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Malloy 6 mental state in the receiver,” relies on the use of gestalt theory and diagrammatic methods. Her logic is strong, in that she argues for building meaning with design; however, her use of manipulation rings closer to Burney’s Propaganda than a future of participatory design, what I feel is the future of the communications industry. 6 Kazmierczak successfully proves designers are indeed partners with viewers and, as such, should act as guides. She also provides a solid outline of how designers typically attempt to control the way users decode messages: hierarchies, signs, and perception devices. Design aesthetics and the function of communication are a must, but we are missing bigger opportunities of meaning. Recent developments in psychology confirm why new media have generated such excitement. Providing a means, such as enabling users to respond on a blog, interact with a poster, or design their own product surface, succeeds because these provisions match our human needs for independence, mastery, and purpose. These needs are not new, just as a wide variety of tastes is not new. The difference is we are only now able to see these motivations and diverse tastes expressed. Chris Anderson, editor of Wired Magazine, describes this phenomenon by saying the fragments have always existed as the “long tail” of niche markets; they are revealed and now made possible via digital stores.7 For example, the breadth now available through the explosively revamped music industry enables a broader expression of tastes. Likewise, the same drives of motivation have always existed; new media have begun to satisfy them, shedding light on opportunities for visual communicators. Reading Daniel Pink and studing Eric Jensen's Teaching with the Brain in Mind introduces the psychology opposing propagandist reasoning. Both authors discuss in depth 6

Elzbieta T. Kazmierczak, “Design as Meaning Making: From Making Things to the Design of Thinking."

Design Issues 19, no. 2 (2003): 49. 7

Chris Anderson, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More (New York: Hyperion,

2006), Chapter 2.

Profile for Renee Malloy

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply  

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply is my MFA thesis paper. Please enjoy.

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply  

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply is my MFA thesis paper. Please enjoy.

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