Page 48

F E A T U R E

single engine, a design the SJ 50 shares with Piper’s single engine PiperJet, currently in development. We headed over to the EAA booth, where an Aviat Husky was on display, mounted as if taking off amidst a faux camping site. “Look at the size of the empennage!,” Martha exclaimed as we approached the Husky. “It has a big rudder and a big elevator, both of which are designed to give you more controllability. In a tail dragger with fairly high horsepower, you need a big, strong rudder to make sure you’re in control of the airplane, and not vice versa.” “Look at the aileron – it’s bigger than on our Falcon!,” John said. “Those give very solid controllability when you’re flying at quite slow speeds,” said Martha of the Husky’s jumbo-sized ailerons. “This airplane is made for short fields and unimproved conditions,” John said in summation. As we examined the Husky, EAA president Tom Poberezny appeared and joined our conversation. Talk turned to Pennsylvania’s Van Sant Airport (9N1), where Tom recalled renting a Great Lakes bi-plane while attending an EAA event. A moment later Dan Schwinn, boyish-looking president, CEO and founder of avionics manufacturer Avidyne, sidled up and the discussion moved to turbine aircraft. A former Falcon 10 owner, Schwinn and the Kings began discussing the benefits and drawbacks of the jet’s optional thrust reversers. As we stood talking under the Husky’s wing, I was reminded of something John said before we hit the convention floor: “I think the miracle of man learning to fly is the greatest expression of humankind’s ability to overcome obstacles. It’s a wonderful example of how we can use innovation and imagination to accomplish the previously thought impossible.” The static Husky, perhaps the most modest aircraft on display at the business aviation convention, was nonetheless demonstrating the miraculous power all aircraft share, whatever the differences in their checklists and operating envelopes – the ability to bring people together. As Martha had said earlier that day, “One of the wonderful things about aviation is, when you’re a pilot and you meet another pilot, you’re never alone. You’ve always got a friend.”

46

PILOTMAG.com

M ay / J u n e 2 0 1 0

Profile for Pilot Magazine, LLC.

PilotMag-May/June 2010  

Aviation magazine

PilotMag-May/June 2010  

Aviation magazine

Profile for pilotmag
Advertisement