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Malloy 15 opening up because their markets are demanding them to do so. And, yet, the AIGA language has, if anything, turned away from progress on this front. In October of 2010 AIGA published an article condemning co-creation and participatory design in response to the Gap logo fiasco; the problem is, AIGA was condemning crowd sourcing, not co-creation and participatory design. Gap published its new logo (which was designed by an established, professional studio) online, only to receive a slew of feedback from angry patrons and designers alike bashing the design. Shortly after, a forum formed where designers started posting alternatives to the design. The rise of the amateur is a whole separate discussion, but what it comes down to is the fact people are doing work for free; professionals and amateurs alike are competing for business. The effect is a loss of value in design. Cheap software has made everyone in the world think they can design. Case in point, if I have access to surgical tools, the tools do not make me a surgeon. Well, technically, I could perform surgery, but I would likely perform poorly or even kill someone. The amateur designer might not kill a client, but the odds are unlikely the amateur would provide the client with great design. The response article, written by AIGA executive director Richard Grefé, reads: We recognize that the dynamics of co-creation, participatory design and audience participation are powerful social changes that corporations cannot ignore. AIGA’s role, and the profession’s, must be to provide a constructive voice that illuminates the value of professional, experienced designers, particularly in developing design solutions that respect client goals, customer interests and social context. We cannot simply say that the current social dynamics are wrong. We believe AIGA’s voice is best used by saying what we as designers can do, and 23 not simply what others should not do.

The leader of the head professional organization in the field of graphic design is using the same terms to define crowd sourcing as the terms ascribed to a well-researched and

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Richard Grefé, "How do businesses balance crowd participation and design?” AIGA | the professional

association for design." AIGA | the professional association for design. http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/howdo-businesses-balance-crowd-participation-and-design (accessed April 3, 2011).

Profile for Renee Malloy

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply  

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply is my MFA thesis paper. Please enjoy.

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply  

Adaptive Design for Visual Communicators:Reexamining Relationships and Making Theory Apply is my MFA thesis paper. Please enjoy.

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