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This season’s must -have costume!

SENATE RACE IS A CLASSIC LEFT-RIGHT COMBO 06

JOAN ARMATRADING TALKS INDEPENDENCE 36

HOUSE, BROKEN: THE ART OF SETH CLARK 46


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015


EVENTS 10.23 – 8pm RICHARD MAXWELL / NEW YORK CITY PLAYERS: THE EVENING New Hazlett Theater Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

11.4 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: LIVE! ON STAGE JONATHAN RICHMAN, FEATURING TOMMY LARKINS ON THE DRUMS! The Warhol entrance space Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

11.6 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN WITH AUTHOR AND FOOD HISTORIAN SUSAN ROSSI-WILCOX The Warhol theater FREE

11.12 – 4:30pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Teachers in attendance receive Act 48 credit. Tickets $10

11.13 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU The Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

A John Waters’ Christmas:

Holier & Dirtier 12.11 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Co-presented with the Carnegie Museum of Art Tickets $25 / $20 Members & students

The Warhol welcomes back the legendary and incomparable writer and director John Waters to the opulent Carnegie Music Hall, with his critically acclaimed one-man show A John Waters’ Christmas. Waters will be holding a book-signing directly following the performance. N E W S

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015


{EDITORIAL}

10.21/10.28.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 42

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER PHOTOS BY THEO SCHWARZ} MODELS: JESSIE IRWIN AND ZHERU LIU

[NEWS] been spending a lot 06 “They’ve of money trying to create a new identity for him.” — State Senate candidate Heather Arnet on her Republican opponent

[VIEWS] get so wrapped up in national 16 “We elections that we fail to recognize

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

that the most important vote you’ll make in the next 20 years is happening in less than two weeks.” — Charlie Deitch on the importance of the upcoming state Supreme Court elections

[TASTE] fufu or Davi Red-Red you’re 31 “Ifafter,it’sthis is your place.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the new takeout spot, African Taste Cuisine

[MUSIC]

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

artistic independence

[SCREEN]

available is an oblique critique 43 “Also of how the U.S. may have strayed from the noble ideals presented here.” — Al Hoff reviews Bridge of Spies

[ARTS] building has been reduced to 46 “The pieces, segments, parts without sum.” — Lissa Brennan on a work by artist Seth Clark

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 50 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 61 +

{ADMINISTRATION}

{PUBLISHER}

“I’ve always been the full force

my music.” — Singer36 behind songwriter Joan Armatrading on her

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THIS WEEK

“I THINK THIS IS A STORY ABOUT MONEY IN POLITICS.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Go behind the scenes of this week’s Sexy Supreme Court Race cover-photo shoot www.pghcitypaper.com

Check out all of CP’s coverage on the upcoming Supreme Court election online. www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Find your way through the woods, sing along to The Wizard of Oz and take a peek into a chef’s kitchen

Heather Arnet talks to voters in Mount Lebanon during recent door-to-door campaigning.

CLASSIC MATCHUP

#CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Instagrammer @jenycan222 sent this cool shot of fog over the city from Mount Washington. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you!

Download our free app for a chance to win a $100 Gift Card to Sonoma Grille. Contest ends Oct. 29. 6

I

N THE FINAL month before the Nov. 3

special election to fill the 37th District State Senate seat, Democratic candidate Heather Arnet has been door-knocking in Bridgeville. She’s also appeared before the Operating Engineers State Council conference and visited a microbrewery in Mount Lebanon. Her opponent, Republican candidate Guy Reschenthaler, has been spotted at the Firearm Owners Against Crime gun bash; has posed for a picture with presidential candidate Marc Rubio; and has met with the Pitt College Republicans. There will be just one debate, held on Oct. 28 at Robert Morris University, less than a week before the election to fill the vacancy that occurred when former Democratic state Sen. Matt Smith resigned earlier this year to lead the Greater Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

So voters who miss the debate, or don’t happen to meet one of the candidates on the campaign trail, will be forced to rely on television commercials and campaign mailers, all of which cost money. And while an accurate accounting of the candidates’ campaign spending won’t be available until Oct. 23, when the first finance report is due, Arnet says she’s been outmatched as a fundraiser.

A progressive Democrat takes on a far-right Republican in a statesenate race {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} “I think this is a story about money in politics,” Arnet says. “My opponent is heavily financed by the Republican state committee. To anyone who’s even paying mild

attention to this race, the difference in money should be very clear.” Since Aug. 1, Reschenthaler’s campaign has sent out nine mail pieces (some of which were 8-by-11 format with full color on both sides). He’s also maintained a steady television presence, in a market where a commercial can range from $3,500 during prime time spot to $15,000 for an advertisement during a Steeler game. Records from the Federal Trade Commission show Reschenthaler’s campaign has purchased more than $150,000 in local TV commercials since August. Reschenthaler’s campaign did not respond to multiple requests for an interview with City Paper for this story, but the candidate did respond to a question asking about Arnet’s claims about his campaign spending and contributions. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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CLASSIC MATCHUP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

“These are completely baseless accusations from a desperate campaign failing to gain traction in this district because of the extreme liberal views and radical tax-andspend policies they champion,” Reschenthaler said via email. But in the face of what Arnet sees as an election heavily influenced by Reshenthaler’s donors, she’s asking voters not to rely on what they see on TV and in their mailboxes. Instead, she’s asking that they look at her opponent’s track record. FOR THE PAST 12 years, Arnet has served as

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

the CEO of the Women and Girls Foundation, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that advocates on behalf of women and girls of all ages. “In that role, a significant part of my job is to advocate for legislation at the city, county and state level, mainly in support of different social-justice and economic-justice issues,” Arnet says. “Most recently, those have included things like paid family leave, paid sick leave, efforts to increase the minimum wage, continued efforts around ensuring low-income individuals have access to safe and affordable housing, health care.” It’s this experience working with state representatives on both sides of the aisle to pass legislation that Arnet says has prepared her to make a difference in the senate. “We’ve worked very closely with the Republican leadership,” Arnet says. “Our mission is to support women and girls. It’s not a partisan organization. We’ve built a reputation of being a coalition builder and bringing to the table people that maybe don’t agree on everything.” In a continuation of her professional career, Arnet says she will be a strong proponent for workers’ rights and other economic issues. She says economic stability is a cornerstone of concern for constituents in her district, be they two-parent families or elderly women who have outlived their partners. “As a state legislator, I will continue to be an advocate for increasing the minimum wage,” Arnet says. “Women make up 75 percent of minimum-wage workers and, probably not accidentally … 75 percent of households living in poverty in Pittsburgh are single-women-headed households. It’s not that I’m looking … only at what’s good for women and girls, but my interest is in hoping to eliminate poverty.” Arnet has also served on an advisory board for a 32-county strategic-planning process. Through this experience, she learned about municipal challenges like stormwater management, land-use planning, transportation issues, highway infrastructure and environmental-impact regulations. “What people mainly care about are

their families and their general, everyday quality of life. They care about their jobs, about living wages, about retirement security, and they care about having good schools for their kids to go to,” says Arnet. “I think those are core values I share. Those are not Republican or Democratic values. They’re family values.” Arnet has been endorsed by a number of workers’ unions, including the local Service Employees International Union and Pennsylvania AFL-CIO. But she says workers’ rights are also a personal issue for her. “When I was little, we lived on food stamps until my parents both found union jobs,” says Arnet. “They provided our families with economic security and health care. My mom had paid sick leave, and as a single mom that mattered. So these are not abstract issues to me. I’ve seen why it’s important for workers to have the ability to negotiate and to demand good working conditions and livable wages that you can raise a family on.” SINCE RESCHENTHALER did not agree to an

interview, City Paper turned to his supporters and to publicly available information about the candidate. “Guy is not your grandfather’s crusty Republican,” says Ben Gross, a member of the Allegheny County Republican Party and one of Reschenthaler’s supporters. “What I like about him, is he has a libertarian bent to things.” Gross says Reschenthaler, like most Republicans, is against major tax increases, but “Guy is also someone who sees problems with poverty and mass incarceration.” According to his campaign website, Reschenthaler is a former district magistrate who has also worked in private practice. He also served in the military as a navy prosecutor. “He’s a bright young man, a hardworking man with service to his country,” says Dave Majernick, vice chairman of the Allegheny County Republican Committee. “The committee members felt he had the best chance to win.” Reschenthaler’s website does not include information on where the candidate stands on the issues facing constituents in the 37th District. (Information on where he stands on pension reform, education and the environment were emailed to City Paper and can be found on a chart on page 10.) But City Paper did listen to segments of a 2013 talk show that Reschenthaler hosted called The Sound of Freedom, a conservative podcast where the candidate and his co-host, Carl Higbie, discussed topics like taxes, immigration and gun control. “I laughed out loud in the section of your book when you talk about having to sit next to fat people on the plane,” Reschenthaler


says of a book written by his co-host. In a segment about gun control, Rexchenthaler says, “The Grundy school shooting shows us two things. That one is the fact that, just what you were saying, the way to stop a bad guy with a gun is to have a good guy with a gun.” Clips of the show were released last week on the website guyreschenthalerpa.com, which was paid for by Arnet’s campaign. “That’s his own voice. It’s his own words. It’s not edited or split. This is a direct audio clip from his radio show,” says Arnet. “And I think that’s what made [Reschenthaler’s campaign] so upset, is they realized that now people will start to learn about who this guy really is. They’ve been spending a lot of money trying to create a new identity for him. This speaks to his values and his beliefs, so it’s absolutely relevant and we’re not making it up.” “It is very sad to see a campaign sink so low and make such outrageous accusations,” Reschenthaler said via email about criticism of the talk show. But the more shocking statements made on the show come from Reschenthaler’s co-host, Higbie, who has campaigned for the candidate in the past.

“I think, stick a fence six feet high with signs on it in both English and Spanish [that] says, ‘You cross this border — this is the American border, you cross it, we’re going to shoot you,’” Higbie says in a segment on immigration. “You cross my border, I will shoot you in the face.” In another segment Higbie says, “The black race is lazier than the white race.” The views expressed on the show, Arnet says, are in sharp contrast to her efforts for equality and women’s rights. For example, she highlighted her work in 2013 with Sara Pesi, a college student who was stalked at 13. Arnet worked with Pesi to pass antistalking legislation. “Voters should really look at our track records. In 2013, Guy was hosting this radio show, and in 2013, I was working with Sara to pass her bill,” says Arnet. “I’ve spent my career working to fight against racism and sexism and social injustice and mockery of the poor. And there is this person running for the legislature who hosted a radio show where he and his co-host continually said things that are racist and sexist and demeaning to people who are low-income. I think voters have a right to know that before they cast their ballots.”

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★ 37TH DISTRICT PENNSYLVANIA SENATE ★

LEFT VS. RIGHT After former Pennsylvania state Sen. Matt Smith announced he was stepping down to take a position with the Greater Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, the Allegheny County Republican and Democratic committees scrambled to select candidates for his replacement. Now, Democratic nominee Heather Arnet will face off against Republican Guy Reschenthaler in a special election for Smith’s 37th district seat.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

GUY

BIOGRAPHY

Reschenthaler was elected as the magisterial district judge for Pleasant Hills, Jefferson Hills and South Park in 2013. He previously served in the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General Corps in Iraq. With a law degree from Duquesne University, he has also worked in private practice.

PENSION

“We’re not in this position because the employees weren’t paying their fair share. The problem is the state government used those funds for other expenses and now are having trouble finding a way to put those funds back.” Would vote to protect defined-benefit pension plans for state employees.

“The public pension system is a significant strain on local school boards’ budgets, and I believe we can take a sensible long-term approach to fixing it. Promises to current and future pensioners must and would be met. However, all new hires would instead be offered a 401(k)-type plan.”

EDUCATION

RESCHENTHALER

Arnet has served as CEO of the Women and Girls Foundation for 12 years. In this capacity, she has worked with lawmakers to pass a dozen pieces of legislation. She also served on the Pittsburgh Public Schools Board of Education from 2007 to 2009.

“One of the things that’s really important for the health of our state is to have an educated workforce, and right now, our state is ranking in the bottom 10 for what we invest in education.” Would vote to reinvest in education to restore funding that was cut under former Gov. Tom Corbett.

“Our children’s education is incredibly important and there must be a two-pronged approach toward fixing our education system. First, our schools must be given the funding they need to successfully educate. Second, fixing the pension system would start to alleviate budget stresses on local school boards.”

“Data has shown that even though we look out the window and everything looks clean, the microparticulate matter in our air is something of grave concern.” Would ensure more funding for regulatory offices to give them greater capacity for enforcement. Would vote for a Marcellus Shale severance tax.

Would not vote for a severance tax on Marcellus Shale drilling. “The energy industry must be allowed to drill and produce energy in our region, but they must do so responsibly and safely. I support the strong oversight and regulation of drillers and the penalties for those breaking the rules should be very stiff.”

Endorsements: PA AFL-CIO, SEIU PA, Clean Water Action, Pennsylvania National Organization for Women, AFSCME, and Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals

Endorsements: Life PAC, Firearm Owners Against Crime, NRA, FOP Lodge 1, the National Federation of Independent Business, and the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS

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ENVIRONMENT

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★ ALLEGHENY COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 11 ★

SHORT-TERM SHOWDOWN

While it at first seemed like a “why bother” race — the winner will sit on Allegheny County Council for just six weeks — this special election has turned into a “why not me?” race. District 11, which includes Shadyside, Squirrel Hill, Greenfield and Homestead, has two green candidates opposing sort-of incumbent Terri Klein. However, on Nov. 5 there will be two ballots for the same seat: No matter who wins the special election, Democrat Paul Klein (no relation to Terri) is running unopposed for the full term of the late Barbara Daly-Danko, who posthumously won the May primary.

BIOGRAPHY

A wealth manager from Squirrel Hill, Dlinn is best known in the community for founding and running the Squirrel Hill Citizen’s Patrol. He is a retired public-affairs naval officer; is a past president of the Rotary Club; and is part of Pennsylvania Republican Leadership Council, a group that supports traditional Republican values.

Lengyel, 71, is a retired Munhall resident who worked for decades at the Benedum Center in various roles. He was tapped by the Constitution Party to run for the council seat and says he has always believed in the Constitution. “Probably the best document ever written,” he says.

ROLE OF COUNCIL

ALBERT LENGYEL

Believes the county should function as a check and balance to the county executive, but says it was “clearly designed to function weaker.” Klein says Daly-Danko was elected because she was recognized as an independent spirit, and she wants to carry on that role. Her work on council led to improvements in medical care for pregnant women at the jail.

Dlinn says council has become a rubber stamp and he is motivated to change that. If elected, he says that he would work to make council “more transparent” to the public.

Lengyel recognizes the council’s “rubber stamp” reputation and says “that is why they need a third-party candidate” to “try to get something different” on council. But he says that he does not really know what he can accomplish in the ultra-short term and that he doesn’t “follow county council that much.”

FRACKING

ANDY DLINN

Terri Klein, of Squirrel Hill, was appointed to temporarily fill the District 11 seat after the untimely death of Daly-Danko in May. She serves on the board of Pittsburgh’s ACLU chapter, is the vice chair for the 14th Ward Democratic Committee, and has received awards for her work with student and women’s health.

Klein is opposed to current and future fracking on county property and favors a moratorium on any fracking until there is more science available on the effects.

Believes that fracking has been great economically for the county and is not opposed to it, if it can be shown to be safe, but adds that fracking in public parks needs adequate discussion.

“I don’t see anything wrong with it,” says Lengyel. He says his only concern is that the money from leasing county property be used correctly, but could not elaborate.

Klein says she was proud to vote for the $5 increase to the vehicleregistration fee because the county “needed more attention to [its] roads and bridges.” She adds that the fee allows the county to leverage more money from the state, which can lead to more infrastructure improvements.

Supports the county’s role in funding transportation as long as officials “keep the cost down and keep the taxes down.”

Lengyel rode the bus every day to work. He supports the privatization of portions of the county’s public transportation.

Dlinn has received support from Allegheny County’s Republican Committee and the Republican Leadership Council.

Tapped by the Constitution Party of Pennsylvania to run, but no other official endorsements.

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS 12

TERRI KLEIN

TRANSPORTATION

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

Klein says she did not seek any endorsements or fundraising dollars, and is “philosophically opposed to fundraising.” However, the Democratic Party placed her on its slate card, which poll workers pass out before the vote.


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★ ALLEGHENY COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 13 ★

BATTLE FOR THE NORTH SIDE

With the departure of Democratic Allegheny County Councilor Amanda Green Hawkins and the primary defeat of a candidate backed by County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, the door is open for a fresh face. The district encompasses Lawrenceville, the Strip District, Downtown, Bellevue, all of the North Side and sections of the South Side.

BIOGRAPHY

Raheem, a 62-year-old resident of Manchester, works as a community organizer for the Hill District Consensus Group. He is also a community activist working on issues such as police accountability, sustainable wages and affordable housing. He is running under the New Afrikan Independence Party, which he founded in 2012.

ROLE OF COUNCIL

Says she wants to be an “independent voice” on council and that many current council members have been receptive to her. Ranalli-Russell says she recognizes the tension that exists among current members, but says that “we should all have the same goal of having the best interests for the county.”

Wants to represent the opposite of the prevailing “rubber stamp” role of county council. “I hope to bring a different style that seeks to empower the people I represent,” says Raheem. He says he wants to focus on the best interests of the people of District 13 and the people of Allegheny County.

Wants to introduce legislation that would protect low-income residents and seniors from sewage rate increases from ALCOSAN. Also supports advocating for issues in Bellevue, since it is the only independent borough in District 13 that is not a part of Pittsburgh.

Would work for $15 minimum wage countywide, and wants to have the county pass “ban the box” legislation so that job applicants do not have to disclose their criminal history on job applications for low-level work. Wants to establish a county civilian police-review board.

Says guards at the facility are overworked. Believes that warden Orlando Harper is instituting policies that hinder guards’ ability to do their jobs and is calling for Harper’s firing. Happy with the county increasing its jail health-care budget and hopes to see improvements in inmates’ health care.

Says county is headed in the right direction by increasing health-care funding. Says warden Orlando Harper should be fired. Is glad to see the county with direct control of jail health care, but would like to see citizens have a more active voice at the jail.

Ranalli-Russell is officially endorsed by Pittsburgh firefighters and the Allegheny County Labor Council. Also endorsed by Teamsters Local 249.

No officials endorsements, but says he represents the community, can speak confidently on issues, and knows what underlying problems are affecting the county.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

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412-586-7644 • THEFLATSONCARSON.COM

KHALID RAHEEM

Democrat Denise Ranalli-Russell, 48, has worked at Ranalli’s Classic Barber Shop for 25 years and took over as owner from her father last year. She serves on the 27th Ward Democratic Committee and lives in Brighton Heights. Through her business, she provides free haircuts to low-income residents and seniors.

COUNTY JAIL

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The future of transit is now and we are working to improve your ride. Look for bus tracking technologies and other innovations to keep you better informed. Getting around town has never been so easy.

FUTURE OF TRANSIT IS NOW THE

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OCT 23 – MAR 21 2016 cmoa.org

CRUCIAL VERDICT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} I DON’T NEED a crystal ball or tarot cards

or the prognostication powers of Karl Rove to know that voter turnout for the Nov. 3 General Election will be low. This is a municipal primary filled with town-council candidates from far-flung communities and judicial races, which never draw voters in droves. I’m probably guilty myself of feeling underwhelmed about voting. In fact, I’ve written more this year about 2016 U.S. Senate and Congressional races than I have about the upcoming election. Well, I’m an idiot. We get so wrapped up in national elections that we fail to recognize that the most important vote that we’ll cast probably in the next 20 years is happening in less than two weeks. Because in a way, the three open seats on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will likely have more direct impact on your life than whom we choose to be the next president (although I’m still not voting for Donald Trump). The problem — and we lampooned the notion on this week’s cover — is that there is a feeling that judge’s races don’t really affect our lives, that they’re not “sexy.” Nothing could be further from the truth;

just look at how we got into this situation in the first place. There was supposed to be only one opening in this year’s election: Former Chief Justice Ronald Castille reached mandatory retirement age last year. But misconduct in office has a way of quickly thinning the herd. Former Justice Joan Orie Melvin was convicted of using state employees who worked for her also-convicted sister and former state Rep. Jane Orie to work on her campaign. And then last year, Justice Seamus McCaffrey was forced to resign after he was implicated in the state pornographic email scandal — a scandal that’s likely to claim another justice before it’s all over. So what we have on Nov. 3 are three Democrats — David Wecht, Christine Donohue and Kevin Dougherty; three Republicans — Anne Covey, Michael George and Judith Olson; and an independent (and former Republican) — Paul Panepinto. We’ve written several stories about this race, which you can read along with any additional stories we write between now and Nov. 3 online at www.pgh citypaper.com, and this column isn’t

“BY MAKING SURE WE INSTALL A MORE LIBERAL-MINDED COURT, WE CAN AT LEAST GIVE OURSELVES A FIGHTING CHANCE.”

The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music

FREE Opening Reception & Artist Talk Thursday, October 22 6:30 p.m.

A spectacular visual and musical journey through the fantastical funerary traditions of South Vietnam.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015


about explaining the virtues of these judges. The fact is, candidates for judge aren’t supposed to tell you where they stand on certain issues, especially social issues, because once they put on that robe and take that seat they must follow the law and leave politics at the door. Yeah, I think that’s pretty much a load of crap, too. I think on a great number of legal issues, judges do follow the law. But let’s be honest, if that were the case there wouldn’t have been a dissenting opinion on an issue like same-sex marriage. Judges are people, and people who run for office are political. Pennsylvania is one of the few states that still runs judicial elections as a partisan competition. I’m not going to argue whether that’s right or wrong. That’s the reality of the situation. And, quite, frankly, I’ll be making my decision in this race based on political ideology. Why? Because social issues like body sovereignty, minimum wage and gun control, and political issues like redistricting, are the ones where politics come into play. For progressive, liberalminded folks, this is a chance to swing the Supreme Court our way. A chance like this likely won’t come around again for a very long time, if ever. Now, I’m not naïve enough to think that all Democrats I vote for will be as socially liberal as I am, and that they will vote the way I think they should all of the time. But by installing a more liberal-minded court, we can at least give ourselves a fighting chance. Let’s look at some issues where this could come into play. Despite watching what seems like a school shooting a week, we still haven’t advanced any form of common-sense gun-control. Many municipalities, like

Pittsburgh, have tried, only to be turned back by the courts and the legislature. In fact, municipalities have attempted to fight many social injustices that the state legislature has ignored. Issues like paid sick leave and any attempt to locally raise the minimum wage will all eventually end up at the state’s high court. And speaking of the legislature, if Democrats ever have a shot of gaining control in Harrisburg, the first step is Nov. 3. This state has some of the most ridiculously gerrymandered districts in the nation. The boundaries are drawn in such a way to give Republicans the edge. Do you really think Jim Ferlo would have retired if his senate district had remained untouched? Instead, his urban district, with a large number of African-American voters, was butchered and joined with a predominantly white district in the North Hills. The same holds true for Pittsburgh’s Congressional district. Need proof? Check out the 12th District that stretches from the Ohio border to Johnstown. As other media have pointed out, the state Supreme Court appoints the tiebreaking member to the state’s redistricting committee. Anyone want to guess which party got that power under the Republican-controlled Supreme Court? We can’t afford to sit on the sidelines for this judicial election. If you still can’t grasp what’s at stake on Nov. 3, think of a vote for the Supreme Court as a vote on gun control, a vote in favor of gender equality, a vote on women’s health issues, or even an early vote for your state and congressional representatives in 2021 and beyond. Because voting in this race now may be the last vote you control for an awfully long time.

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Do you know what your Pittsburgh city councilor has been up to?

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

Follow the latest updates on our new blog at www.pghcitypaper.com

Student tickets start at $15! pittsburghsymphony.org/scaryconcert

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

ISLAND HOCKEY {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

DESPITE HAVING the word “island” in

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

its name, Neville Island continues to be one of the nation’s least popular springbreak destinations. A newspaper ad in 1903 invited people to settle there, speculating that it would be the next Manhattan Island. Obviously, that never panned out and the island continued to be the subject of mediocre jokes (much like the one I attempted above). Once, Virginia and Pennsylvania had disputed the Ohio River paradise until the Supreme Court ruled, in 1799, that it was all ours. I’m no legal scholar, but that seemed like an easy decision since the island is, in fact, located in Pennsylvania. But then nothing really exciting happened on Neville Island until 1998, the year the Island Sports Center was built on the island’s western tip. In 2003, Robert Morris University purchased the center; 12 days later, the school began assembling its first NCAA men’s hockey team, the Colonials, with the goal of beginning play in the 2004-05 season. Twelve years later, the Center is a hotbed for college hockey. The team’s first head coach was a minor-league-hockey journeyman named Derek Schooley. Schooley spent time at the remote hockey outposts of the East Coast Hockey League — the Roanoke Express, the Pensacola Ice Pilots and the Peoria Rivermen. The defenseman picked up some coaching experience at Cornell University and the Air Force Academy before taking over the program. The results of that first season were pretty much what you’d expect from a program starting from scratch and featuring 22 freshmen: 8-25. But the team kept improving. The next year, the Colonials beat Western Michigan, an NCAA hockey powerhouse, in what Schooley called “the biggest win in our program.” The team won 12 games that year, and 14 games in 2006. They even beat nationally ranked Notre Dame. Not even Rudy or Hat Trick Jesus could have helped the Fightin’ Irish that day. At that point, a new hockey program was suddenly on the rise. The team went 18-12-5 in 2010, and the wins kept ticking up each season, culminating with 24 wins last year. In 10 years, the team went

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

from the Bad News Bears on ice to a nationally recognized and respected hockey program. I hope nobody from Cleveland tries to take Schooley. Even the name of the venue has changed: The Island Sports Center is now the 84 Lumber Arena. Being a Pittsburgh purist, I will still call it Star Lake. Tickets for the games are $10-12 and the 1,100seat arena is filling up for each home game with people who love hockey. Not as much as Canadians love hockey, but mothers do not love their children as much as Canadians love hockey. In fact, about half the Colonials roster is from the land of three-down football, weird bacon, Justin Bieber, poutine and rampant politeness. Senior captain Tyler Wilson and alternate captain Brandon Denham are both Canadians. But freshman Alex Dagnal and senior Zac Lynch are from Pittsburgh. Thanks to the arrival of Mario Lemieux in 1984, Pittsburgh moms and dads now make hockey players, too. RMU gives you a great opportunity to check out reasonably priced college hockey against top-flight opponents like Sacred Heart, Canisius and Penn State. The season lasts until Feb. 27, and hopefully, a long postseason run is also on tap. And after another year of continued success, the Colonials can take a well-deserved spring break, ideally on an island where the sun shines more than half the year.

“NOT EVEN RUDY OR HAT TRICK JESUS COULD HAVE HELPED THE FIGHTIN’ IRISH THAT DAY.”

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Thank You Pittsburgh for Voting Us Best Car Dealer.

ROHRICH.COM N E W S

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THANK YOU FOR VOTING US ONE OF PITTSBURGH’S BEST LOCAL PET STORES!

8 convenient locations!

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TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us Best Indian Restaurant in Pittsburgh

SServing North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

THANKS FOR 9 GREAT YEARS, BLACK AND GOLD FANS!

Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

48 FLAT SCREENS. 36 DRAFT BEERS. 1 GREAT RESTAURANT. /4IPSF%SJWFttXXXKFSPNFCFUUJTHSJMMFHSFTUBVSBOUTDPN


Thai Me Up

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THANK YOU PITTSBURGH!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

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Award Winning Thai Cuisine

We at Nicky’s Thai Kitchen want to

THANK Y U!

For voting us best Thai Restaurant 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and now 2015. Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisine to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out. Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day.

——— NORTHSIDE ———

——— DOWNTOWN ———

856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B.

903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424)

www.nickysthaikitchen.com

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Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

Thank You For Voting Us The Best Coffee House in Pittsburgh!

THANK YOU for voting us one of Pittsburgh’s BEST BOWLING ALLEYS!

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES! Delivery Hours 11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

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2961 W. LIBERTY AVE. • DORMONT • 412-563-7655

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

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Find out exactly where to find City Paper’s Best of Pittsburgh winners by exploring our interactive map at www.pghcitypaper.com.

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OUTSIDE THE BOX

Vote in City Paper’s fourth annual ArtBox contest We know what you’re thinking: “City Paper, you’re so stodgy, always wearing formal black and never letting your hair down.” But since many of our writers, editors, photographers and designers tend to wear superhero T-shirts and their best thrift-store jeans to work, we know you’re talking about our distribution boxes. And for the fourth year in a row, we’re adding a little artistic dazzle to our street-box arsenal with our ArtBox project, sponsored by the Hill House Association’s Kaufmann Center. In the next few pages you’ll meet the 10 finalists we selected, and they’ll tell you about their experiences creating their designs. The boxes are out now across the city, and we’re asking readers to choose the winner, who will receive a $500 prize. Go to www.pghcitypaper.com to find an interactive map with the location of each box and to vote for your favorite. Online voting runs through Nov. 25. The winner will be announced in the Dec. 2 issue.

S’Liberty Saturday

Dan Burfield McDonald / Age: 41

October 31, 7am – 9pm Kids Events BEER TASTING Scavenger Hunt

Horse-Drawn Wagon Rides

Retail & Dining Deals

CHINESE ART AND ANTIQUES Free Appraisal Day and Cash Buying Event Beijing HH International Art Fund is the first art foundation in China dedicated to the preservation and collection of Chinese art & Antiques. Based in Beijing and founded in 2004, we now have over $75 million under our management. We are excited to launch our newest venture in the US by hosting Free Appraisal and Cash Buying events in Connecticut, Massachusetts & Rhode Island. Please check our website frequently for updates on event schedules. We welcome collectors, scholars, dealers and institutions to participate in our event and we look forward to seeing you soon. Top price will be paid for the following items: Chinese jade, ceramics, bronzes, Cloisonné, Buddhist figures, robes, embroideries, Snuff bottles, photographs, furniture, watercolors & paintings etc. and we are interested in purchasing art works from one piece to an entire collection. Flexible Payment Methods: Cash, Check & Wire Transfer. We are always buying Chinese Art and Antiques from one piece to entire collection. If you missed our event, please call us and we can arrange a date to see you. • Earn 10% Referral Fee if you refer a friend or family to us. • Free in-home appraisal available for larger pieces.

October 31st, 2015 (9AM - 5PM) COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT 401 WEST WATERFRONT DRIVE ROAD WEST HOMESTEAD, PA 15120 Tel: (516) 815-2258 Email: hhartfund@gmail.com www.hhartfund.com 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

{PHOTOS BY DAN THOMPSON}

Details@ EastLibertyChamber.org

I absolutely love the color scheme Atari used in almost all of the pinball machines they designed. The design style is ’80s modern with all of these parallel lines. This reminds me of growing up in the ’80s, and I remember some friends had an incredible basement game room which had all white walls with these continuing four bands of color that spanned the walls, ending in graphics of people jogging. I’d give anything to see that again. I hope it transports someone back to when they were young and the mysteries of electronics, video games and pinball machines were magical.

Bob Cornelll Lawrenceville / Age: 400 I have always enjoyed the e g stories about my Grandma growing e up in Sweden when she was little d before coming to America. And so my inspiration came from a d collection of Dala horses she had at her home. These are wood-carved horses, painted in bright colorss o in decorative patterns, and given to children to play with in Sweden.. a I also wanted to show Dala d roosters with floral patterns around them to represent Swedish art. I wantt e this to attract people to become d interested in Scandinavian art and its cultural heritage..


SI P. SAV OR. SH A RE.

Brittany Eifler Bellevue / Age: 32 When I was trying to think of what to draw, I was watching the Life Documentary Series and couldn’t help but be distracted. I put up a Facebook post about how it kept distracting me with its awesomeness, and a friend commented that maybe I should draw something from the series. At that moment, I was on the fish episode and had just watched an octopus punch a fish in the face. I felt like my friend was right. Hopefully, when people look at my ArtBox, they think “Adventure Time vs. Giant Octopus in Pittsburgh.”

NEW FALL MENU COMING OCTOBER 26 412.325.2227

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Shamus Fatzinger Fatzin Edgewood / Age:42 Age I moved to Pittsburgh a year ago. I immediately fell in lo love with all of the different neighbor neighborhoods and the unique sense of co community in each. My des design is based on a ph phot otog ot ogra og rap ra p I took photograph in Wilkinsbu Wilkinsburg. I hope when peopl people see this box, they ge get the sense of communi community that I feel is preva prevalent throughout the city.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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OUTSIDE THE BOX, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

HAUNTED HILLS Meet. Eat. Repeat.

HAYRIDE and the

Tiquan Flowers West Mifflin / Age: 21

VALLEY OF DARKNESS

The design I used for my ArtBox was inspired by my love for street art, including graffiti and pop art, which uses a lot of vibrant colors. I’m inspired by the [British] street artist Bansky and also Pittsburgh’s own Andy Warhol. I chose to use diamonds and roses because they are both things that usually make people happy. I hope that my ArtBox can brighten someone’s day, and also allow people to look at street art differently, other than as forms of vandalism.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

Becki Hollen and Chris Bencivenga Lawrenceville / Ages: 30, 31 Our design is an elaboration on an idea that we had for a print earlier this year. It’s meant to evoke a sense of adventure and playfulness both from the design and the materials used. (The ghosts really glow in the dark!) We hope that it brings a smile to the face of anyone who sees it, and they enjoy the spirit of the scene that is unfolding before them.


BAJA BLUE

Sarah Huth Butler / Age: 26 I grew up in the South Hills, and one of my absolute favorite places to be as a child was my grandmother’s house. I remember always eating dippy eggs for breakfast on Saturday mornings; breaking the wishbones she kept on the windowsill; looking at all of the collected treasures in the curio; and connecting with the photos of my family members. I wanted my box to embody all of those things, and to reflect the idea of family and childhood memory to anyone who grew up in Pittsburgh and perhaps had a similar experience.

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Lisa Platt Highland Park / Age: 59 I am a Pittsburgh native and self-taught artist who creates mosaics with handmade ceramic tiles, stained glass and found objects. My hometown was the inspiration for this ArtBox design. From Downtown Pittsburgh through our diverse neighborhoods and beautiful city parks, we are surrounded with stunning architecture, natural resources and a vast variety of culture. The approach of my artwork intends to share my playful spirit urging people to smile and feel a bit of happiness and joy.

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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5166 Butler St. Lawrenceville

Rx Glasses • Sunglasses All frames $95 Contact Lenses • Doctor on site Chromos Cares give back program

OUTSIDE THE BOX, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

John Trivelli Friendship / Age: 27 I wanted to pay homage to Pittsburgh by creating a collection of pop-culture graphics. I hope people spend time with my design and discover its nuances with big Yinzer grins on their faces.

Hours: Mon-Thurs: 10am-7pm Fri-Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: 11am-4pm To schedule an exam call us at (412)-772-1473

Betty Jo Whaley-Stephens Robinson Township / Age: 57 I wanted to do something whimsical; something outside my normal approach. I actually borrowed elements from one of my past drawings. The hodgepodge of images are symbolic — the peacock feathers represent renewal, and I hope the viewer sees it with new eyes. The koi is courage — with the hope of grabbing a City Paper, a cup of java and facing the day. The circles symbolize the viewer [being included] with the piece. Despite all the symbolic seriousness, I would hope that people view it just for the whimsical factor. I hope they also view it with unbridled imagination, [open] interpretation, and to be amused.

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AMONG THE REASONS TO LOVE THAI FOOD ARE ITS SUBSTANTIAL, SPICY SALADS

WEST AFRICAN FLAVOR {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Though Pittsburgh’s restaurant scene is booming, one region scantly represented has been West Africa. That changed Oct. 5, with the opening of take-out and delivery spot African Taste Cuisine. If it’s fufu (a mash of cassava and plantains) or Davi Red-Red (black-eyed peas in red palm oil and tomato sauce) you’re after, this is your place. Founder Audrey Brooks was born in Ghana, emigrated to New York, and five years ago moved to Pittsburgh to study nursing. (She’s since switched to accounting.) With no West African restaurants around, she often cooked for visiting friends, who finally suggested, “Why don’t you start something here?” Brooks, 30, cooks long lunch shifts out of Evo, a rental kitchen in a former Bloomfield church; her husband, Kimball Brooks, handles delivery. The extensive menu of mostly traditional fare includes everything from boiled Ghana yams and stewed goat to meat and vegetable pies and emerging local favorites like kelewele (deep-fried, seasoned plantain). For newcomers, Brooks recommends waakye, a rice-and-bean dish, with fish sauce. West African food tends to be spicy, but Brooks — who sources some rare ingredients in Maryland and New York — says she adjusts for milder tastes. A week after opening, Brooks said that most of her patrons had been non-Africans trying something new. But Brooks, who lives in Greenfield, already hopes to launch a sit-down version of African Taste by next summer. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Hours vary Mon.-Fri. 250 S. Pacific Ave., Bloomfield. 412-927-6657 or www.eatafricanpittsburgh.com

the

FEED

Learn to make top-shelf elf cocktails when Andys dys bar at the Fairmount unt Hotel, Downtown, n, hosts a hands-on cocktail cktail class focusing on infusions. ons. Learn how to infuse a variety of alcohols, and how ow to translate such potions tions into delicious cocktails. tails. Fee of $50 covers instruction, struction two cocktails, cocktails hors d’ouevres and a gift. Reservations required at 412-773-8848. 6 p.m. Fri., Nov. 6. www.andyswinebar.com

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

TASTY THAI

Appetizer sampler with steamed dumplings, chicken satay and shrimp spring rolls

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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NTICIPATE IT or hate it, there’s no

way around it: “Pumpkin spice” ..season is here. Pumpkin-spice coffee, pumpkin-spice beer, pumpkin-spice air-freshener, pumpkin-spice motor oil ... the marketing powers that be have decreed that, for the month of October, we shall live, eat and breathe in a pumpkin-spice world. But we still get some say in how we consume it. With “literally” in mind, in the dwindling light of a crisp early-fall evening, we set forth for My Thai, a new Thai restaurant in Dormont. The West Liberty Avenue space has undergone an attractive transformation from its previous occupancy by a sports bar. Thai art, textiles and wood carvings add texture to the walls, painted in warm tones, while big windows let in plenty of light and views of the bustling avenue. And, unlike at many Thai establishments, the gleaming wood bar serves an array of wines, draft beers and cocktails.

The typical Thai menu, comprised of “secret recipes” passed through generations of the family of Chef Suwannanan, was accented with a few distinctive items, including several appearances of woon sen: fine, translucent noodles known as bean thread. And don’t worry, we’ll get to that pumpkin

MY THAI 3024 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont. 412-207-7507 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $2-9; entrees $11-17 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED curry. But first, a couple of sampler platters allowed us to explore an array of starters and made a good first impression. They were artfully arranged, lined with circles cut from banana leaf and studded with tiny bowls for the myriad dipping sauces, one

of which, plum, we don’t typically see in Thai restaurants. The vegetable sampler included eggplant crisps, medium-thick planks of eggplant fried in a batter that was a touch heavier than tempura, but still light and crisp. This was especially good with the plum sauce, which was topped with chopped peanuts. Crispy tofu seemed to lack any coating, and therefore a substantial crust, but the tofu fresh roll (a.k.a. summer roll) was flawless — full of herbs and vermicelli in a wrapper that was tender, not chewy or dried out. On the meat sampler, satay chicken was cut from white meat, and therefore a tad dry, but still fairly flavorful. Shrimp spring rolls were unusually good, with fillings that went beyond cabbage and carrots, plus enough shrimp for their flavor to really come through. Best of all were steamed dumplings with pork and shrimp, reminiscent of shu mai in shape, CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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TASTY THAI, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31 NNING SAND W WI

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but with bolder seasoning than is typical for Chinese dumplings. Among the many reasons to love Thai food are its substantial, spicy salads. Chef Suwannanan’s My Thai salad was a standout, an intense mix of tofu, red onion and tomatoes with lemongrass and chili paste over greens, all tossed with a chili-lime dressing. The finely diced tofu appeared to have been sautéed with the aromatics, giving it darkened surfaces and deep flavor, while everything else — including pretty good late-season tomatoes — was fresh and bright. A woon sen salad with chicken and shrimp also looked outstanding.

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We had our woon sen in pad Thai with shrimp. The substitution for the usual sen lek — flat rice noodles — was distinctive, and so was the flavor. Bean sprouts seemed to take on a smaller role, spice was clearly present although the overall flavor profile remained mild, and the balance leaned toward sweet tamarind more than citrusy lime. The shrimp were done well. This was not a classic pad Thai, but a tasty adaptation with its own unique appeal. And then it was pumpkin-spice time. Chunks of Asian kabocha pumpkin, sweeter even than butternut squash and with a soft, fluffy texture, commingled with pieces of chicken in an earthy, subtly spicy coconut-milk curry. Red pepper underscored the vegetal sweetness, and basil countered with aromatic, peppery notes. This was a balanced, autumnal and deeply flavorful curry; if there were a pumpkinspice pyramid, we’d install this at the top. With a growing number of Thai places in the South Hills, new ones have to set themselves apart. My Thai does so, not only with its spacious dining room and full, wellstocked bar, but with the flair and flavor of Chef Suwannanan’s family recipes. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

GOOD APPLES Arsenal Cider House keeps expanding It’s been a big year for Arsenal Cider House. Really, it’s been one big year after another for the cidery, which celebrated its fifth anniversary in June. Turning your personal residence into your business comes with challenges (time, money and space, to name a few), and Bill and Michelle Larkin keep stepping up to meet them. On a tour of the basement of the Lawrenceville house, the walls are lined with one shining tank after another, where ciders are constantly rotated out to meet Arsenal’s demand. Bill makes sure to show off his beginner equipment: Compared to what he uses now, it looks like children’s toys.

IT’S BEEN ONE BIG YEAR AFTER ANOTHER FOR THE CIDERY.

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

My Thai front-of-house staff

32

On the RoCKs

In September, the Larkins held the grand opening for their second location, at Soergel’s Orchards, in Wexford, their source for cider apples. While currently this location is only a tasting house, the Larkins have plans to make scrumpy — a cloudy, unrefined cider — on the premises. This season, they were excited to participate from the frontlines in Soergel’s bevy of festivals, especially the Fall Fest, which wraps up this coming weekend. Earlier this year, the Larkins also bought a third space, in Penn Hills. This location will be used to expand Arsenal’s production capacity, and maybe to free up a little space in their home. “We’ll have a place for the pool table now!” Bill Larkin says, chuckling. For now, though, they are still working to comply with Penn Hills building codes. For everyday changes, customers can always look to the ciders themselves: Bill Larkin is constantly trying new recipes. While staples like the popular Fighting Elleck remain on tap, seasonal brews like the Grant’s Flying Pumpkin show up to satisfy the more adventurous drinker. The pumpkin cider, released last week, is cleverly named for the type of shoddy, round-ball ammunition used during the Civil War. More changes are sure to come as the weather gets colder. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

The first hit is free.

BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-940-7777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beer-friendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t dinercheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard ChineseAmerican menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-781-2546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. The cannelloni alone merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-can-eat restaurant. Servers pull barbequed meats right off the rotisserie grill and present them at your table, ready to carve off as much freshly cooked meat as you like. There are hot and cold buffets as well, but savvy diners load up on the juicy meats. KE

Lola Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Selma’s Texas Barbecue THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookish-themed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough

to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying up-to-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF

Actually, so are all the others.

MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/ steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knife-wielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412-321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. This modern take on the traditional Jewish deli makes the argument that such CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

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The Smiling Moose {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Eastern European cuisine deserves to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball soup, egg creams, blintzes and classic deli sandwiches, including one made with “Montreal meat,” a sort of Canadian hybrid of corned beef and pastrami. JF

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

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OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. 412-281-6595. You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE

peppers, corn-and-blackbean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE

FULL LIST ONLINE

THE PINES TAVERN. 5018 Bakerstown TABLES ON THE Road, Gibsonia. GREEN. 1299 Lane ww. r w 724-625-3252. A Ave., Natrona Heights. pape pghcitym longtime commitment .co 724-226-0955. A golf to seasonal and locally course east of town sourced food (including may not be where one on-site gardens and beehives) would expect to find refined spans the menu here. The Cajun and Creole cuisine, restaurant’s casual elegance but that’s exactly what this is suitable for drinks with friends clubhouse restaurant offers. or a celebration meal. And the The menu offers Louisiana fare ranges from pub grub, like bayou classics such as shrimp, burgers and meatloaf, to complex grits, gumbo and blackened fish entrée plates, complete with in an authentic and well-prepared wine and beer suggestions. KE manner. In a nod to Pittsburgh, steaks and Italian pasta dishes SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. are also offered. LE 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT. suggests humble and down11655 Frankstown Road, Penn home, but the ingredients Hills. 412-242-0188. Most of the and preparation seem tailored myriad sushi rolls on offer center to appeal to foodies, with on just a handful of raw options, everything from lemonade to rounded out with traditional tartar sauce and baked beans cooked ingredients such as eel made in-house. Best of all, each and shrimp. The menu offers the meat has its own custom rub and full gamut of maki, from classics is dry-smoked for hours, then like cucumber or tuna to truly served unsauced so that diners original creations, some of them can choose from the six different just short of gimmickry. KF styles on offer. KF URBAN TAP. 1209 E. Carson St., THE SMILING MOOSE. South Side. 412-586-7499. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. Though it’s wallpapered in giant 412-431-4668. The Carson Street TVs, the menu here is mostly bar and nightclub offers a devoid of sports-bar clichés. top-notch sandwich and salad Instead, there is duck-confit menu, by bringing creativity, poutine, mac-and-cheese with quality preparation and a knack smoked Gouda, a burger topped for well-selected ingredients with pork belly and even aged to the burgers, sandwiches and rib-eye steak. With top-notch appetizers. Options include: service and excellent food, Urban shrimp skewers with smoked Tap elevates tavern dining. KE


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V3 Flatbread Pizza Celebratess Downtown Pittsburgh Openingg with 100 Free Pizzas! Grand Opening Celebration on Friday, October 23rd at 11:00am V3 Flatbread Pizza is a new fast-casual,l atbread pizza shop where customers can create their own pizza masterpiece...so the search for the ultimate pizza experience is over. V3 Flatbread Pizza announces the grand opening of their ďŹ rst store in Downtown Pittsburgh on Friday, October 23rd. The new V3 Flatbread Pizza store is located in Pittsburgh at 11 Fifth Ave. and the doors open at 11:00am. In celebration, V3 Flatbread Pizza is giving away fresh, made-to-order pizzas to the ďŹ rst 100 customers at the store at 11:00am on October 23rd. “The free pizza makes for an exciting opening and is a great way to invite the community to enjoy our unique pizza experience,â€? said V3 Flatbread Pizza’s founder, Varol Ablak. The new V3 Flatbread Pizza location will continue the celebration from 11:00am until close at 8:00pm and will have free pizza, a prize wheel, give-aways, and more. N E W S

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Flatbread Create Your Masterpiece

100 FREE PIZZAS!! GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION! )ULGD\2FWREHU‡DP 6WDUWLQJDWDP WKH¿UVWFXVWRPHUV will receive one pizza FREE! * Limit one pizza per family. Must be 18 or older. No coupon necessary. Limited to the first 100 customers to enter our doors at 11am on Oct. 23, 2015.

Open 11am - 8pm Everyday 11 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 A R T S

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LOCAL

“I ALWAYS KNOW EXACTLY WHAT I WANT FROM THE SONGS.”

BEAT

{BY KIMBERLY OLSEN}

If shouting the sweet poetry of your melodramatic youth is your thing, or if you’re nostalgic for the era of Instant Messenger and painfully slow Napster downloads, there’s one night a month that will satisfy that yearning for the days of a pre-Ashlee Simpson Fall Out Boy: Emo Night Live! (Full Band Karaoke) at Altar Bar. The live-band event is the perfect platform for those karaoke enthusiasts looking to express themselves in a way other than “focusing on their art.” The set list, culled from Facebook song requests, includes a wide range of artists, from Dashboard Confessional to Thrice. The band members — drummer Cory Muro, bassist Matthew Fuchs and guitarists Nate Hall and Andrew Agostini — have learned around 50 songs since the event debuted in August. At each show, guests choose their requests from a master set list — most popular are songs from Brand New, Paramore and Taking Back Sunday — and an MC keeps things moving; this month it’s comedian Shannon Norman. Lyrics appear on laptop PowerPoint slides, manually managed by Drusky Entertainment’s Josh Bakaitus. After the success of emo DJ night at Lava Lounge, Bakaitus created its karaoke counterpart and, to his knowledge, Pittsburgh has the only emo live-band karaoke in the country. “It’s pretty awesome to be able to play at Altar Bar, [a place] that has had a lot of these bands play there, like Bayside and Saves the Day,” says Bakaitus. And the karaokeists? “Surprisingly, everyone’s really good. I think these songs are just so embedded in people’s heads from their youth that they just know them.” Indeed, the twenty- and thirtysomething crowd can recall a time when emo peaked not only as a music genre, but also as a subculture for the misunderstood, permeating everything from movies to MySpace to the mall. Adds Muro: “It’s kind of turned into something that’s way more of a hit than we thought it was originally going to be. I think a lot of people come who aren’t trying to sing, who just enjoy the vibe of the night — living in the early 2000s again, loving every second of it.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EMO NIGHT LIVE! 10 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. EMO DJ NIGHT. 10 p.m. Thu., Oct. 29. Lava Lounge, 2204 E. Carson St., South Side. $3. www.emonight.com

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A singer takes the stage at Emo Night Live! {PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK VILSACK}

NEW TEARS

LONE FORCE {BY CARALYN GREEN}

J

OAN ARMATRADING is a formidable

woman. If not for her warm British lilt and a gracious chuckle served after each matter-of-fact remark, she might even seem cold. Her words are straightforward, unsentimental. There’s a directness to Armatrading’s manner that feels both at odds with her introspective music and aligned with its no-nonsense nerve. That a woman must be either all teeth and nails or else flesh and blood is fallacy, made palpable by Armatrading’s vast catalog of more than 40 years of hits that seep past any emotional binary: “Sing me another love song, but this time with a little dedication” (“Love and Affection”). “I’m not the sort of person who falls in and quickly out of love, but to you I gave my affection right from the start” (“The

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEL ANDERSON}

Me Myself I: Joan Armatrading

Weakness in Me”). And “It’s not that I love myself, I just don’t want company” (“Me Myself I”). “It’s not a narcissistic thing,” says Armatrading of the latter, a 1980 single. “It’s not just because I love myself. It’s just

JOAN ARMATRADING WITH MARTI JONES & DON DIXON

7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 28. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $45-65. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

that at this time, it’s nice to be on your own and it’s nice to enjoy your own company. I enjoy my own company. It’s a really nice thing to be on your own. There’s a lot of

people who seem scared to be on their own. I don’t know why.” Currently in the midst of the second leg of what is being called her “last major world tour,” Armatrading is, at age 64, very much alone on stage. She’s performing her songs solo this time around, without her band. “I’ve never done a world tour on my own before,” says the singer-songwriter, who arranges and produces her own music and, on her past three albums, played every instrument with the exception of drums. Does “last major world tour” mean last tour, ever? Not at all, says Armatrading. But it does mean shorter tours for the artist who will play nearly 250 concerts on this particular trek. “I think I deserve to have less road time,” she says. Born in Saint Kitts, in the West Indies,


Armatrading moved to England at age 7, and taught herself to play guitar at 14. She quickly began writing her own songs, and released her debut album in 1972, at the age of 22. Armatrading has since released more than 20 albums, been nominated for three Grammys and two Brit Awards, and performed for Nelson Mandela, twice. She earned a university degree in history at age 51, and ran her first marathon at 57. She’s not afraid of running out of songs to write, and not afraid that people still stop listening. Armatrading is a force who’s referred to, with no exaggeration necessary, as “the first U.K. female singer-songwriter to gain international success” and “Britain’s first truly successful black artist.” What does it feel like to shatter those glass ceilings? How do you go about life knowing you’ve paved the way for Laura Mvula, Lianne La Havas and Corinne Bailey Rae? Armatrading is notoriously vague about any such thoughts. I’d say tightlipped, but when speaking with her, nothing about the exchange feels tight. And yet, these are things about which Armatrading is known not to speak: her queerness, her marriage, her family, her vulnerabilities. Anything about her personal life, really, is off-limits and such questions are met with a laugh and a measured response that ties back to songwriting (“I like writing songs, it’s quite the challenge to say what you want to say in this short state of time”), record production (“I’ve always been the full force behind my music, I always know exactly what I want from the songs”) and music publishing (“I wish I had known that what they were really doing was taking my stuff”). Unsurprisingly, it’s discussing music itself that opens up and excites Armatrading. She loves Snoop Dogg, Eminem and the Killers. She thought Amy Winehouse was “the best.” She likes Sam Smith’s voice and thinks Ed Sheeran is “really good.” When she wants to put on something to “soothe, stir or excite,” it’s typically “something classical.” How does the diversity of what she listens to affect the music she makes, I can’t help but ask. Her records pivot from rock to folk to blues to jazz to straight-up pop. Her choices seem intentional, they feel bold. Does anything intimidate this woman? How is she so fearless? “I like to hear different music because there’s just different music all over the place, and it’s nice to hear different music,” says Armatrading. Then, of course, a hearty laugh — warm and cold, flesh and blood, and firm, unbending bone. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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NEW RELEASES

THE SEMI-SUPERVILLAINS HERE COMES TROUBLE (SELF-RELEASED) WWW.SEMISUPERVILLAINS.COM

Why is this power-pop outfit called The Semi-Supervillains? Is it because their plans for global domination didn’t pan out? They couldn’t manage to get the death ray to work? Here Comes Trouble is the newest five-song EP from the group; its sound recalls early-2000s garage rock, a la The Hives, with hints of “Hash Pipe”-era Weezer. The songs are less edgy, though — more likely to be called “cute” rather than “snotty” or “snarling,” or similar words that critics use to describe rough-and-tumble pop like this. Perhaps the “semi” modifier means these supervillains are more a cuddly sort, the kind you can take home to your mom. BY ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLCANO DOGS VOLCANO DOGS (RAT RECORDS) WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ VOLCANODOGS

On Volcano Dogs’ opening track, “1970,” vocalist Bruce Lentz recounts being 13, “freaking out to Creem magazine … rock ’n’ roll was waiting for me.” He then throws a series of shout-outs: Iggy and the Stooges, Grand Funk Railroad, Alice and Ozzy. Some bands might hint at their influences, but Volcano Dogs provides a roadmap. Which is to say, the band does a great Alice Cooper (“Acid Curveball” and the dubiously titled “War of the Super Bitches”) and an even better Stooges (basically every other song on the record). Featuring members of Dream Death, Silver Tongued Devil, Eviction and others, these Dogs boasts a rich hard-rock pedigree. Though there are several decades of potential musical burnout represented, Volcano Dogs channels the energy and excitement of teenage discovery. BY MARGARET WELSH

VOLCANO DOGS RECORDRELEASE SHOW 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 23. Excuses, 2526 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-4090 or www.excusespghbarandgrill.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA WILSON}

Josh Ritter

STAY GOLDEN {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT} LAST FRIDAY, Josh Ritter released his latest

OCTOBER 29 9PM TO MIDNIGHT

SECOND ANNUAL

HALLOWEEN BASH FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD PRIZES AWARDED FOR BEST COSTUME. $2 YUENGLING 16 OZ DRAFTS • $3 ABSOLUT SHOTS $2 YUENGLING BLACK & TAN BOTTLES

project, Sermon on the Rocks, an album sure to top many “Best Of 2015” lists. The album is aptly named: It does seem to be a sermon of sorts, and one gets the impression that Ritter would be just as comfortable behind a pulpit as he is behind a guitar. Though, as the title suggests — referencing the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus espoused the beatitudes — Ritter’s sermon challenges the authority of religion and simultaneously comforts those who may feel uncomfortable with such a sentiment. “One of the things I’ve been thinking a lot about,” Ritter says, “is trying to reclaim the basic principles of the Golden Rule for us as human beings, not in a religious context, but giving [humans] credit. We don’t have to be moved in a high spiritual sense to be good to each other.” Biblical imagery abounds throughout Ritter’s catalog, and he comes by it honestly. “My family on both sides are firebrand Lutherans,” he explains, “so I’ve absorbed all those biblical stories throughout my years. But I look at the Bible as a comprehensive list of the way people treat each other. You can find that in all the books [of the Bible].” Call it sermonizing, singing or both, Ritter delivers the best songs of his career with Sermon on the Rocks. There are dark, apocalyptic themes like the opening track, “Birds of the Meadow,” which comes off as a warning of impending doom, be it figurative or literal. “I think all of us must have some sense that something out there is happening,”

Ritter says, “but that doesn’t mean that it all has to be bad. One of the great things we have are people that bring us to attention and have [things] to say that make people uncomfortable.” He continues, “I don’t think that religion has any monopoly on prophecy. I do think of [“Birds in the Meadow”] as being delivered by a narrator who is divinely moved.” There are playful moments as well, such as the single “Getting Ready to Get Down,” which tells the story of a young girl, disillusioned with her parents’ brand of salvation, who is forced to attend a Bible college in Missouri (it doesn’t turn out quite the way her parents expect). The song also inspired a line dance choreographed by a fellow Idahoan. A video of the dance is featured on Ritter’s website and is certainly worth checking out, if not learning.

JOSH RITTER AND THE ROYAL CITY BAND 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Mr. Small’s Theatre. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The track order of Sermon on the Rocks serves the album almost as well as the songwriting. “Seeing Me ’Round,” the fifth track on the 12-song album, is a slow, droning murder ballad that breaks from the standard singer-songwriter focus and stands out as somewhat of an intermission. The musical influences on the album are noticeable (Ritter cites Patsy Cline in particular), but the singer takes great care to maintain his own sense of creativity. “Sometimes through emulation you find your own voice.” I N F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015


{PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACH NELLIS}

CRITICS’ PICKS

The Dads

In 2012, Surface Level Records was founded as a collaboration between local hip-hop artists Proseed and Fortified Phonetx. Subsequently, more names have been added to the roster, including Stillborn Identity, The Latebloomer and The Dads. Tonight, at the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Surface Level Records, along with N.U.C. (Never Under Competition Promotions), is hosting a party that doubles as a release for The Dads’ debut album, Jorma Because I Said So. It’s also a celebration of Kaukonen the label, featuring performances from all of the aforementioned artists, as well as live painting, giveaways, food and refreshments. Andrew Woehrel 7:30 p.m. 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. 412-924-0634 or www.surfacelevel records.com

[PUNK] + FRI., OCT. 23 Chicago’s Meat Wave has a curious and amusing name that is strangely apt for its brand of dirty lo-fi punk. The band’s irreverent tunes, led by vocalist/guitarist Chris Sutter’s sneering voice, recall the Pixies’ harsher moments, or other American ’80s post-punk luminaries like The Wipers (whom Meat Wave covered on its Brother EP) or even fellow Chicagoans Big Black. Sometimes Sutter’s whine can remind the listener of The Offspring, but nobody’s perfect, right? See Meat Wave tonight at Cattivo with The Dirty Nil, Huzzah and Roulette Waves. AW 9 p.m. 144 46th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

[AMERICANA] + SUN., OCT. 25 On the third cut of his most recent release,

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Ain’t in No Hurry, an album that is pretty fantastic from top to bottom, Jorma Kaukonen absolutely kills it. The lyrics of the song, “Suffer Little Children to Come Unto Me,” were written by the great Woody Guthrie and given to Kaukonen — the former Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna guitar virtuoso — by Guthrie’s niece. Kaukonen wrote the music; the result is a track that is simultaneously bluesy, funky, folksy and gritty, with guitar riffs that are just plain filthy. Kaukonen is sure to play that cut when he hits town tonight at the Carnegie Lecture Hall (he’ll share the bill with Ernie Hawkins). The album, as he notes in the CD liner, is the musical story of his life, and to see that play out on stage should make for a spectacular experience. Charlie Deitch 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $44 ($23 with student ID). All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTTY HALL}

[HIP HOP] + FRI., OCT. 23

[ELECTRONIC] + TUE., OCT. 27

An up-and-coming producer and popsmith hailing from sunny Los Angeles, Josh Legg writes his summery songs on an acoustic guitar, but transforms them into electronic dance-pop hits under the moniker Goldroom. “If you hear the demos, they almost sound country,” he says in a press release. But Goldroom — playing tonight at Cattivo with guests Gavin Turek and Emerson Jay — sounds nothing like country music. His breakout hit, “Fifteen,” has pulsating synths, heavily reverbed drums, dreamlike vocals from guest singer Chela, and sounds more like Taylor Swift than country. Oh, wait ... nevermind. AW 7 p.m. 144 46th St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 22 CLUB CAFE. Maia Sharp. South Side. 412-431-4950. LAVA LOUNGE. Allinaline, Venus in Furs, Hardcorered. South Side. 412-431-5282. SMILING MOOSE. Standard Broadcast, Pop Thief & The Grand Larceny, Escaping Destiny. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. After Funk. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 23 CLUB CAFE. Lenny Smith. CD release. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Children of October, The Filthy Low Down, the Scratch n’ Sniffs. 724-375-5080. HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2273. HOWLERS. LoFi Delphi, Paddy the Wanderer, The Rockin’ Bones, Bryan Vamp. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. THE R BAR. High Road Easy. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Steeltown Band. Greensburg. 724-836-6060. SMILING MOOSE. Windhand Danava, Monolord, & Molasses Barge. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Motionless in White & The Devil Wears Prada. North Side. 412-229-5483. TEUTONIA MANNERCHOR. The Dave Iglar Trio. North Side. 412-884-7766. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Maccabees. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 24 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Billy Price. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. The Silver Thread, Olympus Mons. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. LRAD, Molly Sharrow, Liss Victory, Big Gypsy. Lawrenceville. 814-403-2989. HARVEY WILNER’S. The Mimi Lee Band. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. THE R BAR. Kings Ransom. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROYAL PLACE. The Wurms. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SNPJ LODGE. The Dave Iglar Band. STAGE AE. Mayday Parade. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Southern Culture on the Skids.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHISPERING WOODS INN. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Eagles Mere. 724-796-0133. ZANDERS SPORTS BAR & NIGHT CLUB. Ridgemont High 80’s. Monroeville. 724-387-2444.

SUN 25 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Jorma Kaukonen. Oakland. www.calliopehouse.org. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Joe Jackson. Homestead. 412-368-5225. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROCK ROOM. Dendritic Arbor. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SPIRIT. Cultivator, Troll Stomper. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

MON 26 SMILING MOOSE. Moose Metal Mondays. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 27 HEINZ HALL. Ringo Starr & His All Stars. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS. Sianna Plavin, Kevin Finn & Wayside Exchange, Zo. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Amity Affliction w/ Chelsea Grin, Secrets, Cruel Hand, The Plot In You. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ David Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 28 PALACE THEATRE. Misfits. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

DJS FRI 23 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777.

MP 3 MONDAY SALVAGE THE TONGUE {PHOTO COURTESY OF CORBIN HARKINS}

Clicking “reload” makes the workday blogh.pghcitypaper.com go faster

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Salvage the Tongue; stream or download “Sit Still,” from the EP Honest, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


EARLY WARNINGS

ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

REGGAE CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS BAR. Funkle Aaron Project Presents Bob Marley Night. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1001.

SAT 24

TUE 27 CATTIVO. DJ Goldroom. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

WED 28 SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

Wilco

HIP HOP/R&B

The Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown

FRI 23 IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Surface Level Records. Garfield. 412-475-8409.

{TUE., FEB. 09}

Skizzy Mars Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

BLUES

{FRI., JUNE 03}

FRI 23 1810 TAVERN. Strange Brew. Beaver. 724-728-5282. GATEWAY CLIPPER FLEET. Jill West & Blues Attack. Station Square. 412-355-7980. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 24 COOL SPRINGS GOLD & FAMILY RECREATION CENTER. The Witchdoctors. Bethel Park. 412-831-5080. GOOD TIMES ON TAP. Strange Brew. Bentleyville. 724-239-9927. MOONDOG’S. Harp Blowout. Charlie Barath, Johnny Rooster & Mark Reisman w/ the Jimmy Adler Band. Each will have a segment of the show & will join together for a magnificent finale. Blawnox. 724-888-6183. SEWICKLEY SONS OF ITALY. Sweaty Betty. Sewickley. 412-741-3722.

SUN 25 BROAD STREET BISTRO. Mark Passaro. North Versailles. 412-829-2911.

TUE 27 BLUSH SPORTS BAR. Shari Richards. Jam session. Downtown. 412-281-7703.

JAZZ THU 22 ANDYS WINE BAR. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

N E W S

Leon Bridges Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

CITIPARKS FARMER’S MARKET BEECHVIEW. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Beechview. 216-534-6372. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

ACOUSTIC

COUNTRY

RIVERS CASINO. Jason Kendall Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

THU 22

FRI 23

ANDYS WINE BAR. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OAKS THEATER. Etta Cox & the Mini Big Band. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 724-691-0536. WICKED FOX. Eric Johnson Trio. Fox Chapel. 412-794-8255.

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MEADOWS CASINO. Chris Higbee. Washington. 724-503-1200.

THU 22

RIVERS CASINO. Back Seat Driver. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 24 RIVERS CASINO. On the Level. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 25

SUN 25 PALACE THEATRE. Michael McDonald. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY. Felicia Lynn Musical Group. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

CLASSICAL THU 22 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Selections from Porgy & Bess, Carmen & La Bohème. Wilkinsburg High School, Wilkinsburg. 412-371-9500.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. University of Pittsburgh Carpathian Ensemble. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 28 BYHAM THEATER. SpokFrevo Orquestra. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY. Friends in Harmony Singing Group. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

JEREMY FISHER ORGAN TRIO. Backstage Bar at Theatre Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE PITTSBURGH PHILHARMONIC. Succop Theater, Butler Community College, Butler. 412-223-7501. SCOTT DETTRA, ORGANIST. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120.

THURSDAY OCT 22 /10-11PM ALLINALINE THURSDAY OCT 29 /10-11PM EMO NIGHT THURSDAY NOV 5/10-11PM AM FACES $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

New MENU New COCKTAILS New MUSIC

SAT 24

COMBINED CHOIRS PERFORMANCE. Epiphany Catholic Church, Uptown. 412-396-6083. ERIC DZUGAN. Performs the music . w w w CLADDAGH IRISH of Henry Papale. paper ty ci h g p PUB. Weekend at First Unitarian Church, .com Blarneys. South Side. Shadyside. 412-422-1630. 412-381-4800. THE PITTSBURGH PLUM AMERICAN LEGION. CAMERATA. The Heart of The NightTones. Verona. Darkness: A Choral Call and 412-795-9112. Response to Injustice. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-661-1245. SAND HILL BERRIES. THE PITTSBURGH Brad Yoder. Mount Pleasant. PHILHARMONIC. Mount 724-547-4760. Alvernia, Millvale. 412-223-7501. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Selections from ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE “The Sound of Music”, “Annie” #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. & Mozart’s “The Magic Flute”, Wednesdays. North Side. more. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-321-1834. 412-392-4900.

FRI 23

SAT 24

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ANDYS WINE BAR. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Daniel Bachman, Milo Jones, Evan Cory Levine. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Rick Revetta. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Maria Beycoates-Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony Campbell & Howie Alexander. Downtown. 412-391-1004. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Igor Butman & The Moscow Jazz Orchestra. North Side. 412-323-4000. MEADOWS CASINO. Dr. Zoot. Washington. 724-503-1200.

ORGANIST THIEMO JANSSEN. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

FRI 23

WED 28

THU 22

FRI 23

TUE 27

OTHER MUSIC

SAT 24 {MON., JAN. 25}

SCHUBERT ON THE BLUFF: CONCERT II. PNC Recital Hall. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6083.

MCMONAGLES PUB. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. California. 724-812-2971.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

Wilco

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 25

FRI 23

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ZORAN ORLIC}

SAT 24

PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SUN 25

WED 28

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– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

JAMESSTREETGASTROPUB.COM +

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do October 21 - 27 WEDNESDAY 21 Disney in Concert: Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

Norah Jones

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Oakland. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Devil Makes Three

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 22 Bill Burr

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org or livenation.com. 7p.m. & 9:30p.m.

ReelAbilities Film Festival

RODEF SHALOM TEMPLE Squirrel Hill. Tickets:

IN PITTSBURGH

jfilmpgh.org. Through Oct. 29.

Vicki Lawrence & Mama

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org or 724-836-8000. 2p.m. & 7:30p.m.

THE CASE OF THE THREE-SIDED DREAM

Ticket ticketmaster.com or Tickets: 800-7 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 25

REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL OCTOBER 22-29

Penn Penntera (Pantera Tribute) / RATM2 Tribu

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 3p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-2 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Pinky Doodle Poodle

Windhand W

SATURDAY 24 The Darkness Blast Of Our Kind Tour

FRIDAY 23

Motionless in White & the Devil Wears Prada

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412412-263-2877. All ages sho show. Tickets: ticketfly.com o 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. or 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Oakland. 412-622-8866. Tickets: pittsburghlectures.org. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 27

S SMILING MOOSE South S Side. 412-431-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21 event. Tickets: showclix.com. 7p.m.

Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side

Literary Evening: Ruth Reichl

THE NEW HAZLETT THEA THEATER North Side. Tick Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

MUM’s The Word Medical Use Marijuana

Upscale urban rentals • 844.734.3719

MONDAY 26

Rich Richard Maxwell / New York City Players: The Evening Play

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Where to live

Flashdance The Musical

Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 7:30p.m.

Beautiful - The Carole King Musical

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Nov. 1.

Goldroom

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

find your happy place

walnut capital.com

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


BRIDGE OF SPIES IS NOT QUITE A THRILLER, NOT QUITE A LEGAL DRAMA

THE RIGHTS STUFF {BY AL HOFF} Peter Sollett’s drama Freeheld takes viewers back to the early 2000s, when equal rights for gay partners was still a messy patchwork of local regulations. So it was for Ocean County, N.J. police detective Laurel Hester (Julianne Moore), who, after being diagnosed with terminal cancer, fights to have her pension transferred to her domestic partner, Stacie Andree (Ellen Page).

Partners: Ellen Page and Julianne Moore

It’s an emotional and inspirational real-life story that, despite some good actors, fails to coalesce into an affecting film. Freeheld is a checklist of standard melodrama that dutifully builds to its feel-good conclusion: The romance is established; a weird pain leads to diagnosis; the pension is denied; assorted players gradually rally to the cause; and so on. Moore, of course, ails exquisitely, but she and Page never find a believable chemistry. (The TV-movie-caliber dialogue can’t be helping.) Moore fares better with her long-time cop partner (Michael Shannon), who also makes the best of his character’s transformation from being uncomfortable with Hester’s sexuality to her most supportive ally. And then there is Steve Carell, who plays a braying, snarky legal activist who takes on Hester’s cause. His performance recalls Carell’s other comically exaggerated characters, and it’s a casting misstep. The screening audience howled at his every line, creating a weird tonal dissonance with the film’s fighting-from-the deathbed vibe. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE GHOST DIMENSION Another family moves into a house, and more ghostly weirdness is captured on camera. Gregory Plotkin directs the latest in this spooky franchise. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Oct. 23

LET’S MAKE A DEAL {BY AL HOFF}

S

In from the cold: Jim Donovan (Tom Hanks) in Berlin

TEVEN SPIELBERG’S Bridge of Spies

is a handsomely produced Cold War tale, “inspired by true events,” in which an American lawyer negotiates an exchange of prisoners between thenadversaries the Soviet Union and the United States. The story opens in 1957, with the arrest of a Brooklyn man, Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance, of TV’s Wolf Hall). Abel is accused of being a Soviet spy, and a straight-shooting insurance attorney, Jim Donovan (Tom Hanks), is tapped to provide his defense. Abel is convicted, but Donovan fights the death penalty, arguing that Abel is more useful alive, particularly as a bargaining chip (“an insurance policy in our back pocket for when the storm comes”). Indeed, after the Soviets capture a U.S. pilot, Francis Gary Powers, the CIA approaches Donovan, asking him to negotiate a prisoner swap. Thus, in 1960, Donovan winds up in Berlin, a fractured city in the process of being walled into two halves, an actual

(and violent) border in the Cold War. There, Donovan will need his lawyering skills and more, as bargaining takes place between a variety of parties, some shadowy and all of them playing multiple hands. Bridge is not quite a thriller, not quite a legal drama, but a straightforward retelling that falls between engaging and stodgy. (Viewers unfamiliar with Cold

BRIDGE OF SPIES DIRECTED BY: Steven Spielberg STARRING: Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance

War history may be bored by the long setup, but will at least get a new-to-them resolution.) Lacking historical intrigue, its pleasures rest mostly on the capable shoulders of Hanks. The actor could play this upstanding moral-compass role in his sleep, but he does make the dependable Donovan a man to watch.

The most interesting part of the film is the relationship between Abel and Donovan — one, because it explores the respective commitments that anchor each man, and two, because Hanks and Rylance have the chops to sell their quiet conversations as entertainment. (The weakest scenes are the rote depictions of Donovan’s home life, where the capable Amy Ryan does what she can with “worried but supportive wife.”) Available for more thoughtful viewers is an oblique critique of how the U.S. may have strayed from the noble ideals presented here. Donovan argues that adherence to the Constitution is what “makes us Americans,” and Bridge turns on an American high ideal — that even the worst person deserves a solid defense and to be treated with dignity. It’s easy to apply this retroactively to a feel-good tale about a long-vanquished enemy, if less so these days, with the never-ending extra-legal doings at Guantanamo and who even knows where. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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“SPINETINGLING!”

FILM CAPSULES CP

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

SIR CHRISTOPHER

LEE

BELA

JULIAN

ROGER

GUILLERMO

LUGOSI SANDS CORMAN DEL TORO

BASED ON THE HORROR MASTERWORKS OF

EDGAR ALLAN POE

HOUSE CINEMA EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT ROW BUTLER ST, (412) 904-3225 STARTS FRI. OCT. 23RD 4115 PITTSBURGH

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK THE APU TRILOGY. Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray’s three films comprising this masterful trilogy — Pather Panchali (1955), Aparajito (1956) and The World of Apu (1959) — have been recently restored. The gorgeously filmed blackand-white dramas depict the coming-of-age of a young Bengali named Apu, and the recently independent India. The deeply humanist films gently mark the transition from traditional to modern, from rural to urban. Ray’s work also helped spark a rise in “world cinema,” films produced outside of Europe and the U.S. In Pather Panchali, the young Apu is left in the care of female relatives when his father seeks work in the city. In the sequel, Aparajito, teenage Apu and his family have moved to the city. And The World of Apu depicts Apu seeking work as a writer, and a romantic relationship, during a fateful journey to a rural village. In Bengali, with subtitles. Pather: 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 21; 3:15 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Aparajito: 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22; 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 23; 5:45 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; 4:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25; and 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 26. World: 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; 6:45 p.m. Oct. 25; and 7:30 p.m. nightly Oct. 27-29. Harris ATTACK ON TITAN: PART II. Shinji Higuchi’s live-action film is adapted from Hajime Isayama’s manga. In it, a young man may be the only hope against giant humanoid Titans who are preying on humans. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22, and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 27. Hollywood

Extraordinary Tales CRIMSON PEAK. Guillermo del Toro’s gothic romance has all the trappings of an excellent thriller: love, murder, ghosts and beautiful scenery. The fairytale begins when an American aspiring writer, Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska), falls into the arms of a visiting English aristocrat, Sir Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston). From the beginning it’s clear that Sharpe and his quiet sister, Lucille (Jessica Chastain), have a secret, but it’s not until Edith’s father, who disapproves of the match, is murdered that the arc of the plot begins to take shape. In mourning, Edith quickly marries Sharpe and is whisked off to a crumbling estate that oozes red clay from the floors and walls, and is beset by hundreds of black moths. Ghosts begin to appear and Lucille becomes even colder toward the lonely Edith, setting the stage for what will soon become an all-out steampunk iteration of Cruel Intentions. While the costumes and sets are exquisite, the plot ends up leaving much to be desired. Go for the visual spectacle beauty and Chastain’s performance. (Celine Roberts)

Poe’s frequently dense text, but once viewers adjust to the literary style, they are rewarded with truly horrifying stories: a twisted sibling relationship in “The Fall of the House of Usher,” a man hypnotized between life and death (“The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar”), and a prisoner’s madness in “The Pit and the Pendulum.” Garcia uses archival voice recordings of Bela Lugosi to narrate “The Tell-Tale Heart,” and director Roger Corman — who made many a cinematic adaptation of Poe’s work — provides the voice of Prince Prospero in “The Masque of the Red Death.” The interstitial material, in which Poe (depicted as a raven) argues with Death, feels a bit padded. But this visit with Poe’s work will have you re-appreciating what an enjoyable twisted oeuvre it is. Starts Sat., Oct. 24. Row House Cinema (Al Hoff)

EXTRAORDINARY TALES. Halloween time means loads of scary movies making the rounds, but fans of horror owe plenty to one of its early masters, Baltimore author Edgar Allan Poe. Raul Garcia’s new anthology presents animated versions of five of Poe’s tales; each is done in a unique style and features different narrators. The narrations are adapted closely from

Zombie

(1979) - 10/21 @ 7:30pm - Lucio Fulci’s horror classic. We are going to eat you! _________________________________________________

TICKETS: JFilmPgh.org PRESENTED BY

Attack on Titan Pt. 2

(2015) - 10/22 @ 7:30pm, 10/27 @ 10;30pm - Live action adaptation of the Japanese anime continues. Mind blowing visual effects! _________________________________________________

Night of the Creeps

(1986) - 10/24 @ 7:00pm, 10/28 @ 9:00pm, 10/29 @ 7:00pm - Fraternity pledges pull a prank with a frozen body and let sluglike creatures loose on campus. _________________________________________________

Halloween III Season of the Witch (1982) - 10/24 @ 9:15pm, 10/28 @ 7:00pm, 10/29 @ 9:00pm - The night no one comes home! An underrated classic. _________________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show - 10/24 @ Midnight With live shadowcast by the JCCP.

_________________________________________________

Breakfast and a Movie - 10/25 @ 10:30pm Featuring the movie North By Northwest (1959), Buy

tickets by 10/22 for catered brunch. _________________________________________________

48 Hour Film Horror Project - 10/25 @ 6:00pm Over 20 short horror films, locally produced, will be screened and awards announced.

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Crimson Peak GOOSEBUMPS. The biggest shocker in Rob Letterman’s new film, based on R.L. Stine’s eponymous children’s horror series, is that it’s funny: It’s successful enough in that comic vein that its failures probably won’t bother you. Dylan Minnette plays Zach, a teenager begrudgingly relocated to suburban Delaware. There he encounters a cute next-door neighbor, Hannah (Odeya Rush), and her reclusive, prickly dad (Jack Black), who, it turns out, is prickly and reclusive for a reason. Suspicions are piqued, basements are entered and before you know it, Stine’s collective literary monsters are brought to life — literally leaping off of their


pages — to wreak CGI havoc all over the small town. Fans of the books will likely recognize every gnome and mummy, but familiarity with Stine’s canon is not a prerequisite. With supporting roles filled by Amy Ryan, Ken Marino, Timothy Simons, Jillian Bell and a scene-stealing sidekick tragically named Champion (Ryan Lee), Goosebumps is an allages comedy dressed up in children’s horror. Though overly reliant on underwhelming CGI and plagued by the pervasive safeness inherent to PG-rated horror, Goosebumps is a success. (Alex Gordon)

THE EVIL DEAD. Among the best of the early 1980s’ “video nasties,” this 1981 man vs. demons horror flick kickstarted a mega-career for director Sam Raimi (Spider-Man series) and long-running cult status for its star, Bruce Campbell. Shot on a shoestring budget, Raimi’s film proved to a generation of young filmmakers that skill leavened with humor could draw audiences. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 24. Manor NORTH BY NORTHWEST. This 1959 thriller is the source for not one but two of director Alfred Hitchcock’s most memorable scenes: Cary Grant running from a cropduster, and the gravity-defying climax on the face of Mount Rushmore. Employing a popular Hitchcock theme — wrongly accused — an ad man (Grant) is mistaken for a spy and chased across the country. And then there’s that delicious banter between Grant and co-star Eva Marie Saint. 11 a.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Hollywood

JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS. Aubrey Peeples (Nashville) stars in this big-screen adaptation of the animated 1980s TV show about an all-girl singing group. Jon M. Chu directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 23 THE LAST WITCH HUNTER. Breck Eisener directs this actioner about the one man who stands between us and dangerous witches. Vin Diesel and Rose Leslie star. Starts Fri., Oct. 23 REEL ABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL. This mini-fest presents five recent films that highlight stories of people with disabilities, including: the short doc about appearance, “On Beauty” (Thu., Oct. 22); The Case of the Three-Sided Dream (Sat., Oct. 24), a documentary about blind jazzman Rahsaan Roland Kirk; Mimi and Dona ( Mon., Oct. 26), a doc about an aging caregiver; Gabriel (Wed., Oct. 28), a narrative film about a mentally ill teen; and The Finishers (Thu., Oct. 29), a French drama about a teen with cerebral palsy who wants to compete in a triathlon. 7 p.m. nightly. Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Complete schedule and tickets at www.JFilmPgh.org. ROCK THE KASBAH. Bill Murray stars in this musicthemed comedy about a manager who trains a teenage Afghani girl to be on the TV talent show, Afghan Star. Barry Levinson directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 23 STEVE JOBS. Danny Boyle’s bio pic looks at Steve Jobs, beloved and despised founder and CEO of Apple. Aaron Sorkin wrote the script; Michael Fassbender wears the black turtleneck. Starts Fri., Oct. 23

REPERTORY ZOMBIE. “When the earth spits out the dead … they will return to tear the flesh of the living.” That’s the truth in Lucio Fulci’s 1979 undead-o-rama, in which zombies run amok on a Caribbean island. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 21. Hollywood BACK TO THE FUTURE, PART 2. In this sequel to the popular time-traveling, family-fixing 1985 comedy Back to the Future, Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) gets sent to the future — actually, right now, Oct. 21, 2015 — to prevent his son from being tossed in prison. Robert Zemeckis directs this 1989 film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 21. AMC Waterfront, $5 BACK TO THE FUTURE, BACK TO THE FUTURE PART 2 and BACK TO THE FUTURE PART 3. Celebrate the

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Goosebumps arrival of the future — Oct. 21, 2015, as depicted in the events of Part 2 — with all three films charting the time-travel adventures of Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox). Robert Zemeckis directs all three. Wed., Oct. 21, through Fri., Oct. 23. Row House

13 SCORE. This recent, locally made horror film from D. Max Walters finds people in a lake-front community murdering one another — just like what happened 260 years ago. Filmed at Conneaut Lake Park. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24. Parkway. $3

BRIGHT STAR. English-lit majors know that this story about the 19th-century Romantic poet John Keats isn’t going to end well. But Jane Campion’s account of his youthful love affair with Fanny Brawne is so sublimely seductive that Romantics and romantics alike may well hope it does. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 22. Melwood

EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE! The touring “Legends” screening event is a greatest-hits package of the truly awful, sublime, hilarious and plain inexplicable foundon-VHS footage that the video archivists at EIT! have discovered over the past seven years. 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 26. Melwood. $10

THE EXORCIST. Time has quelled many of the shocks of William Friedkin’s 1973 film, but the subject matter — a 12-year-old girl potentially possessed by the devil — is still pretty unsettling. Plus, you can’t really be sure the good guys have triumphed. Oct. 24-31. Row House Cinema

HALLOWEEN. The original is still the best: Bite your knuckles as Jamie Lee Curtis takes the worst babysitting job ever, in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 28. AMC Waterfront. $5

NIGHT OF THE CREEPS. The re-animated dead cause havoc on a college campus in Fred Dekker’s 1986 zombie spoof. Starring Pittsburgh’s own Tom Atkins. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; 9 p.m. Wed., Oct. 28; and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 29. Hollywood

Rock the Kasbah

NOSFERATU. In this 1922 silent film by F.W. Murnau, the vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. Live musical accompaniment provided by guitarist George Sabol. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. www.cmoa. org. $15 movie only; $25 with costume party.

HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH. Tommy Lee Wallace directs this 1982 horror film about a toymaker, masks and a plan to kill as many people as possible. Starring Pittsburgh’s own Tom Atkins. 9:15 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 28; and 9 p.m. Thu., Oct. 29. Hollywood

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NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. George Romero’s 1968 depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: no heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Parkway AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD. In colonial South America, a Spanish expedition led by the ruthless Aguirre (Klaus Kinski) travels down the Amazon in search of the fabled city of gold. Werner Herzog directs this 1972 drama, which concludes a month-long series of films about rivers. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Regent Square

HOCUS POCUS. Three resurrected witches create trouble in modern-day Salem, Mass., in Kenny Ortega’s 1993 comedy. Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy star. Oct. 24-31. Row House Cinema

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PITTSBURGH 48-HOUR HORROR FILM PROJECT. See the results of the horror-themed filmmaking contest, in which local teams had just a weekend to write, cast, film and edit a short horror film. Adding to the challenge, each film had to incorporate an assigned character, prop and line of dialogue. Prizes will be awarded. 6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. Hollywood. $10

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WILD AND SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL. The Pennsylvania Resources Council and Allegheny Cleanways present a program of short films about environmental issues, including: “Delta Dawn,” about the challenged Colorado River; “American Lawn”; and “Silent River,” about a polluted Mexican waterway. Plus the locally produced anti-litter short “Crying Steeler Fan.” 6 p.m. Thu., Oct. 29. Kelly-Strayhorn, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. www.prc.org. $15

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[ART]

THE DAMAGES DO NOT SEEM IRREVERSIBLE, AND THE CAUSE NOT WHOLLY LOST

MONUMENTAL Standing 10 feet tall with a 9-foot wingspan, the Porter monument bronze angel sits atop a small bluff in Allegheny Cemetery, where it has attracted visitors for more than 100 years. Despite modern associations with the grim and ghastly, cemeteries like the Lawrenceville landmark have a rich history of combining a stroll through the park with a day at the museum. “Going to a cemetery was like ‘the thing to do’ in Pittsburgh on a Sunday afternoon in the mid-19th century. They were kind of the first sculpture museums,” says Elisabeth Roark, associate professor of art at Chatham University. On Oct. 24, Roark will guide the City of Pittsburgh Office of Public Art’s walking tour of Allegheny Cemetery. The hourlong tour will let visitors learn about the cemetery’s sculptures and the people who helped shape them. Stephen Foster, Thomas Mellon and industrialist John Baptiste Ford are among Allegheny Cemetery’s A-list celebrities, but there are more than 124,000 graves spread throughout the green hills, tall trees and wildlife nestled deep within the city neighborhood. The cemetery itself reflects societal trends ranging from death’s role in everyday life to income inequality, says Roark. But, she contends, it’s the artwork that really brings life to the cemetery’s 300-acre grounds. “The lots weren’t monitored, so there is an eclectic mix of art styles,” says Roark. “I wish I could teach a class right in the cemetery because you can see almost every style you can think of in Western-architecture revival just by walking the grounds.” The cemetery’s Victorian gothic J.B. Ford mausoleum comes complete with a stained-glass cupola. The Winter mausoleum has a distinctly Egyptian style, with two white granite sphinxes guarding the entrance. There are also classical recreations of the Parthenon and Pantheon, the resting places of the Byers and Bindley families, respectively. The Allegheny Cemetery tour continues the Office of Public Art’s series of monthly walking tours of Pittsburgh neighborhoods led by local historians and artists. Before the Oct. 24 tour, musician Vince Curtis will help set the mood by playing a selection of songs on the lute by Elizabethan composer John Dowlan. His performance will begin at 11:45 a.m. at the Butler Street gate. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ALLEGHENY CEMETERY ART WALKING TOUR Noon, Sat., Oct. 24. 4734 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8. www.pittsburghartscouncil.org

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One of Allegheny Cemetery’s many notable gravesites {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH OFFICE OF PUBLIC ART}

{BY MATTHEW CICHOWICZ}

Seth Clark’s “Vinyl Study”

[ART REVIEW]

DECONSTRUCTIONS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

S

ETH CLARK IS the recipient of the

2015 Emerging Artist of the Year award from the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, and the breathtaking exhibition now on view in the gallery proves him beyond worthy for the honor. He’s additionally a contender for many more such honors; if the works here collected are representative of someone just crossing the threshold of his creative journey, what he’ll produce moving forward should be nothing less than astonishing. In his artist’s statement, Clark describes his work as centered upon “deteriorating architecture.” With this latest outing, Clark fills three of the Center’s gallery spaces; though there are close to three dozen works included, all interpret what could probably be one single structure, most likely a house, and possibly a home. This structure is composed simply of dark wood and white drywall, translated in charcoal, graphite and pastel in addition to the practical materials used

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

for building, captured on canvas, through sculpture, as installation, and scaled from miniature portals to paintings that occupy entire walls. Execution ranges from to the fantastical transformation of mundane material into something eerily mysterious that beckons with its oddity, to the heartbreakingly literal documentation of a structure

SETH CLARK: 2015 EMERGING ARTIST OF THE YEAR continues through Nov. 1. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pfpca.org

that disinterest has driven into disrepair (instantly punching square in the throat anyone who has ever attempted to renovate a turn-of-the-last-century Pittsburgh rowhouse, while easing her wallet from her pocket). This house is not a home:

It’s been diminished and rendered ineffectual; it does not give shelter. Through neglect, decay and the violence of demolition it’s been reduced to pieces, segments, parts without sum. And yet, the damages do not seem irreversible, and the cause not wholly lost. The scraps of flooring and flats of wall paneling haven’t been transformed, as happens with structures left alone for long enough — mold spots grow on walls, weeds and webs sprout in corners and cracks, mice leave marks and evidence, and something new develops. We’re not there yet; not even dust has gathered. There’s still hope. Major pieces dominating sections of gallery walls layer, or appear to layer, story upon story of faintly Victorian detritus that you peek and peer dizzily into, creating with their texture an unbelievable depth and the convincing illusion of teetering on the edge. A smaller, identically sized trio is almost indistinguishable squares of solid board, the same in their


attributes, varied in their imperfections, cracks exposing the wood within. Shapes are unexpected and scale is disregarded. Strips of wood form a rough orb like a splintery Death Star, vibrantly alive, or a collapsing circle perilous and dynamic. Circles are complete in frame and perimeter, but missing portions within. The suggestion of transformation is not only important but continually present, and the state of flux is often accented by the works’ refusal to sit tight within frame or upon base, often escaping from those implied boundaries to overflow into their surroundings. A spindly, convoluted, ladder-like assemblage skitters over the edges of its platform like a lumber insect, overgrown and uncontained. A large wall work litters the floor below with joint compound, shedding its scales, bursting its cocoon, metamorphosing. In one of the most captivating pieces, the familiar pedestal that the PCA typically uses to support pieces on display is itself given Clark’s treatment, its top and sides skinned away to reveal the skeleton beneath. It’s brilliant, clever without being cute, simple and keenly original. It’s perfect.

THE BUILDING HAS BEEN REDUCED TO PIECES, SEGMENTS, PARTS WITHOUT SUM. Work is not only presented on the walls; it often goes right through them as well. A peephole delicately framed in dollhouse-sized timbers not uniform but regulated explodes into an exit wound of planks and boards in the next room, spiraling and replicating. Another dainty, tidy passageway curves through the wall in an arcing, semi-circular corridor, realizing the hidden passages and secret portals that all imaginative children dream of stumbling upon, the seduction of magic and adventure within the safety of one’s own familiar surroundings. The interpretation of a home, or at least a house, as what’s here leveled brings context and connection; the result can be disquieting — you’re stripped to your foundations. It will be interesting to see where Clark goes next; having seen one type of construction thoroughly explored, dissected and revisioned, one waits to see where his eye will turn, what style and substance are on his horizon, what facades will be blasted away. For now, this is a stunning display on where he’s looked so far, and is well deserving of our gaze as well. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[BOOKS]

SCOUTING REPORT {BY JODY DIPERNA}

Andrew Conte’s new book, The Color of Sundays (Blue River Press), chronicles the impact of scout Bill Nunn Jr. on the rise of Steelers in the 1970s. But the book concerns much more than football — it had to, in order for Nunn to work with Conte. “I felt emboldened to tell this story … because I worried that all these stories would be lost,” says Conte, an awardwinning investigative reporter with Trib Total Media. So Conte convinced Nunn to at least consider the project. Still, Nunn insisted that Conte do his research on the history of African Americans in sports. It was a game of cat and mouse: They would meet; Nunn would test Conte; Conte would do more research. Then they would meet again and Nunn would test him again. Finally, Conte passed the test and started the work of telling all of the stories involved. Pure football fans will learn how Nunn found key pieces of those dynastic Steelers teams. Nunn grew up in the offices of the Pittsburgh Courier, one of America’s pre-eminent black newspapers. After college, he worked for the paper as a sportswriter. His duties included compiling the Black All-American Football Team, which meant that Nunn traveled all over the South, watching games between Southern black universities — games which went virtually uncovered by the national (white) media and largely unnoticed by NFL scouts. As a Steelers scout, Nunn’s depth of knowledge was invaluable, and he recommended players who proved essential to the club’s success: L.C. Greenwood (Arkansas AM&N), Mel Blount (Southern), Dwight White (East Texas State), Joe Gilliam (Tennessee State), Ernie Holmes (Texas Southern), John Stallworth (Alabama A&M) and Donnie Shell (South Carolina State), to name a few. But the book is also about race in America and race in sports. It’s about the Pittsburgh Courier. And it is about the segregated era of the NFL (1934 to 1946), an era that many fans are unaware of and that the NFL is happy to keep swept under the carpet. “People who are coming to it as strictly Steelers fans might be frustrated by some of that history,” acknowledges Conte.

Childe Hassam (1859–1935), The Outer Harbour, 1909, Oil on canvas, 28 x 26.1875 inches, Mary Marchand Woods Memorial Fund, 1964.1

Your country. Your art. The Westmoreland Museum of American Art Grand Reopening Community Day Sunday, October 25 America has always been about open spaces, new frontiers and room to roam. And now, so are we with thousands more square feet and hundreds of new works of art in a collection more expansive, dynamic and accessible than ever. So come connect to your heritage and discover what moves you. For more info, visit thewestmoreland.org

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE STEELERS’ SECRET STRATEGY: FROM CIVIL RIGHTS TO THE SUPER BOWL, WITH ANDREW CONTE 6 p.m. Thu., Oct. 29. Point Park University’s Lawrence Hall, 201 Wood St., Downtown. Free. Register at www.eventbrite.com.

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FAURÉ

THANK YOU, PGH!

String Trio

SUPPORT THE BURGH’S ONLY NON-PROFIT COMEDY THEATER BY SEEING SHOWS EVERY MONTH

ARCADE HOOTENANNY true stories, made-up scenes

BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL late night stand-up comedy

COMEDY ROYALE

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a 4-way improv comedy battle 811 LIBERTY AVE. DOWNTOWN SHOWS EVERY FRI-SAT-SUN TICKETS $5-10, BYOB! ARCADECOMEDYTHEATER.COM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

MIKE WYSOCKI’S

THE CHEAP SEATS PAGE 18

Ciaran Byrne (left) and Rod Brogan in The Night Alive

[PLAY REVIEWS]

REDEMPTIONS {BY STUART SHEPPARD}

CITY PAPER’S WEEKLY

SPORTS COLUMN

FROM LOCAL COMEDIAN & MEMBER OF JIM KRENN’S Q MORNING SHOW ON Q 92.9 FM

SOMETIMES, IT’S a disadvantage to see a play on opening night. A friendly house, crackling with a second-beer giddiness, can make mundane lines humorous, and push tragedy toward comedy. Such seemed to be the case during the opening scenes of The Night Alive, City Theatre’s Pittsburgh-premiere production of the widely acclaimed 2013 work by talented Irish playwright Conor McPherson. However, the drama eventually found its natural equilibrium between lightness and darkness, and the cast brought off a seriously engaging performance.

THE NIGHT ALIVE continues through Nov. 1. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-61. 412-431-4400 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Set in Dublin during the recent recession, the story centers on Tommy, perceptively played by Rod Brogan, and his clownish sidekick, Doc (Ciaran Byrne), whose relationship falls somewhere in the existential spectrum between those of The Honeymooners’ Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton, and Beckett’s Vladimir and Estragon. As they eke out a living through odd jobs, the hunger of these characters is palpable: Just look at Tony Ferrieri’s impoverished set and you are famished. Blood enters the drama surreptitiously on the face of Aimee (Hayley Nielsen), a rootless prostitute Tommy befriends and

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brings home like a wounded kitten. Nielsen has the toughest role, as she has such little stage time, yet she is effective in making us believe her powerful evolution — from victim to victimizer. There is a steep arc to this story, and the way it’s played for humor in the first half makes it harder for the cast to push the stone of the drama over its apex, and down into the darker business of the second. But it succeeds through the direction of Tracy Brigden, who convincingly navigates the course of redemption in each characters’ journey, whether through compassion or murder. The only hitch occurs with the strange intercession of Kenneth (Brendan Griffin), Aimee’s pimpish boyfriend, in a scene that feels much more Freudian than fearful. Kenneth’s attack on Doc is so passiveaggressive as to challenge credulity. Not to be missed is Noble Shropshire’s performance as Maurice, Tommy’s elderly uncle; Shropshire’s comic timing is brilliant. The ultimate question of whether these souls are truly redeemed is never fully resolved, which makes this darkly comedic production of The Night Alive all the more intriguing. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

TRAPPINGS {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

IN OFF THE WALL Productions’ world

premiere of Andrea Lepcio’s Tunnel Vision, the premise is simple enough. Two women arrive in an abandoned, junk-filled tunnel; neither knows how she got there, and


though both try repeatedly to escape, there is no easy way out. To complicate matters, the women are photo negatives of one another. Jill (Lisa Ann Goldsmith) is a childish dreamer who lets passion guide her, while Olexzandra (Elizabeth Ruelas) seemingly “got the memo� on how to build a proper life: She’s an austere and successful doctor with a husband, two children and a third on the way. However, for all their differences, both women harbor painful secrets, and before it’s over, they realize that to break free from the past, they must plow through the truth.

TUNNEL VISION continues through Oct. 31. Off the Wall Performing Arts Center, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $25-40. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

Thanks to Maddie Bucci’s scenic design, the tunnel itself is deceptively simple; the only accoutrements are dozens of items that would be at home in a ea market, including a pink bicycle Jill rides gleefully around the stage as she avoids Olexzandra’s sometimes exasperated glare. Alone and trapped, the women ďŹ nally ďŹ nd common ground, and one by one, items — and secrets — are unpacked. Though an unlikely

pair, Jill and Olexzandra forge a relationship that is at times as contentious as it is ardent. They conďŹ de, they cajole and they criticize, until at last each one breaks down and confesses why she was running from her life. Playwright Lepcio’s dialogue alternates between heartfelt confessions and irreverent witticisms. While not all the jokes are equally convincing, the performances by Goldsmith and Ruelas, along with Melissa Maxwell’s razor-sharp direction, help to anchor this story of loss and self-discovery. For all its lofty ambitions, Tunnel Vision is a brief play, clocking in at less than 90 minutes. Although a longer running time might have allowed the dynamic between Jill and Olexzandra to ourish even more, the story still manages to pack quite the wallop. While it’s billed as a tale that is uniquely feminine, anyone who’s ever felt adrift in a life no longer his or her own should be able to ďŹ nd something to love about this production. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

EVER-AFTERS {BY TED HOOVER}

IN THE WORDS of Johnny Mercer, let’s ac-

cent-chu-ate the positive and review Point

Park Conservatory’s Into the Woods. This 1987 Stephen Sondheim/James Lapine musical combines extant fairy-tale characters (Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red, et al.) with a few invented ones and, in the ďŹ rst act, sends them into the forest to get their wishes. In Act II, we learn what happens after happily-ever-after.

INTO THE WOODS continues through Sun., Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $12-24. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

The positive news is this outstanding Point Park cast; my date was shocked that they were all students, and his astonishment is understandable. The cast is huge, and I kept waiting for a false note ‌ in vain. Lucy Moon Fitzsimons sings and plays the Witch with the force of an atomic bomb. Nicole Stouffer and Maggie Roos bring to their roles as Cinderella and the Baker’s Wife a sharp, probing intelligence that provides depth and texture. Ben Northrup is deeply moving as the Baker, and Bruce Franz makes his dual roles of Narrator and Mysterious Man compelling. Bebe Mae Tabickman has got both a

knockout set of pipes and a deft hand with comedy. Mason Lewis and Kayla Muldoon, as Jack and Little Red, make the most of the beautiful solo turns Sondheim has written. Playing the Princes with unabashed and entertaining hammy glee are Paul Hambidge and Taylor Warren. The entire cast is a tremendous pleasure, ably assisted by music director Camille Villalpando Rolla and her orchestra. So. Yes. Um. Forget Johnny Mercer! What the hell was going on with scenic designer Britton Mauk’s set?!? I can’t even describe it — sort of three giant paper bags repeatedly, pointlessly spun around and around while a bunch of small geometric shapes get pushed across the stage with the sole purpose of inconveniencing the performers. Really, when the set has more blocking than the actors, you know there’s a problem. And shouldn’t a show set inside a forest have something green in it? The whole thing is the color of a lumber yard. Director Zeva Barzell’s confused trafďŹ c patterns and clumsy staging seem to suggest she’s as gobsmacked by the set as we are. You don’t want to see Point Park’s Into the Woods, but you really do want to see it. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

OCT. 22

The Propeller Group

+ THU., OCT. 22 + FRI., OCT. 23 {STAGE}

We often think of funerals as drab affairs where everyone is dressed in black, but the Carnegie Museum of Art’s new video-based exhibition The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, the Dead Need Music challenges that idea. Created by The Propeller Group, a Los Angeles-based collective, it’s a visual and musical look at colorful, spirited funeral traditions in South Vietnam and New Orleans. The exhibit opens with tonight’s free screening and artist talk. Kelechi Urama 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust presents The Nayika Project, a family-friendly performance blending dance, theater and spoken word to tell the story of two women embarking on a quest for the ultimate love. The show, featuring classical Kuchipudi dance, hip hop and spoken word, stars playwright, director and hip-hop artist Paige Hernandez and dancer Chitra Kalyandurg. The Nayika Project, staged at Downtown’s

{STAGE} University of Pittsburgh Stages presents the Pittsburgh premiere of the 2012 Pulitzer-winning play Water by the Spoonful, about a troubled Iraq veteran and the four people he meets in an online chatroom. New York-based playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes is best known for writing the book for the Tony-award winning musical In the Heights. This production, directed by Ricardo Vila-Roger, gets its first performance in Henry Heymann Theatre tonight. KU 8 p.m. Continues through Nov. 1. 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

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{ART} A memento mori is a little something to remind us we’re going to die. And Mary M. Mazziotti is as on-message as anyone. The internationally exhibited Pittsburgh-based artist faces mortality with droll dark humor. Her new exhibit at borelli-edwards galleries,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VINCENT NOE}

{ART}

Pierce Studio, continues the Trust’s India in Focus festival. KU 10 a.m. and noon. Also 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24. 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10.50. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

OCT. 22 Water by b the Spoonful


sp otlight Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre opens its season in ambitious style with a bill of three masterworks by three of dance’s greatest choreographers. Mixed Repertory #1, Oct. 23-25 at the Benedum Center, brings back George Balanchine’s energetic Americana ballet “Western Symphony” (1954). Last performed by the PBT in 1997, the non-narrative, Old West-themed ballet is set to music by composer Hershy Kay, to be performed live by the PBT Orchestra; the work blends the charm of a classic Western musical with the brilliance of Balanchine’s choreography. The other two works are company premieres. William Forsythe’s “In the Middle Somewhat Elevated” (1987) has been called “the work that changed ballet forever” by London’s The Guardian. Classical ballet’s version of “voguing,” the compellingly virtuosic ballet is set to a prerecorded futuristic electronic score by Thom Willems. Forsythe describes the work as “a theme and variations in the strictest sense.” Finally, set to music of the same name by Leoš Janáček (to be played live), Czech choreographer Jiři Kylián’s “Sinfonietta” (1978) is literally a feet-stamping romp, a gallop and burst of contemporary-ballet genius that is the cherry on top of a landmark production in PBT’s 46-year history. Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 23; 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 24; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 25. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $28-110. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

Memento Mori, is subtitled “embroidered textiles reflecting the transient nature of life.” The three new bodies of work on exhibit starting with tonight’s opening reception explore medievalinspired imagery, the texts of jokes and complex patterns that disintegrate — kind of like we all will. Bill O’Driscoll 6-9 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Nov. 14. 3583 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606 or www.begalleries.com

{COMEDY} Jamie Lissow performs five shows over three days at Pittsburgh Improv. The Los Angeles-based comic had a half-hour Comedy Central stand-up special in 2009, and has appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Late Late Show and Last Comic Standing. Lissow also stars with Rob Schneider on the upcoming Netflix series Real Rob. KU 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Continues through Sun., Oct. 25. 166 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $17. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

{COMEDY} What to do with a low-budget 1966 cult-classic devil-worship thriller that has a 0 percent critics’ rating on Rotten Tomatoes? That is widely considered one of the worst films ever? That people know of only because Mystery Science Theater 3000 mocked it? Well, you stage your own live reading of Manos the Hands of Fate — with an allfemale cast. Matt Buccholz’s Alternate Histories teams with Arcade Comedy Theater for WoManos The Hands of Fate tonight. BO 8 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0698 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

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much totally different than the last time you saw it. In a lengthy overhaul that closed the building down, the Greensburg landmark’s exterior was modernized, with new landscaping, and its interior is nearly 50 percent larger, including new ne space and for both exhibits an education and community com programming. This weekend offers offe two chances to celebrate. ce Tonight’s Sky’s Sk the Limit Grand Reopening Dance Party (7:3011 p.m.; $75) $7 features Tracksploitation, Tracksplo DJ Gordy Gord and live music by Beauty Slap. (A ( VIP pre-party and pre-p cocktail cockt party are sold out.) s On Sun., Oct. 25, S the museum’s m Free Community Day (11 a.m.3 p.m.) p.m offers offer live entertainment enter including includ Colonel Colon Eagleburger’s Eagleb Highstepping Highst Goodtime Goodtim Band, puppet shows, sh puppet-making and puppet-m more. BO 221 2 N. Main St., Greensburg. Gr 724-837-1500 724-837-150 or www. thewestmoreland.org thewestmo

{ART} “Without light, there is no life,” wrote Jane Haskell. The Pittsburgh-based artist, who died in 2013, created numerouss local exhibitions where light ht dominated. She also served d as a board member at Carnegie Museum of Art. To celebrate ate her influence, the Jewish h Community ty Center of Greater Pittsburgh h holds the opening reception for Jane Haskell: Drawing in Light, the first in-depth pth examination on of Haskell’s ’s work. The e exhibition, n, at the Fine e Perlow Weiss Gallery and Berger er Gallery, includes about bout 30 light sculptures, s, paintings and drawings. KU 6-9 p.m. 5738 Forbes Ave., Squirrel rrel Hill. Free. 412-521-8010 521-8010 or www.jccpgh.org gh.org

{BURLESQUE} {BURLE

{PARTY}} The venerable rable Westmoreland eland Museum of American Art looks pretty tty

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Memento Mori

{STAGE} A Brooklyn kid becomes a songwriter with dozens of signature hits and, eventually, a name performer herself. But from “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” to her iconic album Tapestry, Carole King is also the subject of a Tonyand Grammy-winning show. Beautiful — The Carole King Musical combines her famous tunes with King’s personal story of heartbreak and rebirth, and her relationships with the likes of songwriting partner Gerry Goffin. Starting tonight, the North American tour of Beautiful visits the Benedum Center for eight shows courtesy of PNC Broadway in Pittsbugh. Abby Mueller stars as King. BO 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Nov. 1. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $45-100. 412-4564800 or www.trustarts.org

Art by Mary Mazziotti

online alt-beauty/indie-culture community SuicideGirls, costumes its high-energy striptease numbers in Star Wars stormtrooper masks, Clockwork Orange derbies, Donnie Darko bunnysuits and more, from Zelda to Orange is the New Black. The fall tour hits the Rex Theater tonight. BO 9 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $30 (VIP: $90). 21 and over. rex.greyareaprod.com

the end of Gourmet magazine after a 68-year run, no one was more surprised than then-editor-in-chief Ruth Reichl. She channeled her reaction to Gourmet’s closing into a cookbook, My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life (Random House). Through her attention to detail, Reichl, a New Yorkbased memoirist, restaurateur and six-time James Beard Award-winner, changed the way we think about cooking. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Lectures series hosts Reichl tonight at Carnegie Music Hall. KU 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave.,

+ MON., OCT. 26 {WORDS} When Condé Naste announced

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER BEAUTIFUL: THE CAROL KING

BEST COSTUME: PAIR OF PENS TICKETS RUNNER-UP: PAIR OF STEELERS TICKETS

$2.25 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS ALL DAY 1573 MC FARLAND ROAD • MT. LEBANON, PA • 412.561.2025

MUSICAL. The story of King’s rise to stardom. Oct. 27-Nov. 1. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. BETWEEN WORLDS. Work by Brenda Stumpf. Thru Oct. 30. BoxHeart Gallery, Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRAINPEOPLE. Presented by Throughline Theatre Company. Written by Jose Rivera, directed by Sean Sears. As a peculiar dinner party progresses, reality unravels, sanity fractures, & futures are irreversibly altered. Fri., Oct. 23, 8 p.m., Sat., Oct. 24, 2 & 8 p.m., Thu., Oct. 29, 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 30, 8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 31, 2 & 8 p.m. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. CHILLER THEATER: THE MUSICAL. Oct. 23-24, 8 p.m. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK. A play based on the diaries of a teenage girl during WWII. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 25,

2 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK. A revival of the classic. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. The Theatre Factory, Rector. 412-374-9200. THE EVENING. The first installment of a Divine Comedyinspired triptych that features signature Maxwell elements such a minimalist aesthetic & live music. Presented by Fri., Oct. 23, 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. THE GAME’S AFOOT. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. Community Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon, Ben Avon. 412-734-2050. I WANT MY MUMMY. Baroness Frankenstein has opened her castle to monsters of the world who are having difficulty fitting in w/ society. Presented by Greensburg Civic Theatre’s Greasepaint Players. Fri., Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 24, 1 & 4 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

Find your way through the woods, sing along to The Wizard of Oz and take a peek into a chef’s kitchen Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

INTO THE WOODS. A musical storybook mash up presented by Conservatory Theatre Company. Rockwell Theatre. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE NAYIKA PROJECT. Hip Hop artist Paige Hernandez & Kuchipudi dancer Chitra Kalyandurg fuse dance, theatre & spoken word to give contemporary spin to tales of resilient, relatable heroines from Indian myth. Fri., Oct. 23, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 24, 2 & 8 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE NIGHT ALIVE. Tommy has made a mess of things: he’s living low in Dublin, just getting by on odd jobs & doing his best to avoid his ex-wife & kids. But when he rescues a mysterious woman, an escape out of the squalor is possible. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

THE SECRET GARDEN: THE MUSICAL. 11 year old Mary Lennox returns to Yorkshire to live with reclusive Uncle Archibald & his invalid son, Colin. The estate’s many wonders include a magic garden which beckons the children & spirits from Mary’s past. Presented by The Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Seton Center, Brookline. http://www.bphp.org/. TUNNEL VISION. off the WALL productions’ play explores ‘tunnel vision’ from the perspective of two women, thrown together against all odds. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Carnegie Stage, Carnegie. www.insideoffthewall.com. WATER BY THE SPOONFUL. A motley crew gathers in an Internet chatroom to share life’s fragile successes & help weather its bleak realities. Sun, 2 p.m. and Tue-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. www.play.pitt.edu.

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BILL BURR. 7 & 9:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. VICKI LAWRENCE & MAMA. A mixture of stand-up comedy, music & observations about real life. 2 & 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 23

LEGACY SAMPLER 2015-16

NEW!

RETURNING FAVORITES

At your favorite local beer retailer

Acclaimed experimental playwright and director Richard Maxwell’s The Evening, inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy, visits The New Hazlett Theater for a single performance by his New York City Players. Co-presented with The Andy Warhol Museum, the work is set in a bar where three very different friends wrestle with the way they live. Each makes a choice whether to run from, to fight or to accept life’s challenges. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 23. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $12-15. www.ticketweb.com

JOHN MCINTIRE DANGEROUSLY UNDEAD COMEDY TALK SHOW. KDKA Radio host w/ a distinguished panel of guests. 7:30 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. LEVEL THREE IMPROV CLASS SHOWCASE. 9:30 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LEVEL TWO IMPROV CLASS SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PITTSBURGH FRINGE PRESENTS: STAND-UP HORROR. Part live horror show, part stand-up comedy, part B-movie; a one-man cabaret. Proceeds go to Pittsburgh Fringe Festival. 8 & 10 p.m. Max’s Allegheny Tavern, North Side. 412-303-8549. UP ALL NIGHT OPEN MIC. 11 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. WOMANOS: THE HANDS OF FATE. Alternate Histories presents a live reading of the cult classic “Manos: The Hands of Fate” featuring an all-female cast. Show also includes an improvised 1940s serial, free beer from East End CONTINUES ON PG. 53

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“Mold in my basement” (digital photography, 2015), by Linda Davis. From the exhibition Snapshots of Poverty, at Repair the World, East Liberty.

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NEW THIS WEEK PITTSBURGH TATTOO COMPANY. Lucifer’s Gallery. Spooky art, light refreshment & lots of entertainment. October 24, 7 p.m. Downtown. 412-201-9075. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Coding & Antiquities. Part of MAVUNO Festival. Tina Williams Brewer explains mysteries of our ancestors’ writing practices & draws connections to our modern day emojis & texting usage. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Birth Series. Photography series by Gauri Gill that follows a midwife working in the remote village of Motasar, Ghafan. Part of India in Focus showcase. A Million Marks of Home. Sarika Goulatia work incorporates traditional Indian pigments & spices within a contemporary art context. Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/ I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Warhol By The Book. An exhibition on Warhol’s book work, from early student-work illustrations to his commercial work in the 50s. Exposures 4: Travis K. Schwab: Lost and Found. Three new paintings, large portraits of Warhol, flanked by a variety of smaller canvases painted from the lost photobooth strips & books. Permanent collection. Artwork

& artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Multimedia Exhibit. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXWOOD BOUTIQUE. Between the Lines. New & recent works by Jerome D’Angelo. East Liberty. 412-363-2993. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARRIE FURNACE. Alloy Pittsburgh. Temporary site-based artworks by Rose Clancy, Oreen, Cohen, Sarika Goulatia, Nick Liadis & Scott Turri. Rankin. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Amazing Artists Pittsburgh. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry, Patrick Schmidt, Sandra Moore, Carolyn Carson & Dimeji Onafuwa. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888.

CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. Let’s Be Thankful. An open art show sponsored by the Cranberry Artist’s Network. Cranberry. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. A Nightmare on Liberty Avenue. Spooky group art show feat. 14 Pittsburgh artists. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FIREBORN STUDIOS & GALLERY. Potters’ Pots. The works of 28 Pittsburgh artists. South Side. 412-488-6835. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Forbidden Fruit. Porcelain figurines in the 18th century style by Chris Antemann. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FRICK FINE ARTS BUILDING. Reverberations. The Department of Studio Arts faculty members show their work. University Art Gallery. Oakland. FUTURE TENANT. SECAC Juried Show. The juried exhibit is part of the 2015 Southeastern College of Art Conference being held in Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Pour It On. Work by Tony Landolina & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Collections. Painting by Mike McSorely. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HOLOCAUST CENTER, UNITED JEWISH FEDERATION. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1500. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the

Brewing, & an robot emcee. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 24 AARON KLEIBER, MATT STANTON, RAY ZAWODNI. 8 p.m. Mt. Pleasant Twp. Fire Hall, Mount Pleasant. 412-920-5653. FRANKLY SCARLETT: ALL MADE UP. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LEVEL ONE IMPROV CLASS SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAKE NICE BOOM. A team improv competition presented by Unplanned Comedy. Fourth Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. T-ROBE, TOM KUPIEC, J-RUSS. 8 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. 412-751-6960. UNDER THE BRIDGE SHOW - STAND UP SHOWCASE. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. JOHN KNIGHT, RAY ZAWODNI, MIKE SASSON. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. 412-751-6960. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TOM ANZALONE, MATT STANTON, DAVID KAYE. Canon-McMillan Boys Soccer Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. South Strabane Social Hall, Washington. 412-920-5653. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv www. per pa comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. pghcitym o .c The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

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ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Out of This

MON 26 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians.

World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that brings together scientific fact & pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all over the world. Population Impact. How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Voyage to Vietnam. An immersive exhibit celebrating CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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the Vietnamese Tet Festival. North Side. 412-322-5058. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. The Mysterious Nature of Fungi. An overview of these mysterious organisms that are found almost everywhere on this planet & are the cause of both bliss & blight. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501.

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MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. Isabella D. Stoker Graham Collection. Heritage glass from her estate. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Flower Show. Be transported across the globe in Phipps’ Victorian glasshouse to explore the sensational Japanese tradition of mum growing. Runs through Nov. 8. Garden Railroad. Model trains chug through miniature landscapes populated w/ living plants, whimsical props & fun interactive buttons. Runs through Feb. 28. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

highlighting some of Africa’s the Civil War through artifacts lushest landscapes. Oakland. & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-622-6914. 412-621-4253. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland MIXED REPERTORY #1. Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. Pittsburgh Ballet Theater presents A Reverence for Life. Photos choreography to “Western & artifacts of her life & work. Symphony,” “In the Middle Springdale. 724-274-5459. Somewhat Elevated” & SENATOR JOHN HEINZ “Sinfonietta. Feat. the PBT HISTORY CENTER. orchestra. Oct. 23-24, We Can Do It!: WWII. 8 p.m. and Sun., Discover how Pittsburgh Oct. 25, 2 p.m. affected World War Benedum Center, . II & the war affected Downtown. www per a p ty our region. Explore 412-456-6666. pghci m o .c the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life KYIV UKRAINIAN DANCE “Rosie the Riveters” & local ENSEMBLE: JUST DANCE. The Tuskegee Airmen whose story of a young woman who can’t contributions made an connect w/ her inner dance spirit, unquestionable impact on the war w/ Orkestar Zabava. 3:30 p.m. effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359. anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: SUICIDE GIRLS BLACKHEART Western PA Sports Museum, BURLESQUE. A geeky burlesque Clash of Empires, & exhibits on show w/ striptease performances local history, more. Strip District. in tribute to Star Wars, Orange 412-454-6000. Is The New Black, Donnie Darko, SOLDIERS & SAILORS Clockwork Orange, more MEMORIAL HALL. War in the 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection 412-381-6811. of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since BLACKJACK SPECTACULAR. All

DANCE

FRI 23 - SUN 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 24

FUNDRAISERS THU 22

proceeds go to Team Tassy. 6:30 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-231-3338. DESIGN AWARDS CEREMONY & GALA. Celebration of architecture & design, & honors those who create it. Presented by AIA Pittsburgh. 5 p.m. August Wilson Center, Downtown. 412-471-9548. MUMS THE WORD: MEDICAL USE MARIJUANA IN PENNSYLVANIA & EVERY OTHER STATE & FEDERALLY. Dinner, live music from Kelsey Friday of Brownie Mary, Clinton Clegg & Nathan Zoob & feat. speakers: State Senator Mike Folmer & Dr. Cyril Wecht. Proceeds benefit MUMs the Word. Pittsburgh Winery, Strip District. 412-566-1000.

FRI 23 THE BUTTERFLY BALL. The Woodlands signature fundraising event, honoring Sydelle Kessler & the late Dr. Laibe A. Kessler. Plus a cocktail reception, dinner, live music, & a silent auction in the lovely Fairmont Pittsburgh hotel. 6 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 724-935-6533. REACH FOR THE STARS GALA: HOLLYWOOD EDITION. UPMC Club, East Lounge. Supporting children who are deaf or hard of hearing from the DePaul School for Hearing & Speech. 5 p.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-924-1012.

SAT 24 CHANGE A HEART OKTOBERFEST GALA. Sampling of craft beer from local breweries, pretzels, desserts, German entertainment, silent auctions, prizes & more. Proceeds benefit the Change A Heart Franciscan Volunteer Program. 6:30 p.m. Sts. John & Paul Parish, Wexford. 412-821-0861. DIA DE LOS MUERTOS: A CELEBRATION OF LIFE. Honoring the traditions of this Mexican holiday w/ an evening of food, cocktails, art, & entertainment. All proceeds support the life-saving work of Global Links. 6:30 p.m. Global Links, Green Tree. 412-361-3423. OCTOBERFEST. Food, friends & music, benefiting Abiding Ministries/Pittsburgh’s Homeless. 4 p.m. Christ Lutheran Church. 412-466-7773.

SAT 24 - SUN 25 LIVING HISTORY CEMETERY TOUR. Come meet 10 historical figures as they present the stories of their lives. Oct. 24-25, 12-4 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

SUN 25 BACK OF THE HOUSE. Chefs cooking what they cook for themselves..bbq. This event & participating chefs are helping to


VISUAL ART

8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes &wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. Digital Designs: Showcase of Student Design Work. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MARTHA GAULT ART GALLERY. appetite: process & priority of consumption. A joint exhibition by Christian Benefiel & Jeremy Entwistle. Slippery Rock. 724-738-2020. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias, Ethan Frier, Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal & Marnie Weber created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. parallelgenres. Christine Barney, John Burton, Granite Calimpong, Bernie D’Onofrio, Jen Elek, Saman Kalantari, David Lewin, David Royce, Margaret Spacapan & Cheryl Wilson Smith exploring an interconnected set of parameters through different genres. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. ON THE SKIDS. The Hunt. An exhibition of illustrations by Abby Diamond & Sean Coxen. Knoxville. www. facebook.com/ontheskids. PANZA GALLERY. Wabi Sabi N@. An exhibition of photography & clay by Lori Cardille and Maryann (Maruska) Parker. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. North Side. 412-231-7881.

support YouthPlaces job training for the Food Service industry. 3-6 p.m. YouthPlaces, North Side.

MON 26 INTERNATIONAL TRIVIA COMPETITION. Trivia to support the work of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-281-7970.

TUE 27 SPORTS N’AT FOR ACHIEVA. Join Bill Crawford from WDVE for food, drinks, games & the opportunity to bid on lots of autographed memorabilia from

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PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut, linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. In the Air: Visualizing what we breath. Photographs that show the effects of western PA’s air quality. Oakland. 412-681-5449. REPAIR THE WORLD’S WORKSHOP. Snapshots of Poverty. 5 area residents document their personal experiences in photographs that show the impact of poverty in our community. Closing reception November 6, 6-8pm as a part of Unblurred. East Liberty. REVISION SPACE. Les Fleurs du Mâle. Photography & film by Steven Miller that pay homage to the French writer & political activist, Jean Genet. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. An exhibition distinguishing the historical & contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. A Very Long Engagement. The works collected in this exhibition emerge from lengthy encounters with string – whether knotted, netted, interlaced, woven or percussed. Created by six fiber artists, the works form a kind of network of linked ideas, processes, physical properties & material qualities. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x15.

Pittsburgh’s greatest athletes. Funds raised from this event will go towards Achieva’s mission of supporting & empowering people w/ disabilities & their families. 5:30 p.m. Carson City Saloon, South Side. 412-995-5000.

LITERARY ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TA S T E

THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

TUE 27

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THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Plus One. A series of large scale video, sound & print installations invoking repetition & patterns found in traditional Indian visual art. Participating artists: Shilpa Gupta, Sarabhi Saraf, Avinash Veeraghavan, Sumakshi Singh. Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Aqueous Open International. This exhibit showcases the best of watercolor artists both regionally & internationally. Friendship. www.richardclaraval.com SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Coding: We Are Always There. Exhibition of fiber art by Tina Williams Brewer. Artist Talk w/ Tina Williams Brewer on October 24, 6:30-8 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. WINDOWSPACE. MIXTAPE: GOD BLESS THE CHILD THAT’S GOT HIS OWN. Work by Paul Zelevansky. Downtown. 412-325-7723. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Nandini Valli Muthiah. Nandini’s photography incorporates traditional ideas of popular Indian art in contemporary, everyday settings. Part of India in Focus showcase. At Home. London based artist Hetain Patel unveils the photographic series “Eva,” & a newly commissioned work for the exhibition “Jump.” Part of India in Focus showcase. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. STORYTELLING @ RILEY’S. Story telling on a theme every month. Last Tue of every month,

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performances, games & more. 12 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. PAWS FOR A CAUSE WITH ANIMAL FRIENDS. Meet at least one approved literacy animal, hear stories, read aloud to the visiting animal & participate in a literacy activity. We ask all participants to bring along one item from the Animal Friends Supply Drive list which can be found on our website. Registration requested. 11 a.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. SASQUATCH STOLE OUR TREASURE: SCAVENGER HUNT FOR KIDS. 1-3 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. SUZANNE GIBSON. October is Blindness Awareness Month in Pittsburgh? To support this awareness, the Art Studio is hosting guest artist, Suzanne Gibson. Try on a pair of glasses that mimic her eye condition & paint alongside her. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 28 AN EVENING WITH DORA E. MCQUAID, POET. ACTIVIST. SPEAKER. TEACHER. 6 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-364-6728 x15. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting is about poems by Eavan Boland, “In A Time of Violence”. Fourth Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-928-9891. TEEN POETRY SLAM. A poetry slam to practice reading in front of an audience. Each poem must be a work of the poet’s own construction & no longer than 5 minutes. For teens ages 12 & up. No registration required. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

KIDSTUFF THU 22 DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty. www.techshop.ws. THE JOSH & GAB SHOW! Performances utilize humor, music, interactive song recording & storytelling. 1-1:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MUSIC & MOVEMENT STORY TIME. Come dance, sing, or play an instrument. We will make a simple instrument or two, dance & hear some stories related to music. This 30 minute program is for children ages three through five to enjoy w/ their caregiver or parent. Thu, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Thru Oct. 22 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

SAT 24 - SUN 25 CREEPY CRAWLY CARNEGIE DAYS. Investigate the creepy & awesome creatures that call the museum home while trick-ortreating in the exhibits. 12 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 25, 12 p.m. Carnegie

Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SUN 25 HALLOWEEN FAMILY STORYTIME. An afternoon of scary stories storyteller Mary Morgan Smith. 2 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

MON 26 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Story time, make-and-takes, planetarium & live demo shows just for preschoolers. Mon. Thru Oct. 26 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 27 DESIGN & BUILD AFTERSCHOOL. Introducing young innovators to the engineering design process using laser cutters & 3D printers. Students will move through identifying a problem, brainstorming, prototyping & iterative design before refining their CAD skills in Autodesk & Adobe software. For students aged 12-16. Tue, Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 TechShop, East Liberty. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

FRI 23 FRIGHT NIGHT. Family event. Costumes are optional, but highly recommended. Scary books, activities, crafts, more. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 24 COSPLAY HOMECOMING. Open to all in grades six through twelve. Wear your favorite cosplay outfit for an evening of games (Magyk & video game tournaments), music, food, more. 7:30 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. HALLOWEEN MAYHEM. Zombies, a costume parade, puppets, live

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*Stuff We Like

A featured @housesofpittsburgh, photographed by @ar_ay_ef

Houses of Pittsburgh This Instagram account regrams photos of interesting local architecture for a great virtual tour of the city. Submit a photo by tagging your pics with #housesofpgh. instagram.com/housesofpittsburgh

Tacopedia

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDON PERDOMO}

An informative and fun read on the history and complexity of Mexico’s most dynamic dish, the taco.

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

WED 28 STORY TIME! Join our Museum Educators as they bring stories to life through animated readings, songs & stretches. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

at Regent Square Theater, Edgewood

FRI 23

CRITIC: Bryan Wills, a library coordinator from Regent Square

CAMPFIRE GHOST STORIES. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Watch a Park Ranger build a campfire & listen to spooky stories. Wear a Halloween costume. Yakaon Shelter. 7 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, Natrona Heights. 724-295-3570. WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 24 FALL FOLIAGE HIKE. Meet at the Carp Shelter. 10 a.m.12 p.m. Deer Lakes Park, Tarentum. 724-265-3520. PRUNING TREES WORKSHOP. Instruction from Brian Wolyniak, Urban Forester. 9 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-482-3455.

SUN 25 MAP & COMPASS ORIENTEERING. Find flags in the woods using topographic map. 11 a.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 814-255-6606.

FULL MOON HIKE. Traynor Field Parking Lot. Pre-registration recommended at www. alleghenycounty.us/parks. 7:30-9:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766. WISE WALKS. 30 to 45 minute walks to enjoy fall. Water & snack provided. Meet at the Pie Traynor Field in North Park. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

WED 28

The Jakobs Ferry Stragglers

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 22

Yoga Hive Strip District Housed in an unassuming brick building, this studio is easy to miss. But Yoga Hive’s newest location offers skilled teachers and a relaxed environment, in a location convenient to Downtown. 2514 Penn Ave. www.yogahive.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

EVENT: River’s Edge screening

OUTSIDE

TUE 27

This young local bluegrass band brings a fresh take to old-timey tunes. Great strings and vocals make for fun, upbeat live shows. Good luck sitting still. www.jackobsferry.com

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

CARNEGIE MUSEUMS OF ART & NATURAL HISTORY FREE DAYS. Free admission for select days. Thu, 3-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 www.carnegiemuseums.org. CROWDFUNDING YOUR BUSINESS. Learn about crowdfunding & Kiva Zip’s 0% interest micro-loans for startups & small businesses in the Pittsburgh area. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

WHEN: Sun.,

Oct. 18

I live right down the street, and was at [Regent Square Theater] last week when I saw the print ad for [River’s Edge] in the window. It’s one of my favorite movies. I saw it for the first time a really long time ago. It was fourth or fifth grade, in 1988 or ’89. I loved it, I always have, and it’s always stayed with me. The movie is kind of a time capsule, a snapshot of a subset of ’80s youth culture. Crispin Glover gives one of the best performances that I can think of. He makes the movie, it’s all about him. His performance is very inspired, and the reason it holds up. Dennis Hopper is also good, and Keanu [Reeves] is strong. You have to see it. B Y K EL E C HI U RA M A

THE ULTIMATE RECIPE FOR AN ENERGETIC LIFE. A workshop w/ Kathy Parry, a food coach & corporate workshop keynoter. 7 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. YOU CAN’T FIX WHAT YOU DON’T LOOK AT: ACKNOWLEDGING RACE IN ADDRESSING DISPROPORTIONALITY. Discussion by Russell Skiba. 4-5:30 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-8213.

Sun, 2 p.m., Mon-Fri, 1 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 31, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 1 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1537. PSYCHEDELIC MONSTER MAZE. An interactive maze & installation, an immersive light installation, a piece from the Locomotive Explosive collective, DJ Keebs & staff. Music every night from different artists as well as pumpkin carving and contests on select evenings. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. and Tue-Thu, Sun, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Thru Oct. 31 Spirit, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. EXPLORING SOCIAL JUSTICE REELABILITIES FILM FOR VULNERABLE FESTIVAL. Festival POPULATIONS: celebrating the lives, THE FACE OF THE stories & artistic PERSON WHO expressions of HAS EXPERIENCED people w/ disabilities www. per pa VIOLENCE. The event’s through film. For a pghcitym .co sub-themes include full schedule, visit violence against women; http://jfilmpgh.org/ the link between violence & programs-events/festivals/ mental illness; ideologically reelabilities/. 7 p.m., Sat., driven violence & the face of the Oct. 24, 7 p.m., Mon., Oct. 26, young black male. Oct. 22-23 7 p.m., Wed., Oct. 28, 7 p.m. Power Center Ballroom, and Thu., Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Duquesne University, Downtown. Rodef Shalom Congregation, 412-396-6550. Oakland. 401-992-5203.

THU 22 - FRI 23

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 22 - WED 28

FRI 23

LASER HALLOWEEN. Spooky lasers, eerie darkness, ghoulish tunes, & frightful guests. Get into the Halloween spirit w/ the Addams Family, the Ghost Busters, & Beetlejuice. Do the Monster Mash, the Time Warp, & your own ghastly dance. Sat,

GANGS & TRAFFICKING IN CENTRAL AMERICA. Panels will explore the relationship between governance in the region & the prevalence & expansion of the maras(gangs). 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. William Pitt Union, Oakland. 412-648-7814.

PERSONS & THEIR IDENTITIES. Lecture by Paul Snowdon, emeritus professor, Department of Philosophy. Room 1001-B. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. SING-ALONG SCREENING OF THE WIZARD OF OZ. Families, seniors & people of all ages are welcome to enjoy this classic movie w/ sing-a-long prompts & silly props. 7 p.m. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-661-1670. SPOOKY SCIENCE SLEEPOVER. Explore the night sky in the Buhl Planetarium & visit SpacePlace to experience what it would be like to be an astronaut. Design a space rover & then put it to the test. Help a forgetful astronaut find personal belongings in our “Lost in Space” scavenger hunt. 6 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1537. SURFACE LEVEL RECORDS MUSIC & ART EXHIBIT. W/ release party for The Dads, live painting by Dante Lombardi & Neil Glenn, food & refreshments , giveaways & more surprises. 7:30 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-475-8409.

FRI 23 - SAT 24 CHEMFEST. Discover how chemistry colors our world w/ dozens of hands-on exhibits & demonstrations presented by local companies, colleges, & universities. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412.237-1537. SOCIETY FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC EDUCATION MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL CONFERENCE. This year’s theme, “About a Place,” addresses social, natural, political, psychological & personal geographies, broadly. Lecturers, including Linda Benedict-Jones. Oct. 23-24 Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. 412-681-5449.

SAT 24 - SUN 25 PITTSBURGH PET EXPO. Locally produced, one-stop venue for pet products & services for pet owners & pet enthusiasts. 5 p.m., Sat., Oct. 24, 10 a.m. and Sun., Oct. 25, 10 a.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-310-7781.

SAT 24 THE BALLROOM DANCE AT CRANBERRY. Lesson, ballroom dancing, snacks. 7 p.m. Cranberry Township Municipal Center, Cranberry. 724-612-3226. COMPOSTING W/ WORMS. Learning about vermicomposting. Registration required. 10:15-11:45 a.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. CPR & FIRST AID BASICS. Learn how to deliver CPR & other basic lifesaving techniques & get general tips on how to react during emergency situations. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.


DIGITAL MUSIC NETWORK CONFERENCE. Explaining the music industry & offering an inside look of it’s business aspects. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 818-208-0227. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. MEET, LEARN, PLAY: A GAMING MEET UP. All-ages board gaming session, playing & learning about new games w/ an instructor. Quiet Reading Room. Second and Fourth Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ONE HELLOFA BREW TOUR. Visits to Bloom Brew, Four Seasons Brewing Company & Helltown Brewing. 11 a.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. RUST BELT CULINARY TOUR. Visit a renovated church hall, a modernized mill bar, & other revamped treasures that reflect the region’s rich heritage as well as its now trendy rustbelt cuisine. 10:30 a.m. Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709.

Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 25 DRAG QUEEN BINGO. Double Diamond hosts Drag Queen Bingo featuring signature cocktail specials & great prizes. 6 p.m. Andys Wine Bar, Downtown. 412-773-8800. LEGION DRILL DAY & MILITARY MINIATURES. A special display of military miniatures, hand painted toy soldiers, & war gaming dioramas featuring the late 18th & early 19th century armies of North America & Europe. 1 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-221-0348. MURDER MYSTERY SHOW. Figure out who committed the murder of Bartholomeow Cosmo. 7 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. ONE HELLOFA BOO BREW TOUR. Wear a costume & visit Bloom Brew in West Newton, Four Seasons Brewing Company in Latrobe &

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY COUNTY COURT SYSTEM

Stand on the side of a child in the Allegheny County court system by signing up to be a court-appointed special advocate. These volunteers receive training to be able to get to know children and their cases, allowing them to gather information and provide personalized attention. For more information or to sign up for training, visit www.pgh-casa.org.

SPOOKTACULAR DINNER DANCE. Dinner, dancing, costumes in partnership w/ “Yes, You Can Dance”. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Lawrenceville Healthy Living Center, Lawrenceville. 412-622-6918. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TANKS FOR THE MEMORIES. Showcasing its World War II Sherman tank in action & giving the behind-the-scenes story about how tanks helped win the war as part of a special public program. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. TEEN READER’S THEATER. Looking for teens (grades 6 & up) to practice & perform “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” Practice, make scenery & perform in December. 1 p.m., Sat., Nov. 14, 1 p.m., Sat., Nov. 21, 1 p.m., Sat., Dec. 12, 1 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 19, 1 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. TRUCK OR TREAT. A fall festival featuring a variety of Pittsburgh food trucks, local music, kids activities, more. 1 p.m. Schenley

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Helltown Brewing in Mt. Pleasant. 11 a.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PITT NATIONALITY ROOMS & THE AFRICAN HERITAGE CLASSROOM. Tour of selected rooms & talk on African Heritage Room by its architect, Bill Bates. 1:30-4 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-621-9339. PITTSBURGH 48 HOUR HORROR FILM PROJECT. Screening of horror films created over 48-hour period. 6 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-385-7250. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SCAREHOUSE UNMASKED: BEHIND-THE-SCREAMS TOUR. Behind-the-scenes tour, a mini-ScareHouse workshop on creating the spooky attraction; light dinner at Church Brew Works & seeing the action at The ScareHouse. Sun, 3-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Station Square. 412-323-4709. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made

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foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 26 ADHD: FRIENDLY STRATEGIES TO GO FROM “TO DO” TO “DONE”. A workshop w/ Susan Lieber specializes in working w/ adults & college students living w/ ADHD who want to be more productive & gain control of their lives. Please register. 7 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LAUGH FOR THE HEALTH OF IT! A laugh workshop led by Julie Ann Sullivan, Certified Laughter Leader. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATURAL REMEDIES & ESSENTIAL OIL USE FOR CHILDREN. 6:30-8 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. REFLECTION INTO ACTION: FIXING RACIAL DISPROPORTIONALITY IN STUDENT DISCIPLINE. A panel & group discussion to develop new strategies for addressing racial disparities in the administration of school discipline in Southwestern Pennsylvania. 4:30-6 p.m. Woodland Hills High School. 412-731-1300. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TAI CHI. Please register. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Nov. 16 Blueberry Hill Park. TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS W/ SPECIAL NEEDS. Free presentation w/ light kosher meal. 6 p.m. Jewish Family & Children’s Service, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7200.

of burial grounds in the United States & how they transformed into revered & oft-visited park-like spaces. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE FUTURE OF ENERGY & WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU. Three-session workshop series on Energy for area residents. 6 p.m. Ann Jones Gerace Center, South Side. 412-773-7163. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS. Meet & greet. 6-8 p.m. Savoy Restaurant, Strip District. 412-281-0660. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TWIN PEAKS THEMED HAUNTED HOUSE. Join the Dumpster Cats, the World’s 38th Greatest Organization for Paranormal Investigation & Elimination, on an adventure into the heart of the Black Lodge to rescue Special Agent Dale Cooper. Oct. 28-29, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 31, 2-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick. 412-882-3897. YELP’S MONSTER BASH. Costume contest hosted by Hundred Acres Manor, food, adult beverages, entertainment. 21+. 8 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169.

AUDITIONS EXHALATIONS DANCE THEATRE. Auditions for The Choreography Project. 6 p.m. Bring headshot & resume. Email: auditions@ exhalations.org Thru Oct. 25. Millennium Dance Complex, South Side. 610-368-4866.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. CHRISTMAS AROUND THE WORLD PARADE. Float entries are being accepted in the categories of commerical, non-profit & open. For more information, visit InsideButler County.com. Thru Oct. 30. FELLOWSHIP 16 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION. Call for submissions of photography from any eligible local photographers. For more information & to submit, visit www.silvereye.org/fellowship16. Thru Oct. 26. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. GHOULDILOCKS & THE THREE SCARES. Come dressed in costume & join Ghouldilocks & Little Bo

Creep in a Halloween tale geared for children 2 to 8. Sat, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-243-6464. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview. com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. SIDEWALL MURAL PROJECT. Accepting mural submissions for the months January to June of 2016. Fill out submission form at sidewallproject.wordpress.com/ apply. Thru Nov. 1.

TUE 27 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/ schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. AMERICA’S GOT TALENT LIVE: THE ALL-STARS TOUR! Performers include Emily West, Kristef Brothers, Taylor Williamson, Recycled Percussion, Smoothini the Ghetto Houdini & Emily West. 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. FACE IT: HEALTHY BEAUTY. Shop w/ local vendors offering natural, healthy, non-toxic beauty products. 6 p.m. Jay Verno Studios, South Side. 412-404-2872. TAKING IT PERSONALLY. Lecture by Mark Johnson, M.Ed. 1-2 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-8213.

WED 28 CEMETERY TALES: PITTSBURGH’S BURIED ART & HISTORY. This Frick Art & Historical presentation highlights Pittsburgh’s cemeteries & explores the history

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CHEERLEADERS PITTSBURGH 3100 LIBERTY AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 412-281-3110

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

I’m a straight guy, married for 16 years, kids in school. My wife cannot find a way to be intimate with me. We’ve had therapy individually and together. I nearly divorced her, but we decided to stay together — we do love each other, and the economics and child-rearing favor it. After I asked for a divorce, she fucked the shit out of me for the first time in 10 years. That was the last time she fucked me. She’s “broken” — her word, not mine, and her final answer. When the subject of affairs came up in the past, she said, “I wouldn’t blame you.” I could jack off only so many times before I cracked. I went online and met a very sexual woman with a strictly NSA thing for married men, and we fucked. I plan on doing it again. I know this could go all kinds of bad ways, but divorce just isn’t realistic. We had that one conversation, but we do not have an explicit understanding. I don’t want to head into my 50s with 10-plus years of celibacy behind me and decades of celibacy ahead of me. But I want to keep my marriage. Which kind of idiot am I? HELP UNDERSTANDING BOUNDARY-BREAKING YEARNINGS

1. I hooked up with this dude once, and it happened so fast — and it was so sleazy — that I had to fish his driver’s license out of his wallet when he was in the shower because I couldn’t remember his name. And that sleazy hookup led to a relationship so good that I wound up marrying sleazy hookup dude. Twice. So in my experience, WIML, and the experiences of millions of other people in LTRs with people they fucked the first time they met, hooking up isn’t proof that someone isn’t looking for an LTR. So that underwhelming hookup doesn’t make you a hypocrite, OK? 2. Gym dude isn’t into you — just like you weren’t into the dude you hooked up with last night. Don’t be a hypocritical baby about it, OK? 3. You made an underpants perv very happy and you made yourself a little money. Nobody was lied to or misled, no one got hurt, and the total amount of joy in the world ticked up slightly. You have nothing to be ashamed of, OK? One eventful night does not an out-ofcontrol sleazebag make. But if you feel out of control, take things slower. Resolve to be a bit choosier about who you hook up with, remind yourself to be grownup about rejection when it comes your way, and refrain from kink-shaming yourself the next time you make an underpants perv’s day.

“SO WHICH KIND OF IDIOT ARE YOU? THE MOST COMMON KIND, I’M AFRAID.”

If I were required to answer particular types of questions based on the percentage of the mail they constitute, I would answer two questions like yours every week. The majority of the mail I receive is from unhappy people in sexless marriages they either don’t want to end or can’t afford to end. So which kind of idiot are you? The most common kind, I’m afraid. I’m going to take a break from questions like these because I’m sick of the subject and my regular readers must be, too. But for you, HUBBY, and one last time, here’s my advice for people in your situation: Do what you gotta do to stay married and stay sane. Have a convo with the wife about the accommodation you require to stay in the marriage. Reassure her that you’re prepared to spend the rest of your life with her while emphasizing that you refuse to be celibate for the rest of your life. So every now and then, for your own sanity, and for the greater good, you’re going to have sex with other women. If this isn’t something your wife can accept, your only other option is divorce.

These are things I (28, gay, male, single) did last night, and they show how fucked up I am. (1) I hooked up with a guy off Craigslist. It was lame, he wasn’t cute, I was bored. (2) I came home and went on Tinder (which says I’m looking for an LTR, despite that hookup). I saw a guy from the gym — but he didn’t swipe right, and I was devastated. (3) I went online and sold a pair of my used undies. I don’t know what I’m doing with my life. I could use some advice. I’m sure what you say won’t be nearly as bad as what the voice inside my head is yelling at me. WHAT IS MY LIFE?

I’ve come into professional contact with a respected and successful artist. She is a woman in her 60s; I am a man in my 40s. I’m really attracted to women who are strong, talented and smart. She’s all that, and funny. I’ve never been attracted to someone that much older than myself. Nobody bats an eye when a guy gets with a woman who is 20 years younger, but how do I pursue her without her thinking I have some creepy fetish? Am I a creep? I don’t think so. I’m pretty average, I have an unusual but boring job developing woodworking tools, and I don’t have any kinks or fetishes to speak of. I’ve gone out of my way to make her feel special on several occasions, but it has only caused her to remark on my great customer service — and not in a flirty way. How can I let her know that I want to move into something else besides a professional relationship without creeping her out? SHE MAKES A REAL TURN-ON

Your best bet, SMART, is to be unambiguously direct with her (“I think you’re great, and I’d love to take you out on a date”) and to invite her to be unambiguously direct with you (“If you’re not interested, just say no — I’m a grown-up and I can handle rejection”). And if she’s squicked out by the age difference or wonders whether you’re a fetishist, urge her to Google the term “sapiosexual.” On the Lovecast, get kinky with Mollena Williams, a.k.a. the Perverted Negress: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

10.21-10.28

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): More than any other sign, you have an ability to detach yourself from life’s flow and analyze its complexities with cool objectivity. This is mostly a good thing. It enhances your power to make rational decisions. On the other hand, it sometimes devolves into a liability. You may become so invested in your role as observer that you refrain from diving into life’s flow. You hold yourself apart from it, avoiding both its messiness and vitality. But I don’t foresee this being a problem in the coming weeks. In fact, I bet you will be a savvy watcher, even as you’re almost fully immersed in the dynamic flux.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Are you an inventor? Is it your specialty to create novel gadgets and machines? Probably not. But in the coming weeks you may have metaphorical resemblances to an inventor. I suspect you will have an enhanced ability to dream up original approaches and find alternatives to conventional wisdom. You may surprise yourself with your knack for finding ingenious solutions to long-standing dilemmas. To prime your instincts, I’ll provide three thoughts from inventor Thomas Edison. 1. “To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.” 2. “Just because something doesn’t do what you planned it to do doesn’t mean it’s useless.” 3. “Everything comes to those who hustle while they wait.”

When I advise you to GET NAKED, I don’t mean it in a literal sense. Yes, I will applaud if you’re willing to experiment with brave acts of self-revelation. I will approve of you taking risks for the sake of the raw truth. But getting arrested for indecent exposure might compromise your ability to carry out those noble acts. So, no, don’t actually take off all your clothes and wander through the streets. Instead, surprise everyone with brilliant acts of surrender and vulnerability. Gently and sweetly and poetically tell the Purveyors of Unholy Repression to take their boredom machine and shove it up their humdrum.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Some unraveling is inevitable. What has been woven together must now be partially unwoven. But please refrain from thinking of this mysterious development as a setback. Instead, consider it an opportunity to reexamine and redo any work that was a bit hasty or sloppy. Be glad you will get a second chance to fix and refine what wasn’t done quite right the first time. In fact, I suggest you preside over the unraveling yourself. Don’t wait for random fate to accomplish it. And for best results, formulate an intention to regard everything that transpires as a blessing.

According to the online etymological dictionary, the verb “fascinate” entered the English language in the 16th century. It was derived from the Middle French fasciner and the Latin fascinatus, which are translated as “bewitch, enchant, put under a spell.” In the 19th century, “fascinate” expanded in meaning to include “delight, attract, hold the attention of.” I suspect you will soon have experiences that could activate both senses of “fascinate.” My advice is to get the most out of your delightful attractions without slipping into bewitchment. Is that even possible? It will require you to exercise fine discernment, but yes, it is.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

“A waterfall would be more impressive if it flowed the other way,” said Irish author Oscar Wilde. I appreciate the wit, but don’t agree with him. A plain old ordinary waterfall, with foamy surges continually plummeting over a precipice and crashing below, is sufficiently impressive for me. What about you, Capricorn? In the coming days, will you be impatient and frustrated with plain old ordinary marvels and wonders? Or will you be able to enjoy them just as they are?

One of the largest machines in the world is a “bucket wheel excavator” in Kazakhstan. It’s a saw that weighs 45,000 tons and has a blade the size of a four-story building. If you want to slice through a mountain, it’s perfect for the job. Indeed, that’s what it’s used for over in Kazakhstan. Right now, Taurus, I picture you as having a metaphorical version of this equipment. That’s because I think you have the power to rip open a clearing through a massive obstruction that has been in your way.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Years ago, I moved into a rental house with my new girlfriend, whom I had known for six weeks. As we fell asleep the first night, a song played in my head: “Nature’s Way,” by the band Spirit. I barely knew it and had rarely thought of it before. And yet there it was, repeating its first line over and over: “It’s nature’s way of telling you something’s wrong.” Being a magical thinker, I wondered if my unconscious mind was telling me a secret about my love. But I rejected that possibility; it was too painful to contemplate. When we broke up a few months later, however, I wished I had paid attention to that early alert. I mention this, Aquarius, because I suspect your unconscious mind will soon provide you with a wealth of useful information, not just through song lyrics but other subtle signals, as well. Listen up! At least some of it will be good news, not cautionary like mine.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

He spoke of love in ways that sound modern. It can be capricious and weird, he said. It may provoke indignities and rouse difficult emotions. Are you skilled at debate? Love requires you to engage in strenuous discussions. Peace may break out in the midst of war, and vice versa. Terence’s conclusion: If you seek counsel regarding the arts of love, you may as well be asking for advice on how to go mad. I won’t argue with him. He makes good points. But I suspect that in the coming weeks you will be excused from most of those crazy-making aspects. The sweet and smooth sides of love will predominate. Uplift and inspiration are more likely than angst and bewilderment. Take advantage of the grace period! Put chaos control measures in place for the next time Terence’s version of love returns.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

New friends and unexpected teachers are in your vicinity, with more candidates on the way. There may even be potential comrades who could eventually become flexible collaborators and catalytic guides. Will you be available for the openings they offer? Will you receive them with fire in your heart and mirth in your eyes? I worry that you may not be ready if you are too preoccupied with old friends and familiar teachers. So please make room for surprises.

In the coming weeks, you will have a special relationship with the night. When the sun goes down, your intelligence will intensify, as will your knack for knowing what’s really important

Send pictures of your favorite scarecrows or descriptions of your dreams of protection to me at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock did a daily ritual to remind him of life’s impermanence. After drinking his tea each morning, he flung both cup and saucer over his shoulder, allowing them to smash on the floor. I don’t recommend that you adopt a comparable custom for long-term use, but it might be healthy and interesting to do so for now. Are you willing to outgrow and escape your old containers? Would you consider diverging from formulas that have always worked for you? Are there any unnecessary taboos that need to be broken? Experiment with the possible blessings that might come by not clinging to the illusion of “permanence.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Terence was a comic playwright in ancient Rome.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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and what’s not. In the darkness, you will have an enhanced capacity to make sense of murky matters lurking in the shadows. You will be able to penetrate deeper than usual, and get to the bottom of secrets and mysteries that have kept you off-balance. Even your grimy fears may be transformable if you approach them with a passion for redemption.

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east liberty- new location! squirrel hill north hills S C R E E N

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

ADOPTION

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

Couple promises a secure loving family for your baby. Exp. Paid Rachel & Jim 877-244-2053

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

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WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

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HARDBACK BOOKS

KILL BED BUGS

CLASSIFIEDS to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

HELP WANTED

Very Good Condition or Better. I pay more than used book outlets. 412-527-7100

Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

STORAGE

EAST FOR RENT

ABC SELF STORAGE

BANQUET SERVERS/BARTENDERS Part Time/Flexible Shifts 1-888-457-4777 HELP WANTED

Hiring CAREgivers IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!

$10.10/Hour

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HELP WANTED

Looking for cooks with experience! Apply in person! 412-366-8730 elcampesinopgh.com

5x10 $45/mo.+tax. 10x10 $65/mo.+ tax 10x20 $110/mo.+tax. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side.

412-403-6069 ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLASSES

A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER!

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP -24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION 855-403-0215 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

AUTO SERVICES

ROOMMATES

MAKE $1000 A WEEK Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.themailinghub.com (AANCAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

GENERAL FOR SALE

FINANCIAL

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST Call 844-753-1317 (AAN CAN)

Call Center Open House Penn Center Building 2 • 3424 William Penn Highway • 2nd Floor • Pittsburgh PA 15235

October 28th • 10am - 6pm Paid Training • Sign On Bonus • Quarterly Performance Bonus Potential • $12/Hour • Work-From-Home Opportunities (after 6-12 months of employment) Shifts Available 7 Days Per Week • Full Time 40 Hours On site interviews will include a virtual job preview. Please bring a printed copy of your resume or avoid the line and APPLY ONLINE TODAY: http//jobs.cvshealth.com/care • Search Job ID # 296026 - Full Time All candidates must successfully pass a background check and a drug screen. CVS Caremark is an equal opportunity employer.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

WE’RE HIRING!

Squirrel Hill 1 or 2BR w/den. Newly remodeled units. All new eat in kitchen, appliances, carpet, & h/w flr. On site laundry, sec intercom. Starting at $1,049 ht incl. 412-795-1313

FULL-TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

11 Parkway Center Pittsburgh, PA 15220 • 12PM-9PM Shift • $11.50/Hour + $1.00 Shift differential

• • • •

Paid Training, 8AM- 5PM Medical Benefits Regular Pay Increases Tuition Reimbursement Visit PHEAA.org/jobs to apply. PHEAA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED

HE WHO HESITATES

Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days?

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit.

www.smokingresearchgroup.com

SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

ACROSS

1. Home run hit 6. Historical stretch 10. Soup with soy cubes 14. Columbus’s caravel 15. Knick Anthony’s nickname 16. In the mouth 17. Website with the threads “What to look for in a funeral home?” and “Is there life after death?” 19. Ratted (on) 20. Gems on Precious? 22. One who knows every word on every album 25. ___ feeling 26. “When I get my hands on you!” 27. Bayer painkiller 29. Warm up, as leftovers 32. Fancy style 36. Cerveza often served with a lime 38. Throw out there, as a simpleto-answer question 40. Ren Faire time 41. Undeclared earnings? 44. “Gimme ___” 45. Velvet Underground’s drummer Tucker 46. Ronald of many TCM flicks 47. Gets licked 49. “... go on” 51. Food, clothing, and shelter, e.g.

52. “Why ___ even talking about this?” 54. Georgia Dome team: Abbr. 56. Timecard division 57. Tell a rival of the Crips to “give in”? 63. Duff, slangily 64. Bounce off a seraglio wall? 68. Round waffle 69. “I got it, I got it” 70. Blue hue 71. Animal in headlights 72. Change for a Benjamin 73. Thing squeezed on a salad

DOWN

1. Blocking letters 2. Nintendo avatar 3. ___ Taylor (women’s clothing store) 4. It may have a point in the forest 5. Some fancy lamps 6. 2015 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee John 7. Country where the potato originally came from 8. Homecoming V.I.P. 9. Royal beef order request 10. Chopper, e.g. 11. Scrap ___ 12. Inventory clearing event 13. Your technologically clueless parents, with “the” 18. Winter bug

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21. Uno e due 22. Mud application, maybe 23. Spanish Formula 1 racer Fernando ___ 24. Butterflies 28. Entertainer whose work is never seen 30. “Irrational Man” director 31. “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” X-Wing pilot ___ Dameron 33. Appeared threateningly 34. Group of battleships 35. Microscopic 37. Sharpshooter’s skill 39. Big name in lighters and pens

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42. Flapper costume piece 43. From parts elsewhere 48. George W. Bush Presidential Center sch. 50. Killer robots on “Doctor Who” 53. “Can we turn on the A/C?” 55. Waits at a concert 57. Drove like hell 58. Compelling itch 59. Rockers ___ the Elephant 60. Blaze up 61. #23 on the Cavs, familiarly 62. Befuddled state 65. Mojito ingredient 66. Galleon treasure 67. Chess pieces {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Xin Sui Bodyworks

Downtown

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work

Open 24 hours

$40/hour 412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

9:30am-11pm 724-742-3333 20550 Rt. 19 Unit 7 Cranberry Twsp, Pa 16066

412-335-6111

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

HEALTHY Massage Table Shower

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

TIGER SPA

MASSAGE

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.21/10.28.2015

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137


JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Grand Opening 2 Locations!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Bodywork by Cindy Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower available. McKnight - $40 per hour. Table shower only $10. Table shower & unlimited sauna only $15. Imperial - $50 per hour, includes FREE table shower Open 7 Days a Week • 9:30am-10:30pm 7777 McKnight Road, Pgh, PA 15237 • 412-366-7130 180 Imperial Plaza Drive, Imperial, PA 15126 • 724-695-8088 CC Accepted.

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment MONROEVILLE AND WEXFORD, PA

SUBOXONE SUBUTEX

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE TREAT:

LOCATIONS IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency • Group and Individualized Therapy

NO WAIT LIST

Opiate Addiction Heroin Addiction & Other Drug Addictions Serving Western Pennsylvania

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Pregnant?

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

We can treat you!

412.434.6700

412-380-0100

www.ThereToHelp.org

www.myjadewellness.com

WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCES

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4126 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

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Let Us Help You Today!

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Pittsburgh South Hills

Beaver County

412-221-1091

TA S T E

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

info@freedomtreatment.com

724-519-2950

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 21, 2015 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 25 Issue 42 Pittsburgh, PA

October 21, 2015 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 25 Issue 42 Pittsburgh, PA