcare premium shouldn’t cost more than your home mortgage.

What is your view of the federal tax reform legislation signed in late 2017 by President Trump? I’m always supportive of decreasing taxes, and I applaud the President for vigilantly pursuing this. Putting more money back into the taxpayers and into the economy is key. How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? These decisions should be made by those in leadership of our military who know how best to defend our nation and keep the US military in the position of strength and leader of the free world. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? I think this is a common sense idea and should be implemented. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Absolutely. Taxpayer funded abortions must end. I supported ending state funding to Planned Parenthood in the legislature, and I would do the same on the federal level. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to

DENNIS PYLE

Town of residence: Hiawatha Party affiliation: Republican Age: 57 Job: Farmer Prior elected offices: Kansas House, two years; Kansas Senate, 14 years

addictive pharmaceutical medicines? The legalization of marijuana should be an issue left up to the states. As far as pharmaceuticals, that is between a patient and doctor. Our medical providers must prescribe these medicines with care, but it’s best that we trust the medical professionals for steps to take in this important matter.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C5

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: CARYN TYSON Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? As a small business owner, rancher, and a software engineer, I will be a strong voice for fiscal responsibility and economic growth. I will work to curb government waste and keep taxes low. My diverse business background and experience as a citizen legislator, not a career politician, will be an asset in Washington. I support President Trump’s efforts to “drain the swamp” and get government spending under control.

Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you frame such trade agreements to better serve the Kansas economy? NAFTA has not been a fair agreement. If our farmers and ranchers were competing on a fair and level playing field, our exports would increase, benefiting our Kansas economy. People talk of free trade but the world has been feeding off of American generosity for years and we cannot continue to subsidize our competition.

Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? The 2nd Amendment should not be modified. Put a gun on an undisturbed table for years and it will not shoot anyone. The gun is not the problem, the person misusing it is the problem. We must improve our ability to help mentally disturbed individuals who are susceptible to violence, and we must secure our schools.

Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? Repealing the individual mandate was a step in the right direction. Costs are still out of control and we need to repeal Obamacare while keeping some of the benefits such as coverage of pre-existing conditions and dependent care to 26 years of age. We need to get government out of the relationship between you and your doctor.

How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? The President will probably not fire Mueller. We do need to make sure our elections are secure and increase cyber security in the United States.

What is your view of the federal tax reform legislation signed in late 2017 by President Trump? Just look at the results of the federal tax reform legislation; more jobs, less unemployment, better wages, and a booming economy. The tax cuts need to be made permanent.

How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? Military leadership is already evaluating transgender troops and we should give them the time to explore this issue and provide recommendations. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? Yes, citizenship should be asked on the U.S. Census because the count is used to determine representation in government. For example, Kansas has four U.S. House seats. If citizens are not distinguished, Kansas could decrease to three or less U.S. House seats, losing representation while other states, such as California gain seats. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Yes, Congress should end all federal funding of Planned Parenthood. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? The opioid addiction and local production of methamphetamine has reached crises proportion and fentanyl, a cause of many of the opioid deaths, is being trafficked across our southern

CARYN TYSON

Town of residence: Parker Party affiliation: Republican Age: 55 Job: information technology Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate; Kansas House

borders. This must be addressed. On the positive side, the recently enacted legislation that allows experimental drugs to be used for the terminally ill is a good thing. These dying people were searching the world over for help and now have hope here at home.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE — 2ND DISTRICT: STEVE WATKINS Why are you running for a seat in the U.S. House? I am running to bring military leadership and Kansas values to Washington, all in an effort to combat the gridlock and hyper-partisanship that has plagued progress for decades. Throughout my military service I learned how to lead individuals from a myriad of backgrounds and execute plans under pressure in rigorous environments. I look forward to the opportunity to bring that experience, as well as my real-world expertise that I have gained as a engineer and small businessman, to Congress if given the chance by the people of the Second District of Kansas. Do you believe the 2nd Amendment should be modified? If so, how? If not, should there be new gun restrictions to deal with what appears to be an epidemic of mass shootings? The 2nd amendment should not be modified. There is no constitutional freedoms without the 2nd amendment, it is the fail safe of our republic and without it there are no other freedoms. The 2nd amendment exists to protect us. Taking away guns from law-abiding citizens does not protect them, it only puts guns in the hands of criminals who do not mind breaking the law. We should debate the issue of mass shootings. A cornerstone of those debates must be mental health — that’s the crux of this issue and needs to be addressed across the board. How would you respond if President Trump fired special counsel Robert Mueller? Generally, what do you think of the Russia-election inquiry? I support the need for transparency throughout government, especially when it comes to securing our elections. However, I am not going to comment on hypotheticals. It’s painfully obvious that special counsel Mueller had failed to come up with evidence that proves there was collusion, but I would encourage the President to see the investigation through till the end. It is unfortunate that Attorney General Jeff Sessions chose to recuse himself, this investigation could have been done without his recusal and much

swifter instead of simply distracting republicans from implementing the President’s agenda. Has NAFTA done more to help or hurt the U.S. economy? How would you frame such trade agreements to better serve the Kansas economy? I believe in free trade. I think it’s the role of our government to get out of the way and facilitate markets, not inhibit growers. Now, this matters in particular to our farmers. It’s the role of government to facilitate that, not impede it. I believe the U.S. could benefit from renegotiating NAFTA, if done for economic gain, not partisan politics. A complete and hasteful withdrawal would disrupt supply chains that benefit the American worker. The economies of the U.S., Canada and Mexico are interdependent, which helps make, for example, the U.S. auto industry competitive globally. Can you outline how Congress should reform the Affordable Care Act? The Affordable Care Act should be repealed completely. Repeal is what Republicans promised for the last eight years and I am incredibly disappointed that they failed to deliver on their promise despite controlling the federal government since the 2016 election. I’ve been a member of the greater Stormont Vail medical community since I was 6 years old. My father and wife are doctors, so Healthcare is a very important topic for me. Solutions to our problems should be found in establishing in capitalism, transparency, and competition. That drives down costs, increases innovation, and quality. In Washington, I will fight for a patientcentered healthcare system. (99/100) What is your view of the federal tax reform legislation signed in late 2017 by President Trump? The tax reform package passed by Congress and signed into law by the President is one of the biggest wins of his presidency thus far. The lowering of the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% is one of the premier pro-growth policies

passed by the GOP led Congress and authorized by the President, a real testament to what the Conservative vision of low taxes can really look like if given a chance to be brought to reality. A typical family of four in the second district is seeing a federal income tax cut of just over $2,200. (104/100). How should transgender troops be integrated into the military? Or, should they be blocked from serving? I respect commanders throughout the military and will always take their opinions under consideration — even knowing that their opinions, the military, and American cultures evolve. That said, anyone who wants to serve shouldn’t be blocked from serving, assuming they can pass the current physical and mental health requirements outlined by the DOD or their Branch of the Military. Neither the military, nor the taxpayers, should be required to fund voluntary medical procedures desired by individuals. What do you think about including a citizenship question on the U.S. Census? I fully support a citizenship question on the U.S. Census. The government must do everything it can to ensure the data collected in the census are accurate. Working families in Kansas should not miss out on critical resources because undocumented immigrants skew data which, in 2020, will cost the government over $15 billion to collect. These data are important because they help to determine how the federal government allocates resources and we elect servant leaders. If numbers are inaccurate or inflated the weight of an citizen's vote will be inaccurate too, which violates our values as Americans. Should Congress move to end all federal funding to Planned Parenthood? Yes. Planned Parenthood is in the business of murdering our most defenseless: the unborn. Currently, the only protection afforded to those in the womb is the Hyde Amendment. This does not go far enough. Under the current

VO T I N G G U I D E L I N E S

Follow these steps to ensure your vote counts The Capital-Journal

Kansans will cast their votes in the primary election on Aug. 7 to determine the Democrats and Republicans who will advance to the general election in November. Here is some information from the Kansas Secretary of State’s website that might be helpful during this election cycle. When are the polls open for the Aug. 7 primary election? The polls for the primary election will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. How do I find out where I vote? Contact your county election officer. A list of county election officers and contact information is available at bit.ly/2uiLOan. How do I register to vote? There are three steps. 1. Obtain the voter registration application. You may use the Kansas form or the federal form. (a) The Kansas Voter Registration Application form is available for printing on the Secretary of State’s website, bit.ly/CJvoterform, and on the various county websites. It is also available at many locations established by the county election officer. Banks, libraries, schools and government offices usually have the form. Also, everyone has an opportunity to register when applying for or renewing a driver’s license or applying for public assistance. (b) The federal Voter Registration Application is accepted in Kansas. The federal form is found at bit.ly/CJfederal.

Voters will take to the polls on Aug. 7 to pick the Democrats and Republicans they want to advance to the general election in November. Polls during the primary election will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. [2016 FILE PHOTO/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL] 2. Fill out the application legibly and completely, then sign it. 3. Deliver the completed application in person or by mail, fax or email to the county election officer in the county where you live. It must be returned no later than the 21st day before any election. Where can I get election results? For local election results, contact your county election officer. For state and national results, contact the Secretary of State’s office at (785) 296-4561. The Secretary of State’s office and some local county election offices may post the results online as they come in on election night.

What do I need to know about advance voting? With advance voting, any registered voter can vote by mail or in person before Election Day. An advance voting application can be found at bit.ly/CJadvance, or you can contact your county election officer to request an application for an advance voting ballot. Complete the application and return it to your county election officer. You can have your ballot mailed to you starting 20 days before the election. You may vote in person in the county election office starting the Tuesday before Election Day, or up to 20 days before the election, depending on the county.

STEVE WATKINS

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 41 Job: Engineer Prior elected offices: None

provisions set aside in the Hyde Amendment, no US Taxpayer money can go towards funding abortion. However, it does not prevent money from reaching Planned Parenthood, at which point we can’t see where the money is used. I would like to see that changed and look forward to being a part of that effort. How would you reform federal drug policy — from legalization of marijuana to the access to addictive pharmaceutical medicines? A strong strategy must be implemented to tackle the Opioid epidemic that plagues much of America, and even affects communities in Southeast Kansas. We must do all we can to empower the men and women of Law Enforcement to stop the trafficking of narcotics on the streets of our local communities. It is imperative to educate our children on the dangers of using illegal narcotics. I am also open to reviewing the findings of studies conducted into the effectiveness of medicinal marijuana as a treatment for certain conditions.

All ballots must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received no later than three days after the election. Any mailed advance ballot may be hand-delivered to the county election office or any polling place within the county by close of polls on Election Day. Sick, disabled or non-English proficient voters may receive assistance in applying for and casting advance voting ballots. Here are some important advance voting dates for the 2018 election cycle: July 17: Last day to register to vote before the primary election. July 18: First day advance ballots are mailed. In person advance voting may begin. Contact your county election officer to find out when and where. July 31: Deadline for voters to apply for advance voting ballots to be mailed for primary election. Aug. 6: Noon deadline to cast advance voting ballots in person at your county election office. Aug. 7 (primary Election Day): Mailed advance voting ballots must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received in the county election office no later than the third day following the election. Advance ballots may be hand-delivered to the county election office or to any polling place within the county by close of polls. Oct. 16: Last day to register to vote before the general election. Oct. 17: First day advance ballots are mailed. In person advance voting may begin. Contact your county election office to find out when and where. Oct. 30: Deadline for voters to apply for advance voting ballots to be mailed for general election. Nov. 5: Noon deadline to cast advance voting ballots in person at county election office. Nov. 6 (general Election Day): Mailed advance voting ballots must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received in the county election office no later than the third day following the election. Advance ballots may be hand-delivered to the county election office or to any polling place within the county by close of polls. For more information, call (800) 262-8683.


C6  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS GOVERNOR: ARDEN ANDERSEN Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I am running for governor because I, like most Kansans and tax payers in every state, am tired of the politics as usual promises of career politicians. I am tired of partisan bickering and deadlock, of incompetent politicians making ridiculous, inoperable legislation for political favoritism and special interest profit, and of reelection sound bites that never actually solve our healthcare, education, public health and safety, infrastructure, human rights, and environmental problems. I am running because as a family physician, public health professional, farmer and farm consultant, teacher, and Colonel in the Air Force Reserves, I have the holistic perspective, training, and understanding of how healthcare is connected to agriculture connected to public health and safety connected to infrastructure connected to education and human rights. The legislature governs/rules by committee and consensus. The Governor has to make executive decisions, has to have the knowledge of the holistic connection of all areas to make the best decision for all people. I make life and death decisions daily. Many times leaders do not have the luxury of leading by committee, rather have to make an executive decision in crisis. If I am not to able make a good decision in an emergency crisis myself, I will not be able to make a better decision with all the information given to me by others. I am the candidate for Governor that has that needed executive decision making savvy for solving our healthcare, education, infrastructure, and human rights issues, just to name a few. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Most every Kansan acknowledges that the Brownback experiment nearly bankrupted the state. First, it is foolish to think that giving tax money back to corporations will translate to an increase in hiring of workers. Businesses hire workers when their business expands to the point of needing more employees and not before. Employee compensation is tax deductible for corporations, so tax refunds have no bearing in

the hiring decision. Second, basic business sense tells us that when you have significant debt and you get excess revenue funds, you pay those funds on the debt, not go out and splurge the excess funds. The reality is that we just got the tax rates back to where they were before the disastrous experiment, levels that had previously given the state nearly a billion dollar surplus. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I think that is yet to be seen as the legislative analysis report said it would take between $450 million and $2 Billion. $525 million is on the low end of that recommendation. As Governor, I plan to hold 3 to 4 regional teacher forums to collect the information from teachers as to what they require to achieve their mission in teaching our children. (As an Air Force Reserve Colonel I am “ mission oriented.”) We need to know what supplies, what staffing, what equipment, and what specifics they need. With this information, we build a budget from the classroom up. The most important question is not what the Court requires, but rather what do teachers require as they are at the ground level of what education is all about in the first place. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? Absolutely not. We have a 3 branch system for a reason and we cannot amend the constitution every time a special interest group doesn’t like what the judicial branch rules. There was a reason we put the education clause into the Constitution in the first place. The legislature needs to honor that, do their duty, and get on with the business at hand. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? It is always about cost or the availability of State funds. The current budget is $3.3 billion plus or minus a few million covering about 370,000 people. We have 380,000 uninsured in

Kanasas. That translates to $8700 spent per person. Nearly half that money goes to pay big corporation profits and bonuses. Australia spends roughly $4300 per person(that includes mental healthcare). My plan is to deprivation the Brownback/Coyler privatization, get legislation passed/lobby for passage, allowing Medicaid to negotiate drug, laboratory, and radiology services so that we cut the private corporate rape of our tax dollars. The target is $4300 per person, which means we can expand the covered pool of Kansans by nearly 370,000 with NO INCREASE IN TAXES OR SPENDING. This will cover nearly 750,000 Kansans total or everyone below $36,000 in income — so yes, with these funds and no need for tax increase, we can expand the eligibility 300%, helping more of those in poverty. This would be a great shot in the arm for the inner cities and rural communities, public health in general, and small employers who could now raise wages not having to worry about healthcare premiums. I have been saying this for a year in my campaign. Only recently have the other democratic candidates actually listened to my remarks and copy my suggestions. Problem is, they aren’t family doctors, public health professionals, or military medical officers trained in the business. I am. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? This is not appropriate. It is an excuse to kick the can down the road. We are several hundred million behind on road, bridges, and other infrastructure repair, replacement, and new construction. Infrastructure is the foundation of economic growth and public safety. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? We first implement full background checks and cooperation between state and federal law enforcement agencies on domestic abuse and criminal activity. These ideas are supported by the NRA, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to get both parties to agree. Next, we need to limit any gun purchasing by people who are

ARDEN ANDERSEN

Town of residence: Olathe Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 60 Job: Physician Prior elected offices: None

diagnosed with mental illness or taking any medication with a package insert warning that this medication can cause suicidal and homicidal behavior. As a flight surgeon and Chief of Aerospace Medicine in the Air Force Reserves, I personally evaluate all security forces personnel in our Wing and follow Air Force regulations which state these people are not allowed to carry. Military security forces are well trained to be safe and conscientious, yet we do not allow them to carry if they have the above issues. Why in the world do we allow civilians with the potential to become homicidal and with little or no training carry? How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? We need to follow federal law and allowance of pregnancy termination up to 24 weeks. Under 24 weeks, fetuses are not viable outside of the womb. Contrary to the anti-abortion factions, pregnancy termination is not a cavalier decision by women. It is not a common means of birth control nor something they use to excuse promiscuity. Rape and incestual pregnancy are an unfortunate reality in our society, and women must have the right terminate these violently obtained pregnancies.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS GOVERNOR: CARL BREWER Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I’ve seen how policy decisions are affecting our communities and our residents, and it needs to change. Too many citizens’ needs are not getting addressed. Our state will continue to face increasing problems if change doesn’t happen, and happen soon. I am the best candidate to beat Kris Kobach and the one to ensure a safe and successful quality of life for all Kansans. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? We certainly want to get away from increasing the sales tax. What we need is a fair tax system that taxes the appropriate things and doesn’t put a disproportionate burden on lowincome Kansans. We need to work towards the ultimate goal of eliminating tax on our food. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? No. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of

state aid to public school districts? No. If legislators won’t adequately and fairly fund our schools, we need to have such measures as these in place to protect the future of education in Kansas. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? We should expand medicaid. It’s unacceptable for any Kansan to be in a position where their livelihood can be suddenly at risk by an accident or a serious illness that comes with crippling medical bills. No person should fall in the gap that keeps them from being able to have the medical and mental health care they need. If any implementation is done regarding requiring work requirements for recipients, we need to ensure the measurement of what determines who is “able-bodied” is fair and equitable — not just regarding physical considerations, but also matters of mental health. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? This is not appropriate. We need to ensure the funds are there to maintain our

infrastructure throughout the state. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? From my 21 years in the military, I know how easily high-powered weapons can be misused or accidentally discharged, and how fast they can be fired with devastating results. As Governor, I will support and sign a law banning the sale as well as the sale or usage of bullet-storage devices that hold more than 15 rounds. We need universal background checks on every purchase of a firearm in Kansas, with the sole exception of the inheritance or gifting of firearms within a family. Also, we need to repeal the permission to carry weapons onto a college campus. We deserve to live in a nation that is free from fear that our children will be attacked in their classrooms. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? Abortion services should be classified as part of health care. And I believe health care access is crucial to building and maintaining a productive and healthy Kansas. Health care must be affordable, accessible and comprehensive. As Governor, I promise to protect and expand women and children’s health care access. This must include access to the full spectrum of women’s

CARL BREWER

Town of residence: Wichita Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 61 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Wichita mayor; Wichita City Council

reproductive health care needs. We must reduce the teen pregnancy rate and tackle the extraordinary economic consequences of babies having babies. I will increase access to prenatal care and infant access to primary care, and prioritize reducing Kansas’ high infant mortality rate.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS GOVERNOR: LAURA KELLY Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I grew up in a military family, which meant living all over the world. By the time I was 15, I’d moved 12 times. But when my husband, Ted Daughety, and I got married and became parents, we wanted to put down roots. Kansas was the obvious choice. We came here because of the stellar public schools and the strong sense of community. Our two daughters got a world-class education here because of great schools and excellent teachers. That’s why I’m running for governor — to make sure each Kansas child has the same opportunities to succeed my daughters did. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The failed Brownback tax experiment severely damaged our state, decimated our schools and hurt our communities. It resulted in our tax system being completely out of balance. I lead the bipartisan effort to reverse the tax experiment so we could once again invest in our schools, roads and growing our economy. I will work to reestablish the balance between property, sales and income taxes. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? The Kansas Supreme Court ruled recently that changes to the funding formula for schools — which I supported — were constitutional. This will ensure that money is distributed more

fairly. However, the legislature and the new governor must still adjust funding levels to account for inflation this coming year. I will encourage that change to be made quickly. As governor, I will work with teachers, administrators, parents and other experts to set goals and fully fund our schools. Instead of focusing on doing the minimum, we will begin to plan and innovate. We will make sure Kansas has the best school in the nation so our children can be ready for the jobs of the future. And I will use my budget expertise to ensure Kansas can continue to meet the needs of our students in the years to come. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? No, we should absolutely not amend the Kansas Constitution. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? I have always supported expanding Medicaid. It is critical to ensure 150,000 additional Kansans can have access to quality, affordable healthcare. It is also important to our hospitals and clinics — especially in rural Kansas — and our economy. Expanding Medicaid will have a significant positive economic impact on our state, increasing the number of high paying jobs by thousands. To date, Kansas has left over $2 billion of taxpayer

money in Washington to be distributed to other states. I do not support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients. There are no data that backs up the need for such a requirement. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? Due to the failed Brownback tax plan, more than $2 billion has been swept from the transportation fund to cover budget holes. Many projects have been eliminated or significantly delayed, especially in rural communities. When I’m governor this will change. Just last year, I led the effort to reverse the failed Brownback tax experiment and put Kansas on the road to recovery. Once revenue is stable, we will reinvest in the transportation plan and make sure our roads are well maintained and that rural Kansas sees important expansions finished in a timely fashion. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I’ve always been a strong supporter of the second amendment. But we can respect and defend the rights of Kansas gun owners, while also taking effective steps to keep our children and families safe. That’s why two years ago I voted to ban guns in public hospitals, mental health centers and college campuses. This year, I voted for a bill that makes it illegal for anyone convicted of domestic violence to possess a gun. I also supported common sense

LAURA KELLY

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 68 Job: Legislator Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate

safety regulations like requiring background checks, banning bump stocks, and limiting access to assault weapons that were designed for combat zones. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? We need to protect a woman’s right to make her own informed, safe decisions about her body. Kansas already has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country. As governor, I will make sure women’s have access to healthcare options.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C7

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS GOVERNOR: JOSH SVATY Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? My wife Kimberly and I love our state and hope our children will experience the same quality of life and economic opportunities we have experienced. In recent years our State’s leaders have failed to face and tackle the challenges of today, which spurred me to put my name on the line to help find ways to restore an optimistic spirit for Kansas, to rebuild the public’s confidence in our future, and to relaunch an economy in which good jobs are available for young Kansans ready to make their mark and build their future in Kansas.

2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I believe leadership requires that we look first at how consistently we address and strive to meet the constitutional mandates as we see them, principally, that our schools be adequately funded, and that the funds be equitably distributed. Recent court challenges were caused by Governors and Legislators who failed to do their jobs. We should not blame the courts for this lack of leadership. Instead we must elect and support leaders who will take steps to do the best that we can for our children and for our teaching professionals.

What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The decision to slash the State’s income taxes threw the State’s entire financial health into chaos. The legislative decision to reverse those revenue cuts was a good step back toward responsible fiscal stewardship. The sales tax should never be relied upon excessively. I favor a balanced reliance on sales, property, and income taxes. That is more fair and reliable. The most important tax reform we should consider in our next review of state tax policy should be to reduce and eventually repeal the truly indefensible sales tax on food.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? No. Governors and Legislators are not above the law. When they fail to do their jobs, the Courts must intervene on behalf of our children.

Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the

Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? The State should expand KanCare to enable tens of thousands of working Kansans to be able to afford health care. The available Federal dollars are our dollars, and it has been

a foolish policy that has turned aside billions of dollars which would have greatly benefited the Kansas economy during our recent fiscal challenges. I would be open to any well-devised programs which improve the chances of any Kansan to improve their economic opportunities. I currently see no need for those programs to be wedded to our health care policies. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? Highway funds save lives by maintaining safe roads and bridges and create good jobs for Kansas workers. The repeated transfers of dollars out of the highway fund into the general fund must stop. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? Many of the reasonable restrictions we put in place when I helped pass the first concealed carry law — such as training and requiring a permit to carry — were unfortunately removed when the Legislature passed “constitutional carry”. I believe in a person’s right to carry but I also believe it is appropriate for the state to ask that that person have some knowledge of how to handle the weapon. Also, I do not support arming teachers in classrooms. How would you reform state law regarding

JOSH SVATY

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 38 Job: Farming Prior elected offices: Kansas House

availability of abortion services? I would veto any new restrictions on women’s reproductive rights. The state should not be spending millions of dollars defending laws it knows are unconstitutional. Also, I believe the state should focus on access to women’s health across the state, particularly in rural or underserved areas where a lack of access to vaccines, sex education, screenings, and contraceptives is affecting myriad health outcomes.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS GOVERNOR: JIM BARNETT Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I want Kansas to be a state where people want to live, work and raise a family. During the Brownback/Colyer years, we became a state that lives month to month, paycheck to paycheck and is passing credit card debt to our children and grandchildren. Kansas has to elect a Governor that will pivot, or we will never again see the Kansas we used to know and love. The Barnett/Hansen ticket is the only Republican alternative willing to make the investments and hard decisions to save our state. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The Browback/Colyer tax experiment brought great harm to our state and it will take a decade to a generation to recover. Sales tax on food is the worst tax for the impoverished. The legislature had to override the Governor’s veto in 2017, in order to restore a new economic foundation for Kansas. I support their efforts. Governor Colyer is still taking money from KDOT, delaying KPERS payments and raiding every cookie jar possible. It is time to balance our budget and put money in the bank. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? No. I do not think schools have been

adequately funded and believe that an inflation factor is appropriate and necessary for future years of school funding.

that work requirements are not successful and people are actually more able to work if they have access to healthcare.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? No. This issue is about our kids, not the court. We should invest in their future, which is our future. We have sent a message across the state that Kansas does not value teachers or education. Teachers tell their own children not to go into education. The economics do not make sense and the state has taken respect away from teachers. As Governor/Lt. Governor, we will change that narrative.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? This is crazy. Kansas has eaten all of its seed corn. Because the highway fund has been raided, we are not positioned to grow economically, nor compete with the nation. Since Brownback/Colyer took office, the state has bonded over $1.3 billion dollars in 20 year interest only bonds. Principal payments do not start for 20 years. Our current road resurfacing programs now come from 20 year interest only bonds, prior to paying principal. The roads will be worn out, before our children and grandchildren pay any principal.

Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? The state should expand Medicaid for both humanitarian and economic reasons. If you do not have access to health care, you wait until it is too late and lose a limb or a life. This is Governor Colyer’s pet project and no doubt, many of our fellow citizens have needlessly suffered under Kancare and failure to expand Medicaid. If a community loses a hospital, it is like losing your school. I want all able bodied people to work. Many are working multiple jobs now and cannot afford healthcare. Studies show

In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? The fist action to be taken is restoration of a functioning mental health system. Mental healthcare has been systematically dismantled during the Brownback/Colyer years. We now address mental healthcare in Kansas in 4 ways: hospital ER’s, jails, schools and our homeless shelters. None are appropriate, effective or safe. This is not what Kansas is about. The second action is to address generational failure of the family and poverty. Both lead to drug related violence. The second action starts with helping

JIM BARNETT

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 63 Job: Physician Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate; Emporia school board

young children through very early childhood education and support for broken or struggling families. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I have practiced medicine for 36 years, working to preserve and protect life. I am pro-life and support current law. Pro-life means from the unborn, all the way to natural death.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS GOVERNOR: JEFF COLYER Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? Kansas is the true heart of America. I am a fifth-generation Kansan from Hays and grew up in an environment with many opportunities to succeed. However, many of our children are packing up and moving to states like Texas and Colorado to start their lives. My highest priority is to make Kansas the place where our children see their future. They must have opportunities to succeed and thrive right here at home. To accomplish that goal, we must focus on improving Kansas’ great education system, increasing economic opportunity, creating a skilled labor pool, maintaining our first-rate transportation network, emphasizing our competitive cost of living, and ensuring we have a low-tax and low-regulation environment. I pledge to listen, serve, and lead as we work to accomplish these goals and in doing so, make Kansas a better place. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? I have never voted to raise taxes. I worked as a White House Fellow for President Reagan which helped form my philosophy as a low-tax fiscal conservative. I support common-sense solutions to lower taxes, and certainly oppose another tax increase. For a state dealing with stagnant population growth, common sense tells us that continuing to raise taxes higher than our neighbors will only exacerbate that problem. As businesses make decisions about where they should relocate or grow, tax policy is a crucial factor. As Governor, I support policies that keep taxes low on families and businesses, while ensuring they are predictable, fair, and easy to understand for everyone. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution?

When I became Governor, I called on the Legislature to keep schools open, invest in education over multiple years without raising taxes, and focus on improving student outcomes. We got it done. The solution is a good faith effort to make a strong investment in our children and the future of our state. It resolves the equity issues so children in Galena, Hays, Salina, or Overland Park will have the same educational opportunities. It includes measurable outcomes through the accreditation system, which are absolutely key to getting the focus back on Kansas kids. I look forward to building upon the work we did together this year to address the remaining issues and focus on sending dollars to the classroom without raising taxes. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? We’ve had 10 straight Governors, 5 Republicans and 5 Democrats, who have led with the cloud of school finance litigation hanging over their heads. I believe it’s time to let the people of Kansas weigh in and decide this issue. They changed the constitution in the 1960s by adding provisions on what comprises suitable provision for the finance of education, and they should get to decide again if they still support that or if they want to change it. I support letting the people vote. The amendment is one way to end decades of school finance litigation. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? I’ve been fighting Obamacare, and its skyrocketing premiums with shrinking benefits, since before it passed. Medicaid expansion is not financially sustainable, and it focuses

on the wrong people. I’m focused on supporting mental health and fighting for rural hospitals. We’ve been working with sheriffs and local mental health centers to reform the mental health system to get Kansans the care they need. I’m from Hays and understand what rural hospitals mean for our communities. Obamacare’s Medicare cuts have been devastating. That’s why we increased our investments in hospitals and nursing facilities. I support work requirements in our current program to help people improve health by achieving independence. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? Infrastructure funding is critical to the economic development of our state. Highway funding sweeps have plagued the state budget, and we need to get back on track. As Governor, I am focusing on a new infrastructure framework to help rebuild roads, bridges, railways, and airports. I signed a bill to create a transportation task force to take into account the input of business and community leaders, legislators, local governments, and other stakeholders as we figure out how to fund our transportation priorities over the next several years. We must achieve sustainable solutions from Kansans for Kansans. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I signed a bill this session to make it harder for those convicted of domestic violence to access firearms. Other changes I support include ensuring that law-abiding citizens can legally bring their firearms with them in other states that allow concealed carry. I support allowing 18-20-year-old adults, many of whom fight on behalf of our country in the military, to exercise their second amendment rights. I am against restrictions which limit citizens’

JEFF COLYER (incumbent)

Town of residence: Overland Park Party affiliation: Republican Age: 58 Job: Physician Prior elected offices: Lieutenant governor; Kansas Senate; Kansas House

constitutional rights, and the second amendment is no exception. Kansans must have the ability to protect themselves and their families and to hunt our rich Kansas landscapes. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am, and always have been, a vigorous defender of the right to life. Kansas was founded on the idea that all people have value. Everyone has a God-given right to life and liberty. As a doctor, I’ve seen newborn babies, who no one gave a chance, thrive. I’ve seen mothers frightened by a scary ultrasound, only to rejoice at their child’s wedding 20 years later. When Kansas entered the Union, our first laws emphasized basic human dignity by prohibiting slavery and abortion. I will always defend life and appoint judges who strictly interpret the Constitution as written.


C8  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS GOVERNOR: KRIS KOBACH Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? Growing up in Topeka and today, I’ve been frustrated seeing how politicians in the Capitol never change the way things are done. I am going to end the culture of corruption by demanding that legislative committees record every vote, by pushing for term limits, and by decreasing state spending so taxpayers get some relief. Kansans are being taxed to death, and I want to create a Kansas where my daughters can afford to raise their own families in the future. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Brownback and Colyer refused to cut spending in 2012. You have to cut spending when you cut taxes. Our sales taxes are 8th highest in the nation. Being the high tax state in the five-state region has consequences. Kansas was one of three states with negative growth last year. If we want Kansas to be a place our children and grandchildren thrive, we have to get spending under control so we can lower income, sales, and property tax rates. As Governor, I’ll work to lower all three. I’m the only candidate to sign a No Tax Hike pledge. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution?

The Kansas Supreme Court has twisted the word “suitable” beyond recognition. Article VI of the Kansas Constitution states, “The legislature shall make suitable provision for finance of the educational interests of the state.” It does not require a specific dollar amount, and it doesn’t empower the judiciary to set spending amounts. We should focus on how the money is spent. We need to ensure that 75 percent of funding that goes to schools is spent in the classroom — not on fancy buildings and more administrators. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? Yes. As Governor, I will work for such an amendment. This conflict isn’t going away. It is time to return the spending power to the elected representatives of the people. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? The 31 states that expanded Medicaid costs exceeded estimates in those states by 76 percent. States are now spending one out of every $3 on Medicaid. It’s unaffordable and unsustainable over the long term.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? Despite the two largest tax increases in state history — sales taxes in 2015 and income taxes in 2017 — Kansas continues to sweep money from the highway program to backfill the state budget. This is outrageous and just another symptom in the Topeka’s addiction to spending. When I am Governor, I will cut spending. My running mate, Wink Hartman, will be tasked with auditing every state department and ensuring we are getting the best bang for our buck. We will put the state budget in rehab, ending the usage of highway fund money for basic government services. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I am a lifelong gun owner and hunter. I know that the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. I work everyday to strengthen the Second Amendment in Kansas. We need to expand our concealed carry rights to 18-20 year-olds. We also need to ensure that children in our schools are protected. I will make Kansas the number one state in the nation in protecting the right to keep and bear arms. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I’m pro life, and I think that in Kansas, we

KRIS KOBACH

Town of residence: Lecompton Party affiliation: Republican Age: 52 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Secretary of state; Overland Park City Council

need to do everything we can to protect the unborn. The Kansas Supreme is quite possibly about to hand the state a very poor decision. They may find an invisible, unwritten right to abortion in our state constitution. That is incorrect and damaging to our existing pro-life laws. If that happens, we must move swiftly to adopt a constitutional amendment to correct the Supreme Court, and I will lead that charge.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS GOVERNOR: TYLER RUZICH Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I am seeking the governorship because Kansans value people over politics, compromise over gridlock, and solutions over inaction. I recognize that Kansans want a governor that believes in meeting in the middle and not moving Kansas left or right, but moving Kansas forward. And like many Kansans, I am fed up with Topeka’s indifference towards public education, KanCare, infrastructure, taxes, and jobs. Most importantly, I believe it’s time to work with each other not against each other. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Taxes are what we pay for the resources to live in a civilized society. However, Kansas families already face a high tax burden from federal income taxes, county property taxes, and so much more. Thus, I do not believe in any increase in taxes for Kansas families, individuals, and small businesses. Instead, I believe that large corporations should pay a little bit more in taxes to contribute to the common good go Kansas. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution?

While the recently adopted plan is a good place to start, I do not believe it provides enough funding for rural school districts and lower income school districts to provide the needed educational resources to ensure student success. I will be an advocate of continued investment in Kansas public education. Investing in education made Kansas strong and it will make Kansas strong again. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? No, Kansas voters already have the power to vote out Kansas Supreme Court justices at the ballot box. I firmly support the status quo which allows voters to decide who stays and who goes on the court. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? State Medicaid needs to be expanded especially in the area of telemedicine. The state should find ways to expand state Medicaid by making healthcare more accessible to rural and elderly Kansans. I also do believe that all able-bodied adults who receive any form of government benefits need to be working, training, or seeking work.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state's highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? Infrastructure is all too important to taxpayer money away from. Infrastructure funding should be protected and kept far away from the state general fund. Small towns, Kansas families, and Kansas businesses all benefit from a well funded and stable infrastructure. Thus, the money that is meant for infrastructure must be used for infrastructure. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? Comprehensive legislation is needed at the state level to ensure public safety. I believe these would include prohibiting the purchase and possession of sex offenders, child molesters, and those with a background of domestic violence. I also believe in closing the gun show loop hole and universal background checks. However, if you can pass a background check and if you follow the laws of this state, I will go out of my way to protect your second amendment rights. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? Nearly all Kansans, like myself, value the sanctity of human life. Like many Kansans I am disturbed by practices such as sex-selective

TYLER RUZICH

Town of residence: Prairie Village Party affiliation: Republican Age: 17 Job: Student Prior elected offices: None

abortions. However, women must have adequate access to reproductive healthcare services no matter what part of the state they live in. Changes in law need to made to ensure that state Medicaid covers medically necessary pregnancy terminations under a court order, decreasing the current waiting period for medically necessary terminations, and ensuring greater access to RU-486.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS GOVERNOR: KEN SELZER Why are you seeking the nomination for governor? I am a CPA and a businessman. Because of these qualifications Kansans readily chose me to be their Insurance Commissioner four years ago, in my first statewide elected position. Over the last four years I have proven that government can be more efficient and far more productive. Government can be run in a more businesslike manner, saving tax dollars for everyone. I am a candidate for Governor because I have the right tools for what Kansas needs right now. My financial and business background have enabled me to bring good business practices to an important state government department. We will do the same for the broader state government. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The tax decreases and subsequent multiple increases have occurred because of the irresponsible management of our state budget. A governor needs to have the discipline to cut expenses when he sharply cuts revenues. Brownback and Colyer obviously didn’t have this discipline. We have had a poorly managed budget since, resulting in sharp tax increases that in total are far greater than the tax decreases in 2012. We need to think about the future of Kansas, not the quick, short-term

political points that can be made by sharply cutting taxes without some corresponding expense cuts. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? The next governor needs to demand more accountability throughout the educational system, from early childhood education to K-12, to the tech/community college/university system, to job retraining. All need better alignment with their local business communities (even early childhood education so more kids come to kindergarten reading ready) so they produce graduates that better match local needs. The Kansas Supreme Court will rule on the adequacy of funding. This should be the responsibility of the elected legislature. I will support a constitutional amendment to make this responsibility clear, so that the endless and costly school litigation can end. We will demand more accountability and better aligned of school output with the needs of our local communities. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? A constitutional amendment is needed to end

the litigation that has continued for decades. This litigation is unproductive and costly. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? I would STRONGLY PREFER to NOT expand Medicaid. The federal budget is awash in red ink because of Medicaid and most state government budgets are out of control for the same reason. I don’t see a reason to put Kansas in a similar position when the expansion would be taking almost half of the newly covered individuals from the private market. Further, almost all of the newly covered individuals are able bodied working age adults. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? It’s not appropriate to sweep funds like Brownback and Colyer have done. It is the result of a grossly mismanaged budget under their watch. It will take us years to recover.

KEN SELZER

Town of residence: Fairway Party affiliation: Republican Age: 65 Job: Insurance and farming Prior elected offices: Kansas insurance commissioner; Fairway City Council

How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am rock solid on Pro-life issues.

In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? We need to be tough on crime. We will always be tough on crime.

OTHER CANDIDATES Gubernatorial candidates Jack Bergeson, Democrat, and Patrick Kucera and Joseph Tutera Jr., both Republicans, didn’t return the questionnaire.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C9

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: BRIAN MCCLENDON Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? The Secretary of State is a different job than it was before the digital age and perennial cyber and data security concerns. It requires professional and technological accountability with a strong, non-partisan user focus. If we’re going to keep our elections and data secure, protect the fundamental right of every eligible citizen to vote, cultivate new businesses, and open the digital doors of our democracy, the Secretary of State must better use technology to lead priority problem-solving. I would like to contribute to a more civil, efficient and fair society, using my skills and experiences to serve my fellow Kansans. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? Non-partisan studies and expert court testimony yield no evidence of voter fraud at any appreciable level. By any measure, non-citizen voting is a rare occurrence. For example, recent federal court testimony confirmed that 5 non-citizens submitted about 10 ballots in Sedgwick County since 2004 — about 10 votes out of more than a million. Over the last 18 years, more than 13 million votes were cast in Kansas, but only 1 non-citizen was convicted of voting illegally. The handful of cases resulting in voter fraud convictions in Kansas (by citizens and non-citizens) all arguably resulted from mistakes and/or lack of information. How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? Support voter access to advance voting and mail-in ballots. Streamline voter registration and make it more efficient and accessible,

including online and mobile applications. Support county elections staff and volunteers and increased local voting access. Expand education and information promoting a nonpartisan understanding of the voting process, the candidates, and the issues in question. Use digital and social media more robustly to encourage voting and information about voting. Comply with the National Voting Rights Act. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? Separate from providing documentary proof of citizenship in order to register or vote (addressed below), there should be no general issue with providing photo ID at the polling place in order to receive a ballot so long as the state provides consistent and affordable access for all eligible citizens to obtain a valid photo ID and so long as such access is coordinated across state agencies, clearly and publicly communicated to citizens, and doesn’t violate federal law. Many states do this and Kansas should be able to provide this service to its eligible citizens. The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? First and foremost, state law in this context should comply with federal law, in particular the National Voting Rights Act. It was never appropriate for the state to saddle citizens with that burden. It has now been ruled unconstitutional at both the state and federal levels. The critical issue is citizenship, not

on-demand access to a birth certificate. With better technology and interstate cooperation, the State of Kansas can more efficiently and cost-effectively verify citizenship. Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? The limited resources of the Secretary of State’s office are better focused on increasing the number of eligible citizens registered to vote, promoting a non- partisan understanding of the voting process, candidates and the issues in question, and facilitating participation in the voting process. With appropriate leadership and support from the state, county elections staff are admirably effective at managing voting rolls. And the office of the Attorney General is better staffed and better qualified to handle law enforcement and prosecutions in the rare instances of voter fraud. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? Not while serving in that elected position. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state's ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? Random post-election audits can effectively detect anomalies and patterns related to fraud or tampering. All voting machines should have paper trails which, if problems are detected or questions arise, can be inspected and could confirm results one way or another. Digital security protocols should be in place regarding electronic voting machines to maintain air

BRIAN MCCLENDON

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 54 Job: Information technology Previous elected offices: None

gaps between voting machines and internet access. Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about results of elections? Federal law currently requires documentary evidence of voting results be retained by the counties for 22 months. Such evidence should be retained. Two years seems a reasonable amount of time and we should be careful not to require additional time without a clear and compelling justification given the additional cost and burden it could place upon county clerks and local election staff.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: RANDY DUNCAN Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? I am the ONLY candidate actively involved in the Republican Party all of my life, with more than 40 years as an elected precinct committeeman, township clerk, township treasurer, and 8 years as a county commissioner from Saline County, Kansas. I’m the ONLY candidate who understands county government and has direct experience in working with county clerks. I can work with our county clerks to keep our Federal, State, & Local elections safe and secure by working to improve election security systems. I strongly support the photo I.D. and proof of citizenship voting requirements in Kansas and will working to improve the registration process for small business owners in Kansas. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? While some cases of fraud have been found in Kansas — overall it is a fact that in general elections are safe and secure in Kansas! In serving two elected 4 year terms and serving my fellow Commissioners as Chairman of the Board for 3 years (2009, 2013, 2014) it was the job of the Board of County Commissioners to canvass each election or to certify that election. In our county of nearly 60,000 population we never once observed a case of fraud and our elections remained safe and secure.

How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? Kansans currently can vote 20 days ahead in a process called ADVANCE VOTING. We continue to educate to encourage voters to begin voting early and not wait until election day. Continued education through electronic media attempting to make more voters aware that this option is available to them. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? I support PHOTO I.D. and believe this law has helped to strengthen Kansas election laws and keep Kansas elections safe and secure! The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? I support the current state law and proof of citizenship. Having said that — in the last day or so the courts overturned the the law. I’m sure this will be appealed. Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? Because of my background in County Government — obviously I believe in local control in almost all matters in working with our County Clerks and the Board of County Commissioners who also serve as the Board

of Canvassers after the elections to resolve election questions. However, it is important to have legal counsel on staff at the Secretary of State’s office for situations that come up. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? NO! It seems to me that it would be best while serving in this position NOT to have a PAC. At this time, I do NOT plan to start my own political action committee if elected your next Secretary of State. I think it is inappropriate as Chief Election Officer of the state. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state’s ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? In Saline County we did use voting machines with paper (tape) back-up that provided a paper record for each voter who used the electronic machine so there was a verifiable back up to that system. The machines were calibrated and checked by the County Clerk & his staff and by the firm that sold them to the county prior to each election and stored in a safe and secure place prior to each election. Verifiable back up is important to me and would be something I would work with my IT staff on. We also provided voters in the county with the ability to voted a traditional paper ballot because not all voters wanted to vote on the electronic machines.

RANDY DUNCAN

Town of residence: Salina Party affiliation: Republican Age: 60 Job: Businessman Prior elected offices: Saline County Republican chairman, 1987-2002; Republican 1st District chairman, 2004-17; Saline County Commission, 2007-15

Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about results of elections? YES! 4 YEARS seems like a reasonable time frame but I’m open to discuss the amount of time.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: KEITH ESAU Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? I’m running to ensure the security and integrity of one of our most fundamental rights as citizens, that of a fair election. I am also running to protect the integrity of the backbone of our state’s commerce and property rights held in the business registrations. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? Most of the possible voter fraud was reduced significantly by the SAFE Act. Requiring voter ID at the polls ensures that the person voting matches the registration. The remaining attempts at voter fraud can mostly be deterred through successful prosecution of voting crimes, which is now taking place. How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? It is the job of the candidates, parties, and individual voters to drive turnout for elections. History shows the biggest motivator for turnout is a hotly contested election. The office provides assistance in turnout through detailed, updated voter data, providing easy access for voters to see their ballot, and ensuring proper notices are given of voting locations, changes, and election dates. I will push for doing voter education about the importance of voting. In Presidential election years, this would be done by the Secretary of State. In statewide election years, this would be done by the county election officials. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? The Voter ID law has been a great success.

As I meet with individuals across Kansas, they tell me that requiring voter ID at the polls is just plain, common sense. Not only does it deter voter fraud from people voting in place of someone that is unlikely to show up at the polls, it also inspires confidence that our polls are protected against such fraud. Because people already have IDs for most other transactions they do in society, it is not an unreasonable burden for anyone. The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? The recent ruling removing the requirement is being appealed, so we don’t yet know the final outcome. Like Voter ID, many Kansans I have talked with believe this is common sense. I hope Kansas law is eventually upheld. I will continue the in through the courts. With the increase in security across the nation, the requirement for proof of citizenship is happening in more places. Kansas is already asking for it to get a Real ID star on driver’s licenses and that proof is shared with the office to verify citizenship. I believe proof of citizenship will increase nationwide. Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? I was a supporter of this legislation and recognized the need for it. District attorneys have bigger issues on their plate and view voter fraud as a victimless crime. However, without prosecution there is little deterrent to people who wish to defraud our system. The SOS

office has most of the data needed to prosecute these crimes, easy access to verification of the crime, and the expertise in this area of the law. It makes logical sense for this to be prosecuted from the SOS’s office and probably saves the state money because prosecuting it there saves research expenses. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? That is a determination for the people of Kansas, not the law or courts. The First Amendment protects such affiliations and the right of an individual’s free (political) speech. Holding office does not take away that right, but that does not mean it is prudent either. I have no intention of starting or maintaining a PAC as an elected official. There are plenty of outside groups to provide influence in elections. I prefer to listen to individuals and businesses in Kansas, not PACs and lobbyists. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state’s ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? This year, I helped complete the effort to require random auditing of election results to ensure that the machine counts match exactly with the paper trail. It also requires that new machines purchased in Kansas provide a voter verifiable, paper ballot. I will also work to improve the security of information exchanged with other states through Crosscheck. There is no need to share sensitive date (such as the last four digits of the Social Security number) without encryption. This would prevent anyone accessing or analyzing the data from

KEITH ESAU

Town of residence: Olathe Party affiliation: Republican Age: 58 Job: Software consultant/developer Prior elected offices: Kansas House, 2013 to present; chairman of House Elections Committee

seeing the original values or accidentally disclosing them like Florida did. Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about results of elections? Current law (KSA 25-2708) provides for ballots to be maintained for 22 months (6 for municipal elections). I believe this is sufficient time to settle disputes and verify the accuracy of election results. I am not aware of any arguments to hold these internal records for a longer period.


C10  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: CRAIG MCCULLAH Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? I’m running for Secretary of State because I believe we need someone with experience within the office to lead the agency. As a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, I’m the only candidate that won’t have to conduct on the job training. Each of the other Republican candidates are all past or present politicians looking to enhance their resumes. There’s too much work to be done at the agency for politics and I didn’t want a politician standing in the way of our progress. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? In 2016 I became the first Voter Fraud Investigator in the history of the agency. Kansas has the most secure elections in the country and although there are some individuals who have maliciously double voted, it’s not very common. It’s less of a fraud issue and more of a voter education issue. We need to do a better job educating citizens about election rules and regulations. How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? I don’t think it would be appropriate to spend the public’s money encouraging people to vote. We can do a better job educating voters about election rules and deadlines but the Secretary of State’s job is to assist the counties with facilitating elections, not to encourage participation. The Secretary of State’s Office is in a good position to

help citizens navigate the roles and responsibilities of various elected bodies and I plan to do that with an online platform. With so many levels of government (cities, counties, school boards, townships, watershed districts, etc.) I think it’s tough for people to keep up on who’s doing what. I’d like to give them a tool to cut through the noise. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? I support the law and think it’s a no-brainer. The office will provide a free ID card if you need one and voter registration in Kansas has increased since implementation. The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? Requiring proof of citizenship to complete your voter registration is a way to ensure an unqualified voter doesn’t cancel out the vote of a qualified voter. As Secretary of State I would make decisions based on the law and would administer the law equally across the board. One of the issues with the current law was that individuals were not being properly informed when registering to vote at the DMV that their registration wasn’t complete until they provided proof of citizenship. I would ensure every government employee involved with the voter registration process was properly trained on the law to prior to it going into effect.

Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? Yes. The Kansas Legislature gave this authority to the Secretary of State because these cases were not being pursued. The Secretary of State’s Office has the experience and the expertise to begin the investigations and build cases. From there we have the ability to hand the cases over to county prosecutors or prosecute them ourselves. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? Although it’s legal it’s not something I would do. We have a partisan election for Secretary of State so there’s always going to be perceived conflicts of interest regardless of validity. I wouldn’t do anything that would degrade the public’s confidence in our electoral process. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state’s ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? As Secretary of State I would promote and assist counties with the procurement of election equipment that produces a Voter Verified Paper Ballot trail that will enhance our ability to audit elections. We also need to upgrade our electronic poll pads to produce higher quality handwriting exemplars. I want to redirect filing

CRAIG MCCULLAH

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 35 Job: Real estate investor Prior elected offices: None

fees to help counties update their equipment and improve election administration. Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about results of elections? Yes. I support maintaining documentary evidence of votes cast for four years and want to expand election audits across the state.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: SCOTT SCHWAB Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? As Chairman of the House Elections committee in 2011, I helped spearhead the passing of the SAFE Act requiring proof of citizenship for new voters and photo ID at the polling place. As Secretary of State, we want to ensure the legislative intent of that policy is executed with excellence and interpreted the same across all 105 counties. I’m the only candidate in the race with both extensive legislative and private sector experience to ensure our clerks have the resources they need, the SAFE Act is defended, our business filings are streamlined and we have cutting edge IT security in place. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? Voting fraud was an issue in our state before it even became a state. In the beginning, Missourians would come across the border and influence our elections. Before photo ID law was enacted, multiple successful attempts at voting fraud were conducted in local elections statewide. Now, we have outside actors attempting to hack into our voting systems. The methods change but the intent does not. There will always be people attempting to influence election results. Our form of government requires results you can trust. To have secure elections we must safeguard our elections at registration, at the polling place, and on the technology front. How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? Election turnout is determined by whether voters are excited to vote for the candidates running. Where the Secretary of State can help is by making it as easy as possible to register to vote and vote without compromising election security. One way this can be done is by providing the necessary resources to our county election officials. It is these

officials who truly conduct the election and work in their local communities. Helping them to simplify the registration process and speed up the lines on election day will encourage more Kansans to vote. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? In 2011 as Chair of the House Elections Committee I played a leading role in passing the bi-partisan SAFE Act that required photo ID when voting. Photo ID has had widespread support across Kansas and passed with a large bi-partisan majority. Getting on an airplane, cashing a check, and so many other things we do on a regular basis require a photo ID. It is a simple but effective election security measure to ensure Kansas has trusted results on election day. The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? This issue has been politicized by the left and unfortunately some Judges allow their decisions to be influenced by personality conflicts. I stand behind the requirement that newly registered voters prove their citizenship. That said, it’s important that this policy be carried out as effectively as possible. The Secretary of State’s office needs to have clear guidelines in place for the county election officials to follow. As a state agency, we owe it to all Kansans to make the registration process as easy to navigate as possible. If we do this and execute this policy excellently, many of the real issues with proof of citizenship will go away. Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? For a number of years county attorneys

were not interested in prosecuting voter fraud. This is understandable due to their limited resources and higher profile crimes. This is why the Secretary of State acquired the right to prosecute voter fraud. Since that time they have secured nearly 15 convictions. My priority is that when there is a voter fraud, it be prosecuted. However, I am not an attorney. I’m not concerned with who does the prosecuting, rather that the prosecuting takes place. As Secretary of State I will work with the Attorney General and county prosecutors for the prosecutions of these cases. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? I do not have a political action committee and have no plans to start one. I believe it is between the voters and the candidate whether they are okay with such actions but I personally will not be operating a political action committee as Secretary of State. Whether it is legal or not is a policy subject for the Legislature to decide. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state’s ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? We have policies in place to help secure our elections at the ballot box. The newest threat is in the field of technology. Foreign nations and other bad actors are attempting to hack into voting systems across the country. If citizens cannot have confidence in the results of their elections, they will not have trust in their government. This undermines our entire way of life. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on having cutting edge IT security in place. My

SCOTT SCHWAB

Town of residence: Olathe Party affiliation: Republican Age: 45 Job: Health care sales Prior elected offices: Kansas House, speaker pro tem

background working at Fortune 50 company has shown me that IT security is always evolving. If you are standing still, you are falling behind. This includes providing proper resources to our county election officials, having an IT security staff that is constantly undergoing security training, and working with outside organizations like the Department of Homeland Security. Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about results of elections? I am a strong believer in having paper back up for all votes cast, including on electronic voting machines. We must have a paper trail that we can reference back to if there are any issues raised. You cannot hack a sheet of paper.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE: DENNIS TAYLOR Why are you a candidate for secretary of state? As Shawnee County Commissioner and as a state official I have been involved in the financial and policy issues of elections management. I want to bring those experiences to partner cooperatively with county election officials. We need to ensure public trust and confidence in election outcomes by providing objective measurement of elections administration. With more than 30 years of broad management in private business and public service, I will provide the leadership needed to make changes that will improve communication, transparency, and accountability. I am the only candidate with management experience in private business, local government, and state government. What is your sense of the extent of voting fraud in Kansas? Voting fraud is likely minimal in Kansas. However, since the Secretary of State has never audited elections there is no objective basis for concluding whether such fraud is taking place or not. Without an audit and a paper ballot audit trail, the claim of fraud is easy to make and difficult to challenge. Continuing lack of application of basic management tools (an audit and paper ballot backup in all counties) contributes to erosion of public trust in elections, the critical component of democratic self-governance. We should audit elections and backup votes with paper ballots in all counties. How would you strive to encourage more Kansans to participate in elections? I lived and worked in emerging democracies where voting had been mandatory and non-voting punished. Government-driven citizen participation breeds cynicism and distrust of institutions even when citizens are freed from obligation. However, low rates of citizen participation in elections also have corrosive effects, often creating a downward spiral cycle in which the less frequently citizens vote, the less invested they are in good

governance, causing even less participation and investment. This hurts us all. I will improve communication of election rules and deadlines and collaborate with schools, non-partisan community and civic groups to maximize awareness. What are your views of the state law requiring a photograph identification when voting? There is nothing wrong with requiring photographic identification when voting. Such identification is regularly insisted upon when engaging in much less consequential commercial transactions today. We should not, however, assume that this requirement makes our elections more secure. The honest person will, of course, present their real identification. The dishonest will find a way to cheat with a fake ID with their picture and the name of the voter they claim to be. In the absence of an audit program we should not be lulled into thinking photographic identification makes elections more secure. The requirement to prove citizenship to vote in state elections has inspired litigation. How should state law be changed to affirm the proper people are voting while avoiding the lawsuits? The goal of the proof of citizenship law was to prevent voting by non-citizens. Even if the law had not been found unconstitutional it was never going to meet that goal. First, the law did not apply to persons already registered. Second, the law provided no greater certainty that a new voter was a citizen than the requirement that a voter simply declare citizenship under penalty of perjury. Birth certificates and passports are easily forged. The Secretary of State never checked their validity. We do not need more laws. We need a rational audit program to create trust. Is the power of a secretary of state to prosecute alleged voting fraud justified given county authority to deal with misconduct? I do not believe the Secretary of State needs prosecutorial power although it can be justified.

First, county and district attorneys are often subject to criticism for using limited resources to prosecute vote fraud. Second, in smaller counties county attorneys are often part-time and have a hard enough time balancing their private practice with their public duties without adding to the burden. Third, some prosecutors may have potential conflicts of interest. While these cases are routinely transferred to the Attorney General, I do not doubt the Attorney General would prefer to spend its limited resources on other matters. Can the state’s top elections officer operate a political action committee and donate to candidates without an appearance of a conflict of interest? I believe active participation by the Secretary of State, or participation by others at his or her direction, in election contests other than for one’s own re-election to the position of Secretary of State creates an unbridgeable appearance of a conflict of interest while holding the office of Secretary of State. It is improper. I pledge not to create, maintain, or operate a political action committee while serving as Kansas Secretary of State and I will not donate to candidates for public office. How would you improve security of electronic voting and bolster the state’s ability to provide verifiable backup of voting results? Some believe recent legislative action, now found unconstitutional, has made Kansas elections more secure. It has not. Please see my response to Question #5 above. I would Audit elections; Backup votes with voter-verified paper ballots in all Kansas counties, and Constantly verify system security, by first acknowledging that our election registration systems, which are tied to the internet, are vulnerable. Second, conduct serious and comprehensive threat assessments. Third, we should take corrective action, applying best practices in cybersecurity such as block chain, an incorruptible digital distributed

DENNIS TAYLOR

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 68 Job: Director, Lawyer Referral Service, Kansas Bar Association Prior elected offices: Shawnee County Commission

system of storing transactions in multiple locations rather than storing data in one central, easily hack-able location. Should documentary evidence — electronic, paper, whatever — of votes cast be preserved for at least four years if questions arise about the results of elections? If questions are raised about the results of elections through objections to the State Objections Board, challenges before a county board of canvassers, or lawsuits, such questions will arise immediately after elections. Legal challenges would include a request by a complaining party to a judge to preserve the evidence. I will audits elections and would expect to preserve documentary evidence of voting for some extended period to allow for such audits. Whether four years is the right period of time or not, it is clear that document preservation is necessary for audits and ensure confidence in our election system.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C11

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS INSURANCE COMMISSIONER: NATHANIEL MCLAUGHLIN Why are you campaigning for state insurance commissioner? I seek the office of insurance commissioner because I have (a) the political independence and courage to regulate objectively for all Kansans, and (b)the compassion to advocate for all Kansans to ensure that the insurance marketplace is not a dark scary place. I will use these God given traits to assist the three h hundred fifty thousand Kansans age 19-64 without health insurance obtain health insurance. My business acumen will be used to achieve this goal without the accomplish being a burden or increase cost to our taxpayers. What career experiences related to the insurance industry prepared you for the role as statewide public official? Thirty seven years of executive leadership in healthcare management assisting client healthcare providers in cost reduction efforts and maximizing efficiencies in the areas of risk management programs that help drive down insurance expenses for (a)worker’s compensation, (b) visitor and patient safety and (c)professional liability insurance costs related to hospital infection control and clinical practices pertaining to dietetics and HIPPA matters. Moreover, part of my development program

for managers reporting to me was for me to provide ongoing in-service training whereby reporting managers were competent to assist employees during “annual enrollment to ensure informed decisions were made as to dental, disability, health and/or employer provided life insurance. Do you support expansion of Medicaid in Kansas? I support the expansion of Medicare. States like Kansas that did not expand Medicare have had a sharp increase in the number of uninsured citizens. How can your office improve the state’s ability to hold down the cost of health insurance? Excellent question. Reducing the cost of health care is a must step in addressing the cost of health insurance. I would respectfully ask my peers in other state agencies to review any regulation on our health care providers to ascertain if the cost of complying with any regulation outweighs the benefit of the regulation, then the regulation should be voided. Any regulation that is directly related to a chronic medical condition or the care of our elderly, veterans or mentally/physically disabled would not be subject to such a review. Tort reform is a must. Our health care providers are subject to

outrageous liability insurance costs because civil case awards are sometimes beyond reason. Do you believe the pre-existing condition provision should be removed from the Affordable Health Care Act? NO. In what ways will you demonstrate to Kansans an independence from companies you regulate? During my campaign for the office of insurance commissioner, I will direct my campaign treasurer not to accept campaign donations from any insurance companies registered to do business in Kansas , any board member of an insurance company, or any senior executive of an insurance company who has the title of CEO, COO, or CFO. Suffice it to say, no donations will be accepted from any person who sits in the board room or C-Suite of an insurance company. How are you improving education of the public about securities fraud? If elected Kansas Commissioner of Insurance, I would establish advocacy offices strategically across the state to assist Kansans on matters such as understanding securities fraud and any

NATHANIEL MCLAUGHLIN

Town of residence: Kansas City, Kan. Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 64 Job: Retired district executive for Sodexo Healthcare Services Prior elected offices: None

insurance matter. There is the realization up front that some insurance questions will not and not be resolved in the consumer’s favor. Should the job of insurance commissioner be converted to an administration position appointed by the governor? NO

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS INSURANCE COMMISSIONER: VICKI SCHMIDT Why are you campaigning for state insurance commissioner? I became a pharmacist because I wanted to help people and I’m running for insurance commissioner for the same reason. I believe Kansans deserve an advocate when it comes to insurance. What career experiences related to the insurance industry prepared you for this role as statewide public official? I have worked over 40 years as a local pharmacist and deal with Kansans health insurance problems every day. I am familiar with the complexities of Medicaid, Medicare and the leading insurance providers. I’ve also served my friends and neighbors in the Kansas Senate, where I’ve spent 12 years on the Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee and served as chair of the Public Health and Welfare Committee. Do you support expansion of Medicaid in Kansas? Yes, I have voted to support Medicaid expansion. Hospitals in Kansas, especially those in rural areas strongly support expansion as it will help give more low-income Kansans access to healthcare. Kansas taxpayers are paying for the expansion of Medicaid nationally. Medicaid expansion in our state would allow Kansas to get back money our taxpayers

have paid to the federal government. If we don’t take it, it goes to other states. I believe we should put those dollars to use in Kansas. How can your office improve the state’s ability to hold down the cost of health insurance? As a pharmacist, I see families and seniors struggle with the cost of health insurance. Kansas is overdue for a discussion on how to hold down the cost of health insurance. We need to make sure Kansas is open for business and ensure regulations allow for a competitive market so consumers have options. Do you believe pre-existing condition provision should be removed from the Affordable Care Act? No. While the Affordable Care Act was controversial, this provision was one that both Republicans and Democrats supported. So much so, that Republicans included it in their proposed changes to the ACA. It is vital Kansans be able to get insurance coverage regardless of their pre-existing conditions. In what ways will you demonstrate to Kansans an independence from companies you regulate? I have a proven record in the Legislature of standing up to career politicians and lobbyists

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS INSURANCE COMMISSIONER: CLARK SHULTZ Why are you campaigning for state insurance commissioner? I am running to protect the interests of insurance consumers in Kansas by fullfilling the mission that the Kansas Department of Insurance has held since 1871. What career experiences related to the insurance industry prepared you for this role as statewide public official? I’m am currently your Assistant Insurance Commissioner which has given me direct hands on experience running the department. I have held an insurance license since 1999, managed two insurance businesses, spent a decade protecting Kansans as an auditor for a national insurance underwriter, making sure insurance companies follow state and federal laws. I was Chairman of the Insurance Committee in the Kansas House of Representatives, served as a state senator, and I teach the insurance class at Washburn University. Do you support expansion of Medicaid in Kansas? Because Medicaid is a state and federal government program it is not maintained or regulated by the department of insurance. The future of Medicaid will be determined by the state legislature and the governor. My goal is to see every Kansan covered by an affordable heath insurance policy. How can your office improve the state’s ability to hold down the cost of health insurance? I will fight harmful state tax increases such as last year's increase from 2% to 5.77% on HMO's. This type of health insurance policy has been popular because of it’s lower costs. This extreme tax increase adopted by the legislature, caused companies to drop these affordable policies. I will work to reduce this tax and return lower priced policies. Also we will continue to attract new companies to Kansas who will offer new plans and offer competition which tends to reduce the price for all policies. Do you believe pre-existing condition provision should be removed from the Affordable Care Act? No In what ways will you demonstrate to Kansans an independence from companies you regulate? We conduct regular audits of companies, perform market conduct examinations, and consumer outreach programs. If a company is

CLARK SHULTZ

Town of residence: Lindsborg Party affiliation: Republican Age: 61 Job: Assistant insurance commissioner Prior elected offices: School board; Kansas House; Kansas Senate

acting against the law regarding consumers, we take appropriate action to stop the harmful acts including fines and cease and desist orders. The employees of the department pride themselves on providing the best protections possible for Kansans. The citizens of Kansas are our customers. How are you improving education of the public about securities fraud? We have a statewide education program that is offered to all age brackets, groups, and professions. We have booklets and other educational information that is available as well, and we approve continuing education courses across the state. We also offer financial training in our high schools. Should the job of insurance commissioner be converted to an administration position appointed by the governor? It should be considered. In all but 11 states the Insurance Commissioner is appointed. This might make it more certain that the position is filled as required by Kansas law with a person “well versed and experienced in the business of insurance and matters relating thereto.” This is an important position that should be held by someone who has worked in many aspects of the industry.

to fight for the people I represent. I plan to take that same fight to the Insurance Commissioner’s office. In the Legislature, I fought the Insurance companies to ensure coverage for children with autism and for coverage parity for telemedicine services so critical to rural Kansas. How are you improving education of the public about securities fraud? First and foremost, the Insurance Commissioner needs to make sure the public is aware of the resources available. That education could take place in a variety of ways, including partnerships, media campaigns, and direct marketing efforts. Should the job of insurance commissioner be converted to an administration position appointed by the governor? I strongly support the democratic process that allows for the public’s participation in choosing their leaders. Kansans have been well served with an elected Insurance Commissioner. The

VICKI SCHMIDT

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 62 Job: Pharmacist Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate

four-year term is appropriate to provide for the proper checks and balances in leadership.


C12  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS TREASURER: MARCI FRANCISCO Why are you a candidate for state treasurer? After serving for fourteen years as a State Senator, I am acutely aware of the damage done to the state of Kansas by the Brownback administration and how difficult it will be to repair that damage. The November election gives Kansans an incredibly important opportunity to get our state back to fiscal responsibility and I am ready to step up and help meet that challenge as State Treasurer. What professional experiences fit best with the requirements of the treasurer’s post? The State Treasurer plays many roles: manager, leader, fiduciary overseer. In my career at the University of Kansas, I developed management skills as an assistant director in the Office of Facilities Planning and number-crunching skills in the Office of Space Management. In other roles I have served as Mayor of Lawrence, a member of the Senate’s Ways and Means and Assessment and Tax committees, as treasurer for my neighborhood association and the Lawrence Preservation Alliance, and as chair of the Endowment Committee for my congregation. I understand money and finance and would be a good steward of the state’s resources. In what ways can the office improve return of unclaimed property to rightful owners? The unclaimed property program has been a “jewel in the crown” of many previous treasurers; many people search the website at the state fair. Diligent management, however, requires active searching for property owners year-round and I am prepared to do that. To encourage more claims, I would propose that the state also offer opportunities for property owners to donate their money to charity, similar to our Kansas tax “checkoff” program. Was the sweeping of about $300 million from a treasurer’s office fund to cover basic

government costs justified? Should that money be repaid? I think this is referencing the $319 million loan from the Pooled Money Investments Board funds (investments of the state’s “idle” monies); it was a loan, not a sweep, and is scheduled to be repaid in six years starting in FY 2019. I do object to the “sweeps” of the fee funds that were paid by individuals for state licensing fees and then used to cover basic government costs; I believe those dollars should be repaid. What are your views about state treasurers appearing in hundreds of thousands of dollars of advertising for the state’s college savings program? The state should be encouraging families to save for post-high-school education; however, I am very concerned that we are spending money advertising a program that is ranked one of the least effective in the country and the required advertising adds to the cost of administering the program. One of my goals as Treasurer would be to rebid this program to increase the interest earned by its investments and increase its productivity for participants. I also want to explore alternative opportunities that would provide every child in Kansas an education savings account. Should incumbent treasurers be prohibited from being featured in promotions for the savings program in advance of the primary and general elections? Incumbents will always have a political advantage, and I don’t think we can say the treasurer shouldn’t be at the state fair talking about these programs in an election year. I do believe that any paid advertising for the program should not highlight an individual treasurer, but rather clearly promote a fiscally responsible investment program. I have promised not to appear in any advertising for the state’s Learning Quest or (529)ABLE programs.

What is your response to suggestions by legislators that the elective office of treasurer ought to be converted to a position appointed by the governor? I recognize that this issue has come up from time to time in the legislature. I believe it is important to have an elected Treasurer, independent from the Governor’s office. Some have expressed concern in the past, for example, that an appointed treasurer could be pressured to withhold some disbursements, such as school payments. Accurate and reliable reporting of receipts and expenditures to the public should come from an elected Treasurer. Further consolidation of power in the executive branch is not necessary and is not good stewardship. In what ways would you reform the treasurer’s role in administering municipal bonds? Since the 1980s, the State Treasurer has been registrar and transfer agent for those Kansas registered municipal bonds that designate the Treasurer as paying agent. The office services more than 2,000 municipal bond issues totaling in excess of $13 billion. The state needs to continue servicing these bonds in a timely and accurate manner. As Treasurer, I will ensure there are well-trained staff and good communications with local government finance officials and bond houses. I do think other reform is needed to allow Kansas banks to pay the same interest rates offered to municipalities by the Pooled Money Investment Board. How can the treasurer’s office improve transparency of its work in state government? The treasurer’s website should be expanded to include information about the state’s receipts and expenditures, including the highway fund and our Kansas Public Employees Retirement System so that the office is sharing information about the financial health of the state. By statute, the office is required to make a variety of reports, all of which should be posted on the website and made available to the public.

MARCI FRANCISCO

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 68 Job: State legislator Prior elected offices: Current Kansas Senate; Lawrence City Commission, 197983; Lawrence mayor, 1981-83

What are your ideas for making the office more efficient without cutting services to the public? The office must be both efficient and effective. I would appoint a CPA as Assistant Treasurer to ensure professionalism of the office. Second, I will travel the state to speak about fiscal responsibility and the financial health of Kansas, including the education and ABLE savings programs. I will work closely with the legislature, local governments, county treasurers and finance officers. Third, I will work with the Department of Revenue and local governments on cash management procedures, municipal bonds and unclaimed property. Finally, I will hold the Treasury staff and myself accountable to the highest audit and finance standards for government.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS TREASURER: JAKE LATURNER Why are you a candidate for state treasurer? I’m running for State Treasurer to serve the people of Kansas by continuing to transform state government into an entity that works for them. As a son of an educator and grandson of a veteran and judge, I truly believe that public service can be a noble profession if you put the needs of the people you serve above all else. What professional experiences fit best with the requirements of the treasurer’s post? Having served as Kansas Treasurer for over a year, I can tell you that my experience in customer and constituent services has been invaluable. I was twice elected to serve in the Kansas Senate where I chaired the Federal and State Affairs Committee and served on the Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee as well as Transportation. During that same time I worked as a consultant for customer relations with a major rail company. Prior to that I was a District Representative for former Treasurer and current Congresswomen Lynn Jenkins in her Pittsburg Office. In what ways can the office improve return of unclaimed property to rightful owners? Since July 1st, 2017 my office has returned over $26 Million in unclaimed property, with average claims of $240. That is the most money returned by any Treasurer in a single year in Kansas history. Additionally, the number of searches on www. kansascash.com doubled to over 2.1 million. To accomplish this, we took our services on the road with a 105 County Tour, utilized an innovative approach on social media, rolled out a user and mobile friendly website and partnered with Kansas television stations. I plan to continue to meet Kansans where they are and raise awareness.

Was the sweeping of about $300 million from a treasurer’s office fund to cover basic government costs justified? Should that money be repaid? Generally speaking, sweeps or other onetime budget fixes are not the way to fund core functions of government. That being said, the legislature’s decision to give the Pooled Money Investment Board more liquidity during a difficult financial period was understandable, as this was one of several difficult choices. The legislature has agreed to make repayments, which is appropriate. What are your views about state treasurers appearing in hundreds of thousands of dollars of advertising for the state’s college savings program? The Kansas Treasurer is statutorily required to administer and promote the Learning Quest 529 Program. Since its launch, every Treasurer, regardless of party affiliation, has appeared in advertisements and the results are clear. Kansas is only the 34th most populous state, but ranks 14th in total assets under management. This year, Forbes also ranked Learning Quest as a Top 5 529 plan in the nation. Should incumbent treasurers be prohibited from being featured in promotions for the savings program in advance of the primary and general elections? Under Kansas law, all statewide officials are prohibited from appearing in any promotions 60-days prior to the primary election until after the general election. I fully support this law and thank former Treasurer Estes for leading the charge in the legislature on this subject.

What is your response to suggestions by legislators that the elective office of treasurer ought to be converted to a position appointed by the governor? On the official seal for the Treasurer’s Office, there is a watchdog guarding a vault. I think that represents the primary duty of the Treasurer perfectly. There absolutely should be an independently elected watchdog to oversee state financial transactions. Allowing this position to be appointed by a governor would eliminate a critical check and balance. In what ways would you reform the treasurer’s role in administering municipal bonds? Over the last year, I charged our Bond Services and other departments to review and revise their internal processes. We have implemented an online, paperless payment process for municipalities and internal scanning processes for new bond issuances. These updates have helped us hold the line on fees, operate with one less employee in that department and create a more transparent archive. How can the treasurer’s office improve transparency of its work in state government? During my time in the legislature I worked with the Kansas Press Association and others on proposals to make government records more accessible to Kansans. I’ve taken that same desire for transparency into the Treasurer’s Office. My goal is to improve transparency by allowing Kansans to see detailed state financial transactions in an online user-friendly format. This is a significant undertaking, but Kansans deserve to have this information and the ability to hold their elected officials accountable.

JAKE LATURNER (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 30 Job: Politician Prior elected offices: Kansas treasurer; Kansas Senate

What are your ideas for making the office more efficient without cutting services to the public? Through a series of prioritizations, we have made great strides in the area of efficiency. While operating with a smaller staff and reduced budget authority we broke the record for the amount of unclaimed property returned in a year. Additionally, we rolled out a much more user friendly website, implemented direct deposits for bonds and unclaimed property claims and are working on an updated internal unclaimed property system.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL: DEREK SCHMIDT Why are you a candidate for attorney general of Kansas? I have had the privilege of serving as attorney general for the past two terms. I would like to continue building on our strong record of consumer protection, support for public safety, expanding protections for seniors and children, providing professional legal services for the state and standing up against federal overreach. What court case you directly participated in helped prepare you for the job of attorney general? Explain? As attorney general, I have directly participated in almost all of the state’s major litigation in the past seven years. Of particular note were Kansas v Carr and Kansas v Cheever, two murder cases I personally and successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. Do you support the 2018 Legislature’s decision to implement a payment system for the wrongfully convicted? Yes. I think the mechanism that was chosen for determining eligibility and making payment may not be optimal, but I support the underlying policy.

How should criminal law be reformed to hold accountable law enforcement officers, prosecutors or judges responsible for conviction of people subsequently proven innocent? Current criminal law is sufficient. In almost all cases, civil and/or administrative redress will be more appropriate than criminal prosecution. What is your view of the Kansas death penalty and legislative interest in converting those sentences to life without parole? I support the current law. Was transfer of the power to prosecute securities cases to the AG’s office a worthwhile decision? Yes. This reform has been a critical component in the expansion and strengthening of the ability of the attorney general’s office to investigate and prosecute financial crimes and elder abuse. As the state’s top prosecutor, would you advocate to restore the training requirement for people to carry concealed firearms in Kansas? No. I would leave that policy choice to the Legislature and would neither advocate for nor against it. I do, however, always recommend

that people who choose to carry concealed handguns also choose to obtain appropriate training whether or not it is legally required. In what ways can the state’s open records and open meetings laws be adjusted to improve compliance? Should penalties be enhanced? Because most violations arise from ignorance of what the law requires, expanded training and education ar the key. We have stepped up training in recent years and will continue doing so if reelected. I would not oppose enhancing civil penalties but think it would have little practical effect. Should the Legislature revoke power held by the secretary of state to bring criminal charges in alleged voter fraud cases? Yes, after the current secretary of state leaves office — particularly since the next secretary of state may not be an attorney. The attorney general’s office could easily handle these cases if provided modest funding from the secretary of state’s office. This model has proven effective in the handling of cases from the securities, insurance and revenue departments, as described above.

OTHER CANDIDATES Democrat Sarah Swain, who is running for Kansas attorney general, didn’t return the questionnaire.

DEREK SCHMIDT (incumbent)

Town of residence: Independence Party affiliation: Republican Age: 50 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas attorney general; Kansas Senate

Please share a bit of advice about the legal profession from law school, business or family mentors? Always take the work seriously, but never take yourself too seriously.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C13

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 47TH DISTRICT: GEORGE HANNA Why are you running for the Kansas House? I have long been disgusted by the degradation of our political process. It would be naive to not recognize that money and politics have always gone hand in hand, however the Citizens United decision has only served to reinforce the notion that it acceptable to “Buy” a politician. As far as I am concerned the principle of a free (fairly balanced) election is just as vital to our democracy as free speech or press. Without reversing the Citizens United decision we as a country will not have a true representation of the people, nor will we be able to elect those that can. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? There is a clear distinction between moral ethics and business ethics. Relying on the morality of those with the resources to ensure there is equal opportunity for those less fortunate is reckless. I feel that it is the responsibility of our government to protect every citizen through equitable legislation. That being said, I would like to see an increased number of tax brackets and a reduction or elimination of sales tax on food and utilities. Taxes should be primarily focused on “disposable income” goods. Regressive taxation only serves to disproportionately hurt those least able to pay. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? No, The 2018 plan falls short in the “Equitable” requirement. We as a state continue to fall short in Pre-K funding and those with disability. The

expansion of State funding obligations while refusing to expand the funding itself if irresponsible. Kansas must fund schools at a level that not only is adequate and equitable, but also at a level where school district can budget accordingly, recruit highly qualified teachers and fulfill the current contracts in line with inflation. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? Absolutely NOT! While I will disagree with various legislation, I will always respect the judicial oversight. In order to prevent an abuse of power and/or an eventual dictatorship we must have all three branches of Government. This is amplified in today’s political culture as it is already to easy to purchase legislation. As an example. without past judicial decisions we would not have free press. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Kansas should no only expand medicaid, but should work to Universal Healthcare with appropriate oversight. Today, because of the refusal to expand Medicaid Kansas looses an estimated 1.8 million dollars per day, while rural health centers and assisted living centers are closing. The closings are largely due to the difficulty in eligibility and the smaller facilities inability to “float” the expenses. Additionally, those larger medical facilities that continue to operate are doing so with a tax exemption and/ or other subsidies, while executive salaries are

grossly out of line. To pay seven figure salaries from a self sustaining company is entirely different that one doing on the backs of tax payers and the needy. I do support a return to work or training incentive or plan. I would not go so far as to make it a requirement. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? I am strongly opposed to diverting funds from one budget to another. Kansas must be able to make both short and long term plans that will be fulfilled. This is crucial to not only Kansas workers for these programs, but also future development and attraction of industry to Kansas. Without stable schools and infrastructure Kansas can't count on reduction of taxes alone to bring in new business. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I support “Red Flag” laws as well as removing guns from publicly funded schools. I do support a responsibly regulated 2nd amendment. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I would not. I support a women’s right to choose. I would further support access to women’s healthcare and family planning. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? Yes, I would support term limits. A limit of 4

GEORGE HANNA

Town of residence: Tecumseh Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 48 Job: Artist Prior elected offices: None

terms each would allow for a turnover of representation while allowing for a livelihood on politics if allowed by the Kansas voters. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on results from the large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? Why is the Governor reporting in the first place, unless it is self serving. That role should be done by the State Treasurer after a stable metric has been established to determine the results. To continue to “develop” a new plane of measuring the benefits or decline to the state to manipulate the perception to the public is deceptive.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 47TH DISTRICT: RON ELLIS Why are you running for the Kansas House? I have lived and worked in Jefferson County for over forty years. I know the people I represent. I am involved in the county through membership in a variety of organizations and boards. I taught history and government in Oskaloosa Public Schools for 37 years. I own three farms in Jefferson County and raise cattle. I understand the issues that are important to the people of District 47 because these are the same issues I face every day. I have completed my first two-year term in the House where I served on the Agriculture, State and Federal, and Health Committees. I have made a number of connections and alliances with other representatives and leadership in order to get the business of Kansas accomplished without wasting taxpayer time and money. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The 2012 tax cut was too much, and when it was discovered that the plan was not working, there was no remedy to correct either by decreasing spending significantly or reevaluating the levels of the tax cuts. The 2017 tax increase was too much and significantly higher than what was needed to fund the state’s needs. I believe a lower tax increase would have been kinder to the tax paying citizens in Kansas and would have met the needs of the state. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? The Kansas Constitution uses the word “suitability.” The Supreme Court believes they have the power to determine “suitability” and thus legislate the amount of money that is provided to schools. The legislature is charged with determining how monies are allocated and spent in the state. I believe the $525 million five-year plan will give schools a better forecast

of the monies they will have available year to year and complies with the Constitution. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? It may be necessary as courts should not dictate any funding levels. If it takes a change in the state constitution to remedy the current situation, I would strongly consider it. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? The Kansas Health Institute reports that approximately 90% of Kansans are covered by private insurance coverage and by public coverage including Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, and other public programs. Of the remaining 300,000 Kansans without coverage, over 50,000 are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP but not enrolled and an additional 151,000 qualify for financial assistance to buy coverage on the health care exchange. The remaining 100,000 Kansas are those people who do not have access to public coverage and who do not qualify for financial assistance. I believe the Insurance Commissioner, the Kansas Hospital Association, the Kansas Medical Society, and other key stakeholders could come together and develop a uniquely Kansas solution for Kansans without coverage and could do so in a more economically prudent manner than expanding Medicaid. I support work and training requirements for all able-bodied Medicaid recipients as these skills will provide a long-term solution for the Kansan to have a better life and not be dependent upon a government program for healthcare. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to

support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? I do not believe this type of shifting of funds is appropriate and should only occur in the case of a dire state financial emergency. Such shifts should be completely transparent to all Kansans with a timely plan for repayment. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? We must do more to ensure people with certain mental illnesses do not have access to firearms. When people use social media to threaten violence we must have mechanisms to review social media site content and investigate or address potential threats before they are acted upon. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am pro-life. Under the law, there are facilities in the state that provide abortion services and these facilities should be inspected for adherence to the same type of standards as ambulatory surgery centers. Women seeking services in these facilities should be assured that they will be safe, their healthcare needs will be addressed, and that they can rapidly be accepted in a hospital should an emergency arise. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? Is so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I believe in term limits. There is a steep learning curve when elected to represent the state. Understanding the structure, processes, and inner-workings of the state takes a great deal of time. Relationships are also key to accomplishing the work of the legislature which also take time to develop and hone. I believe reasonable terms limits for the Senate to be four terms with limits of five to six terms for the House.

RON ELLIS (incumbent)

Town of residence: Meriden Party affiliation: Republican Age: 65 Job: Self-employed as cattleman Prior elected offices: Kansas House

How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? I believe it is important for the state government to be as transparent as possible. Data should be provided county-by-county on those companies receiving tax breaks including the number of jobs the companies provide and where the citizens who hold those jobs reside. Downstream revenue from the companies should also be considered including the types of products purchased from other companies in order to operate the company receiving the tax break. The information should be provided in such a manner that the average Kansas citizen can clearly compute the “gain” Kansas receives from the tax break provided.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 53RD DISTRICT: JIM GARTNER Why are you running for the Kansas House? I am unopposed this election cycle but I want to continue representing the 53rd House District so I can and make a difference for my constituents. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? I believe the Brownback tax experiment was a complete failure. I voted to end this experiment in 2017 knowing it would take some time to get our financial house back in order. I think we are seeing the outcome with State revenues coming in over estimates for this fiscal year. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I voted for the school finance plan this session even though I still think it does not meet the adequacy requirements. By the time these responses are published the Kansas Supreme Court will have made their decision, and in my opinion we will be addressing this again next legislative session. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? I do not believe it is necessary to amend the constitution to limit the powers of the judicial branch. This is why we have three branches of government and the checks and balances that make sure not one branch has more power than the other.

Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? We should expand expand Medicaid in our state. I have voted for this every time it has come up in the House. This will enable some 140,000 fellow Kansans to have medical coverage that they cannot acquire. It will also help our strengthen our rural hospitals and communities. This is the right thing to do. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? The diversion of state revenues from the highway program has jeopardized our standing as having some of the best highway system in the nation. It put a hold on our ten year transportation program and cost the state millions in revenues from the good construction jobs that would of been created. This failure was again created by the Brownback tax experiment, hopefully with continued strong revenue growth we can reverse this trend. In what ways should the Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? This last session the legislature did pass HB 2145 which will keep guns out of the hands of domestic abusers, which was a good first step. I believe we need to do more, such as allowing relatives of suicidal people or those who have threatened imminent violence to seek-ordered

removal of guns from the home. People who suffer from mental illness should not have access to guns. Encourage better training for physicians in how to recognize patients at risk for suicide. Last but not least I would ban assault weapons and large magazines, in my opinion these are weapons of war. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? As long as Roe v Wade is the law of the land I would not reform the availability of abortion services. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I do not believe it is necessary for the state to have term limits. I believe history has shown that if a State Senator or Representative is not representing their constituents they will be voted out of office. Yes we do have some legislators that have served a number of years but I believe their constituents approve of the job they are doing. I also believe that it is a whole different situation at the Federal level and would support term limits. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large state tax breaks awarded to companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? We have a transparency problem when it comes to tax breaks and credits. This past

JIM GARTNER (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 70 Job: Retired from telecommunications industry in 2001; AT&T lobbyist until 2014 Prior elected offices: Kansas House, 2016-18

session I introduced HB 2753 which would have reviewed and evaluated all tax credits and exemptions over the next four years. The House and Senate committees would have been responsible for the review and evaluation which could include recommended changes or the elimination of such tax break was not producing the desired outcome. This bill passed the House 122-0 but never made it through the Senate. I will be introducing similar legislation in the 2019 session.


C14  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 50TH DISTRICT: DAN BRENNAN Why are you running for the Kansas House? I am running so that my opponent, the incumbent, my current representative, can spend more time with his family and law practice, as well as attend to the duties of his position on the school board. He works hard at making sure children in the school district have everything they need to be successful at learning and he is a true role model with his generous giving back to our community. Me? I would like to give back by serving, and representing, the citizens of the 50th district to the Kansas State House of Representatives. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? It was foolish to exempt and lower income tax rates in 2012. The sales tax hike in 2015 was necessary to patch lost revenue due to the results of the failed Brownback experiment. In 2017 the Income taxes were raised as a response. We need a fourth, and possibly even a fifth, income tax bracket and reduce to 0 the sales tax on food. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I think it falls short and implementation is delayed for far too long. Funding is still inadequate and has been for several years. Those are years that our current students have been shorted already. It is past the time to fully fund our schools.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? It’s not necessary. We should fund schools well, equitably and equally, adjusted for lots of weighted circumstances, some possibly unique even. If we fund schools adequately and well, then there would be no judicial decisions on school funding.

when deciding on locating here or not. We need the best roads, airports and rails available.

Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Yes, we should have expanded Medicaid at the beginning of the Affordable Care Act. And we should do so now until something better can be crafted. We could do so, craft something better, at the state level if we had the will and the foresight to see what could be.

How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I don’t believe we need anymore restrictions placed on the availability of a safe, legal abortion. In fact, I feel that there are too many restrictions placed on women who need health services in general.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? It is not appropriate. Those funds will always be needed for highway projects including any future projects that will require funding. Now we will have to look ahead and restore funding quick enough to keep our highways in excellent shape. That would be what a business looks at

In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? Violence is often a symptom of poverty. Gun violence is a symptom of a gun culture mixed with poverty. Let’s work at ways in which we can begin to reduce poverty first and perhaps the violence with guns will be reduced as well.

Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I am not aware of any reason to support term limits imposed by law. I feel the voters can make wise enough decisions to changing out their representatives at the ballot box when desired. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs?

DAN BRENNAN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 63 Job: Executive director of Capital City Equality Center Prior elected offices: Precinct committeeman

I believe there are better incentives that can be offered that would not involve large tax breaks. Make the state more attractive and that would incentivize even more companies to move into the state. The more businesses that move into our state creates more economic activity and revenue to the state then as a result allowing the state to then reduce property tax and later even provide more tax relief as well.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 50TH DISTRICT: FRED PATTON Why are you running for the Kansas House? When I first ran for the House, I was concerned about the direction our state was headed. Since being elected, I have worked across the political spectrum and served as a voice for common sense solutions so that we could begin to get our state back on track. While we have made progress on balancing the budget, restoring tax fairness, and funding our schools, we still have a lot of work to do to make Kansas a place future generations want to live, work, and raise their families. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Our state, our schools, and our economy faced very serious challenges after implementation of the 2012 Brownback tax plan — challenges that required real revenue reform from the Legislature. In 2017, I supported the proposal that reversed a portion of the Brownback tax plan. We have now put Kansas on a sustainable course that provides stability to our families, our seniors, our schools, and our businesses. I voted against the sales tax increase in 2015. As revenues stabilize thanks to the action in 2017, the Legislature should begin reducing our high sales tax rate, especially on food and other necessities. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? As Chairman of the House K-12 Budget Committee, I am proud of the work we have accomplished regarding school finance. We passed a bipartisan bill that, when combined with the additional funding allocated last year, will increase annual state funding for our schools by nearly $825 million above 2017 funding levels. This amount is in line with testimony received by the committee over the past two years from our schools and our State Board of Education. These additional dollars will make a significant difference to schools across our state and can be paid for without a tax increase.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? I respect the decision Kansans made in 1966 to add the current language to our constitution. However, I don’t agree with the plaintiff’s attorney when he said all other areas of the state budget should suffer to fund schools, which is what would happen without a significant tax increase. Over the past two years, we have added nearly $825 million more in school funding. If the Court finds this additional funding is still unconstitutional, then it may be time to again ask Kansans if they want to change the constitution in some manner or leave it the same. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able- bodied” recipients? Improving access to health care is extremely important to our state. We must also maintain quality and cost effectiveness. The Legislature and Governor should work together on a Kansas specific solution to improve our health care system and save our hospitals which could include expanding the state’s KanCare program in a responsible way. Any program should include work and training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients. We should also provide additional resources to our safety net clinics and mental health systems. These investments in providing better access will improve both the health of Kansans and the Kansas economy. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? The Legislature began sweeping transportation dollars to fund general government expenses when the Brownback tax plan failed to work. Given the sharp decline in revenues, the only way to fund state government was to take dollars from areas such as the highway fund. Thanks to the reversal of the Brownback tax plan, we are able to begin addressing some of

the shortfalls from the past six years, including significantly reducing the amount of funding taken from the highway program. Moving forward, we must end the reliance on highway dollars to fund general state government. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I am not in favor of allowing criminals to possess guns. Unfortunately, we know that criminals do not follow the law. We should give law enforcement additional resources to enforce our laws and to remove guns from violent criminals. Many violent crimes are caused by individuals with mental health issues. We need to do a better job of providing services to those who are facing these challenges. We have some great providers in our community, but they lack the resources to meet the overwhelming needs before them. The state must make addressing the mental health crisis a priority. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am Pro-Life and am proud of the work we have done to protect the most innocent amongst us. We must continue to identify the issues parents face when in a difficult situation and then undertake efforts to address those needs. We must also address our adoption and foster care programs so that adoption is accessible and affordable for more families. While we have begun to see some positive change, we have a long way to go. Far too many children in our system are waiting for a loving, permanent home. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I trust the people of Kansas to elect legislators who have the state’s best interests at heart. During my few years in the Legislature, I have already witnessed significant turnover. I have appreciated the historical prospective some of the longer serving members of the Legislature have provided me and my colleagues. I believe we need a good balance of members with fresh ideas and members with experience. In states

FRED PATTON (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 44 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Seaman School District Board of Education president

with term limits, often lobbyists and special interest groups have more power because they are the only ones with experience in the process. We don’t want that to happen in Kansas. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? As President Lincoln stated, “Democracy is the government of the people, by the people, and for the people.” With technology, it has become relatively easy for people to observe and interact with their government online. The same should be true with economic development incentives. Companies should be held accountable to achieve the targets set forth when they are provided tax breaks or financial incentives. One way to make sure that happens is to involve the public by posting online terms of incentive packages along with progress reports measuring the companies’ progress toward meeting the contractually required targets.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 55TH DISTRICT: ANNIE KUETHER Why are you running for the Kansas House? I am running because I would like to continue to serve the people of the 55th District and to return Kansas to its former status….a wonderful place to raise a family, get a great education, enjoy the arts and sciences and to travel on excellent roads and to take care of our most vulnerable people, children and the elderly. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The Brownback 2012 tax policy almost destroyed our state and its ability to even fund the most basic needs. The 2017 restoration helped to jump start our economy and yet our taxes are still at a lower level than we had in 2012. We can now begin to fund services for children, Veterans, KBI, raises for state employees – such as Corrections officers, who have been ignored by this Administration. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I don’t believe that the education bill is quite enough. As in most jobs, one likes to keep up with inflation and our funding over the years has not done that. We are losing educators to other states with better pay and respect for teachers. If we were doing a better job, and

funded education as we should have, since 2005, we would not be needing any Court opinion(s). Children represent the future of this state. We should be doing right by them. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? I heard the testimony for this Constitutional amendment in the House Judiciary Committee. I voted against it. There is a reason for the three branches of Government, and it is all about checks and balances. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Expansion of Medicaid is the right thing to do. It would help to insure over 100,000 Kansans with OUR TAX dollars. Right now, those tax dollars are being used be other states….we have lost millions of Kansas tax dollars. It would help health care costs, keep people healthier, and create jobs. Having more people being able to work means a more stable economy for the state. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not?

Due to the Brownback 2012 tax cuts, our Highway fund turned into the “Bank of KDOT”, which is just wrong. Taking money from our roads to pay for the fundamental functions of Kansas government is just wrong. I look forward to turning this practice around. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I support the 2nd amendment but I also believe in responsible ownership. I do support background checks and training for concealcarry. I view these steps in a similar light as getting a license to drive a car….very basic rules…to operate something that can kill. With the awareness of mental health concerns, I think these make sense. We stopped a law lowering the age to 18 on college campuses and passed one to keep guns out of the hands of those who are domestic abusers. I am also realistic enough to understand that this will not stop all violent crime. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? Abortion is legal. Health care rights should be equal and be an issue between the doctor and the patient. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not?

OTHER CANDIDATES Democrat Joseph Stringer, who is running for the Kansas House, 55th District, didn’t return the questionnaire.

ANNIE KUETHER (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 66 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Kansas House

Term limits destroy institutional memory. Serving in the legislature starts with a steep learning curve. By the time you have your feet on the ground, your time may be up. It is important to know your state’s history. Kansas has always had a high, natural turn over in the statehouse. This year is no different with 57 seats up for change. House members are up for election every 2 years and the outcomes come from the voting booth.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C15

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 52ND DISTRICT: TONI SCALIA Why are you running for the Kansas House? Phone calls and letters to legislators are ineffective if I wish to have my voice count on legislative issues of health care, education, and taxation facing Kansas. I want to legislate as I would have others legislate for me and I do not see this, ‘Golden Rule’, of legislation being applied in Kansas. I am a 78 year old woman and I lived and lived well in a Golden Rule country. I want to do my part and my best to leave Golden Rule legislation as my legacy. Running for the Kansas House is a start. What do you think about Kansas (2012) lowering and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? War and taxes are two tried and tested methods of generating taxes. Increasing sales tax is financial war on both lower and middle class economic groups while a graduated income tax allows for a far fairer tax. I was against the 2012 lowering and for the 2017 raising but against hiking sales tax rates. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? First, I do not believe that it is realistic to project financial needs five years out for any given purpose. Projections so futuristic are bound to be far less than real time needs. Second, studies have shown that the number is half of expected needs. Third, the continuing erosion of public school funding by vouchers, home schooling, corporate tax rebates without stated restrictions and removals of these expenditures both as they are today and as they might be in five years time makes it difficult to accept that the $525 million will comply with the Kansas Constitution. In addition, there has been a push by the Republican lead legislature to change the judicial constitutional requirement which belies any understanding that, as written, the funding would satisfy the requirement. No, I don’t think it complies.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public schools? Absolutely not given that, to do so, undercuts the court system and further puts public education squarely under the thumb of the majority party with partisan desires overriding policy needs. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for, “able-bodied” recipients? In 2015, the CDC reported that 27 students in an Olathe, Kansas public school tested positive for TB. Medicaid should be expanded if for no other reason than to encourage early medical care for financially distressed families. In addition, the state government in Kansas should enter the federal program and recoup the $950,000,000 lost to Kansans as a result of opting out of the program. Further, had Kansas opted into the program they would have avoided the egregious act of selecting three private insurers who have paid one billion, 225 million, and 1.5 million dollars in fines for inappropriate payments, disallowing insurance access to pregnant women and the seriously ill from entering the program, and suffered from a serious lack in the number of medical providers respectively. This status of each of the three private insurers was public knowledge before their selection by the current Republican led legislature. This is one deciding factors in my decision to run. Any training or work programs should be offered in addition to and not a requirement of Medicaid and should be under public, not private, operation. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not?

It is inappropriate because it encourages financial irresponsibility. Keeping a sacrosanct line item budget forces responsibility, allows for more transparency and is one of the protectors of democratic governance. We all know the financial trouble we can get into with three or more credit cards and that is precisely what diverting dollars allocated for one item into a polyglot stew supporting other items does to the supposed fiduciary responsibility of the state. Such a financial stew is both tasteless and unrecognizable and Kansas is better and Kansans deserve better. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I don’t believe that it is realistic to be able to legislate a ban on military assault rifles that appear to be the weapon of choice for large scale murders or to ban other weapon of gun violence. It may be possible to legislate biannual license registration of a selection of guns not used for hunting with the additional revenue allocated to victims of gun related violent crime. The seemingly successful Australian gun laws, banning all rapid fire long guns, is often sited as model however, I do not believe that it is applicable on either a federal or state level in the US without further analysis. Please do not take this response as an answer to the question of school safety, a response not asked for here and one that I believe requires an understanding of mandatory reporting and the development of an attached mandated specific follow up protocol given the thus far known profile of perpetrators of school shootings. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? Abortion is a right according to the Supreme Court of the US. No abridgment. I do recall that the Republican led legislature offered bill that did not pass stating that it was appropriate for a

TONI SCALIA

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 78 Job: Retired professor of sociology; author/writer Prior elected offices: None

physician to lie to a pregnant woman if medical tests showed that the fetus was deformed and the physician thought that the pregnant woman would seek an abortion if she were given accurate knowledge of the medical test. Bluntly said, women have the vote, the right to drive, and the right to an abortion without restrictions other than those stated in federal law. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? No. It is not necessary and, while it is for me, counter-intuitive, studies show (Legislative studies Quarterly) that,” term-limited legislators become less beholden to constituents in their geographical district and more attentive to other concerns” and the, ”reform increases the power of the executive branch and weakens the influence of party leaders”.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 52ND DISTRICT: BRENDA DIETRICH Why are you running for the Kansas House? I am seeking a second term as State Representative for the same reasons I ran in 2016. I ran to get our state back on the right track by restoring stability to the state budget and adequately funding essential services. Everyone I talked to was concerned about public safety, education, roads and bridges, programs for our disabled, elderly, and our foster children. I worked hard to be a voice for the people of the 52nd House district while also being a good steward of our tax dollars. I have proven that I am willing and able to work with others to find common sense solutions to complicated issues in order to create a better Kansas for those that I serve. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rates (2015)? The impact of the 2012 tax cuts created an unbalanced and unfair tax code, reduced our bond rating, and forced extreme reductions in core services. In 2015, the Legislature was deficit spending, delaying KPERS payments, sweeping funds from KDOT and other agencies, eliminating thousands of state jobs, and scrambling for more revenue. The Governor believed an increase in sales tax was necessary to balance the budget. The 2017 legislature restored some of the tax cuts of 2012, and have gotten our fiscal house in order. As state revenues stabilize, the next step would be to strategically plan a reduction in sales tax, especially on food. Do you believe the $525 million, 5-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? The Supreme Court will be the determiner of constitutionality, but I do believe the additional new funding provided in this bill and the increased funding included in last year’s bill, which will result in $825 million over 6 years, is a substantial investment in public education. It is imperative the legislature honor these financial obligations to our schools. As a former Superintendent, I am pleased with this bill’s increased accountability

measures, assurances of a greater investment in Special Education, and the ability to provide our schools with the resources they need to make significant progress. The additional $525 million was accomplished without a tax increase. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? There are a lot of different organizations weighing in on this issue and it has certainly become a divisive issue in the Senate and the House. Those in support of amending the state constitution believe it can/will end the continued cycle of litigation regarding school finance in the future. I doubt that will be the case, but perhaps it is time to have the debate on the floor of the House. My sense today is that a change to limit judicial oversight and/or change any language in Article 6 will be viewed as weakening the protections to our schools by the majority of my constituents. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? We know that access to healthcare in Kansas is a problem for many of our residents. For some, the issue is that our low-wage earners make too much for traditional Medicaid, yet not enough to qualify for insurance subsidies under ACA. Data suggests that expanding Medicaid would provide coverage for as many as 80,000 Kansans each year and would also provide additional resources in rural areas for hospitals, clinics, and doctors. Healthcare experts in Kansas believe we should take advantage of the federal dollars to expand Medicaid, otherwise they are being lost to other states. Any plan for expansion should have rigorous checks and balances to make sure the dollars are going to serve the people they are intended to serve. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to

support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? There were many unintended consequences of the 2012 tax plan. Revenues were not funding core services, the state had spent down its reserves and was deficit spending. The Governor began recommending deep sweeps from many funds and agencies, including KDOT, to help fill the state’s budget hole. This year, I was proud to support a budget that begins the process of reversing this fiscally irresponsible trend. Kansas is now in a better position to repair much of the damage that was done. It will take time, but it is a top priority to end the dependence on KDOT to fund our state’s budget and use those dollars for infrastructure needs. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? This is a very complicated issue that will require the consideration of a broad range of potential strategies. I think we can all agree that we have to be vigilant in keeping guns out of the hands of criminals and to make sure that all of our laws are enforced uniformly. We should provide adequate resources and training for our law enforcement officers and access to mental health services for those who have violent behaviors. Our state should take the lead on looking at the integration of tools and resources that focus on ways to determine and prevent the root causes of the violence, rather than just focus on the violent act itself. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am Pro-Life, but I am also Pro-Adoption and Pro-Foster Care. There are many reasons individuals or families might find themselves considering making a difficult decision regarding parenting. It is incumbent upon us, as a state, to provide safety nets for those fragile Kansans to help them through these agonizing situations. We are in need of more foster care homes and an affordable option for families who want to adopt so they can bring the thousands of kids in

BRENDA DIETRICH (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 65 Job: Retired superintendent of AuburnWashburn school district Prior elected offices: Kansas House

Kansas waiting for a forever family into their loving homes. As a member of the House Children and Seniors Committee, I have seen the issues in our foster care system and the barriers to adoption services. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? Is so, what do you propose? If not, why not? There is some value to having knowledge and experience in an organization. Too much turnover can lead to chaos; but, there is also a lot to be gained from new perspectives and fresh ideas. I was told last year that there are only 27 legislators in the House that were there in 2010. That is significant change. If your constituents believe you are not doing the job they elected you to do, then they have the opportunity to make a change every 2 years in the House or every 4 years in the Senate. Term limits do not appear to be necessary in state government in Kansas, based on past practice.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 54TH DISTRICT: SARAH COATS Why are you running for the Kansas House? Every day, working parents like me are underrepresented in the State House. After working for nearly a decade within social systems in the community, I have witnessed the gaps in vital services, and know just how important a functioning, compassionate government is. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? The lack of a sustainable budget causes too much fluctuation in tax rates. The people of Kansas pay high taxes, including some of the highest taxes on food sales in the nation, with little to show for it. To make our state more financially stable, we need a fair budget that can be sustained over time. Do you believe the $525 million, five-year school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I do believe the court will send the legislature back to session to continue to work on the budget again. I believe many worked hard on this budget but it fails to meet the courts requirements. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit

power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? The lack of a sustainable budget causes too much fluctuation in tax rates. The people of Kansas pay high taxes, including some of the highest taxes on food sales in the nation, with little to show for it. To make our state more financially stable, we need a fair budget that can be sustained over time. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? I am in favor of expanding medicaid to provide more services to children, seniors and people with disabilities in our communities. This is a service we currently pay into the federal government and the money is spent in other states. We should get the services we are paying for. Hundreds of millions dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? It is not a good practice to take from one pot of money to pay for another. When looking at a sustainable budget with fair taxes we have to

support infastructure. I have a many rural areas in my district and there are large potholes, broken bridges, and roads falling apart. It is important these roads are usable as the state has closed many rural hospitals. Children need to be able to ride the bus safely to school. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I support the bill that restricts sales of firearms to people convicted of domestic violence. I do not have all the answers to address violent crime, but I do know that arming teachers is not one of them. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? At this time there is not much reform that could be done. Any further restrictions would violate federal law. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? Why or Why not? There is something to be said for making it easier for fresh voices to enter the legislature, but I do not know if term limits are the right solution at this time. How would you improve public reporting to the

SARAH COATS

Town of residence: Auburn Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 33 Job: Social worker Prior elected offices: None

governor on results from the large state tax breaks awarded to companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? We should be able to see where the streams of money flow from and to. This information should be easily accessible to the legislature and the public. This could be provided by publication and/or posted online.


C16  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 54TH DISTRICT: KEN CORBET Why are you running for the Kansas House? Rural Kansans need someone who is willing to stand up for them. I have lived in this area my entire life. My wife, Bev, and I met here, raised a family here, and built a business right here in the 54th district. My job in the House is to the represent the people and values of the 54th district. Those values are who I am and I’m honored to fight for my friends and neighbors in the Kansas House. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? I believe in low taxes across the board. When I’m out talking to the people of the 54th district they don’t tell me they want higher taxes. Instead I hear complaints about income, sales, and property taxes. In order to lower taxes we need to operate state government more efficiently. Whether a family budget or the budget of our family business you simply cannot spend more money than you bring in. When that starts to happen it is time to tighten your belt and find ways to save. Unfortunately it does not work that way in government. There are people across the 54th district struggling to make ends meet. We owe it to them to reduce their tax burden and ensure that their government is operating responsibly. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? There is nothing more important than our kids and they deserve a quality education. We spend over $5 billion a year on K-12 which amounts to over $13,000 per student. Our focus should be on using those funds to provide an innovative, student focused education system that best prepares our kids to eventually enter the workforce. We invest over half of our state

budget into K-12. There should be no question our school finance plan is constitutional. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? The school funding debate has been dragging on for decades costing millions of dollars. Over half the state budget goes to public school districts. This constant litigation needs to end and the focus needs to shift to how best use the billions of dollars in the K-12 system. That cannot happen until the uncertainty of these legal battles end. The only way that can happen is if the people of Kansas decide, via constitutional amendment, how they want schools to be funded going forward. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? I oppose expanding Medicaid/Obamacare in Kansas. Medicaid is a safety net program, expanding this program turns it from a safety net program to a program covering able bodied adults. The better option is to create an economy where these individuals can find gainful employment. Thankfully Kansas is experiencing record low unemployment. In addition state after state that has expanded Medicaid under Obamacare has seen costs far exceed expectations. There are estimates that expansion in Kansas will cost the state $1.1 billion over 10 years. It will likely cost much more than this. We simply cannot afford this extra cost without another significant tax increase. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not?

Any parent can tell you that when it comes to creating the family budget you have to prioritize. Our highways and infrastructure are important. Thankfully Kansas has some of the best roads in the country and we should keep them that way. At the same time every year when the legislature passes a budget we have a duty to look at needs across the board and prioritize accordingly. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? Firearms are objects. Just like a hammer or a car. Violent crime is caused by people, not by an object. Rather than pass new laws affecting law abiding gun owners there needs to be a focus on real solutions. New security protocols in schools including armed security, a focus on mental health, greater emphasis on detecting threats, and a coordinated effort to combat street gangs are real solutions to addressing violent crime. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I am 100% pro-life. I am proud to have helped make Kansas one of the most pro-life states in the country. We all have a duty to protect defenseless children. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I’m a small business owner, not a career politician. I support amending the Kansas constitution so no one can serve more than 8 years in the Kansas House or Senate. The Kansas legislature is meant to be a citizen legislature, not a career. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large

KEN CORBET (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 69 Job: Owner/operator of Ravenwood Lodge Prior elected offices: Kansas House, 2013-present

state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? We need increased transparency in this area. Government should create an overall favorable business climate to attract new businesses and increase jobs. Government should not pick winners and losers by awarding enormous giveaways to a select few, connected, corporate interests. All business incentive packages need to be thoroughly vetted. In addition there needs to be ongoing analysis to determine the effectiveness of the program. I also advocate that strings be attached to these funds to prevent corporations from taking the money and running. Finally there needs to be safeguards to prevent any incentives being provided to interests engaging in shady practices such as having a history of tax evasion or hiring illegal aliens.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 56TH DISTRICT: VIRGIL WEIGEL Why are you running for the Kansas House? I am running for the Kansas House 56th district to continue the work we started in 2017-2018 session; school funding, more transparency in government, increasing reimbursement rates for HCBS providers; restore 3 million dollars for seniors care; restore funding to KDOT for better roads and bridges and fighting for sales tax relief on food. Also provide more assistance to our veterans. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Taxes raised in 2017 (back to 2012 level) eliminated never-ending budget deficits by the Brownback administration experiment, and taking money from KDOT and not fully funding KPERS properly. Compared to 2012 tax rates, every taxpayer is paying a smaller percentage rate for each income tax bracket now than they did in 2012. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? The $525 million - five year school finance bill passed probably will not meet all requirements but is a good faith effort to fix school funding and will need more work to comply with the Kansas courts.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? No. (limitation of judicial power for school funding)

In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? Kansas firearm laws are fine — no modifications are necessary. We need tougher enforcement of violent offenders and longer sentences for repeat violent felons.

Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Kansas should expand eligibility for Medicaid to give over 150,000 uninsured Kansans health care coverage. I support work/ training programs for recipients under strict guidelines. Expansion will also help rural and small hospitals in Kansas to stay open.

How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? State abortion laws are adequate in their present form.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? We have to stop the bleeding of money out of KDOT road projects to fund other state agencies or balance the budget. Our highways and bridges are vital to the Kansas economy and we cannot allow continued disrepair of roads and bridges which grows our communities and makes travel more safe by periodic repairs and replacement of roads and bridges.

Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? I don't know if it is necessary for term limits or not in Kansas-just to follow other states legislation. I do believe we should have a conversation about term limits in this state and let voters have a voice in this discussion. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? I believe the governor’s office should always be transparent upfront to voters on reporting of large or not so large tax breaks awarded to companies that move their business to

VIRGIL WEIGEL (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 65 Job: Retired state enforcement agent Prior elected offices: Kansas House, 2013-2014 and 2017-18

Kansas. And how many jobs will be created, wages of employees and long term goals of the company (expansion and spin-off companies)

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 56TH DISTRICT: MICHAEL SNOWDEN Why are you running for the Kansas House? I will be a strong, effective voice for the voters in our district. I am passionate about our community. I want to see a change in the culture and makeup of the legislature. I want to help bring compassion and common sense to the Capitol. One of my concerns is that the Kansas foster care system is not working. I would also like to see our public schools fully funded, where more money ends up in the classroom. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Raising taxes makes it difficult for hard working Kansans to buy the things that their families need each week. We need to make it easier, not harder, for people to buy groceries, clothing, and other necessities. The state government serves an important role in many areas, but the state government has grown too large. With responsible budgeting and less spending, we can improve the quality of life in Kansas and revitalize our economy. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? Our children need a quality education. A quality education should be our priority. This plan may or may not technically comply with the constitution, but if we do not address the main issue of quality education for our

children, then we have missed the point. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to the limit power of the judicial branch to dictate the levels of state aid to public school districts? The Kansas Constitution states “The legislature shall make suitable provision for finance of the educational interests of the state.” We need to make sure all children get an equal opportunity for a quality education even if they are not in a wealth district. The court doesn’t get to set a dollar amount. The Court is meant to function as a check on the legislature and is responsible for making sure that the legislature upholds its constitutional mandate. However, the constitution is vague in defining what “suitable” means which has caused some issues in recent years. I will be talking with people in the district to find out their opinions on the matter. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? A bill to expand Medicaid passed the legislature but was ultimately vetoed. I have serious concerns about an expansion for able bodied recipients that we cannot afford. If we are going to continue this conversation, I think we should hear directly from the voters which is what I intend to do as I go door to door. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being

diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? We cannot continue to shuffle money around to try to balance the budget, nor can we spend more than we have. It’s time to stop spending and to start looking at areas we can save in. I promise to listen to the voters in my district and fight for them in the legislature. In what ways should the Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I think we need to look past laws and look at the break down of the family. Violent crimes are often committed by those who have lived in broken homes, or didn’t get their basic needs met early in life. We also need to look at how to improve our mental health systems. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? Every life is precious and has value if elected, I will stand up for the voiceless and defend for the rights of the unborn. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? In Kansas we have term limits, they’re called elections. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on the results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a

MICHAEL SNOWDEN

Party affiliation: Republican Town of residence: Topeka Age: 24 Job: Worship pastor, First Assembly of God Prior elected offices: None

business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? If we award tax breaks to companies that move to Kansas, we need to have clear measures showing that they are contributing to the overall prosperity of the state. I think the anyone should be able to access to how many jobs were created and how much revenue was brought in as opposed to how much revenue would have been lost for the duration of the period of tax cuts.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, July 15, 2018  C17

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE — 51ST DISTRICT: RON HIGHLAND Why are you running for the Kansas House? Encouragement from political leaders and constituents in the 51st District was the major factor for me in deciding to run again for a fourth term. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) the state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? Unfortunately, economic conditions in the country and our state during those times created a situation where a choice of cutting spending or raising taxes presented itself. The will to cut spending was not there resulting in tax increases. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? Yes. Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? The Court is within its power as defined by the Constitution to evaluate equity. However,

the funding is strictly within the power of the Legislature. Unfortunately, a clear statement in the Constitution is needed. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Every research document and information I have reviewed indicates that the cost of expansion would be too costly for Kansas. The experience of other states bears this conclusion to be true. The surest way for any recipient to become a productive citizen is to help that individual find and keep a job. Therefore, I do support such programs. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is this appropriate or not? No. The money collected via the gasoline tax should go to the infrastructure development, maintenance, and planning. The budget should be maintained unless there is a catastrophic event. Identification of priorities by the Legislature and the Governor is required during the budgeting process.

In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? The Legislature has made modifications to the laws recently and I feel they are sufficient. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? I would vote to strengthen, not weaken. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? At first this sounds logical. But, the voters determine the length of time a person serves them. By passing a law to limit terms weakens the peoples vote and could lessen their involvement in the process. I would require a great deal more information before voting on such a bill. How would you improve public reporting on the results from large state tax breaks awarded companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? We passed legislation in 2018 that creates transparency in this process within the Commerce Department. They will develop a web site that will be available to the public to see

RON HIGHLAND (incumbent)

Town of residence: Wamego Party affiliation: Republican Age: 71 Job: Retired veterinarian Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Wabaunsee County Republican Precinct Committeeman

the funds allocated, to whom, and the results. I would encourage local governments to do the same.

OTHER CANDIDATES Democrat Noah Wright, who is running for the Kansas House, 51st District, didn’t return the questionnaire.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE — 57TH DISTRICT: JOHN ALCALA Why are you running for the Kansas House? I’ve been in public service for many years now, and it’s incredibly important to me that my district is accurately and compassionately represented. I take pride in being accessible to all of my constituents and helping them in any way that I can. Taking their concerns and opinions to the Statehouse ensures we, including myself, are all properly represented. What do you think about Kansas lowering (2012) and raising (2017) state income taxes while hiking the sales tax rate (2015)? I was first elected to the House in November 2012, and unable to vote against the 2012 tax experiment. However, I would never have voted for such a reckless policy, and like my colleagues, foresaw this as a disaster to the state economy. I voted against the 2015 tax hike, which at that time was the largest in state history, because it was nothing more than covering up the failure of the 2012 policy. By the time we got to the vote in 2017, Kansas was $1 billion in the hole. There was no other option but to vote yes. Our state’s schools, social services, infrastructure, and entire economy depended upon it. Do you believe the $525 million, fiveyear school finance plan adopted by the 2018 Legislature complies with the Kansas Constitution? I agree with the Kansas Supreme Court that the plan was not adequate and did not provide appropriate adjustments for inflation. That is why I voted with my colleague Representative Trimmer to bring the inflation adjustments to the correct levels, unfortunately that amendment did not pass.

Is it necessary for legislators and Kansas voters to amend the state constitution to limit the power of the judicial branch to dictate levels of state aid to public school districts? Absolutely not. The three equal but separate branches of government are the very foundation of our democracy. This was nothing but an attempt to limit the power of a certain branch of government solely because one side didn’t or doesn’t agree with the outcome. Not only is this amendment attempt harmful to our children, it would strip the fundamental checks and balances from government. Why should, or why shouldn’t, the state government in Kansas expand eligibility for Medicaid? If expanded, do you support work or training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients? Kansas should absolutely expand Medicaid — and we should have done this years ago. Expanding Medicaid would not only provide healthcare coverage for over 150,000 Kansans that are currently in the coverage gap, but it would greatly improve their health and wellbeing. It would make Kansas a healthier state overall. We are also paying into a federal program and not getting anything in return — expansion is a cost-friendly option for helping thousands and thousands of Kansans. I do not support work requirements for Medicaid recipients. Many of the people who are eligible for Medicaid already have jobs, it’s just that those jobs pay so little they actually qualify for Medicaid. Corporations need to increase wages before the state implements work requirements. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being diverted from the state’s highway program to support the government’s base budget. How is

this appropriate or not? For years Governor Brownback raided the State Highway Fund to help offset the plummeting state budget after the enactment of his tax experiment. The Highway Fund is a valuable economic driver for our state and also ensures we have safe roads and bridges to travel on. I do not support taking money out of the Highway Fund to plug holes in the State’s budget and I will work to reverse this action. In what ways should Kansas firearm laws be modified to address violent crime? I fully support the second amendment, the Constitution, and what it stands for. However, we do need to find a failsafe way to keep firearms out of the hands of dangerous people. While I support law-abiding citizens’ right to access guns, I also support keeping guns out of our schools and hospitals, and out of the hands of domestic abusers. How would you reform state law regarding availability of abortion services? This is typically a national issue and not a state and local one. I do believe abortion services, like any medical services, should be provided in a safe and professional environment and that is where the state does come in. Is it necessary for Kansas to follow other states with term limits for House and Senate members? If so, what do you propose? If not, why not? Kansas does have term limits for House and Senate members — through elections. The people are the term limits. How would you improve public reporting by the governor on results from large state

JOHN ALCALA (incumbent)

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 59 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Topeka City Council

tax breaks awarded to companies that move a business to Kansas or promise to remain and increase jobs? The legislature needs to adopt legislation that would require the Governor to seek legislative approval for any large tax breaks provided to corporations to entice them to move or increase jobs. Doing so would greatly increase the transparency of these actions with the creation of a legislative record and would also provide accountability for the voters. Additionally, any tax break handed out to a corporation to increase jobs needs to have teeth by requiring they actually do create jobs. If that corporation doesn’t increase jobs, then they should pay back the tax breaks.

OTHER CANDIDATES Democrat Vic Miller, an incumbent running for the Kansas House, 58th District, didn’t return the questionnaire.

D E M O C R AT

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION — 1ST DISTRICT: CHRIS PALMER What makes you the best candidate for this job? Others may also be well suited, but I think my background in running a business, creating and meeting budgets and supervising those who have created and met budgets, as well as my involvement in partnerships where public and private entities worked together to address challenges make me a good fit for Shawnee County Commissioner. What’s the most common thing you hear from people as you’re out campaigning? “You’re much better looking in person!” Okay, I’ve never heard that. Most folks are optimistic about things happening in Topeka and Shawnee County and think it’s a great place to live and raise a family but local taxes and crime routinely come up as areas of concern. This position is partisan. Should it be? And how would the partisan nature of the position impact your role as a commissioner? I would prefer County Commissioner not be a partisan position, but it shouldn’t matter all that much. The closer you get to the people and local issues you really shouldn’t have time for pontificating on partisan issues. Just get the job done and work together. What do you consider to be the most important part of a county commissioner’s job? Being a good steward of public funds and working for the common good.

After earmarking $3 million of $6 million in available excess revenue to go for parks and recreation purposes, county commissioners recently have been discussing how to use the remaining $3 million. What do you think? The commission had agreed that any available excess revenue would go toward deferred maintenance for Parks and Recreation and/ or deferred maintenance at the Kansas Expo Centre. I think they should honor their commitment. There are still millions of dollars in deferred maintenance items carried over from the consolidation of the Topeka and Shawnee County Parks and Recreation departments. If you could make one change to Shawnee County laws/ordinances, what would it be? Review the home rule resolutions and eliminate any that are outdated, redundant or were implemented for a specific purpose that is no longer an issue. Even well thought out and properly executed regulations, if not reviewed, can become excessive and burdensome decades later. What’s your stance regarding whether the county should buy the property that formerly housed Camp Daisy Hindman? Camp Daisy could offer opportunities for all Shawnee County citizens to experience expanded and unique recreation experiences. However, I don’t see the rush to enter into a purchase of this size and continued responsibility before the county has done it’s due diligence. I would need to see a detailed proposal taking

into consideration all aspects of owning and operating a property of this size and scope and incorporating it into what I believe is a fine parks and recreation department before I could make a judgement. I do understand the passion and energy from the community; Camp Daisy has provided memories for tens of thousands of campers for decades. What does this community need to do from an economic development standpoint that it’s not doing already? My best advice is, "don’t be afraid to try!" As a community we have made mistakes and I’m sure we will make more. The thing that bothers me is when the fear of failing keeps us from being bold. I have participated in Chamber of Commerce sponsored inter-city trips and learned what other communities facing similar challenges have done and I am inspired by our progress toward economic and quality of life improvement. There are dedicated professionals working every day to further the cause of economic development in Topeka and Shawnee County. As a candidate I will continue to listen and learn more from them about the long-term goals and plans in the works. Do you have any potential “skeletons in your closet” you’d like to address? I am embarrassed to admit that until I was 40 years old, I thought the, “drummies” when you ordered chicken wings were from the legs of really small chickens.

CHRIS PALMER

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 50 Job: Executive director of Cornerstone of Topeka Inc., a private, nonprofit affordable housing developer and provider that owns and manages 175 Topeka properties Prior elected offices: None

What’s your favorite thing about Shawnee County? It’s home.


C18  Sunday, July 15, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 PRIMARY VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION — 1ST DISTRICT: JEFFREY COEN What makes you the best candidate for this job? I’m not a politician, I am a small business owner and I’m always looking through that lens. When I ran for City Council, I heard many complaints about the streets. After being elected, one thing I found discouraging was that street projects take 3 years to complete. The first year is the planning stage, the second year is to move the utilities and gain the right of way and the last year is construction. I figured the only way to start improving our streets and to make a difference was to ask our city manager to find more money for streets from within our current budget. The city manager came through and we were able to secure $2 Million in new street funding in 2017 without raising taxes. The new $2 Million also remains in the 2018 budget that we are discussing right now. I haven’t been afraid to say ‘no’ to wasteful City Government spending and government overreach. I think the fireworks ban is bad for business and not very patriotic, and the tobacco ban is infringing on our civil liberties. I have been a lone voice that our economic development partner G.O. Topeka shouldn’t be rolling over $17.5 Million dollars. Rolling over 3 years’ worth of their annual budget is not what the tax payers voted for with the countywide sales tax. That money was set aside for Economic Development and should be working in our communities, not gaining interest. What’s the most common thing you hear from people as you’re out campaigning? The most common thing I’m hearing right now over and over is that spending $45 Million to renovate the Kansas Expocentre is a complete waste of taxpayer money. Now that the current designs are coming in $5 Million over budget, that is a big concern to those I’ve talked to. They wish projects could be more like the Willard Bridge, ahead of schedule and under budget. Many people also expressed frustration with the brand new Shunga sidewalk segment that was torn up

at the Wheatfield Village construction site. There were a variety of negative comments. I am also hearing that community pride may be turning a corner for the better. People are excited about the positive changes happening in our communities. Violent crime is also a growing concern. This position is partisan. Should it be? And how would the partisan nature of the position impact your role as a commissioner? As a City Councilman, I have always tried to make the best decisions for my District and the City based on the information available. These decisions have little to do with politics, but has everything to do with creating and building momentum for Shawnee County and Topeka to move our communities forward. What do you consider to be the most important part of a county commissioner’s job? I believe the most important part of a County Commissioner’s job is to listen to those they represent. After earmarking $3 million of $6 million in available excess revenue to go for parks and recreation purposes, county commissioners recently have been discussing how to use the remaining $3 million. What do you think? In my 3 short years of public service I am still learning about how taxes are collected and spent. But when the term “excess funds” is used, it makes me wonder if we’re collecting too much money to run the county. Spending excess funds happens at the City level, too, and I just do not agree with why we must spend the excess revenue instead of returning it to the tax payers with lowering their taxes. We are taxed out! I have attended many commission meetings since last October and heard that technology upgrades are needed at the courtrooms. Perhaps those access funds could go to that.

If you could make one change to Shawnee County laws/ordinances, what would it be? I wasn’t happy with the new county law banning Tobacco purchases by those under 21. I’m not going to argue that using tobacco is bad for your health. I wish people wouldn’t do it. However, tobacco is currently legal to purchase nationwide for those over 18. This Shawnee County law limits personal liberties and will probably wind up in court just like the city’s tobacco ban did. We shouldn’t be going down this road, we should be encouraging all businesses to grow and flourish in our communities. What’s your stance regarding whether the county should buy the property that formerly housed Camp Daisy Hindman? The last story I read said that Camp Daisy was losing $200 Thousand dollars per year. No business can sustain annual losses like that. I do not believe that government ownership is the best solution. A private investor (or possibly a church) could step up and purchase the property and turn it around like a private investor did for Heartland Park. What does this community need to do from an economic development standpoint that it’s not doing already? I would like to see us focus more on helping new and existing small businesses by increasing the budget for the Entrepreneurial and Minority Business Development program. They offer matching funds for capital expenses, building improvements and marketing dollars to small businesses in Shawnee County. This could help with buying and upgrading equipment and making improvements to their store front, exactly a shot in the arm that small businesses could use. Do you have any potential “skeletons in your closet” you’d like to address? I bought my first sport bike motorcycle in the early 1990’s and got 3 speeding tickets in the

JEFFREY COEN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 47 Job: Owner of The C-Team Studios, a website, videography and graphic design firm; does general IT service, networking and support Prior elected offices: Topeka City Council, 2015-present same month. What’s your favorite thing about Shawnee County? Our way of life is pretty good here in Shawnee County. I got caught in rush hour traffic in KC recently, and realized that the congestion we’re seeing at 29th and Fairlawn seems pretty minor compared to bigger cities. Something else I like about Shawnee County is there is always something to do. It’s a great place to raise a family and to call HOME!!

REPUBLICAN

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION — 1ST DISTRICT: CAROL MARPLE What makes you the best candidate for this job? I have the time to devote to this job. I have county experience. I own property in the city and have spent learns learning about JEDO (Joint Economic Development Organization). I believe being a county commissioner is actually three full-time jobs: county commissioner, voting member of JEDO, and oversight of the Parks and Recreation Department. What's the most common thing you hear from people when you are out campaigning? I have heard repeatedly, "No one listens to me. They are going to do whatever they want to do anyway." I want to change that. I will listen. I believe every citizen in this county should be treated with courtesy and respect. We all have a right to be heard. This position is partisan. Should it be? And how would the partisan nature of the position impact your role as a commissioner? The position should not be partisan. To me, being a county commissioner means doing what is best for our county and the people living in it. I believe everyone should be treated equally and fairly regardless of party affiliation. What do you consider to be the most important part of a county commissioner's job? I believe it is listening to the public, doing research, attending meetings and making informed decisions.

After earmarking $3 million of $6 million in available excess revenue to go for parks and recreation purposes, county commissioners recently have been discussing how to use the remaining $3 million. What do you think? Commissioner Cook reminded everyone at the June 18, 2018 commission meeting that the remaining $3 million can only be used for deferred maintenance at the Expocentre or in the Parks and Recreation Department. I do not believe these $3 million should be used at the Expocentre. When voters voted to extend the half cent sales tax, $45 million was voted for the Expocentre. That should be enough. This money needs to be used to perform maintenance that has been deferred and make necessary repairs to our parks.

Hindman. I believe Camp Daisy is the best kept secret in Shawnee County. This camp consists of 155 acres and the camp is in excellent condition. It would present the residents of Shawnee County with a unique experience. The ways in which the camp can be used are endless. Most importantly, owning the camp would give the people in southwest Shawnee County a camp, playground, fishing, and a splash park in their area.

If you could make one change to Shawnee County laws/ordinances, what would it be? I would change the number of county commissioners to five commissioners. I believe this would provide better representation of the public. The commissioners should be able to discuss issues among themselves. At the present time the three commissioners are unable to do this because of the Open Meetings Act.

Do you have any potential "skeletons in your closet" you'd like to address? No.

What's your stance regarding whether the county should buy the property that formerly housed Camp Daisy Hindman? I would have pursued purchasing Camp Daisy

What does this community need to do from an economic development standpoint that it's not doing already? We need to start with redefining the meaning of economic development.

What's your favorite thing about Shawnee County? That would be the people who live here. Ben and I have been blessed to have many, many good friends. Shawnee County is made up of very caring people. We have a granddaughter with a severe congenital heart defect, and we will never be able to repay the help, prayers and kindness that have been given to our family.

CAROL MARPLE

Town of residence: Wakarusa Party affiliation: Republican Age: 64 Job: Co-owner of family farm and shareholder in Auburn Investment Group, which owns apartments in Auburn Prior elected offices: None

REPUBLICAN

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION — 1ST DISTRICT: BILL RIPHAHN What makes you the best candidate for this job? I believe that I am the only candidate who could bring a voice of experience in planning, development, and project management to the board of commissioners. With the current members bringing valuable backgrounds in accounting and law, I feel that there is beneficial insight to be added through someone who has experience working with developers, engineers, architects, planners, and contractors. Beyond that, with an education and history founded on design, I see one of my strengths as being a person of vision. Whether for hikers wanting trails, kids wanting skate parks, veterans wanting a memorial, or neighborhoods wanting input into their park plans, for over thirty years, I have been in collaboration with the people of Shawnee County. Another unique perspective that I bring is that of one who has worked within the city and county governments for the length of my career. I know first hand the effects of the “beast of bureaucracy” and have an in-depth understanding of how it causes our government entities to work with limited EFFICIENCY and VISION. I want to battle that beast! What is the most common thing you hear from people as you are out campaigning? I hear concerns for the level of property taxes and the perceived lack of economic growth. This position is partisan. Should it be? And how would the partisan nature of the position impact your role as a commissioner? For some voters, knowing a candidate’s political background provides beneficial insight as to that candidate’s core values and approach to governing. On the other hand, at the level of county commissioner, voters are more likely to have had first-hand experience or knowledge of the candidate and his/her content of character and are thus able to make their decision outside of the realm of political parties. I would say that I am fine with the present system. As

a commissioner, I would be representing constituents of the first district.......of all political parties. My loyalties would lie with doing the right thing on behalf of those constituents. What do you consider to be the most important part of a county commissioner’s job? I don’t believe that there is one part of the county commissioner’s job that is more important than the others. The job of the county commissioner is to oversee the usage of tax dollars in maintaining and improving the quality of life in our county. Within that, budget, health and safety, infrastructure, long-term planning and vision come to mind. The most important thing is to look collectively at all the responsibilities and find a strong balance in meeting needs. After earmarking $3 million of $6 million in available excess revenue to go for parks and recreation purposes, county commissioners recently have been discussing how to use the remaining $3 million. What do you think? I am an advocate for a 5-year county-wide Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). Such would address infrastructure, equipment purchases, roadways, public health and safety, and quality of life investments. If Shawnee County had a CIP, making a well-thought-out investment decision that includes long-term vision would be more probable. If you could make one change to Shawnee County laws/ordinances, what would it be? Whereas laws and ordinances are concerned, my general philosophy is to beware of our human tendency to make so many rules that we take away our freedom to use common sense. At this point, I do not have specific laws and ordinances that I would target for change. My intent would be open-mindedness in listening to and addressing any related concerns of my constituents.

What is your stance regarding whether the county should buy the property that formerly housed Camp Daisy Hindman? After doing a site visit, it appears to have some possibilities for future use as park land. Back in 1899, the city commissioners were given a similar opportunity when Mr. Gulford Gage wanted to give land to the City of Topeka for the establishment of a park. At that time, the park was two and a half miles out in the country. Many residents were opposed to this acquisition because it was so far out of town. Gage Park is now one of our two regional parks with Shawnee Lake being the other. At Topeka’s current rate of growth, in a few years, Gage Park will be the center of town. In observing the development of Shawnee County, Camp Daisy Hindman could be a future regional park. I believe that such future potential should be taken into consideration. What does this community need to do from an economic development standpoint that it is not doing already? Shawnee County has land, water, connections to interstate, and schools for the provision of high tech training. We need to develop and improve quality of life resources. Our goal is not just to attract businesses; Shawnee County needs to be an attractive place for people to live. Such efforts will go a long way toward the retention of a talented work-force. Do you have any potential “skeletons in your closet” you would like to address? No. What is your favorite thing about Shawnee County? I will never stop being amazed and grateful for the mentality of generosity of the people of Shawnee County. At every turn in my career, I have found myself surrounded by those who go above and beyond for the sake of having a positive impact. With Keep America Beautiful, I’ve seen

BILL RIPHAHN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 62 Job: Landscape architect working for city of Topeka and Shawnee County in the planning and development of parks Prior elected offices: None

the legions show up on a given Saturday morning to clean our parks and green spaces. On many Sundays, there are those veterans who volunteer to work at the Gage Park Memorial putting out 20 flags and then holding brick placement ceremonies for families who come to honor the service of their loved ones. Old Prairie Town swarms with hundreds of volunteers for Apple Festival. After the death of my daughter, my wife and I were overwhelmed by the mass of people, some we knew and some we didn’t, who worked along-side the local water garden club to build a beautiful garden at Ward Meade Park in honor of our Anna. The list could go on; suffice it to say that Shawnee County is made great by the quality of its citizenry.

2018 Topeka Capital-Journal Primary Voters Guide  

Here is the 2018 Topeka Capital-Journal Primary Voters Guide. The primary is Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, in Kansas.

2018 Topeka Capital-Journal Primary Voters Guide  

Here is the 2018 Topeka Capital-Journal Primary Voters Guide. The primary is Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, in Kansas.