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CORROSION OF CONFORMITY Flashback to an unfortunate time in rock music history when big hair, contrived androgyny, and mandatory ballads for every “heavy” album reigned supreme. In 1985, the line up of Mike Dean, Woody Weatherman, and Reed Mullins released what would arguably be called on of heavy music’s most essential albums, in Animosity. North Carolina’s Corrosion of Conformity has endured a slue of roster changes over the band’s 30-plus years. The trio that was responsible for such an influential album came together to release a new self-titled record in February of 2012 that is by far one of the band’s heaviest in a very longtime. While the band did enjoy much more success under the Pepper Keenan era of COC, which was responsible for some of COC’s most polished, mass friendly work, the Southern stoner sludge of the Animosity line-up remains firmly in tact despite the long time lay off. Recording the new project in longtime COC fanatic Dave Grohl, the band managed to do more than channel a sense of nostalgia here. This isn’t Animosity 2. In fact, the heavy factor sort of gives way to an intricate take on Southern rock music that clearly embraces their Raleigh roots, without sounding too pretty. There is doom, there is dirge, there is thrash, and there is a fury whip in COC that is intrinsic. Even after 30 years and a rotating roster. COC.com

THE DROWNING MEN Superlatives aside, this Oceanside, CA. outfit leans more towards to folk end of rock music but manages to make their brand of musical dexterity insanely vivid. Almost ominous in the vein of Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds and loudly urgent much like some of the more boisterous Pixies’ stuff, The Drowning Men are poised to become one of music’s most sought after brands in that they do not fit any particular mold. Having toured successfully with the likes of Flogging Molly, Lucero, And The Airborne Toxic Event, their esthetic is that of rough and tumble dockworkers, complete with scruffy beards and salty dispositions, but their sound is a potent blend of sweeping crescendos and lyrical intuitiveness that will really resonate well with fans looking for something more than a catchy beat. From mandolin to keys, there is a healthy dose of unconventional at the root of the band that never comes off as forced. It’s simultaneously dark and hopeful, beautiful and maybe even a bit morbid. Above all else, it forces you to pay attention – no two ways about that. Soon to release their Borstal Beat Records’ debut helmed by Bill Mohler (Jon Brion, Macy Gray), expect to hear a concoction of songs are theatrical in their delivery and gimmick free throughout. TheDrowningMen.com

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Profile for Skinnie Magazine

Skinnie Magazine Issue 120 - April 2012  

MUSIC • SPORTS • LIFE

Skinnie Magazine Issue 120 - April 2012  

MUSIC • SPORTS • LIFE

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