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RACE REPORT thanks to Regatta Director Donna Hilmyer and SSS Hostess with the Mostest, Nellie Camardo. Full results at regattanetwork.com, go to the Results Archive.

Kona North American Championship, Clearwater, FL, Oct. 28-29 By Bruce Matlack

The winners of the 38th Stiletto Nationals on Sunspot. From left to right: Dave Hillmyer, Skipper Bill Johnsen, SSS Commodore Barry Milbourn, Charlie Clifton, Kirk Burnett. Photo by Cindy Clifton.

Corsair/PHRF fleet on his 750, Tri Force. On Saturday, the fleet moved into Sarasota Bay, joined by Windriders, Wetas, F16s and F18s. Hulls were flying and spray was spewing on three courses around the bay. In the 11 boat Corsair/PHRF Fleet, Kathryn and Paul Garlick of Palmetto on their Corsair 28, Evolution, handily won their group by 10 points. They won four of the nine races, the only team to win more than one. Tom Reese from Youngstown Yacht Club was runner up on the Corsair 28, Flight Simulator. In the competition for the Stiletto Nationals, Bill Johnsen—with Kirk Burnett, Dave Hilmyer and Charlie Clifton on the 30-foot Sunspot—won five of the next six races to take that title. Dave Ehlers, sailing with brother Bob and Bruce Hood on the 27-foot Yin Yang logged their 26th Nationals, having missed only one since buying the boat 27 years ago. Ellen Dowd was recipient of the Bob Buzzelli Trophy for her work and spirit in support of the class. In the eight-boat Weta Class, Norm Hansen from Delray Beach ran away with the title posting all firsts and seconds. Norm has been sailing the boat 4 years. Stephanie DeLair Taylor was runner up in Stephalicious. In the nine boat Windrider Class, Rob and Linda Powell from the Royal Palm Beach Yacht Club narrowly edged out Jim Rodenkirk from the Wisconsin Brotherhood of Beavers. Although each team won six races, the Powells got the edge through consistency by never finishing worse than second. The 10-boat Portsmouth Fleet consisted of F16s and F18s. Maxime Loiselle and Olivier Pilon towed their boat to Sarasota from Quebec behind their Sprinter regatta support vehicle, Max Marine. On their way to the Cata Cup in St. Barth, they appeared in good form as they won that fleet by 10 points. Also headed for the Cata Cup are Charles Tomeo and Dalton Tebo. They sailed the last day only and posted a 1-1-3-1. They look ready to continue the form that won them the F18 Americas Championship last September. Racing, camping and cook-out were enjoyed by all, 68

December 2017

SOUTHWINDS

Wow! Fifty participants for this event. What a turn out— and what a turn-around by the Clearwater Community Sailing Center—double the participants from three years ago when this event began as simply the Kona Gulf Championship, sponsored by local windsurfer Brit Viehman, owner of North Bay Windsurfing. This year the Kona class conveniently made it their new venue for their North American Championship as well, which drew people from Sweden, Canada and the U.S. West Coast. There was keen, special interest from the strong Canadian contingent, because next year’s event will host the Kona World championship at the same time and place. A remarkable side story is about the father and daughter who took first and second place. In their formative years, the father, Jerome Sampson, was his two daughters’ coach, always finding a spot on the RC boat, but he was never a competitor. When the daughters, Charlotte and Margo, emptied out of the nest and moved on, Dad decided to try his hand at racing as a novice. I remember his first race in Sarasota. His starts were perfect; however, he did not have much of a clue after that! But he did have boat speed and the ability to sniff out the wind shifts. Forward to this regatta. He got a big first place, with his daughter Margo taking second! The moral of the story might be that time spent volunteering for the race committee, and being an observer, might be time well spent! He is definitely not a novice anymore! I recall several years ago when windsurfing players had to walk about as if treading on eggshells amongst the sit-down sailboaters  at the sailing center. This is something I have experienced at “clubs” over the years from the very inception of windsurfing in the early 70s. We were never really considered equals with the other “racing yachts” most of the time. Well, I can now report that there is now total integration at the Clearwater Community Sailing Center! It might be worth analyzing by other clubs to see how this has happened, especially when I hear clubs are losing their young people to video games. Good job to all those responsible. Another observation from participating in this event was that the aggression and infighting on the course that many classes are complaining about does not exist here. Corinthian yacht racing of old and Paul Elvstrom ethics are back in the Kona fleet! Competitors monitor themselves and their actions on the racecourse, not in the protest room, and the kinetics rule (no pumping or fanning one’s vessel around the course) is honored to an amazing degree of professional conduct. Many of you sailors have tried windsurf racing in the past but left it for various reasons. If you left because the boards were too small and tipsy for your weight, or because www.southwindsmagazine.com

Southwinds December 2017  

A free, printed sailing magazine reporting on sailing in the southeast U.S: Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Missi...

Southwinds December 2017  

A free, printed sailing magazine reporting on sailing in the southeast U.S: Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Missi...