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Pilot Reports

And these same skilled pilots will do well as they transition to larger airplanes. For the lower cost of entry to be a pilot, the Allegro LSA is a great way to start. One of the joys of this adventure here in North Carolina was flying into the tiny airstrip at Gilliam Airfield, Carthage, NC (5NC3). It’s one of those “must see” airports with a 2,500 foot runway that’s only 36 feet wide and surrounded by 75 foot trees - it’s great! I checked in with Doug Hempstead from B Bar D Aviation to see how the LSA/Allegro flight training business was doing in these challenging economic times. Doug said that December 2009 and January 2010 business was twice that of the previous year. They’re finding many former students who quit are returning to earn their sport pilot certificate because B Bar D can help them for almost one-fourth the cost of getting a private pilot certificate in a non-LSA aircraft. Doug claims that 80% of students complete their training in the LSA versus 20% in the traditional private pilot syllabus. The Sport Pilot and LSA advantage is that students are transformed into pilots in a matter of weeks rather than months. B Bar D Aviation is a tremendous supporter of the EAA Young Eagles program. During the local air show event in October 2009, Doug, Ross and the staff were able to share the fun of flying with 61 Young Eagles in three Allegro planes. The simplicity and economy of the Allegro allowed each plane to fly all day using only one tank of gas! My discovery with the Allegro is that the dream is still alive for pilots that need to recharge their batteries of enthusiasm for aviation. The Allegro LSA allows the pilot to go full circle and get back to the dream of having an adventure every time they fly! to coordinate the proper amount of rudder with aileron in a turn. The students often have no preconceived ideas or bad habits to overcome – they just do what they are told. Because of the slower speed of the Allegro and other LSAs, there can be a significant amount of adverse yaw with improper use of rudder. Although the coordinated turn is a simple maneuver, many advanced pilots in advanced airplanes tend to get complacent about adverse yaw and its potential impact in a stall-spin scenario close to the ground. In my opinion as a former instructor, I believe that LSA pilots will be more aware of, and more proficient in, properly coordinated turns such that they will recognize and avoid the dangers of a low altitude stall and spin.

Fly Safe! Fly Smart! Capt Ron CaptRon@PilotMag.com

Captain Ron is a test pilot, instructor pilot, aviation writer and consultant, having published several books and study guides for aspiring pilots and airline candidates. He holds an Airline Transport Pilot, CFII, and Ground Instructor ratings with 10 type ratings and 10,000 flight hours in over 100 types of aircraft. He attended the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB, CA where he was involved in numerous projects with the Air Force, DoD, and NASA.

M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 0

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PilotMag-May/June 2010  

Aviation magazine

PilotMag-May/June 2010  

Aviation magazine

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