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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.16/09.23.2015 X PGHCITYPAPER XXX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX XX PGHCITYPAPER

BEETHOVEN + COLDPLAY

Tuesday, October 6, 2015 • Happy Hour 5:00 p.m., Concert 6:30 p.m. • Heinz Hall

Tickets are only $30! Visit pittsburghsymphony.org/FUSE and use promo code FUSECP to save 10%!

SUPPORTING PARTNER MEDIA SPONSOR


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015


EVENTS 9.18 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

9.18 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! The Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television, a project of Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for the Arts in Society. Tickets $10 / $8 Members & students

9.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TELEVISION Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with WYEP 91.3FM Tickets $30 / $25 Members and students

10.17 – 8pm; VIP 7pm NIGHT OF 1,000 ANDYS Tickets $95/$85 Members; VIP $250 FREE parking in The Warhol lot

A John Waters’ Christmas:

Holier & Dirtier

10.23 – 8pm RICHARD MAXWELL / NEW YORK CITY PLAYERS: THE EVENING New Hazlett Theater Tickets $15 / $12 Members & students

12.11 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Co-presented with the Carnegie Museum of Art Tickets $25 / $20 Members & students

The Warhol welcomes back the legendary and incomparable writer and director John Waters to the opulent Carnegie Music Hall, with his critically acclaimed one-man show A John Waters’ Christmas. Torn between capitalism and anarchy, Waters offers his hilariously incisive take on “Christmas crazy,” spreading his subversive yuletide cheer and lunacy while feeling “needy, greedy, and horny for presents and filled with an unnatural desire to please.”

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015


{EDITORIAL}

09.16/09.23.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns THEO SCHWARZ, KELECHI URAMA, ANDREW WOEHREL

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 37

GE T TO KN OW

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Artist Jennifer Howison poses with the dolls she painted for our Fall Arts Preview cover.

[PULLOUT] isn’t just for football. Come 29 Autumn scrimmage with our fall arts guide.

[NEWS] transit workers deserve living wages 06 “All and benefits and an adequate voice over their workplace.” — Molly Nichols on pay disparities for micro-transit drivers

“These ladies are the only women’s team to be featured on ESPN.”— Mike Wysocki on the Pittsburgh Passion football team

[TASTE] mildly flavored beers go perfectly 18 “These with the root veggies and hearty meat dishes of fall.” — Drew Cranisky on brown ales

YO UR CR AF T BE ER

Great Lakes Eliot Ness

Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Marketing & Sales Assistant MARIA SNYDER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

the record live took quite a few 22 “Playing rehearsals!”— Television’s Tom Verlaine on Marquee Moon

Magic Hat #9 Brewed clandestinely & given a name whose meaning is never revealed. Why #9? Why indeed. A sort of dry, crisp, refreshing, not quite pale ale, #9 is really i impossi ble to describe because there’s never been anything else quite like it.

Admittedly, it’s a bit of a paradox to name our Amber Lager for history’s most famous agent of prohibition. But it’s a smooth, malty (and dare we say, arresting?) paradox.

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER}

[SCREEN]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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[VIEWS]

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{ADVERTISING}

“The thread of community is everywhere to be found in this film.” — Celine Roberts on Food Systems, a documentary on the local restaurant scene

[ARTS] announcement of an architect 68 “The indeed seems like an ill-timed slap.” — Charles Rosenblum on Lower Hill redevelopment efforts

[LAST PAGE] came out in droves to see 87 “People these cats.” — Samantha Martin on her touring show the Amazing Acro-Cats.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} EVENTS LISTINGS 72 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 80 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 81 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 84

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STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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Brown Shugga’ Substitute Ale. This beer is a ‘cereal m ley’ of barley, rye, med wheat, and oats. Full of complexishness from the 4 grains, then joyously dry-hopped for that big aroma and resinous flavor.

The first Woodchuck cider was crafted in a two-car garage back in 1991. The recipe remains the same today. Amber is a traditional cider boasting big red apple taste. Expertly crafted with a medium body, golden hue, and refreshing clean apple finish.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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llagunitas Sucks

woodchuck amber

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THIS WEEK

“THEY ARE FILLING A NEED WHERE WE DO NOT HAVE SERVICE.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Hear from the local artists who featured their work at the nationally touring Wizard World Comic Con that rolled through town this weekend. www.pghcitypaper.com

Check out #EarlyBurgh, our new weekly Instagram feature, by Theo Schwarz, showcasing earlymorning scenes throughout Pittsburgh. instagram.com/pghcitypaper {PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Lynn Manion with the ACTA shuttle outside IKEA

MICRO MANAGEMENT

This week: Balkan dance parties, bands in homage to bell hooks, and hot, hot peppers. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

This week we re-grammed @shansstory’s #CPReaderArt photo from The Waterfront in Homestead. Tag your Instagram photos as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to Toby Keith on Sept. 26 at First Niagara Pavilion. Contest ends Thu., Sept. 17.

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EET ALLEGHENY County’s “secret” shuttles: Ride ACTA and Heritage Community Transportation are “micro-transit” services that provide some 240,000 rides a year to mostly low-income riders, in suburban areas that aren’t covered by the Port Authority. While many locals haven’t heard of them, these tiny transportation groups provide a crucial service. And some see them as the future of public transit in outlying suburban areas. But critics wonder why these services don’t have to follow the same rules as the Port Authority (PAT). Micro-transit drivers are paid less than PAT drivers, and the agencies are not required to adhere to the same accountability standards the Port Authority follows. “If they are being seen as public transit, then they need to act like public transit,” says Molly Nichols of Pittsburghers for Public Transportation, a transit advocacy group.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

NYESHA NEAL lives in Duquesne and works at Firehouse Subs, in Robinson. She commutes more than 90 minutes each way on two PAT buses, the second of which drops her off about a mile from work. Without the Ride ACTA shuttle, she would have to walk over the 376 overpass and up two hills, all with no sidewalks to separate her from the cars that speed between shops in Robinson Town Centre.

What does the growth of “micro-transit” services mean for public transportation? {BY RYAN DETO} “There are a lot of jobs out here that are really hiring, but I wouldn’t travel all the way out here without the shuttle,” says Neal. Ride ACTA and Heritage were both created in the early 2000s as nonprofit social-

service organizations, in part to transport workers and fill gaps left by canceled Port Authority routes. Ride ACTA, the transit arm of the Airport Corridor Transportation Association, serves the pedestrian-unfriendly airport-corridor area of Robinson, Findlay and Moon. It picks up riders at the IKEA Port Authority stop, then the driver plans the trip based on the destinations requested by riders (most of whom get dropped off at one of two large call centers, Fed Ex or Wal-Mart. Heritage (part of Heritage Community Initiatives) serves the Mon Valley on fixed routes, with many stops connecting to PAT buses. Both services contract out to local transportation companies that provide the drivers and shuttles. Lynn Manion, director of ACTA, says that more than 70 percent of the nonprofit’s ridership is lower-income riders, and that 96 percent of all Ride ACTA riders use the service to get to work. “Just because these jobs are in a middleCONTINUES ON PG. 08


ADVENTURE BINGO! WITH HARVARD & HIGHLAND’S ALEXI MORRISSEY

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Artist and entertainer Alexi Morrissey returns to CMOA with his own brand of old-school bingo-meets-pub-quiz!

WEEK

Begin the night with special activities in the museum’s exhibition HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern, seeking out clues that will provide an advantage during the game. Then, put your trivia skills to the test with a special Pittsburgh-themed edition of Adventure Bingo!

Thursday, Sept. 24 7–10 p.m.

Fame, fortune, drinks, and fabulous (and not-so-fabulous) prizes await!

$15 ($10 members), includes 1 drink token!

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MICRO MANAGEMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

income area, does not mean the workers are middle-income,” says Manion. Heritage CEO Paula McWilliams says that more than 60 percent of her service’s riders have an annual household income of less than $10,000. About 97 percent of Heritage riders would not have means to get to work without the service, according to its website. Originally, Ride ACTA and Heritage (formerly Work Link) were funded through the federal Job Access Reverse Commute program, which provided transportation to low-income workers. After that funding was cut, in 2013, the state began providing funding through transportation bill Act 89, the same bill that boosted PAT funds. As required by Act 89, the micro-transit agencies began to act more like publictransportation entities and less like special, federal-funded programs. The state provides about 85 percent of the funding for both Ride ACTA and Heritage’s transportation services; the rest must be secured through a 15 percent local match. (PAT also receives more than half of its operating funds from the state.) All agencies funded under Act 89 must also charge fares; both Heritage and Ride ACTA are instituting a 25-cent fare come October. Until now, fares have been free. But Pittsburghers for Public Transportation’s Nichols questions why substantial differences remain between PAT and microtransit services. While she acknowledges that Ride ACTA and Heritage provide an important service, she feels that ultimately, that service should be provided by publictransit agencies. “All transit workers deserve living wages and benefits and an adequate voice over their workplace,” says Nichols. “If many local transit providers can start to form around the region and receive public funding, that seems much less efficient than having a centralized agency run the service.” Ride ACTA drivers work for Pittsburgh Transportation Group and belong to Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1743. Diane Stambaugh, Local 1743 rep, says that Ride ACTA drivers make a bit less than $14 an hour and receive some holidays off and a contribution to their medical care, but no paid sick days. She says she has not fielded grievances from Ride ACTA drivers, but adds that they “are not paid enough for the work they do.” “I think Port Authority has the only drivers that are fairly compensated,” says Stambaugh. (PAT drivers belong to ATU 85.) Heritage drivers work for the trans-

portation arm of P.R.N Health Service, according to McWilliams. She says she is not sure how much its drivers are paid. But Mike Harms, a transit-union organizer in Pittsburgh, says that drivers for companies like P.R.N typically make around $10 an hour. McWilliams says that while Heritage’s drivers are not employees of the nonprofit, they are “fully committed to what we do at Heritage.” PAT drivers start out at $15 an hour, but after five years make up to $28 an hour, says PAT spokesman Jim Ritchie. Drivers also receive full benefits and pensions. Additionally, because Ride ACTA and Heritage are private nonprofits, they are not required to hold public meetings, nor do they. According to PennDOT press secretary Rich Fitzpatrick, the state does suggest that micro-transit agencies “communicate with their riders about fares and changes to fares.” McWilliams says she reached out to riders and received mostly positive feedback about Heritage’s new fare. But when City Paper rode the Ride ACTA shuttle on Sept. 10, no rider out of a dozen informally surveyed was aware that a new fare would be instituted on Oct. 15.

“THEY NEED TO ACT LIKE PUBLIC TRANSIT.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

WHILE SUCH issues have some critics crying

foul, others see these two micro-transit agencies as public-transportation allies. “They are filling a need where we do not have service,” says PAT spokesman Ritchie. “We think that those [micro-transit] systems make it possible for people to ride our systems who would otherwise not have a way to ride our system.” Between 2009 and 2014, Ride ACTA ridership increased from 40,000 to 89,000. Heritage has grown even faster, from 50,000 in 2008 to 150,000 in 2014. (These figures, while substantial, are still micro compared to Port Authority, which provides 200,000 rides daily.) Chris Sandvig, of Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, says the two microtransit groups can “play a role to increase the ridership of major transit authorities.” He adds that traditional transit usually has trouble serving outlying communities. Another issue is budget. Ride ACTA and Heritage receive a combined $1.7 million from the state and county; that largely pays for services including the three fixed routes Heritage will have starting in October. At PAT, that $1.7 million “might get one small route, one with limited operating times,” says Ritchie. CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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Clicking “reload” makes the workday blogh.pghcitypaper.com go faster

MICRO MANAGEMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Sandvig says that another major obstacle to Port Authority running services like a micro transit is how these suburbs are laid out. He says that large buses can’t navigate some of the small suburban streets of the Mon Valley, and have an even harder time driving between the retail shops and other businesses in the airport corridor. “A private developer built [the Robinson retail site] without transit in mind,” says Sandvig, “but businesses realized they could not get workers to the jobs.” Could micro-transit nonprofits be the future of suburban public transit in Allegheny County? It appears that county officials might be starting to think so. County spokesperson Amie Downs issued this statement to CP: “These micro transit entities have thus far enhanced overall public transportation accessibility in their respective areas. Accordingly, we would consider providing matching funds to other micro transit units on a case by case basis.” However, that future is potentially rocky, says Sandvig. “If ACTA and Heritage could get out of the transit, they would. It is expensive and difficult.” (While ACTA focuses on transportation, Heritage also

provides services like day care and a holiday food bank.) While Heritage receives its entire local funding match from the county, Ride ACTA also seeks funding from other sources. This year, it raised around $30,000 in donations from two of its largest-served businesses, Ibex call center and Fed Ex, and from the governments of two of the townships in its service area, Moon and Findlay. Sandvig cautions, however, that such funding could easily dry up. Manion says this fear of losing funding is part of the job. “We have to approach the county and townships and businesses every year; of course it is scary.” But McWilliams believes this is the sort of drive micro-transit agencies need to stay afloat. Just like PAT, both Heritage and Ride ACTA must submit ridership reports to the state that meet certain metrics to continue to receive funding. “If we don’t run our nonprofit like a business, and if it is not worth the investment, then we should question its use,” says McWilliams. “It is my responsibility. If I don’t do that then I will be letting thousands of families down.” RYA N D E TO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

RREESSEEAARRCCHH SSTTUUDDYY

Borderline Pe r s o n a l i t y D i s o r d e r The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, difficulty controlling anger or frustration, mood swings, self-destructive or impulsive behaviors, or history of self-inflicted pain or injury. Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality traits and will be compensated up to $125 upon completion of the interviews. Some participants may also undergo an fMRI scan. There is no cost for this procedure. Participants are compensated $50 upon completion of the fMRI. For more information, call 412-246-5367.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

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UNNATURAL SELECTION

Public argues over how to weigh its voice in new superintendent-selection process {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} HOURS AFTER Pittsburgh Public School Dis-

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trict Superintendent Linda Lane announced she would not seek to renew her contract, local stakeholders were already weighing in on the search for the district’s next superintendent. Most called for a national search and community input. Now, a week later, these stakeholders are debating what that community input should look like. Some say community members should be included on a screening committee, similar to Mayor Bill Peduto’s Talent City process that was used to fill city positions. But others argue that a screening committee would take the decision out of the hands of the district’s school board, which has the final word in selecting the new superintendent. “This is obviously the board’s job, but we hope we will be looking nationally for a high-quality leader,” says Carey Harris, executive director of education watchdog A+ Schools. “We think getting more community people invested in the search is in everyone’s best interest. This is a very critically important job, and people want to be engaged.” In the past, Pittsburgh’s school board has taken different approaches to finding a new superintendent. Some boards have hired private search firms, while others have turned to education experts like former superintendent Helen Faison. So far, A+ Schools, county-wide education-advocacy organization Allies for Children, the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh’s leader Esther Bush and Saleem Ghubril, from the Pittsburgh Promise scholarship fund, have called for a search process that would create a committee of community members to screen applicants. “The mayor did this with the chief of police. The mayor went out and identified some really talented people who were well respected by the community,” says Patrick Dowd, a former school-board member and president of Allies for Children. Dowd says a screening committee would lend transparency and credibility to the selection process by including members of the public. Hiring a private firm alone would do the opposite, he says. “If you had a national search with set criteria and a screening committee, it would be more transparent than if you had a private firm,” says Dowd. “By establishing credibility early on, they’re setting up a pro-

cess whereby the public should have more confidence in the outcome.” Despite agreeing that the board should hear input from parents, students, teachers, community members and leaders, and that the board needs administrative support in the process, groups like Great Public Schools Pittsburgh say a screening committee would take power away from the school board. GPSP is comprised of union organizations Action United, One Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers, Local 400, SEIU 32BJ and SEIU Healthcare PA, along with activist groups Yinzercation and the Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network. “I think they should hire a national search firm,” says Pamela Harbin, a member of GPSP. “What we’re objecting to is the Talent City model that the mayor used to screen candidates. That’s undemocratic. We have nine democratically elected school-board members. The school board’s job is to hire the superintendent.” Over the weekend, this debate played out on #OurSchoolsOurSuperintendent, a new Facebook group created by Harbin. For some observing the debate from the outside, it seems as if the opposing groups have more common ground than they think. “What I caught the other day was two clearly passionate people in conversation who seemed to be missing the values behind what the other was saying,” says Andy Parker, who joined the online discussion. But those who oppose a screening committee say the difference between the two sides is more nuanced. “We want our board to use a professional process with a lot of community input, but we want the board to be the final arbiter,” says Jesse Ramey, founder of GPSP. “The school board would not be relinquishing its duty and turning that over to an outside group. It doesn’t make sense to add another layer or filter.” Despite clamoring from the public, current and incoming board members tasked with choosing the next superintendent have not yet shared their plan. A private board meeting is scheduled for this week. “The public has entrusted the elected school board to lay out the best process for selecting the superintendent,” says Kevin Carter, who was selected to represent District 8 in the May primary. “That’s why the school board is elected.”

“WE THINK GETTING MORE COMMUNITY PEOPLE INVESTED IN THE SEARCH IS IN EVERYONE’S BEST INTEREST.”

RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015


Would you like to Participate in a fertility study?

You’re Invited! Sunday, September 20

th

1:30 - 3PM

Volunteering couples are needed to join a research study in Monroeville You may qualify if you and your partner are: • A monogamous, heterosexual couple • Between the ages of 20-45 years old • Sexually active • Trying to conceive or using a non-vaginal form of birth control

You will receive compensation for your time and participation. The device is for home use, and has been cleared for OTC use by the FDA. You will be asked to use the device in the privacy of your home. It requires two physician examinations for female participants. Call 412-200-7996 to see if you qualify.

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

PASSION PLAY {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

WITH LABOR DAY behind us, as we move

full steam ahead into fall, it’s natural to reect on the summer of 2015. With Pittsburgh being a diverse city, I’m sure we all spent the warmer months a little differently. Some folks vacationed in foreign lands and swam in exotic Mediterranean locales. Some hit the Southern beaches and golf courses of the Carolinas. Some ventured to Ocean City, Md., or the Jersey shore. Others hit the beaches in Erie, with a stop at the Big Butler Fair. And others, myself included, stuck close to home and swam in local pools, which is kind of like taking a large bath with everyone you see at a Dollar General store. But the beauty of being Pittsburghers is that regardless of our social status or economic condition, we are bound by a love of family, beer and football. So while all of us were taking it easy, the members of the Pittsburgh Passion were busy winning their second Independent Women’s Football League title. That’s no easy task in a league with more than 30 teams. There were no spray parks or trips to Kennywood for these warriors. It was a summer of full-contact football, getting their ďŹ ngers stepped on and ruthlessly being tackled to the ground in the sweltering summer sun. The Pittsburgh Passion are like the great soccer star PelĂŠ — the one entity in their respective sport that everyone has heard of. These ladies are the only women’s team to play in an NFL stadium and to be featured on ESPN. In their inaugural season, the Passion had a losing record, but they haven’t had more losses than wins since. That ďŹ rst season, they played home games at Belle Vernon High School in front of sparse crowds. Thirteen years, three world titles and a couple of Dapper Dan awards later, they now play to much larger crowds at Cupples and Highmark stadiums, both on the South Side. Plus, Mayor Bill Peduto recently proclaimed an entire day in their honor. The crowning moment of the 2015 season was a 41-37 victory over the Utah Falconz in the July 25 championship game, in South Carolina. Yes, that’s Falconz with a z, apparently to give them some street cred. Utah, a region that roots for the NBA’s Utah Jazz and listens to Donny and Marie Osmond records, is no place I want to live. Both teams were undefeated going into the ďŹ nal.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mike Wysocki

There’s a lot to love about the Pittsburgh Passion. Mostly, it’s their passion for the game. These ladies aren’t the spoiled, entitled, sometimes criminal football players that we ďŹ nd in the male version of the sport. The players in this game have an intense love of the sport and that gets them out on the ďŹ eld despite making little money, or none at all. When you talk about the Passion, you talk about legendary quarterback Lisa Horton and international superstars like linebacker Octavia Griswold and defensive back Sharon Vazquez. These stars now play in front of passionate crowds, and they’ve earned their successes. The team’s next goal is to have the most IWFL titles. The all-time record is three, which was set by the Sacramento Sirens at the turn of the century. It’s time to wipe the smug look off the faces of those Sacramento people. They think they’re a big deal because the Terminator lived in their town for six years. But they’re not Pittsburgh. Sacramento is no city of champions: They have only the NBA’s Kings, and they never win anything. Passion owners Teresa Conn and Franco Harris — yes, that Franco Harris — have assembled a winning machine. In a classic Pittsburgh sports scenario, Teresa is Chuck Noll and Franco is Art Rooney as they go for a third straight title in 2016. Go check out the Passion next season (which starts in April); I think that third title is a pretty safe bet.

“THE PLAYERS IN THIS GAME HAVE AN INTENSE LOVE OF THE SPORT.�

pt. 18 Join us Se W IRURXUQH[ KW LJ Q NO-KIDS

Meet Carnegie Mellon University’s robot, HERB, and explore the science of robotics with local experts! Live music, cash bars, snacks available for SXUFKDVHIRXUçRRUVRIH[KLELWVDQGVFLHQFHIXQ 9LVLW&DUQHJLH6FLHQFH&HQWHURUJIRUGHWDLOV DQGWRUHJLVWHU &RVWLQDGYDQFHGD\RIWKHHYHQW

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Mike Wysocki is a standup comedian and member of Jim Krenn’s Q Morning Show each weekday morning on Q92.9 FM. Follow him on Twitter: @ItsMikeWysocki


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015


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“DRY” — UNSAUCED — SAUTÉED GREEN BEANS WERE EXCEPTIONAL

VEGAN FUN FOOD

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

With menu items like Kale Satan and War Pig (a vegan hot dog with sautéed kale, cashew cheese or lentil chili), it’s clear that the folks behind mobile food company Onion Maiden are fans of heavy metal and puns. They’re also devoted to providing appealing options for those who don’t eat animal products. Onion Maiden — which has recently set up at Pittsburgh VegFest, the Polish Hill Arts Festival and the Strip’s Bayardstown Social Club — is all vegan, with a focus on Asian fusion. “We make all of our own toppings, including kimchi and vegan mayo,” says Elyse Hoffman, who runs Onion Maiden with partners Diana “Dingo” Ngo and Brooks Criswell. The menu also includes baked goods and nachos: “We cater to nostalgia for vegans,” Hoffman says. “People are really excited to have nachos again.” The idea for the pop-up restaurant was born in February, when Hoffman’s music-promoter husband was putting together a show and wanted to provide food for concert-goers. Ngo and Hoffman had already talked about collaborating on a food-service project, and gave it a shot. “The response was really positive, so we kept going.” You can track Onion Maiden’s whereabouts on Facebook and Twitter, though Hoffman says a food truck will be in the company’s future. For now, the goal is to make food that vegans and non-vegans alike enjoy. “[We want] to make it approachable,” Hoffman says. “We’re trying to keep things fun.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.facebook.com/onionmaiden or @onionmaiden

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FEED

It’s one of the new signs of fall — the annual Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival, now in its third year. Celebrate these delicious dough-pockets, on Sat., Sept. 19. Live music, merchandise and photo-ops with the Pirates’ Pierogies, plus more than 30 vendors selling pierogies. Event begins at 1 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. Tickets are $12.50; free for 12-and-under. More info and tickets at www.pghpierogifest.com

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Diced-chicken Chongqing style

NEW, OLD-STYLE CHINESE {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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NLESS WE LIVED in China, most of us probably grew up with generic “Chinese” restaurants. That is why the current trend toward regional Chinese cuisines, especially the assertive Szechuan (or Sichuan) tradition, is so refreshing. As its name makes clear, Sichuan Gourmet is part of this recent boom in notyour-parents’-Chinese food. And yet, in a sense, it literally was Jason’s parents’ Chinese restaurant. Sichuan Gourmet opened recently, but it continues a decades-old line of Chinese restaurants in its Squirrel Hill location, a line that was well established when Jason ate there with his folks as a college freshman. The quality has varied over the years but, other than one pan-Asian predecessor, previous offerings have generally hewed closely to old-school, Americanstyle Chinese.

In keeping with the more adventurous tastes of modern diners, Sichuan Gourmet’s menu features primarily dishes that were scarcely available here five years ago, let alone 10. There’s no “secret” menu, no pleading with the server to bring the “good stuff”; at Sichuan Gourmet, you’re

SICHUAN GOURMET 1900 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-1313 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. noon-9 p.m. PRICES: $5-20 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED free to pick something as familiar as kung pao, or as out-there as duck tongue, and roll with it. Of course that’s easier for some of us than others, which is why there’s also a full

American-style menu (called online the “Pittsburgh Menu”), from which we ordered a couple items in case our kids flinched from hot chili oil and tongue-numbing Sichuan peppercorns that are the signature ingredients of the cuisine. Pan-fried dumplings went over well with the spice-averse set. They were dense and meaty with flavorful pork fillings. Honey-roasted ribs got a mixed review: The child who ordered them found them too sweet, but Jason, a fan of neither sweet meats nor honey, thought they were pretty good. The seasoned ribs’ rich, nutty flavor stood up to their syrupy surface, and the meat’s texture was tender with some chew and a few crisp edges. For the adults in our party, ordering Sichuan was not intimidating; the only problem was narrowing down the epiclength menu. We began with Sichuan CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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NEW, OLD-STYLE CHINESE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

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dumplings. They inverted the meat-first proportions of their non-Sichuan brethren, with large, tender, slippery wrappers, each containing just a morsel of pork. But these morsels packed a lot of flavor. They were almost juicy, and similar to sausage in their intensity. And where pot stickers come with a bit of sauce on the side for dipping, these Sichuan dumplings were swimming in a bowl of gorgeous red chili oil, which was nowhere near fiery, but rich and zippy. “Pickles” were actually thick slices of cool, crisp, fresh cucumber tossed with oil, herbs, garlic and Sichuan peppercorns. This dish was fantastic, more deeply flavorful than we ever thought cucumbers could be, and provided a vivid experience of the famous tongue-numbing effects of Sichuan peppercorns. (A compound called hydroxy alpha sanshool is the culprit, creating an effect almost indistinguishable from vibration.) While there were no peppercorns apparent in the cukes’ herbal, lime dressing, the effect was unmistakable, especially when we drank some water that suddenly seemed carbonated! A variety of dishes were listed as containing “tofu seasoning,” which seemed inconsistent with our experience of the blandest of proteins. We chose braised pork belly with tofu seasoning. It turned out to be strips of tender bacon in a dry rub (as opposed to a sauce), with lots of scallions, chopped nuts for crunch, whole peppercorns and batons of tofu that were firm, almost chewy, and thoroughly infused with spices. Angelique found the pork caused this dish to lean toward the salty side, but Jason reveled in the complex interplay of flavors and textures. Surprisingly, the whole peppercorns here resulted in considerably less numbing than we’d experienced with the cucumbers; presumably the cukes’ dressing more effectively conveyed the sanshool. Ho fun — wide, flat rice noodles — came with tender beef, stir-fried in a greasy but tasty sauce that, though mild in terms of spice, was pleasantly seasoned. “Dry” — unsauced — sautéed green beans were exceptional: blistered outside, perfectly cooked and tender inside, their fresh flavor released at its peak and enhanced by savory bits of minced pork. Sichuan Gourmet offers Chinese food that could not be farther from our brownsauce-drenched Chinese-American memories. Not every dish was fiery, but each was flavorful, utilizing elements of Sichuan cooking in different combinations and preparations to create a meal that dazzled our palates. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

BROWN’D TABLE

Brown ales complement fall meals perfectly Brown ales could use an image overhaul. Up against beers with “barrel-aged” and “imperial” in their names, how could a drab name like “brown ale” compete? Nevertheless, the classic, loosely defined style is worth another look. As the temperatures start to drop, brown ales offer a sessionable and food-friendly alternative to the almighty pumpkin beer.

MANY PITTSBURGH BREWERS HAVE MADE THE STYLE A STAPLE. According The Oxford Companion to Beer, “the term ‘brown ale’ can easily be confusing, or at least not much more useful than the term “red wine.’” That confusion, however, is part of its allure, as the style leaves brewers plenty of room for interpretation. Generally speaking, a traditional English-style brown ale is low on hops and alcohol, with lightly roasted flavors that often translate to slight nuttiness and caramel sweetness. American versions tend to crank everything up, increasing the hops, darkening the roast and pumping up the ABV. The relative mildness of brown ales makes them perfect accompaniments for a range of autumnal meals. “The toasty, sweet malt character of brown ales goes very nicely with a wide variety of spices and flavor,” explains Barrett Goddard of Full Pint Brewing, who makes the rye-based, slightly smoky Little Brown Ale. While crisp lagers and pilsners are a great match for summer fare, heavier dishes call for something slightly more robust. Where stouts and porters can overwhelm and pumpkin beers are best reserved for an after-dinner treat, brown ales go perfectly with the root veggies and hearty meat dishes of fall. Options for brown ales are vast and varied, and many Pittsburgh brewers have made the style a staple of their lineups. East End’s Fat Gary is a classic low-alcohol, English-style version, and Hop Farm’s One Nut Brown has notes of chocolate and toasted nuts. For a full-on American take, try Wynona’s Big Brown Ale from Voodoo Brewing, which is “big” with ample hops and a 7.3 percent ABV. Brown ales: They aren’t flashy, but they’re a lovely addition to your fall beer rotation. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


40 Craft Beers w

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museum-staff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wideraging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE ATRIA’S. Multiple locations. www.atrias.com. A local chain, Atria’s locations offer distinctly different atmospheres but the same quality steaks, chops and pasta menu. Suburban spots are for quiet casual dining while the North Side location is pure sports pub. Regardless of the ambience, the sherry crab bisque and the pasta fra diablo are superb. kE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

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Savoy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “open-kitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers small-to-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and European-influenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J COLE CAFÉ. 1718 Mount Royal Blvd., Glenshaw. 412-486-5513. This breakfast-lunch spot exemplifies the appeal of a typical diner in nearly every way: basic, familiar food, cooked well and served fast and hot. The menu leans toward breakfast (eggs, pancakes), as well as a selection of mixed grills, combining meats, veggies, eggs and home fries. J

ontap w

Wai Wai {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DIVE BAR AND GRILLE. 5147 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-408-2015. The kitchen at this unpretentious venue is a sort of freewheeling laboratory for a “what if” approach to re-imagining classic bar fare: sliders, quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, burgers, specialty burgers, entrees and “I Hate Vegetables” (meals built atop French fries). KE EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food.

The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF

WHITE OAK FARM

3314 WAGNER ROAD, ALLISON PARK JOIN US FOR A DAY OF FOOD, DEMONSTRATIONS, LIVE ENTERTAINMENT, ARTISTS, MERCHANDISERS, CRAFTERS, HAYRIDES, KIDS ZONE, WALKING TRAIL AND MORE. TICKETS $7 IN ADVANCE, $10 AT THE GATE. CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER FREE. FREE PARKING. RAIN OR SHINE. LIKE REYNA FOODS ON FACEBOOK OR VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.REYNAFOODS.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION. SPONSORED BY REYNA FOODS.

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant, situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

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KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini macand-cheese is a classic. JE

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FEATURING FRESH AND DELICIOUS HATCH, NM CHILE PEPPERS ROASTING ALL DAY! BUY THEM FRESH OFF THE PLANT OR HOT OUT OF THE ROASTER. CASA REYNA AND VARIOUS OTHER LOCAL FOOD VENDORS WILL ALSO BE ON-SITE, OFFERING DELICIOUS MENU ITEMS MADE WITH THE HATCH CHILE PEPPER.

4TH ANNUAL

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DINING LISTINGS KEY

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11AM TO 8PM

REYNA FOODS INVITES EVERYONE TO THE FARM!

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Monday & Thursday

Hartwood Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

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Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

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----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

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LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF

SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current finedining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) and Southern comfort (chicken with black-eyed peas and greens, watermelon salad). LE

MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings www. per such as cilantro, lime a p ty pghci m and feta. LE .co

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd Mt. Royal Plaza | GLENSHAW Next to Shaler Middle School

www.colecafe.com (412) 486-5513

PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. www. pamelasdiner.com. There are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner mini-chain: the cheery atmosphere; the oldfashioned breakfasts featuring raisin French toast, fried potatoes and corned-beef hash; and light, crispy-edged pancakes so good that President Obama had them served at the White House. J PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d expect, such as greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF

STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ


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Every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM. • 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

BOLEROS LATINOS

OAKLAND 328 Atwood St. Tel 412-621-6889 • Fax 412-621-6890

INDUSTRY ND NDUSTRY DUSTRY S R N NIGHT NIG G T

LIVE HORA LATIN FELIZ! MUSIC (HAPPY HOUR) FRIDAY SEPT 18TH:

Tel 412-521-1313 • Fax 412-521-1223

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LOCAL

“THERE’S A FEW ODD CHORDS I STILL HAVE NOT FIGURED OUT.”

BEAT

{BY TYLER MILLER}

UP-AND-COMING ELECTRO

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VIA 2015 KICKOFF PARTY feat. ONDO, TOM MCCONNELL, IVIES. 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 25. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com

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THE

MEDIUM IS THE MESSAGE {BY {B BY MI MIKE KE S SHANLEY} HANL NLEY Y}

MISC Records’ first release, MISC-001

On Fri., Sept. 25, local record label MISC Records will be featured at the VIA Festival’s kick-off party at Cattivo, in Lawrenceville. Featuring musicians Ondo, Ivies and Tom McConnell, the night will be not only a showcase for an emerging local label, but an appropriate kick-off for VIA, which aims to present the future of art, music and culture. Founded by Juan LaFontaine — who also helps run the local techno- and house-focused label Detour — MISC records was launched about a year ago as an outlet for music that didn’t seem to fit Detour’s style. Its first release, MISC-001, which appeared as a “name your price” download on Aug. 11 on Bandcamp, features all the artists appearing at the VIA showcase, as well as Good Dude Lojack, Slowdanger, Telavision and Yaeji. “There were a lot of tracks that I thought were great and should be put out there for people to listen to. Unfortunately, since they didn’t fit the sound we were looking for with Detour, we had to pass on them,” says LaFontaine. “There was music being made in Pittsburgh that I really wished to support and release on a label, so I decided to start one.” While Detour tends to be driven heavily by techno and the prominent pulsing of a 4-4 kick drum, MISC leans to the mellower side, featuring styles ranging from minimal techno to hip hop, funk to ambient. With tracks like the ambient “What They’re Playing,” by Yaeji, and the poppier, vocally enriched track “Walking in Circles,” by Slowdanger, the label takes on a sound of its own with a very diverse set of tunes. MISC has already been featured in Chicago-based 5 Magazine, a prominent, publication with a focus on house music, which called Pittsburgh a “hotbed of American electronic music.” LaFontaine is already working to put out four more EPs from artists featured on the compilation, hopefully to be released by the end of the year. MISC Records serves as yet another label to pop up in Pittsburgh that aims to serve the city’s surging electronic music scene.

B

RIAN ENO ONCE said the Velvet Underground sold a minimal number of albums, but everyone who bought them was inspired to form their own band. The implication is that the band’s ripple effect greatly exceeded industry goals and expectations. By the same token, it could probably be said that Television — one of the original bands to put the late New York club CBGB on the musical map — had a similar impact. Between the Ramones’ primal, twominute-or-less power-chord blasts and Talking Heads’ herky-jerky attempts at pop, Television occupied a unique space. While their peers shunned proper “lead” guitars, Television’s Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd not only soloed, they did it incredibly well. They stretched songs past the 10-minute mark, building in intensity akin to jazz musicians, but in six-string voices that fit in with the burgeoning punk scene. “Little Johnny Jewel,” the 1975 debut single, splits a vamp of a song over two sides. Lloyd and Verlaine each engages in a combination of frantic plinking, bluesy bends that touch on Neil Young and — in the second half — a loop that sounds like a spastic version of jazz guitarist Grant Green. While English punks The Clash dismissed the Rolling Stones in their song “1977,” Television wasn’t opposed to encoring with “Satisfaction.” And it sounded much closer to the original than Devo’s rewiring of that classic. Live, the band dug deeper into music history, covering the 13th Floor Elevators and Bob Dylan. Their close friends, the Patti Smith Group, drank from the same musical

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEFANO GIOVANNINI/HIGH ROAD TOURING}

Television’s Tom Verlaine

well, but the execution was vastly different. Like any punk band worth its salt, Television released just two albums before breaking up: the astounding Marquee Moon (which even Rolling Stone noticed and included on one of its umpteen “500 Best Albums of All Time” lists) and the intriguing

THE WARHOL: SOUND SERIES PRESENTS

TELEVISION 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 25. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $30. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Adventure. Verlaine and Lloyd embarked on solo careers, but the original lineup got back together and released a self-titled third album in 1992. Live performances of the band’s first run appeared in the meantime,

building further on its history. A performance in San Francisco from Television’s final 1978 tour shows the group in top form, with songs segueing seamlessly into one another, guitars instinctually weaving together. Lloyd left the group amicably eight years ago, replaced by Jimmy Rip, who has played with Verlaine’s solo group since the early ’80s. With original bassist Fred Smith and drummer Billy Ficca also on board, this local performance has been eagerly anticipated, to put it mildly. Verlaine is no stranger to Pittsburgh, having appeared at The Andy Warhol Museum and the Regent Square Theater in recent years, accompanying films. But this is the first appearance by his band proper. While Verlaine’s guitar work can be expansive and dream-like, his high-pitched vocals always had a great deal of under-


statement to them, even while unraveling poetic imagery in songs like “Friction” and “Marquee Moon.” So it shouldn’t be surprising that his offstage manner is similar. For one thing, Verlaine has more perspective on CBGB, which became something of a mecca to fans before closing in 2006. “To be honest, there’s not a lot of ‘memories’ about that spot,” he says via email. “And I never run into any of the people that played there. I do still see Patti Smith a few times a year … just did a mostly poetry show with her about a year ago. No drums, just guitar and her daughter on keyboards. [It was] very fun!” Legend holds that Television used to practice six days a week, and the interplay between Lloyd and Verlaine on Marquee Moon seems to justify the claim. “It’s basically a ‘live’ record with the mistakes patched up and some editing here and there,” Verlaine says. “Playing the record live took quite a few rehearsals! There’s a few odd chords I still have not figured out.”

ON THE RECORD

! P U N E LIST

with Dr. Lonnie Smith {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days. {PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN STOCKER}

Tune in while you read, and judge for yourself whether that indie band’s guitar work is really angular, or if that singer actually sounds like Sandy Denny.

Dr. Lonnie Smith

Dr. Lonnie Smith started playing Hammond B3 organ with George Benson, and went on to become one of the best-known practitioners of what is known as soul-jazz. He’ll tear it up in Pittsburgh on Saturday, with his trio.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE THE B3 WAS YOUR INSTRUMENT? The organ is an extension of me. It has every element in the world as far as I’m concerned. You have the sun, the rainbow. You have water, the thunder, the rain. See, when I play, it’s like electricity going through my body at that moment.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ADI LEITE}

Television

As far as the album being worthy of rock-critic terms like “seminal” or “influential,” Verlaine is also matter-of-fact about it. ‘I never think of it in any context in particular,” he writes. “It seems to get re-discovered by a new generation every 10 years or so. That’s kinda cool.” The new generation of fans, incidentally, has spread to South America, where the band has toured three times in the past few years, as well as Korea and Japan, where it traveled this year. Television isn’t going to live off its back catalog either. Verlaine says the band has 14 tracks recorded for a new album, although no release date has been set yet. The group also worked up three new songs during a tour of Japan. “That’s my favorite place to play now,” he writes. “No one videos the shows on their cellphones or such. They like just listening, so it is a very good audience to play to, [and] to improvise to.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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YOU WERE IN PITTSBURGH WITH GUITARIST GEORGE BENSON BUT JUST BRIEFLY? We were in his mother’s basement and we learned two songs. Then he said, “[Guitarist] Grant Green is playing tonight in New York. If we leave now, we can catch him.” So we took off for New York. Grant was playing on 125th Street and Seventh Avenue. They called us up to play a tune and [Green] didn’t want me to get off the stage. George and I stayed together. We got signed to Columbia Records. BUT THEN YOU MOVED TO BLUE NOTE — WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? I was shocked myself. I had only been playing for about a year. They had all the great organists and the great horn players — so what do they need me for? But I didn’t realize that it was a little different style. I had a laid-back, lazy groove, and they loved that. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DR. LONNIE SMITH TRIO 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $30. All ages. 412-322-0922 or www.newhazletttheater.org

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KST PRESENTS # W O R L D S TAG E

GLOBE-TROTTING TROUBADOUR {BY KIMBERLY OLSEN} IN 2005, British singer-songwriter Frank

“A forceful, individual brand of movement theater.” —Los Angeles Times

BAKER & TARPAGA DANCE PROJECT

Turner parted ways with his hardcore band, Million Dead, and began strumming his way around the U.K., playing house parties and pubs, recording songs on his laptop and sleeping on strangers’ couches. Exhausted and a little defeated, he was hell-bent on one thing: continuing to play music. Ten years later, Turner, 33, has headlined a sold-out Wembley Arena and performed at the London Olympics Opening Ceremony. He’s also corkscrewed around the globe playing nearly 2,000 meticulously archived shows, many of which are detailed in his 2015 bestseller, The Road Beneath My Feet, a tour diary of the highs and lows that punctuated his trajectory from drifting lyricist to swashbuckling folk-punk hero. Backed by the heft of his steadfast band The Sleeping Souls, Turner’s latest studio album, Positive Songs for Negative People, debuted at No. 2 in the U.K., and with it, Turner is adamant he’s not interested in repeating himself. “Every time I release a record, somebody, somewhere says, ‘It’s not like the old thing!’ And I say, ‘I know! That’s the fucking point!’” he says in a phone interview from a dock in Hamburg, Germany (shortly before playing show No. 1,725 on a boat named Frau Hedi).

World Premiere 'HFODVVL´HG0HPRU\)UDJPHQW 8p Performance / 7p Pre-Show Mixer Featuring a top-notch ensemble of dancers and musicians from Burkina Faso, Olivier Tarpaga’s newest work of dance theater pulses with the beauty and complexities of contemporary African society. Made possible with support from The Benter Foundation and contributors to the World Stage Fund.

TICKETS & INFO

Choose any price you feel good about—or name your own!

KELLY-STRAYHORN.ORG 412.363.3000

FRANK TURNER & THE SLEEPING SOULS with SKINNY LISTER, BEANS ON TOAST 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. Mr. Small’s Theatre. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. Sold out. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Kelly Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave, Pittsburgh 15206

FALL 2015 :: TICKETS ON SALE NOW Featuring Bill Shannon, Balafon West African Dance Ensemble, Ursula Rucker, Sean Jones and the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra and more! Full details online.

OCT. 9 slowdanger

said, ‘Are you serious?’” The worry, says Turner, was money: “And I said, ‘Oh, bollocks.’” Turner connected with Walker via email. Turns out he’s a fan. In 2014, Turner and The Sleeping Souls recorded the album in Walker’s Nashville studio in just nine days, lending it the live, unvarnished sound Turner had envisioned. Positive Songs is a combustible cocktail of optimism, near-victory and regret. From the wake-upcall anthem “Get Better” to one of Turner’s favorites, “Josephine” (a name evoking the love interests of Napoleon and Beethoven, and, for Turner, “the idea if the ‘perfect other’ even exists”), the album’s rollicking strings and pounding piano balance Turner’s soaring vocals, which are propped by the rowdy chorus anthems beloved by his live audiences. The finale, “Song for Josh,” is a tribute to Turner’s close friend Josh Burdette, who took his own life in 2013. Burdette worked at the legendary 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C., and Turner recorded the song there, with Burdette’s family in the audience. These days, Turner — who first played in Pittsburgh in 2010 in response to an email from a guy named Dan (show No. 803 is simply archived as “Dan’s Basement”) — might be exhausted, but he’s anything but defeated. He kicks off his North American tour this Saturday at Mr. Small’s, show No. 1,729.

EXHAUSTED AND A LITTLE DEFEATED, HE WAS HELL-BENT ON ONE THING.

SEPTEMBER 25–26

SEPT. 30 Vieux Farka Touré & Julia Easterlin

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JJ MEDINA}

Folk-punk hero: Frank Turner

OCT. 16 Luke Murphy/ Attic Projects

Whereas his last album, 2013’s Tape Deck Heart, was about failure and collapse, Positive Songs is about picking oneself up and putting the pieces back together. “I had a very clear idea of how I wanted it to sound,” says Turner. “I wanted a more immediate, slap-in-theface kind of vibe [rather] than a grower.” To achieve this, Turner sought out producer and songwriter Butch Walker, a move initially dismissed by his label. “I genuinely had no idea that he produced people like Taylor Swift and Beck,” he says. “The label kind of looked at me funny and

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRICK STOWELL}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Mac Miller

[ROCK] + THU., SEPT. 17

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MILAN ZRNIC}

You could accuse Twin Shadow of many things, but being “elitist” probably isn’t one of them. Nevertheless, George Lewis Jr. branded his first two records as such — even though 2012’s great Confess powered into a pastiche of the Top Gun soundtrack. To tone down the elitism of cruising around on a motorcycle and playing shirtless volleyball, Lewis significantly broadened the appeal on his major-label debut, Eclipse. He shied away from guitars and the singular machismo of his early work for a collection of fine, inoffensive pop. So as Lewis opens for Death Cab for Cutie tonight at Stage AE, come for the Confess cuts; stay for the Transatlanticism. Shawn Cooke 6:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $38.50-40. 412-229-5483 or www.promowestlive.

[POST-PUNK] + THU., SEPT. 17 Perhaps best known by younger generations for its inclusion on the soundtrack of the 2001 cult film Donnie Darko, Echo & the Bunnymen might be the second-most famous rock band to come out of Liverpool, England (you can probably guess who the first is). Its romantic, Doors-y psychedelia was popular amongst goths in the ‘80s, and tonight the band plays at Mr. Small’s with special guest Brett Staggs. Andrew Woehrel 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $32-35. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[DANCE] + FRI., SEPT. 18 Lawrenceville’s Spirit has become the new goto spot for dance parties. Tonight’s Slappers & Bangers Dance Party promises rap, R&B and pop — “anything that slaps and/or bangs” — provided by DJs Arie Cole and Norman Drip.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

”This shit is free!” boasts the event page, so don’t worry if you don’t have a lot of spending money. AW 9 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

[HIP-HOP] + SUN., SEPT. 20 Squirrel Hill’s own hip-hop wunderkind, Mac Miller, returns to Pittsburgh tonight at Stage AE, with support from Choo Jackson and The Come Up. If you haven’t been paying attention, the Taylor Allderdice alum released his debut in 2011 and has since become a national hip-hop star with his own label and a $10 million distribution deal with Warner Bros. But he’s not too good for his roots; you can still occasionally find him getting a drink at Kelly’s with his friends, Twin or strolling down Shadow Forbes Avenue on a summer night, just like any other tattooed 23-year-old. AW 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $29.50-35. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[METAL] + WED., SEPT. 23 Before Justin Broadrick scales things back for a more melodic and wordy collaborative LP with Sun Kil Moon, he’s going to steamroll some clubs with a rebooted Godflesh. The British industrial lifers returned last year with the one-two punch of the Decline & Fall EP and A World Lit Only By Fire — the band’s first full-length in 13 years. Broadrick promised that the new music would be highly similar to the first two or three Godflesh records, and it delivered on that promise, packing a minimalist sludge of noise and aggression. The wildly prolific noise artist Prurient opens for Godflesh tonight at Altar Bar. SC 8:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $25-30. 412-263-2877 or www.thealtarbar.com


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CITY THEATRE 2015–2016

TICKETS ON SALE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015


Opening September 2015

Pittsburgh’s Premiere BYOB Paint Studio

Upscale Men’s Clothing, Grooming Supplies, Luggage & Accessories TUES - SAT: 11AM - 7PM SUN: NOON - 4PM

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We Pre-Sketch the Canvas for an Anxiety-Free Experience!

OCT. 10 & 11, 2015 The region’s largest showcase of

Opens September 12, 2015 Our ninth annual exhibition of original, interactive artworks “tough” enough to withstand kid handling. 2015 Tough Artists are: Danny Bracken, Rachel Buse and Ann Tarantino.

MAKING, BUILDING & CREATING

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Nova Place, Buhl Community Park, and Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh

For tickets visit:

makerfairepittsburgh.com Produced by:

Sponsored by:

pittsburghkids.org In collaboration with: Innovation Works, Faros Properties, Hack Pittsburgh, Assemble, TechShop Pittsburgh and Urban Innovation 21

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015

Opens October 17, 2015 pittsburghkids.org


MEDIA SPONSOR

S U P P O R T I N G PA R T N E R

MANFRED HONECK, MUSIC DIRECTOR PRESENTS

DON’T MISS THE

120 SEASON! TH

Tickets start at $20!

Classical Guitar Master Pablo Villegas

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11 AT 2:30 P.M. PABLO VILLEGAS

B E E T H O V E N + C O L D P L A Y Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Happy Hour - 5:00 p.m. • Concert - 6:30 p.m.

Gustavo Gimeno, conductor (debut) Pablo Villegas, guitar Greenwood: There Will Be Blood (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra premiere) Rodrigo: Fantasía Para un Gentilhombre Stravinsky: Jeu de cartes, Ballet in Three Deals Ravel: Suite No. 2 from Daphnis et Chloé

The Rite of Spring

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 AT 8:00 P.M. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18 AT 2:30 P.M.

YAN PASCAL TORTELIER

Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor Gretchen Van Hoesen, harp Edú Lobo: Suite Popular Brasileira Ginastera: Harp Concerto Stravinksy: The Rite of Spring

Tao, Gershwin and Strauss FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30 AT 8:00 P.M. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1 AT 2:30 P.M.

Tickets are only $30!

Come and enjoy complimentary lite bites, pre-concert beats, and happy hour priced drinks. Use promo code FUSECP to save 10% if you purchase now!

PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG/FUSE 412.392.4900

Leonard Slatkin, conductor Conrad Tao, piano (debut) CONRAD TAO

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Call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/classics

Save an additional 10% by using promo code CITYPAPER BRING YOUR GROUP & SAVE! 412.392.4819 CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015

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FallAPREVIEW rts

FALL ARTS DOLLS PAINTED BY JENNIFER HOWISON PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015


Photographs by Nandini Valli Muthiah at Wood Street Galleries for India in Focus

FallArts

INDIA IN FOCUS FESTIVAL {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

WITH 1.3 BILLION people, India is the sec-

Indeed, many of the festival’s artists ond-largest nation on earth, and about explore how traditional and modern 2.6 million Indian immigrants and their Indian culture blend — or don’t. The children call the United States home. Yet, festival’s five visual-art exhibitions, all except among fans of Indian restaurants opening during the crawl and all with and Bollywood, modern Indian free admission, include the North society and culture get relaAmerican exhibition debut tively little attention here. of U.K.-born and -based FALL ARTS In Pittsburgh, at least, Hetain Patel, at Wood that’s about to change Street Galleries. Patel’s ART with India in Focus. At Home includes vidThe Pittsburgh Cultural The Pittsburgh Cultural eos and photographic Trust Gallery Crawl, a free quarterly multi-venue event Trust’s six-week festiseries that uses huDowntown, includes the launch val of art and culture mor and pop culture of the India in Focus festival, from the Republic of to explore identity forSept. 25. 412-456-6666 or India and the Indian dimation, especially for www.trustarts.org aspora is a likely highlight people with marginalized of the arts season. identities. Also at Wood It starts at the Sept. 25 Gallery Street, photographer Nandini Crawl, including a big street party with Valli Muthiah offers three photographic British-born, New York-based DJ Rekha, series that place traditional Indian culwho merges classic bhangra and Bolly- tural icons in contemporary settings — wood sounds with electronic dance music. think a bushed Krishna slumped in a

HIGHLIGHT

A NEW SERIES OF INTIMATE CONCERTS FEATURING AWARD WINNING SOUL, JAZZ, AND R&B ARTISTS

AUGUST WILSON CENTER

TRUSTARTS.ORG t BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 t GROUPS 10 t TICKETS 412-471-6930

CONTINUES ON PG. 06

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015

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The Palace Theatre Highlights! Sep 16 Sep 17 Sep 18 Sep 19

Wed Thu Fri Sat

7:30PM 6PM 8PM 8PM

Sep 25/26 Fr/Sa 7:30PM Sep 27 Sun 2PM Sep 29 Tue 7:30PM Oct 2 Oct 3 Oct 4 Oct 10 Oct 13 Oct 14 Oct 15 Oct 18

Fri Sat Sun Sat Tue Wed Thu Sun

8PM 7:30PM 3PM 7PM 7PM 2PM/7:30PM 8PM 7PM

Oct 21 Oct 22 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 27

Wed Thu Sat Sun Tue

7:30PM 2PM/7:30PM 7:30PM 7PM 7:30PM

Oct 29 Thu 7:30PM Oct 31 Sat 8:30PM

PalacePA

Nov 5 Thu 7:30PM Nov 6 Fri 8PM Nov 7 Sat 7:30PM

Latshaw Productions: The Bronx Wanderers WCT: T.G.I.S. Finale Concert on Palace Stage Elko Concerts presents Ace Frehley Pat DiCesare Productions LLC presents Beatlemania Now! Relive The Beatles ‘64 Stage Right presents Tink! A New Musical Stage Right presents Tink! A New Musical ACE FREHLEY Latshaw Productions: Michael W. Smith w/special guests Phillips, Craig & Dean Elko Concerts presents Arlo Guthrie River City Brass presents Brass at the Movies Latshaw: Guy Penrod w/guest Jimmy Fortune Big Brothers Big Sisters/Laurel Region: The Clarks WCT: “Fall into Fashion” Runway Fashion Show WCT: Menopause The Musical: The Survivor Tour BEATLEMANIA NOW! Elko Concerts presents Last Comic Standing Live Nation presents Lewis Black The Rant is Due: Part Deux Elko Concerts presents The Price is Right Live! Latshaw Productions: Vicki Lawrence & Mama Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra: Opening Night Latshaw Productions: Michael McDonald Elko Concerts: America’s Got Talent Live! The All-Stars Tour Latshaw Productions presents Chubby Checker with The Vogues & The Latshaw Pops’ Orchestra WCT presents Classic Albums Live performs Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon Latshaw Productions presents Amy Grant E - PINK FLOYD WCT presents Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood CLASSIC ALBUMS LIV River City Brass presents The Home of the Brave

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 05

“Grains,” by Surabhi Saraf, at SPACE

INDIA IN FOCUS

Sept. 25-Nov. 9. Various venues, hotel room. And SPACE hosts Plus One, in Downtown. Prices vary. 412-456-6666 which Indian artists Silpa Gupta, Surabhi or www.trustarts.org Saraf, Sumakshi Singh and Avinash Veeraraghavan use new media to summon the repetition and pattern-making of tradi- Theater, include the acclaimed, Banglagoretional Indian culture. based Nrityagram Dance Ensemble Birth Series, at 707 Penn Gallery, is (Oct. 3), and U.K.-based Aakash Odedra photographer Gauri Gill’s documen- Company (Nov. 6), the latter inspired tation of a midwife delivering her by South Asian classical dance, contemgrandaughter in a remote Indian village. porary dance and collaborative partnerAnd at 709 Penn, Sarika Goulatia, a ships. On Nov. 8 comes Mystic Pittsburgh-area artist of IndiIndia: The World Tour, “a Bolan descent, offers a “feast lywood dance spectacufor the senses” that emFALL ARTS lar” with music ians, ploys traditional powaerialists and acrobats dered pigments and joining the dancers, MAKING spices to create conand 750 costumes. Pittsburgh Children’s temporary installaMuseum hosts Maker Faire Theater offerings Pittsburgh, “the region’s largest tion art. include Why Not showcase of making, building Dance p programs, g Theatre’s A Brimful of and creating,” creating Oct. 10-11. a l l a t t h e B yh a m . Asha (Oct. 15-17), in 412-322-5059 or 412-322 which Canadian-born www.pittsburgh www.pi playwright Ravi Jain kids.org kids and his real-life mother tell what happened when Jain’s parents tried to introduce him to Indian brides. Indian Ink Theatre Company’s The Elephant Wrestler (Oct. 30 and 31) is a romantic thriller about a poor tea-seller and an abandoned girl. And Alice in Wonderland is India’s Tram Theatre’s contemporary exploration of imagination through the lens of Lewis Carroll’s classic literary creations, for ages 7 and up. On the music side, classical tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain teams up with the great English jazz bassist Dave Holland and the eight-member SFJazz collective for an evening of adventures in sound.

HIGHLIGHT

SQUIRREL HILL

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015

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October 25, 7:30 PM Carnegie Lecture Hall Tickets: calliopehouse.org 412-361-1915

Jorma Kaukonen A special concert to support Calliope Spend an evening with the legendary Jorma Kaukonen: Grammy nominee, member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and founding member of two legendary bands— The Jefferson Airplane and the still-touring Hot Tuna.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ©CHRIS ANTEMANN AND MEISSEN COUTURE®}

“Covet” (detail) from Forbidden Fruit: Chris Antemann at Meissen®, Oct. 3 at The Frick Art & Historical Center

FallArts

VISUAL ARTS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

senger pigeons and European Jewish imPittsburgh Cultural Trust festival India migrants by Ann T. Rosenthal and Steffi in Focus. Venues throughout Pittsburgh’s Domike with Ruth Fauman-Fichman, Cultural District will be filled with is at the Christine Fréchard Gallery work that showcases art created in and through Oct. 1. Tina Williams Brewer will show Coding: We Are Always There at inspired by Indian culture. Wood Street Galleries will show vid- Sweetwater Center for the Arts (Sept. 25). eos and photographs by a London-based Seth Clark, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ artist in At Home: Hetain Patel and Emerging Artist of the Year, and Artist photographs by Nandini Valli Muthiah of the Year Dennis Marsico are showing through Nov. 1. And, of course, the (Sept. 25). Plus One at Space Gallery roster of local artists is never (Sept. 25-Nov. 22) will include complete without Warfour artists, while 707 Penn FALL ARTS hol. Warhol by the Book Gallery will show a set will be on display at of photographs called T h e A n dy Wa r h ol Birth Series by Gauri COMEDY Los Angeles-based actor Museum (Oct. 10). Gill (Sept. 25) and Miles Allen performs J a n e H a s k e l l ’s 709 Pen n G al ler y One Man Breaking Bad: Modernism at the will show A Million The Unauthorized Parody, Carnegie Museum of Marks of Home, an condensing “60 awesome Art (Nov. 7) will highinstallation by Sarika episodes,” Oct. 8. Altar Bar, light the work and colGoulatia (Sept. 25). Strip District. www.drusky entertainment.com lection of the influential Goulatia is a local figure in Pittsburgh who artist and many other venwas a board member and doues throughout Pittsburgh nor to the museum. Jane Haskell: will showcase local talent. Paul Zelevansky will show Mixtape: God Bless Drawing in Light, at the American Jewish the Child That’s Got His Own, a multime- Museum will also highlight her artwork dia piece, at windowSpace (Sept. 25). The (Oct. 20-Feb. 19). CMOA also includes a brace of addiUniversity of Pittsburgh, Department of Studio Arts faculty exhibition, Reverbera- tional modernism-themed exhibitions, tions is at University Art Gallery in the including HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining Frick Fine Arts Building through Oct. 23. the Modern (through May 2); Silver to Moving Targets, an exhibit about pas- Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-

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Munk (Nov. 21); and The Propeller Group: The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music (Oct. 23). Factory Installed at the Mattress Factory (through winter 2016) is a two-part exhibition of room-sized exhibitions by eight artists or groups, two from Pittsburgh. Chosen from an open call of 500 applicants, some are already on display at the museum’s building at 1414 Monterey, while the rest open on Sept. 18. In the Making, at Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center through Oct. 2, includes 10 local, national and international artists who are participating in the Center’s public-art programs. The Pittsburgh Glass Center will show Indagare, works made by Therman Statom during his residency at PGC (Oct. 2), and Forbidden Fruit: Chris Antemann at Meissen®, at The Frick Art & Historical Center (Oct. 3), will show works in porcelain made by the artist in residence at the Meissen Manufactory artCAMPUS in Germany. Exhibitions that engage topics that defy stigma and stereotype include Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art at the Society for Contemporary Craft (Sept. 18); Les Fleurs du Male, works by

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART}

Silver to Steel: The Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk, Nov. 21 at the Carnegie Museum of Art

Steven Miller at Revision Space (Sept. 18); and Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity, at Silver Eye Center for Photography (Sept. 18). I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF THEATER

Music Director:

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Stage Director:

KARLA BOOS

Through October

3

Quantum presents a world premiere Baroque opera set with Shakespeare’s text, in English. The Winter’s Tale sweeps breathtakingly from tragedy to comedy and along the way visits kings and queens, dancing shepherds, a most extraordinary statue, and one notoriously hungry bear, before it reaches its stunning, magical conclusion.

Evil Dead The Musical, Oct. 29-31

FallArts

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near-future where a host invites two guests to a dinner party fraught with mystery burgh, are dominating theater this fall. On the 10th anniversary of Hurricane and menace. City Theatre launches its season with Katrina, Caravan Theatre presents the Pittsburgh premiere of Lower Ninth (opens one of the best-reviewed new plays of Sept. 24). The 2008 play — set on a roof- 2013: Conor McPherson’s The Night Alive top during the storm, where two men (Oct. 10), a drama set in Dublin’s demiawait help alongside a corpse — is by Beau monde. While McPherson (The Seafarer) is familiar to Pittsburgh audiWillimon, the House of Cards ences, City introduces us to showrunner and screenwriter. both acclaimed playwright Choir Boy (Sept. 25) is FALL ARTS Dominque Morisseau the latest Pittsburgh preand Sunset Baby (Nov. miere for Tarell Alvin OPERA 7), her drama about a McCraney, known here The Pittsburgh Opera opens young woman, a street for The Brothers Size its season with a new production hustler whose father, and Marcus; or, The of Nabucco, Verdi’s epic story once part of the blackSecret of Sweet. The of the Jews in exile in Babylon, liberation movement, Oct. 10-18. Heinz Hall, REP stages this 2013 Downtown. 412-281-0912 tries to reconnect. coming-of-age drama or www.pittsburgh Joe Pollono’s dark set at an elite boarding opera.org comedy Small Engine school for young AfricanRepair (Nov. 19) premieres American men. locally at barebones producPlaywright Andrea Lepcio tions. Chickens in the Yard (Nov. 20) (Looking for the Pony) returns to Off the Wall Theater with Tunnel Vision (Oct. inaugurates Quantum Theatre’s Gerri Kay 16), a drama about two women confront- New Voices Program with a story about ing their pasts and each other. Also at Off “fragile couples and developing unconthe Wall is Scared of Sarah (Dec. 4), Laura ventional families,” from Pittsburgh’s own Brienza’s new play about an upwardly Hatch Collective. And while we don’t normobile couple who fear their unborn child mally associate December with serious (let alone seriously profane) theater, that’s might be autistic. Expect additional challenging theater what we’ll get as Point Park Conservatory as Throughline Theatre Co. offers the Pitts- presents the local premiere of Our Lady of burgh premiere of Brainpeople (Oct. 23). 121st Street (Dec. 4). The 2002 comedy by Jose Rivera’s 2008 play is set in a dystopic Stephen Adly Guirgis (The Motherfucker

NEWER PLAYS, and voices new to Pitts-

HIGHLIGHT

12

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015


With the Hat) is a large ensemble work revolving around the death of a beloved nun in uptown Manhattan. There’ll also be new plays as part of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s India in Focus festival (see page 5) and, for the sanguinary-minded, Evil Dead The Musical (Oct. 29-31), a touring comic take on the gory “Evil Dead” films, at the Byham Theater. The Benedum Center, meanwhile, hosts the touring production of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder (Nov. 17-22), the 2014 Tony-winner for best musical. And the revitalized August Wilson Center hosts the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Sancho: An Act of Remembrance (Dec. 10 and 11), a one-man show about famed 18th-century AfricanBritish composer and man of letters Charles “Sancho” Ignatius.

Remy Zaken in The Diary of Anne Frank, Sept. 24-Oct. 25

Theater-goers seeking older or classic work won’t be out of luck. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., for instance, stages Dulcy (opens Sept. 26), an early one by hometown legend George S. Kaufman and collaborator Marc Connelly (himself a McKeesport native). As artistic director Mark Southers continues recuperating from a bad car accident, this 1921 comedy, with its cast of 11, is directed by Corey Rieger. Pittsburgh Public Theater opens its season with The Diary of Anne Frank (Sept. 24), the 1955 adaptation of the iconic book. Point Park’s Conservatory has both Sondheim’s Into the Woods (Oct. 16-25) and Ibsen’s The Wild Duck (Nov. 6). And Bricolage Productions has two live-radio-style Midnight Radio shows: a dramatic adaptation of Orwell’s 1984 (Oct. 29) and the rather lighter-hearted, locally customized holiday spoof Yinz’r Scrooged (Dec. 3). D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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We want to know what you think about Convenience Stores The RAND Corporation is recruiting middle and high school students to participate in a research study to learn about what you think about shopping in convenience stores. Participation requires attendance at a single, 60 minute session at the RAND study site in Pittsburgh. Students will each be compensated $25.00 for completing the study procedures. Reimbursement for parking or transportation is also provided. If you are interested and want to find out more, please call 412-545-3005. Enrollment is limited. The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.


SEP 25 – NOV 8 For six weeks this fall, through more than a dozen arts experiences, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust brings into regional focus a selection of art and culture from the Republic of India.

STREET PARTY KICK-OFF @

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

FRIDAY, 9/25 5:30 – 10 PM

GALLERY RY CRAWL IN THE CULTURAL DISTRICT

India in Focus kicks off with a street party, free and open to o the public, during the Gallery Crawl - a quarterly showcase of art and entertainment in the 14-block Cultural District. Discover a rich, deep, and beautiful world of art in downtown Pittsburgh.

DJ Rekha Liberty Ave, Main Stage | 9–10 pm DJ Rekha is British-born and New York City-based DJ, curator, bassador of record label owner, and educator. Called the “Ambassador Bhangra” by the New York Times and named one of the most influential South Asians by Newsweek, Rekha is among mong the first nds into the DJs to merge classic Bhangra and Bollywood sounds language of contemporary electronic dance music. c.

DISCOVER THE GLOBAL INFLUENCE OF INDIAN ART AND CULTURE.

TrustArts.org/India

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


EVENTS Patty Griffin THE JONES FAMILY SINGERS

STREET PARTY KICK-OFF SEPTEMBER 22-OCTOBER 4 | BENEDUM CENTER

SEPTEMBER 25 | CULTURAL DISTRICT

SEPTEMBER 27 | BYHAM THEATER

OCTOBER 2 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

MARSHA AMBROSIOUS

Zakir Hussain’s Jazz: A Musical Bridge East to West

OCTOBER 10 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

OCTOBER 13 | BYHAM THEATER

Nrityagram Dance Ensemble OCTOBER 3 | BYHAM THEATER

PHILADANCO

TOMMY TUNE

OCTOBER 5 | CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE

OCTOBER 9 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

OCTOBER 15 | BYHAM THEATER

A Brimful of Asha

Joan Armatrading

The Nayika Project OCT 15-17 | TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER

OCTOBER 18-25 | VARIOUS LOCATIONS

OCT 23 & 24 | TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER

OCT 27-NOV 1 | BENEDUM CENTER

Alice in Wonderland

EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL

OCTOBER 29-31 | BYHAM THEATER

Aakash Odedra

OCTOBER 28 | BYHAM THEATER

Mystic India

The Elephant Wrestler OCT 30 & 31 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

NOVEMBER 6 | BYHAM THEATER

NOV 5-7 | TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER

NOVEMBER 8 | BYHAM THEATER

The Tenors

STEPHANIE J. BLOCK NOV 9 | CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE

CAPS FOR SALE

AILEY II

NOVEMBER 10 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

NOVEMBER 15-22 | VARIOUS LOCATIONS

NOVEMBER 17-22 | BENEDUM CENTER

NOVEMBER 18 | BYHAM THEATER

DECEMBER 22-27 | HEINZ HALL

DECEMBER 29 & 30 | BENEDUM CENTER

DECEMBER 31 | CULTURAL DISTRICT

Sancho: STRAIGHT NO CHASER DECEMBER 8 | BENEDUM BEN ENED EDUM UM CENTER CENTER

An Act of Remembrance

DEC 10 & 11 | AUGUST WILSON CENTER

SEP 25 – NOV 8

A selection of art and culture from the Republic of India.

Celebrate the tradition. Embrace the unexpected.

TRUSTARTS.ORG A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

CULTURAL DISTRICT TrustArts.org/India

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BRUSH UP ON YOUR AUDITION SKILLS!

Zakir Hussain: CROSSCURRENTS

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TH E ST OR Y OF FR AN KIE VA LLI & TH E FO UR SE AS ON S

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GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District

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CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

1. Wood Street Galleries

5. Shaw Galleries

601 Wood Street

805 Liberty Avenue

At Home | Hetain Patel In Hetain Patel’s North American debut “At Home”, Wood Street Galleries presents a selection of works from the London based artist including videos, the photographic series ‘Eva’ and a newly commissioned video work specifically for the INDIA IN FOCUS exhibition, “Jump.” Nandini Valli Muthiah Nandini Valli Muthiah has rapidly emerged as a central figure in Indian photography. Nandini’s images incorporate traditional ideas of popular Indian art by capturing them in contemporary everyday environments. Her images of Krishna, from the Definitive Reincarnate series, portrays a tired-looking Krishna sitting on the edge of a bed in a luxury hotel room, highlighting the gap in India culture between historic value systems and rapid modernization.

Fritz Keck: New Work of Old Pittsburgh Oil paintings of vintage Pittsburgh scenes by Fritz Keck.

2. SPACE

809 Liberty Avenue

812 Liberty Avenue

Plus One Using contemporary technology and methods of art production across large scale video installations, sound works, prints and installations, the artists in “Plus One” also invoke the repetition and pattern making of traditional Indian visual culture. Participating artists: Shilpa Gupta, Surabhi Saraf, Avinash Veeraghavan, Sumakshi Singh. window SPACE MIXTAPE: GOD BLESS THE CHILD THAT’S GOT HIS OWN | Paul Zelevansky Combines video footage, animation, graphics, text, sound effects, and music samples to create a narrative exploring the intersections of everyday life, pop culture, and various questions about knowledge and belief. Millcraft Table Visit the Millcraft table located in front of SPACE Gallery and learn more about the Upscale Downtown experience and register to win tickets to see Stars in concert on October 9th at Mr. Smalls Theater.

3. 820 Liberty Ave Kadambari Arts & Mehndi By Soma Experience an India-inspired oasis and receive a custom henna tattoo by international henna artist, Kadambari Patil and Mehndi Artist, Soma Chatterji.

4. Tito Way Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | Information Lab

6. Trust Arts Education Center 805-807 Liberty Avenue Third Floor and Fourth Floor

Design Pittsburgh 2015: AIA Pittsburgh’s Annual Design Exhibition View the works of talented Pittsburgh architects, designers and photographers. Peirce Studio (Basement)

Temple Architecture and Archaic Knowledge in South Asia A lecture by Dr. Madhuri Desai, Associate Professor of Art History and Asian Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. 5:30–6:30pm

7. Harris Theater Crawl Shorts Short films playing on a continuous loop from 5:30–9pm.

8. Arcade Comedy Theater 811 Liberty Avenue

Live Improv comedy every half hour! Every half hour catch a brand new improv show at the Cultural District’s award-winning comedy theater!

9. Liberty Avenue Stage 800 Block Liberty Avenue

CMU Bhangra Dance Group Watch and learn as students from Carnegie Mellon University perform the traditional dance of Bhangra, starting at 8pm. DJ Rekha DJ Rekha is a British-born and New York City-based DJ, curator, record label owner, and educator. Called the “Ambassador of Bhangra” by the New York Times, Rekha is among the first DJs to merge classic Bhangra and Bollywood sounds into the language of contemporary electronic dance music. Performance at 9pm!

10. Social Status 717 Liberty Ave. Stop in and view paintings by Keah Adams and Naomi Walker.

11. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center 212 Ninth Street

From Zero to 3D In the winter and spring of 2015 MCG Youth & Arts offered classes in 3D modeling and printing.

12. Summer Night Market

23. Katz Plaza

Penn Avenue and 8th Street

7th St. and Penn Avenue

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership presents Night Market featuring Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors. 2nd floor

Formula 412 Live performance by five-piece hip-hop band, Formula 412. Carnegie Library Button Making and Books Port Authority Tent

Magenta Foundation Exhibit 80 portraits from the Humanae/I AM AUGUST installation.

24. Grille on Seventh

13. 937 Liberty

14. Tonic 971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery.

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Art by Lory Zegarelli accompanied by acoustic music

15. The August Wilson Center 980 Liberty

Humanae/I AM AUGUST (Unveiling) A portrait-based installation featuring the faces of Pittsburghers. The Liberty Avenue side of the August Wilson Center will feature more than 200 portraits of participants. Humanae/I AM AUGUST.

16. Urban Pathways 6–12 Gallery 914 Penn Avenue

Fresh Celebrate back to school with new student artwork.

17. CAPA Gallery 111 Ninth Street

Pittsburgh CAPA 6–12 Gallery Back to the Studio Fall Exhibition

18. Future Tenant 819 Penn Avenue

2015 SECAC Annual Juried Show A Juried Show curated by Jessica Beck, Assistant Curator at the Andy Warhol Museum.

19. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council 810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

Chimera | Women and the Grotesque

20. Bend Yoga 808 Penn Avenue

Stop in for some Downtown Dog! Free mini classes from 5:30–6 and 6–6:30: Pre-register at info@bendyoga.com.

21. 709 Penn Gallery 709 Penn Avenue

A Million Marks of Home | Sarika Goulatia Local artist of Indian decent, Sarika Goulatia’s work is a ‘feast for the senses’ incorporating traditional powdered pigments and spices within the context of contemporary installation art.

22. 707 Penn Gallery 707 Penn Avenue

Birth Series | Gauri Gill The set of photographs was made when Gill lived some days with a midwife in a remote village in Motasar, Ghafan.

130 7th St

Stop in and enjoy live music!

25. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Music by Dhruva Krishna A blend of elements from bluegrass, folk, pop, and classical Indian to create a unique blend of music. 5–7:25pm.

26. Boutique 208 208 Sixth Street

Live music featuring Johnathan Dull.

27. Olive or Twist 140 6th St

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni and Student Show

28. Verve 360 142 Sixth Street

Sweet Dream Bombyx Collective dancers and aerialists move through a surreal dreamscape. Performance at 8:30pm.

crawl after dark For the Love of Bachata Starting at 10pm Cabaret at Theater Square

Kick-off dance for Pittsburgh’s “For the Love of Bachata” Fall Festival featuring four world-renowned instructors that specialize in traditional bachata history and dance. Grains | Surabhi Saraf 10pm Trust Arts Education Center, Peirce Studio 805-807 Liberty Avenue

Grains by Surabhi Saraf weaves a rich tapestry of sounds, multiplied and fragmented, creating dynamic textures and immersive architectural soundscapes. Beautiful Nightmare 9:30pm, $5 Verve 360, 142 Sixth Street

This Bombyx Collective performance includes more adult themes in a beautiful nightmare of the erotic and uncanny. Karaoke with Rock ‘n Ray the DJ and YOU 10–2am August Henry’s City Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

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VISIT THE BEST RESTAURANTS DOWNTOWN After the show Enjoy

LIVE MUSIC

Wed-Fri-Sat

RML Jazz WED | SEPT 16 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

John Gresh

FRI | SEPT 18 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

Billy the kid & The regulatrs

SAT | SEPT 19 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

Dr Zoot

WED | SEPT 23 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

Billy Price

FRI | SEPT 25 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

Olga Watkins

SAT | SEPT 26 | 8PM -----------------------------------------------------------

Mystic Knights

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AAP Curated Exhibit: The Landscape Problem at the Mine Factory: Curated by Adam Welch, Opening Night: Saturday, September 26th, 6-9pm. Artist talks October 3rd, 6-9pm.

Pittsburgh’s Classic AAP Group Exhibit: Drawing on Drawing juried by Kim Beck, FrameHouse/Jask Gallery, IceHouse Studios, Lawrenceville. Opening: Friday, October 2nd, 6-8:30 pm.

SEPTEMBER 18 -20th & 25th-27th

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LOWER NINTH by:

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Shanna Simmons Dance, Nov. 5

FallArts

DANCE

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

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explores how memory decays and is redeanchine, William Forsythe and Jiří Kylián fined in each passing moment. Also at the to an Indian dance festival and a Michael Alloy Studios, on Oct. 16, Irish dancer/actor Jackson tribute show, fall’s eclectic dance Luke Murphy returns to Pittsburgh for a season is sure to satisfy most any dance- work-in-progress showing of his latest, On Triumph and Trauma, inspired by 1916’s lover. Here’s a sampling. On Sept. 18, dancer/choreographer Jas- failed Irish uprising against British rule. Texture Contemporary Ballet’s second mine Hearn joins a host of performers including 2015 Brazzy Award-winners Anna offering of the season, Timescape, Sept. Thompson and Taylor Knight, of slowdan- 25-27 at the New Hazlett Theater, features Obuger, for Trans-Q Live, at The Andy ndy Warhol a reprise of company directors Alan Obu Museum. This queer evening g of perfor- zor and Kelsey Bartman’s “Infinity” (2012), mance includes dance, poetry, y, comedy and music. On Oct. 30 and 31, Hearn teams with fellow FALL ARTS Pittsburgh dancer Jessic a Mar in o OUTDOORS and Philly’s AnnVenture nture Outdoors leads the Marie Gover for challenging, enging, day-long eight-mile us., an evening McConnells Connells Mill Hike e through this state park’s rugged Slippery of solos and Rock ock Creek Gorge, with its duets at Wood famous mous waterfalls, Nov. 21. Street Galleries. 412-255-0464 or www. At the Kellyventureoutdoors.org Strayhorn Theater, the dance season opens Sept. 25 and 26 with the return of Columbus, Ohio’s Baker & Tarpaga Dance e Project in its latest dance-theater work, Declassified Memory Fragment. Danced d to live music, the work is described as “an n open letter on African society — its lifestyles, les, cultures, beauty, complexities and politics.” ics.” On Oct. 9, slowdanger presents work-in-progress k-in-progress memory 4 at KST’s Alloy Studios; os; the piece

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HIGHLIGHT

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Anthony Williams, Dec. 10

24

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015


along with a new ballet co-choreographed Michael: A Glorious Tribute to the King of by Bartman and dancer Alexandra Tiso to Pop at The Hillman Center for Performing the music of rockers Bastille. Point Park Uni- Arts, on Oct. 17. The show features Grammy versity’s Conservatory Dance Company’s Award-winning singers, Broadway dancers Student Choreography Project returns to and urban acrobats. On Nov. 14, the Center the George Rowland White Performance presents the U.S. premiere of MontréalStudio on Oct. 1-3 and Nov. 13-22 for Con- based Cas Public in Symphonie Dramatique, temporary Choreographers; the student a contemporary version of Shakespeare’s company takes on works by Gregory Dol- Romeo and Juliet. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre opens anothbashian, Ori Flomin, Jessica Hendricks and er ambitious season with Mixed Repertory Septime Webre. East meets West in the The Pittsburgh #1 featuring the PBT Orchestra, Oct. 23-25 at the Benedum Center. The don’t-miss Cultural Trust’s India in Focus festival. program showcases the compaFestival dance performances ny in a trio of masterworks: begin at the Byham Theater Balanchine’s Americana with Pittsburgh Dance FALL ARTS ballet Western SymCouncil presentations phony, Jiří Kylián’s poof Nrityagram Dance FREE STUFF Ensemble’s Samyoga: etic Sinfonietta and The Allegheny Regional Asset An Ode to Love (Oct. William Forsythe’s District holds RADical Days, its annual 3), which explores thrilling In the Middle three-week program of free admission the differences beSomewhat Elevated. to exhibits and performances, including museums, concerts, the tween the sexes’ apClosing out 2015, zoo and more, Sept. 18-Oct. 11. proach to love, and Attack Theatre celwww.radworkshere.org www.radworks Aakash Odedra Comebrates the North Side pany in Rising (Nov. ov. 6), with the world premiere a collection of solo works of Remainder|Northside, created for Odedra edra Nov. 14-15 at the New Haby noted choreograzlett. The dance and live-music ographers Akram Khan, event culminates a year-long project inhan, e Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui volving creative input from North Side aoui v and Russell Maliphyouth. Other late-season shows include: aliphyo ant. The Dance Council Bodiography and La Roche College preBo also welcomes Philadelsenting Maria Caruso’s The Messiah, Nov. se phia’s famed Philadanco 20-21 at the Byham; dancer/choreograadanco 20 (Oct. 9) and young guns pher ph Anthony Williams’ full version of Ailey II (Nov. 10) his 0) to hi Loving Black, at the New Hazlett, on the reopened August Dec. gust D 10; and Pittsburgh’s Shana Simmons Wilson Center. Dance joining forces with NYC’s The D Michael Jackson Moving Architects on Dec. 5, at the Alloy son M is celebrated in King Studios, for a split bill of new works. ing St

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE WHITE}

Shemekia Copeland, Sept. 30

FallArts

MUSIC

{BY MARGARET WELSH} AFTER THE USUAL late-August concert lull, power-metal stalwarts Blind Guardian September is bursting with notable perfor- will be at the Carnegie of Homestead mances, thanks — in large part — to the Music Hall on Nov. 4; and a couple bigincidental tag-team scheduling of the VIA name black-metal bands — Watain and and Thrival festivals. Mayhem — bring their evil to Mr. Small’s By now, VIA is an institution and this Theatre on Nov. 22. new-music-and-media event (Sept. 24– Oct. 3) features one of its most exciting lineups yet, including MC Lyte, Lower FALL ARTS Dens, Sheer Mag and Ikonika (check the schedule for info on various locations). At this year’s Thrival Festival, the muBURLESQUE The nationally touring sic is happening on a stage in HazelSuicide Girlss bring their Blackheart wood. That hat fest, held Sept. 25-26, foBurlesque, which includes cuses on n various facets of innovation, Orange Is the New Blackk and boasts sts a weekend of high-profile and Star Wars-themed s musicians ns like Raekwon and Ghostnumbers, Oct. 24. Rex face Killa, la, Panic! At the Disco and Theater, South Side Strand of Oaks. The Andy Warhol Museum prefers to spread great lineups throughout out the year: This fall, its Sound Series welcomes the influential art-punk rt-punk band Television on Sept. 25,, long-standing dream-pop band Luna na on Oct. 14, and the always delightful Jonathan Richman n on Nov. 4. Fans of heavy music will have ve busy schedules over er the next few months. Experimental metal band Godfl esh Godflesh comes to o Altar Bar on Sept. 23;; Spirit Caravan {PHOTO COURTESY OF HIGH ROAD TOURING} — featuring uring the nearly Jonathan Richman, legendary ry Wino — plays Nov. 4 the 31st Street Pub on Oct. 21;

HIGHLIGHT


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Yo La Tengo, Sept. 29

Lucinda Williams, Oct. 14

As for jazz, Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild’s season includes Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton on Oct. 9, Al Jarreau on Oct. 14, and David Sanborn on Nov. 19, among others. No matter when you were born, there will be plenty to inspire nostalgia. 1990s post-rockers Godspeed You! Black Emperor will appear at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall on Sept. 23. Original members of The Zombies will perform Odessey & Oracle at the same venue on Oct. 14. For the old punks, Gang of Four appears at Altar Bar on Sept. 29, The Vibrators play the 31st Street Pub on Sept. 30, and Altar Bar will host Public Image Ltd. on Nov. 12. And indie-rock fans of a certain age should note Yo La Tengo on Sept. 29 and Built to Spill on Oct. 4 (both at Mr. Small’s.) So far, there’s not much on the landscape in terms of big-name hip-hop tours — that could change in the coming weeks — but Def Jam’s Big K.R.I.T performs at Mr. Small’s on Oct. 29. You may not be able to place the name Icona Pop, but you’ve likely had its hit “I Love It” stuck in your head at some point. The Swedish electropop duo plays Stage AE as part of the 96.1 KISS Halloween show on Oct. 31. If you’ve got a soft spot for tough-guy hardcore, don’t miss Madball on Sept. 30 at Cattivo or Terror at Altar Bar on Nov. 30. You’ll also want to note Sincerity Fest 2015, happening at Altar Bar on Oct. 10. The lineup includes Bitter End, Shai Hulud, Eternal Sleep and many more. Locally based neo-folk singer-songwriter Brooke Annibale releases her new record at Pittsburgh Winery on Oct. 3. Alt-

Americana band The Lone Bellow returns, heading to the Rex Theater on Nov. 3, and the Rex stage will be full on Nov. 21, when seven-piece rock/soul band Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds comes to town. On Sept. 30, electric-blues singer Shemekia Copeland plays Club Café, and

FALL ARTS

HIGHLIGHT COMEDY OMEDY Bo Burnham, ham, the comic known for his satirical songs, brings his North orth American tour to the Carnegie Music Hall, Nov. ov. 11. Oakland. www.ticketmaster.com cketmaster.com

Valerie June, une, who plays bluess of a folkier sort, appears ppears Oct. 10 at the Carnegie Lecture Hall, in Oakland, as part of Calliope’s main-stage e season. And speaking of Calliope, its schedule in n the coming months hs includes Jorma Kaukonen, aukonen, of Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna, a, on Oct. 25; he’ll be joined oined at the {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

Raekwon, at Thrival

Carnegie Lecture Hall by Ernie Hawkins. And at the Root Cellar at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, it’s Ronny Cox on Oct. 15, and singer-songwriter Vance Gilbert on Nov. 12. Roots-music fans can also look forward to Patty Griffin on Sept. 27 and Lucinda Williams on Oct. 14 (both shows at the Byham Theatre). Arlo Guthrie brings his Alice’s Restaurant 50th Anniversary Tour to the Palace Theater in Greensburg on Oct. 2. Mark Knopfler comes to Heinz Hall Oct. 21, Norah Jones on Oct. 13; and on Oct Carnegie Music Hall in will appear at the Carn listeners away with her Oakland to sweep listen Much-admired singer-songsmooth vibes. Much-ad appear at Mr. Small’s writer Josh Ritter will ap Theatre on Oct. 25; indie-rock band Stars Canadian indieSmall’s on Oct. 9, and plays at Mr. Smal Yamagata (who has colRachael Yamaga everyone from Ryan laborated with ev Adams to Toots and the Maytals) Café on Oct. 15. Provistops at Club Caf dence, R.I.’s sweet and stark folk artist Sianna Plavin will appear at the 31st Street Pub on Oct. 27. Also in the realm of the lovely and heartfelt, on Stevens makes a highly Nov. 3, Sufjan Steve appearance, bringing anticipated appe heart-wrenching baroque pop to his heart-wrenchi Heinz Hall. events of note: Krar A few more ev London-based Ethiopian Collective, a Londo play at Tana Ethiopithree-piece, will p an Restaurant on Oct. 1; Hold Steady Finn will be joined frontman Craig F Patterson at Club Café on by Esme Patterso Pittsburgh’s favorite Oct. 31; and Pitt band, Zombi, appears synth-post rock ban 14. at Cattivo on Nov. 1 MWE LSH L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FallArts

FILM

{BY AL HOFF} Nov. 6. Antonia Banderas heads up an enyou’re in luck: Docudramas, bio-pics and semble crew as one of the Chilean miners rescued in 2010; The 33 opens Nov. 13. Edhistorical re-enactments rule this fall. A lesbian couple (Julianne Moore, El- die Redmayne and Alicia Vikander star in len Page) fight back against discrimina- The Danish Girl (Nov. 27), about the first tory benefits practices in Freeheld, and person to undergo gender-reassignment surgery in the 1920s. Also Tom Hardy plays both Kray twins, inNov. 27, Tom Hiddleston famous 1960s London gangsters, takes on an Ameriin Legend; both open Oct. 2. can icon, country On Oct. 16, Steven Spielberg FALL ARTS singer Hank Wiland Tom Hanks team up liams, in I Saw to save an American U-2 MUSIC the Light. pilot in the Cold War tale Guest conductor Yan Pascal Tortelier leads the Pittsburgh Symphony They’re lost: Bridge of Spies; also that Orchestra in a program including Chris Hemsday, Cate Blanchett and Stravinsky’s epochal The Rite of Spring, worth plays a Robert Redford revisit the Oct. 16-18. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 1 9 th- c e n t u r y 2004 brouhaha surround412-392-4900 412 392 490 or ing Dan Rather sailor adrift in her and CBS www.pittsburghsymphony.org www.pittsburghsym News, in Truth. Ron Howard’s In ruth. Michael Fassbender plays the tech the Heart of the Sea giant in Stevee Jobs (Oct. (Dec. 11), and Leon19). Vote, ladies! ardo DiCaprio plays a es! The period drama Suffragette, 19th-century uffragette, fur-trapper starring Carey and bear-attack victim in Alejandro ey Mulligan and Meryl Inarritu’s The Revenant (Dec. 25). Also on ryl Streep, Inarr hits Oct. 23. Christmas: Will Smith plays then-PittsChris Spotlight shines on burgh-based Dr. Bennett Omalu, who disburghthe Boston Globe’s covered lobe’s investicovere that football players were suffering gation of child from degenerative brain disease; Concusild sex-abuse d allegations within the sion opens Dec. 25. op Catholic Church, Fall is time for more serious dramas urch, and Bryan Cranston and thrillers. In The Martian, Matt Damon ston stars th as Trumbo, the fends for himself on the red planet (Oct. he screenwriter who broke the 2). Beasts of No Nations explores child Be Hollywood blacklist soldiers lacklist of soldie in Africa, and Guillermo De Toro the 1950s; both delivers the gothic thriller Crimson Peak; oth open deliv

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both open Oct. 16. David Gordon Green tackles political strategists in Our Brand Is Crisis (Oct. 30), starring Sandra Bullock and Billy Bob Thornton. Two domestic dramas: Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt star as a married couple confronting tragedy, in By the Sea (Nov. 13); and Rooney Mara and Cate Blanchett star in Todd Haynes’ 1950s-set simmer, Carol, about female desire (Nov. 20). On Dec. 25, Jennifer Lawrence re-teams with director David O. Russell for Joy, about a woman’s transition from housewife to entrepreneur. Remakes, Sequels and Such: Pan (Oct. 9) presents an origin story for the guy we know as Peter Pan; R.L. Stine’s kid-horror books get adapted in Goosebumps (Oct. 16); and ’80s poppers Jem and the Holograms Beasts of No Nations, Oct. 16 are back Oct. 23. Agent 007 returns, and confronts a new villainous syndicate, in Spectre (Nov. 6). Julia Roberts and Chiwetel ning festivals to return is the 30th annual Ejiofor star in Secret in Their Eyes, a remake Pittsburgh International Lesbian and Gay of the 2009 Argentine crime thriller, on Nov. Film Festival, now called Reel Q (www. 20. That same day, the rebels take the capi- reelQ.org); the fest runs Oct. 9-17. Soon aftal in The Hunger Games conclusion, Mock- ter, the 34th annual Three Rivers Film Festiingjay: Part 2. Rocky (Sylvester Stallone) is val (www.3rff.com) kicks off. The Filmmakback, and now he’s coaching Apollo Creed’s ers affair runs from Nov. 6-15. As always, variety is key, with short features, kid (Michael B. Jordan) in Creed (Nov. documentaries, indies and 25). The never-ending space opinternational cinema. era continues, now with J.J. The Hollywood conAbrams at the helm: Star FALL ARTS tinues its mix of new Wars: The Force Awakfilms, rep programens (Dec. 18). 1991’s GRAND REOPENING ming and special Point Break get reAfter extensive renovations, events. Upcoming this imagined, now with the Westmoreland Museum of fall: The Decline of more globe-hopping American Art holds a free Grand Western Civilization and bigger stunts; it Reopening Celebration Community trilogy, with director opens Dec. 25 Day with live music, puppet shows Penelope Spheeris atand more, Oct. 25. 724-837-1500 In Other News: For or www.wmuseumaa.org tending (Nov. 6-7), and kids, Nov. 25 sees The the Internet Cat Video Good Dinosaur, an aniFestival (Nov. 13). At Row mated feature from Pixar. House Cinema in LawrencevFor the holidays, two films ille, upcoming special screenings about Christmas Eve get-togethers: Love the Coopers (Nov. 13) (shot in Pitts- include the Back to the Future festival (Oct. burgh) and The Night Before (Nov. 25). And 21-23) and the Pittsburgh premiere of Exfor a more violent holiday, Quentin Taran- traordinary Tales. At Harris Theater Oct. 19tino re-works the Western in The Hateful 29, Filmmakers presents the restored Apu Trilogy, Satyajit Ray’s landmark of midEight (Dec. 25). The first of Pittsburgh’s two long-run- century Indian cinema.

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Richard Blanco, Oct. 2

Leslie Pietrzyk, Oct. 8

FallArts

LITERARY {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta (Nov. 4). The series, which takes place at Heinz Hall, is subscription-only. Another hot ticket (albeit this time a Madfree one) is the venerable v Reading Series, which women Readin hosts one of the on Oct. 2 ho best-known living nation’s best Richard Blanco, who poets: Richar President Obama’s read at Pres inauguration. Blan2012 inau co reads at Antonian Hall, on tthe Carlow University ccampus. Just up Fifth Avthe University of enue, th Pittsburgh’s Pittsburgh Pittsburg Contemporary Writers Contemp its fine Series continues co work with wit free readings from Anthony Marra An (Oct. 21), a Fred R. Brown Literary Award winner A and author of the critically acclaimed novel A Constelno lation of Vital Vit Phenomena, STAGE AGE and award-winning poet award Spoken-word artist, poet and Ed Roberson (Nov. 19). vocalist Ursula Rucker performs Also at Pitt, P on Sept. 30, My Father’s Daughter, aughter, r a “live the University Bookstore Univer memoir” with projected video hosts longtime Pitt prolong and live music, Nov. 20 and 21. fessor Lynn Lyn Emanuel for Kelly-Strayhorn orn Theater, the launch of her new poEast Liberty. 412-363-3000 or www.kellyw.kellyetry collection, The Nerve collect

INTERNATIONALLY renowned authors and

speakers, as well as nonhousehold names of interest, are behind lecterns everywhere this fall. As usual, some of the biggest ggest are at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, which opens its 25th season with journalist Hector Tobar (Sept. 21), whose Deep Down Dark chronicles the 2010 Chilean mining ing disaster. Other PAL guests at Carnegie Lecture Hall include food writer Ruth Reichl hl (Oct. 26), novelist David Mitchell (Cloud d Atlas), and journalist Elizabeth Kolbert (The Sixth Extinction). And on Sept. 30, at the Byham Theater, Kolbert’s fellow New Yorker luminary Adam Gopnik hosts Tangled Up: The Moth in Pittsburgh, the annual nnual showcase of touring storytelling talent alent from the popular public-radio program. am. Additional famous names highlight the Pittsburgh Speakers Series, s, which opens with novelist John Irving (Oct. 14) and FALL ARTS CNN chief

HIGHLIGHT LIGHT

strayhorn.org orn.org

Ruth Reichl, Oct. 26

30

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2015


of It. And on Oct. 8, Alexandria, Va.-based Leslie Pietrzyk visits for a reading and book-signing of her Drue Heinz Literature Prize-winning story collection from the University of Pittsburgh Press, This Angel on My Chest, at Phipps Conservatory. City of Asylum’s slate of readings includes gritty, Massachusetts-based poet Martin Espada (Oct. 9) and Chinese humanrights activist Chen Guancheng (Dec. 1). In 2012, Chen, an attorney, caused an international diplomatic crisis by taking refuge in the U.S. embassy in Beijing. Local bookstores do their bit. On Sept. 20, Classic FALL ARTS Daniel Khalastchi, Oct. 5 Lines Bookstore welcomes Theresa Brown, a PittsCOMEDY burgh-based nurse and Jimmy Tatro, known for his reading series including YouTube channel, author who’ll read from LifeAccordingToJimmy, hits Versify, which continher new book, The Shift: town Oct. 3. Altar Bar, ues Sept. 19, and UnOne Nurse, Twelve Hours, Strip District. www.drusky der the Sign of the Bear, Four Patients’ Lives; Brown entertainment.com which resumes Sept. 26. also reads Sept. 22, at Pitt. Fall is also a good time On Sept. 27, East End Book Exfor festivals. On Oct. 4, the change hosts Abdellah Taia, conUnion Project hosts the Fifth sidered to be the first out-gay Arab writer, reading from his novel Salvation Army. Annual PGH Zine Fair. And another, EEBX follows up on Oct. 5 with award- unrelated zine fest gets started with winning Iraqi Jewish American poet Dan- the inaugural Feminist Zine Fest, to be iel Khalastchi reading from his latest col- held Oct. 16-18 in part at Oakland’s Frick lection. The store also hosts the poetry Fine Arts Building.

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ANNOUNCING Animal Rescue League’s

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Celebration and Blessing of Animals

SAV

Bellefonte Street in Shadyside

THE

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October 4

Wild about Education

October 9 - 12

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October 24

Halloween Jam on Walnut

October 31

Paw Prints Gala

November 7

Goodwill Donation Drive

Noon – 3pm 7pm -11pm

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7pm – 10:30pm

10am -2pm

Wildlife Center, 6000 Verona Road, Verona

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THE LION

WRITTEN AND PERFORMED BY BENJAMIN SCHEUER

Show titles, dates, and prices are subject to change.

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) CityTheatreCompany.org 1300 Bingham Street, South Side

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THU 17 BRILLOBOX. Crooks on Tape, Bob Schriner, Robin Vote, South Seas Sneak. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. LATITUDE 360. The Bo’Hog Brothers. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. LAVA LOUNGE. Young Rapids, Grand Bell. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Echo & The Bunnymen. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Turkuaz w/ Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. South Side. 412-682-0177. SMILING MOOSE. Whipstriker, Rawhide, Seax, Savage Master, w/ PanzerBastard. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Death Cab For Cutie w/ Twin Shadow. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 18 31ST STREET PUB. False Profit, The Moneys, Six Speed Kill, The Bestevers. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Red Western & Native Alloys. Strip District. 412-251-6058. CHUMP JUNGLE. Nerve Beats, Secret Paper Moon, The John Trumaine Show, Worn Colors. Oakland. 412-853-0518. CLUB CAFE. Chuck Prophet. South Side. 412-431-4950. LATITUDE 360. Totally 80s. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MEADOWS CASINO. Dancing Queen. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats w/ Ruby The Hatchet, Ecstatic Vision. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PALACE THEATRE. Ace Frehley. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARK HOUSE. Blackwater Mojo. North Side. 412-224-2273. ROCK ROOM. Victims Of Contagion, Trollkicker, Incinerate Creation. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. 724-319-7938. SMILING MOOSE. Kings Of OK, The Gentlemen, Renton, Asshouse, w/ Divulge. Early. Devon Miles, John Quest, Joel kellem, Komplex. Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Spanky Wilson & The All-Stars. Title Town. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

CLUB CAFE. Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown Band. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Midday Veil, Olympic Village, Gangwish. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JACKSON ST. Daniels & McClain. Evans City Oktober Festival. www.danielsandmcclain.com JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. MEADOWS CASINO. U.S. Kids. Washington. 724-503-1200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Senators, Andrew Lasswell, Derek CF Pegritz, Endless Mike & The Beagle Club, Lorenzo’s Oil, Boys, Trash Bag, Pond Hockey, Murder For Girls. Bloomfield. 412-324-2213. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls w/ Skinny Lister, Beans On Toast. Millvale. 412-821-4447. NIED’S HOTEL. Jumpin’ Jack Flash & Southside Jerry. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PALACE THEATRE. Beatlemania Now. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SMILING MOOSE. Darkness Divided, It Lies Within, A War Within, Beneath The Current, W/ The Last Snow. Early. Camp Element, Skratch. Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. TOWN TAVERN. Driven. Southside. 724-845-2430.

SUN 20 ALLISON PARK PAVILION. Slim Forsythe & the New Payday Loners. Allison Park. 412-770-8150. BRILLOBOX. Fanfarai, Vardo Sisters, DJ Pandemic. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DERRY COMMUNITY CENTER. The Lenny Smith Band. Latrobe. 724-309-1746. THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SCOTTDALE FALL FESTIVAL. The Holidays. Scottdale. 724-619-1733.

MON 21 HARD ROCK CAFE. Finger Eleven. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Wailin’ Storms, Cruces, & Old Dream. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

MP 3 MONDAY DREAM PHONE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KARLY TAKACH}

ROCK/POP

Each week we bring you a new song by a local artist. This week’s track comes from Dream Phone; stream or download

SAT 19

“Mind Reader,” from the band’s

BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576.

new self-titled release, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions w/ Chelsey Nicole & the Northside Vamps. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

HEAVY ROTATION

ACOUSTIC

Here are the songs Jackson O’Connell-Barlow THU 17 of Mrs. Paintbrush can’t stop listening to: CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF

TUE 22 CLUB CAFE. Holly Miranda w/ Gracie & Rachel. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Crystal City, The Tilt Room, Inco Fido. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Punch Brothers w/ Gabriel Kahane. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Aer w/ Cody Simpson. South Side. 412-381-6811.

PITTSBURGH. Breakneck Creek. North Side. 412-477-0655. CLUB CAFE. Melissa Ferrick. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE ROOTS CELLAR. Mac Martin & The Dixie Travelers. Shadyside. 412-361-1915.

Duncan Browne

“The Wild Places”

FRI 18 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Tommy Womack. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

Just-Ice

“The Desolate One”

WED 23 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Love Letters. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992. CLUB CAFE. Head For The Hills w/ Lone Wolf Club. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Freedy Johnston & Jeffrey Gaines. Station Square. 412-481-7625. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Calexico w/ Gaby Moreno. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SMILING MOOSE. Blacklist Royals, Remainders, DIVORCE, Bryan McQuaid. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Automatic Man

SAT 19

“Automatic Man”

SUNBURST SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Ben Bedford & Tom Breiding. Squirrel Hill. 412-475-8280.

TUE 22 THE R BAR. Tom & Katie Show. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

DJS

MRS. PAINTBRUSH RELEASE PARTY

WED 23

10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 18 BRILLOBOX. Bombardier, Speak Onion, 8Cylinder, Disheveled, Cutups. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. KEYSTONE BAR. DJ Mike. Braddock. 724-758-4217. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 19 DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Top 40 Dance Party. South Side. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPIRIT. DJ Kelly. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Organ Trio. Downtown. 412-325-6769. HARTWOOD ACRES. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. LEMONT. Judi Figel & Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo/Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-691-0536.

BLUES THU 17 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

SAT 19 BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. MOONDOG’S. Jeff Fetterman Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. STARLITE LOUNGE. Ric Proudfoot. Blawnox. 412-828-9842.

THU 17

RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Richie Cole, Frank Cunimondo Trio, Patricia Skala, Michele Benson & The Bensen Burners. Carnegie Celebrates . w w w Jazz. Carnegie. aper p ty ci h g p 412-279-0770. .com

ANDYS WINE BAR. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 18

SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-Money. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Bob Mintzer Big Band Elevations. North Side. 412-322-0800.

HIP HOP/R&B SUN 20 STAGE AE. Mac Miller w/ Choo Jackson, The Come-Up. North Side. 412-229-5483.

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SAT 19 ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

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MON 21 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

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SUN 20 ORGANIST ANNIE LAVER. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Season opener featuring performances of Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 “Italian” & Tchaikovsky’s Capriccio italien. Plus Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov performing his own work. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. ROBERTA JONES, ORGANIST. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

TUE 22 RESONANCE CHAMBER. The Livermore, East Liberty. 412-956-6033.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 18 BUNKERPROJECTS. Bell’s Roar w/ DJ Babyteeth, blackmermaid & PJ Roduta. Garfield. CLUB CAFE. ElectroBelly Dance Troupe with Rich Ermlick & Andrea & Danielle Commisso. South Side. 412-431-4950.

LIVE BAND THURSDAYS!

THURSDAY SEPT 17/10PM YOUNG RAPIDS, GRAND BELL THURSDAY SEPT 24/10PM BARNYARD STOMPERS THURSDAY OCT 1/10PM TAIL LIGHT REBELLION $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

REGGAE FRI 18 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-904-3335.

COUNTRY THU 17 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

FRI 18 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Lady Antebellum, Hunter Hayes & Sam Hunt. 724-947-7400.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Texas Tex’s Tribute to Buddy Emmons w/ Pete Freeman. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CLASSICAL

WED 23 ANDYS WINE BAR. Shari Richards. Downtown. 412-773-8884. RIVERS CLUB. Lucarelli Jazz w/ Peg Wilson. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

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FERN HOLLOW NATURE CENTER. Ras Prophet. Sewickley. 412-741-6136. MITCHELL’S. The Flow Band. Oakland. 412-682-9530.

SAT 19

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

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PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Season opener featuring performances of Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 “Italian” & Tchaikovsky’s Capriccio italien. Plus Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov performing his own work. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 19

SUN 20

FULL LIST ONLINE

JAZZ

FRI 18

THU 17 AMANDA VAN STORY LEWIS. Opera debut. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 1-800-838-3006, x 1.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do Sept 16 - 22 WEDNESDAY 16 The Winter’s Tale

IN PITTSBURGH JERSEY BOYS

SEPTEMBER 22 - OCTOBER 4 BENEDUM CENTER, DOWNTOWN

UNION TRUST BUILDING Downtown. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412-362-1713. Through Oct. 3.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Mac Miller

21+ Night: Robots

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Of Monsters and Men

A$AP Rocky

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Visit carnegiesciencecenter.org to register. 6p.m.

Bayside

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5p.m.

WVU COLISEUM Morgantown, WV. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 8:30p.m.

Fit For Rivals

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

McKeesport. Tickets: mckeesportlittletheater. com or 412-673-1100. Through Sept. 27.

SATURDAY 19 Shine 2015 Tour: The Color Run

NORTH SHORE. For more info & tickets visit thecolorrun.com. 9a.m.

PHOTO BY JEREMY DANIEL

Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio

THURSDAY 17

The Amazing Acro-cats Pounce on Pittsburgh 937 LIBERTY AVE., 1ST FLOOR Downtown. Tickets: circuscats.com. Through Sept. 27.

NEW HAZLETT THEATER North Side. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com or 1-888-71-tickets. 8p.m.

Turkuaz with Yo Mama’s Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Big Fat Booty Band REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Death Cab for Cutie

Gypsy

STAGE AE North Side.

FRIDAY 18

SUNDAY 20

Where to live

NOW LEASING

OVERKILL

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Finger Eleven

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Minors under 21 with parent. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Jersey Boys

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 4. NOW LEASING

BEST

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& TOWNHOMES NOW LEASING

Find your happy place

MONDAY 21

TUESDAY 22

Taylor Caniff’s “RV Project” Meet & Greet Tour

MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


I’VE LONG WONDERED WHERE THE WORD “CRABBO” CAME FROM.

TWO WOMEN {BY AL HOFF} Queen of the Earth begins with an ending: Catherine (Elisabeth Moss), shot in tight close-up, her face tearstreaked, is in the final throes of a breakup. The scene shifts and now she is en route to a lake house, along with her best friend, Virginia (Katherine Waterson), to recuperate. But in Alex Ross Perry’s spare melodrama, the week in the country exposes the rifts in the women’s friendship, and finds Catherine spiraling into a breakdown.

Troubled times: Elisabeth Moss

Or so it seems. The enigmatic film has a loose narrative, marked by flashbacks to last summer at the lake and lengthy monologues. Viewers will work to pick out threads, and even to sort out what might be delusion. The two summers are mirror images: In one, Virginia nurses a breakup, and is neglected by Catherine; now the roles are reversed. Both women enjoy material and social privilege, but seem incapable of looking after each other, or themselves, when life zigs rather than zags. Perry (Listen Up, Philip) shoots in a tense but ethereal style, employing close-ups, silence and sun-lit moodiness. The film recalls earlier arthouse works such as Persona, Interiors and Three Women and, like those films, demands a patient viewer. Starts Fri., Sept. 18. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Kahlil Gibran’s best-selling book of poetry celebrating freedom of expression, The Prophet, has been adapted into an animated feature, directed by Roger Allers. In it, an exiled poet, his housekeeper and her lively daughter embark on a journey. The film features animated sequences created by Bill Plympton, Tomm Moore (Secret of the Kells), Nina Paley (Sita Sings the Blues) and others. Starts Fri., Sept. 18. Regent Square

{FILM STILLS COURTESY OF DAVID BERNABO}

Scenes from the film Food Systems: A Night Out

THE PLATE SHOW {BY CELINE ROBERTS}

A

FTER A SUCCESSFUL Kickstarter and

months of shooting and editing, David Bernabo is releasing Food Systems: A Night Out, the first of three installments in a series about Pittsburgh’s food and restaurant culture. A 105-minute compilation of interviews and mesmerizing, fast-paced cooking montages allow the viewer to step into the world behind the swinging doors. By peeking into the lives of those whose sweat and innovation are making Pittsburgh a world-class dining city, the film focuses on the culture of who we are and where our culinary traditions came from. As to where we are going, Bernabo leaves that mostly up to the viewer. Most of the interviewees are big-hitter chefs like Jamilka Borges, Sonja Finn, Toni Pais, Bill Fuller, Keith Fuller and Kevin Sousa. But Bernabo (also known locally as

a musican, composer and performance artist) is careful to include food writers, historians, educators, servers and even a few politicians to give the full scope of what it takes to create “third places” (where we live our lives when we aren’t at home or work).

FOOD SYSTEMS: A NIGHT OUT DIRECTED BY: David Bernabo 7 p.m. Wed., Sept. 23 ($12 with reception) and noon, Sun., Sept. 27 ($8), Row House Cinema, Lawrenceville. Also, 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 1, Wigle Whiskey Barrelhouse, 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side (free)

The film’s major calling card is the tribute it pays to the history of Pittsburgh cuisine through the eyes and memories of those who have been in the industry since

the 1970s — when, according to Tim Ryan, the president of the Culinary Institute of America, even sourcing things like fresh herbs was difficult. Because restaurants are places of comings and goings, their life cycles often make huge impacts on the food culture but leave little physical trace after they’re gone. Each interviewee is linked to every other through the web of these life cycles. Many of them learned their craft side by side in the famous kitchens of La Normande, Big Burrito and Baum Vivant, and went on to open successful restaurants of their own. While history is paid its due, the film homes in on the present as well. A particularly endearing discussion of restaurant lingo reveals the more personal sides of those being interviewed. It’s hard for even the most professional staff not to crack a CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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THE PLATE SHOW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 65

Steve Jobs: The Man In The Machine

(2015) - 9/16 @ 7:30pm, 9/17 @ 7:30pm A look at the personal and private life of the late Apple CEO, Steve Jobs. _________________________________________________

The Underground at The Hollywood

9/18 @ 5:00pm, 9/19 @ 10:00am Two days of mind blowing horror! _________________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show

- 9/19 @ Midnight With live shadowcast by the JCCP! _________________________________________________

Trail Running Film Festival - 9/20 @ 5:30pm The first & only theater-based touring trail running film festival in the United States returns with all new films. _________________________________________________

Digging for Fire (2015) - 9/22 @ 7:30pm The discovery of a bone and a gun send a husband

and wife on separate adventures over the course of a weekend.

smile over the terse, often odd words that get thrown around in a fast-paced working environment. I’ve long wondered where “crabbo,” the industry word for a quartsized deli container, came from, and thanks to Bill Fuller, I have my answer. Equally as refreshing is Bernabo’s decision not to shy away from addressing the industry’s issues with sexism. Sonja Finn and Hilary Zozula both discuss (if briefly) the problems that can face a female chef/owner and how frustrating it can be to come up in a male-dominated profession. Sexism, along with racism and fair wages, are the trinity of issues that restaurants have begun to tackle publicly over the last few years. Hopefully, a further discussion of all three will show up in the final two installments of Food Systems.

From theater to dance to the visual arts, City Paper offers

the most honest,

in-depth arts criticism in Pittsburgh

every Wednesday in print and online at www.pghcitypaper.com

Toni Pias

From Kevin Sousa’s molecular-gastronomy ventures and the now-closed Le Pommier’s chicken-liver mousse that has found a second life at Thin Man Sandwich Shop to Finn’s own pizza ovens, the thread of community is everywhere to be found in this film. Tribalism in the restaurant world is strong, born of an arena where hard work is king and every night is a baptism by fire. At one point during a montage, the Sharpied words “eye of the tiger,” scrawled across the top of the stainless steel line counter, flash on screen during a cooking montage. No sequence better sums up the tone of the piece. The film itself is a mixed bag of styles. It oscillates between beautiful, warm shots that look like they could be stills out of Food and Wine Magazine, and hyper-realistic scene-setting footage that often focuses on the gritty side of Pittsburgh’s cityscape. The music, written by Bernabo and Le Rex, is used masterfully particularly through the kitchen montages, where cooks flash pans and move as though they could hear the sound track as well. The driving drums during the opening sequence of a busy kitchen plating for service made me feel like I was right back in my apron on the line … although with significantly less swearing under my breath. CELI NE @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK BLACK MASS. Johnny Depp stars as the infamous Boston gangster (and FBI informant) Whitey Bulger in this biographical crime thriller directed by Scott Cooper. Starts Fri., Sept. 18 CAPTIVE. A single mother is held captive in her own apartment by a criminal on the run. Kate Mara and David Oyelowo star in Jerry Jameson’s thriller. Starts Fri., Sept. 18 EVEREST. Baltasar Kormakur directs this dramatization of the disastrous and deadly 1996 season on Mount Everest. Jake Gyllenhaal, Josh Brolin and Jason Clarke head an ensemble cast. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., Sept. 18 GRANDMA. Retired feminist poet and practicing misanthrope Elle (Lily Tomlin) is in a funk after the recent death of her longtime partner. She’s hardly fazed when her teenage granddaughter, Sage (Julia Garner), turns up at her house looking for financial help with an abortion. But grandma’s broke too, so the pair takes off around boho Los Angeles to rustle up the funds before the late-afternoon appointment. Various friends, lovers, frenemies and family members are visited, including Sage’s mom (Marcia Gay Harden). The day-long quest turns out to be good for everybody — reinvigorating Elle, and facilitating the sharing of knowledge and experiences across three generations of strong-willed women. Paul Wietz’s latest film is a mélange of comedy, mini road trip and coming-of-age story (even in its short timespan, the characters gain insight and change for the better). All this was great, but honestly I could have just watched Lily Tomlin drive around L.A. dropping truth bombs on people for eight hours. I hope her well-received performance here reminds other directors what a great and versatile performer she is. Starts Fri., Sept. 18. Manor, SouthSide Works (Al Hoff)

CP

The Tribe Sept. 18; 6 and 8:15 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19; and 6:15 p.m. Sun., Sept. 20. Parkway (AH) THE VISIT. It’s impossible to approach any new M. Night Shyamalan movie without some trepidation: There have been some epically bad movies in his spiral downward from his debut hit The Sixth Sense. And, when it’s an advertised thriller, you’ll be distracted looking for and anticipating a Big Twist. So perhaps because half my brain was taken up with these aforementioned concerns, I was buffeted about by this outing, which is a curious hybrid of horror, comedy, found footage and elder-care primer.

MAZE RUNNER: THE SCORCH TRIALS. Getting out of the maze was just the beginning: Now on the open road, still more obstacles await our heroes. Wes Ball directs the second segment of this teen-dystopia franchise, adapted from James Dashner’s novels. Starts Fri., Sept. 18 THE TRIBE. Miroslav Slaboshpitsky’s debut feature is unlike any you’ve seen — and you will see it. The only language employed is Ukrainian sign language (with no translation, subtitles or intertitles), and the experience is both disorienting and engrossing. The general plot is easy enough to follow: A teenage boy, new to a rundown boarding school for the deaf, falls in with the school’s criminal element (pimping, robbery, assorted thuggery). It’s not really a silent movie — there is ambient sound, such as footsteps or doors slamming. But it does require a different form of processing, a keen attention to body language and onscreen details. Our exclusion from the dialogue reinforces the insular nature of this community, with its own codes and dynamics determined as much by economic challenges as social ones. The students occasionally resemble an animal pack, roaming the mean streets, their lean bodies projecting a feral insolence. This is not an uplifting tale — there are several tough scenes of violence and sexual assault. And it is often in these scenes that these kids, who move through their world with confidence, seem most vulnerable, particularly when their physical weaknesses are exploited by those who share them. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri.,

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The Visit Fifteen-year-old Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and 13-year-old Tyler (Ed Oxenbould) set out to spend a week at the remote country house of the grandparents they have never met. Aspiring filmmaker Becca decides to turn the visit into a documentary, hence Shyamalan’s adoption of the now-dated found-footage gimmick. (This also gives Shyamalan a chance to auteur-splain about filmmaking through Becca, but it comes off more pedantic than meta.) But Nana (Deanna Dunagan) and Pop-Pop (Peter McRobbie) turn out to be first odd, then troubling and, finally, scary. (Oh, and also “hilarious,” if mocking various age-related infirmities is your thing.) The Visit probably succeeds better as comedy than as horror. It’s got that cheerfully low-rent, domesticgothic vibe of an old EC Comics tale, and is certainly more entertaining than Shyamalan’s recent “serious” features. It’s still kind of a misfire, filled with plot holes and tired jokes, but at least it moves along. (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Bill Murray series. Caddyshack (this 1980 comedy is the greatest movie ever made about golf, gophers and groundsmen),


Sept. 16-17. Lost in Translation (an aging movie star and a young woman become friends while visiting Tokyo, in the melancholic comedy from 2003), Sept. 16-17. Stripes (joining the army seems like a good idea for a couple of layabouts, in this 1981 comedy), Sept. 16-17. Groundhog Day (a Pittsburgh weatherman finds his day repeating in this 1993 comedy), Sept. 17. Made in Pittsburgh series. Night of the Living Dead: RiffTrax edition (1968 classic that put Pittsburgh on the zombie map). 7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri., Sept. 18. Flashdance (the 1983 tale of the plucky welder-exotic dancer who dreams of being a ballerina), Sept. 18-19, Sept. 21 and Sept. 23-24. The Wonder Boys (Michael Douglas struggles with writer’s block in this 2000 dramedy), Sept. 18-20 and Sept. 22-24. The Fish That Saved Pittsburgh (1979 comedy about a basketball team and an astrologer), Sept. 18-22 and Sept. 24. Slap Shot (1977 Paul Newman comedy features rough-and-tumble hockey in a struggling steel town), Sept. 19-24. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9 THE UNDERGROUND: MASSACRE FEST 666. A two-day festival of independent horror films presented by Massacre Video and Horrorrealm. On Friday, it’s Mondo Magic, Mutant War, Hack-o-Lantern and Diary of a Deadbeat: The Story of Jim VanBebber. Saturday’s selections include: Run, Hunters, Invalid, Manna, Revenge Is Her Middle Name, ArME and the intriguingly titled American Guinea Pig Bouquet of Guts & Gore. All directors are expected to attend. 5 p.m. Fri., Sept. 18, and 10 a.m. Sat., Sept. 19. Hollywood. $40 (both days), $25 nightly or $8 per movie. www.horrorrealmcon.com CAPOTE. Bennett Miller’s film is an account of the six years it took Truman Capote to write In Cold Blood, his book about a multiple homicide in rural Kansas in 1959. The rest of the film is a subtle effort to reveal the darkest heart of its difficult central figure. Philip Seymour Hoffman re-creates his subject’s nasal

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finds a husband (Jake Johnson) and wife (Rosemary DeWitt) disagreeing over how to handle the discovery of a bone and old gun. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 22. Hollywood REFLEKTOR TAPES. Kahlil Joseph’s new documentary goes behind the scenes at the making of Canadian band Arcade Fire’s Reflektor album. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 23. Hollywood. $10 MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000: THE MOVIE. The popular 1980s Comedy Central TV show, in which junky old movies are mocked on screen, had its own big-screen version in 1996. In this extended episode, directed by Jim Mallon, Mike Nelson and his robot companions are forced to watch the 1955 stinker This Island Earth. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 23. AMC Waterfront. $5

Grandma lisp and cavalier humanity with such precision that it becomes distracting, though Hoffman occasionally cuts through to find the tender meat inside. 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 18. Melwood (Harry Kloman) TRAIL RUNNING FILM FESTIVAL. This touring film festival presents a nearly three-hour selection of short documentaries about trail running, including treks in Siberia, the Seward Mountain foot race in Alaska, and a speed challenge on the Pacific Crest Trail. Wear comfortable shoes. 6 p.m. Sun., Sept. 20. Hollywood. $15 TWO LANE BLACKTOP. There’s not a lot of dialogue in Monte Hellman’s widescreen paean to cars, speed and going somewhere, but

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each line seems portentous. Maybe it’s the strippeddown vibe — the nameless characters, the empty highways, the primer-gray ’55 Chevy that co-stars — that makes this 1971 road-trip movie seem like a mash-up of European arthouse and home movies of California car culture. Musicians James Taylor and Dennis Wilson star as two street-racers heading east who challenge an enigmatic sweaterwearing dude (Warren Oates) to a cross-country race. It’s minimal, but still thoughtful, funny and beautifully shot. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series, “What Were They Thinking?” 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 20. Regent Square (AH) DIGGING FOR FIRE. Joe Swanberg’s new dramedy

GALAXY QUEST. The aging, bickering stars of TV space drama Galaxy Quest find themselves whisked into outer space by their adoring fans from planet Thermia, in Dean Parisot’s 1999 comedy. Screens as part of the Brew Cinema series. Also available: beer from Voodoo (with donation) and limited-edition screenprinted posters by Mike Budai ($30). 6:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 24. Hollywood. $10 (all ages) (AH) MODERN TIMES. Unlike most of his earlier features, Charlie Chaplin’s 1937 film has a clear political message to impart, but it’s still remarkable how seldom this classic strains for effect. The Tramp is enmeshed (often literally) in the machinery of the industrial world — on an assembly line, in jail and inadvertently leading a labor march — along the way making cause with a fellow outcast (Paulette Goddard). The screening continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 24. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomesteadfoundation. org (Bill O’Driscoll)

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[STAGE]

EXPRESSED LIVE

“WE’RE TOTALLY GOING TO GET TO THAT SOON.”

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TRANS-Q LIVE! 8 p.m., Fri., Sept. 18. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $8-10. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

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[ARCHITECTURE]

UNPAID DEBTS Musician Bell’s Roar {PHOTO COURTESY OF BELL’S ROAR}

Much like the first edition of Trans-Q Live! at The Andy Warhol Museum, in 2013, this year’s edition at the 100-seat Warhol Theater will retain a pop-cabaret/varietyshow feel. Essentially a live version of the Pittsburgh-produced online variety show Trans-Q Television, the 90-minute Sept. 18 production offers an eclectic mix of music, dance and spoken-word and visual artists for an adult evening of entertainment. The show is produced by Scott Andrew, Adil Mansoor and Suzie Silver, but its title can be somewhat misleading, acknowledges Silver, who’s an art professor at Carnegie Mellon University. While the program has a queer-community focus, she says, “We are interested in more radical expressions of gender and desire as an artist than [in] someone’s sexuality.” Hosted by Joseph Hall, this year’s lineup of local performers include bawdy sketch-comedy troupe The Bang Gang; brash and funny drag performer Cindy Crotchford (Billy T. Sharp); Trinidadian spoken-word artist Bekezela Mguni; and a collaborative performance by multimedia artist Mario Ashkar and theatrical drag performer Moonbaby. A last-minute replacement for hip-hop soul singer Blakk Rapp Madusa is New York-based indie synthpop singer/songwriter Bell’s Roar (Sean Desiree). Bell’s Roar will perform selections from her soon-tobe-released Firebrand Records EP SECOND CHANCES Vol. 1. Silver says she lucked out that Bell’s Roar was already going to be in Pittsburgh that day to perform at Bunker Projects as part of her 11-city Midwest tour. Also on the program are performances by dancers Anna Thompson and Taylor Knight (a.k.a. slowdanger), their work eXchange, in which the dancers take turns generating sounds with their bodies and responding through movement. And in a collaboration between dancer/ choreographer Jasmine Hearn and visual artist Alisha Wormsley, the pair will explore themes of transitioning and otherness using dance, video and song. “With Trans-Q Live! we are really trying to provide a venue and a platform for local artists to experiment and collaborate with fellow artists that they might not otherwise get,” says Silver. Intermixed with the live performances of eight to ten minutes each will be video excerpts from upcoming Trans-Q Television episodes and a video by Portuguese video artist/dancer Daniel Pinheiro that references the 1968 Andy Warholproduced film Flesh.

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

B

ARACK OBAMA was recently in Alas-

ka talking about dangerous climate change even as he announced plans to allow Shell to begin major Arctic drilling. This seemingly stark hypocrisy is likely more complex than it looks. Doubtless, the president dislikes but cannot stop oil drilling, while he admires but cannot fully implement environmental sustainability. The world’s most powerful man is stuck in the historical moment, where momentum and inertia are sadly reversed. This is how I understand the recent announcement by developers McCormack Baron Salazar, accompanied by Mayor Peduto, that Bjarke Ingels Group will be the lead architectural designer for the redevelopment of the Lower Hill around the old Civic Arena site. (I avoid saying “BIG,” a name that emits cliché headlines like radioactivity). Bjarke Ingels, the Danish architect, is barely 40 and already a superstar, author

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

{PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ}

Grounds for discussion: The former Civic Arena site, now a parking lot.

of a thick architectural treatise in comicbook format and the subject of a New Yorker profile, even as his international projects proliferate. He has sustainable projects in his portfolio, such as the proposed Amager Bakke Waste-to-Energy power plant in Copenhagen, which emits stylish steam instead of smoke. It will also serve, notoriously, as a ski slope. Still, Ingels is, more broadly, the thing that we think will make the future better. The unstoppable undesirable momentum, however, is the Penguins’ ownership of the development site and, more broadly, publicly supported development of privately owned real estate. If Penguins owner Mario Lemieux and his partners are considering selling the site or taking on investors at a profit, as has been widely reported, they should surely pay back all of the public subsidies that made the whole enterprise possible. Even Peduto has publicly hinted at such a thing.

The Lower Hill is not an asset for the Penguins to sell, it is a debt for them to repay. Meanwhile, for all the great achievements in the city, we’ve also just been named one of the most racist cities in America. Accusing website insidermonkey. com is obscure, but similar published indictments of this city proliferate. The usual chirpy cheerleading websites are notably silent on the matter. So it’s particularly bad timing to announce that your white developers have chosen a really white architect (albeit a really good one) to work in an overwhelmingly African-American neighborhood, especially when the published response from McCormack Baron Salazar about minority-developer participation is, effectively, “We’re totally going to get to that soon.” It’s notable that a Community Benefits Agreement, guaranteeing financial payments and employment participation for


communities in the Hill, has been worked out. Based on my own experience hearing many hours of public testimony, demands for the agreement ranged from absolutely just and necessary to simply angry and unrealistic — not easily resolved. So the announcement of an architect, even if CBA parameters are still in place, indeed seems like an ill-timed slap. While Mario Lemieux is already contemplating his taxpayer-funded profits, and Ingels is coming on board, fulfillment of the promises for local employment have yet to begin. Likewise, a project of this size and importance should really have a more publicly visible selection process — more firms presenting their work with opportunities for public input, regardless of who makes the final decision. Such a process could also give an opportunity to present more clearly how an Ingels-led design team can still honor the letter and the spirit of the CBA by hiring by other entities as collaborators.

Speaking of other entities, what happened to Walter Hood? The African-American landscape architect is a brilliant designer and dynamic public speaker with a national reputation. He was hired to work on designs around the Consol Energy Center, in a project that has quietly stalled with insufficient funding. Hood doesn’t quite have Ingels’ magnesium-flare visibility, but he should join the new design team. He is practically already on it. How did his work fall off the radar when so many are worried about Ingels getting hired and Lemieux getting paid? Shameful. It’s great to praise Ingels, but not when the city and developer lose focus on issues of ownership, justice and participation. Such failures only update the decadeslong legacy of structural racism rather than solving it. One talented African-American designer is hardly going to eliminate such problems. But he could certainly help change the impression about what is unstoppable and what never quite gets started in redevelopment of the Lower Hill, something that Bjarke Ingels will not completely achieve, no matter how remarkable his designs might be. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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PRESENTS...

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

“Hammer. I Miss You,” by Jeremy Beightol

THE LOWER HILL IS NOT AN ASSET FOR THE PENGUINS TO SELL, IT IS A DEBT FOR THEM TO REPAY.

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

[ART REVIEW]

The Gallery 4 consistently produces some of the most intriguing exhibitions in the area, and the current joint show Stranded in the Underworld, featuring works by Jeremy Beightol and Brian Holderman, is no exception. Two artists with a healthy dose of shared qualities, balanced with healthy divergence, combine to present a big exhibition in a small space. It’s been several years since Beightol’s last showing, Satan Is Real, a stellar joint exhibition with Jesse Best, at ModernFormations Gallery. In the time since, Beightol has expanded upon and complicated his already captivating vision and added layers upon layers of depth. The style and subject matter are similar — wizards and warlocks, saints and animals, nature and the supernatural, executed with precise lines and clarity — but the execution has evolved and deepened. Previously working in predominantly flat hues and noon-bright light, he’s now employing a lush richness, complex shading and subtle yet electrifying gradation, darkness and shadow, and suggestion, going from comic to Crowley by way of Black Sabbath, with a touch of Alphonse Mucha. Roses in full bloom, moons, stars, toadstools, madonnas, magical rabbits, providential eyes, beasts, babes and blood are all rendered with a vibrance that mystically seems to hold an antiquity. Beightol’s new approach to color furthers his work with the implication of age, something sorcerous found in a dusty corner of a hidden antique shop. It’s always been powerful, but now it’s rich with wisdom. Where Beightol is eerie and earthy, Holderman is space-age and cosmic. An aesthetic combining vintage vixens, golden-age superhero comics (and contemporary artists like Darwyn Cooke who emulate that signature style), pulp monster movies and atomic-era aliens mashes together with clean lines and vibrant color. Women in spacesuits battle slime creatures and tentacled googly-eyed goliaths, lounge in coffins with tar serpents, and imperiously guard the gates to hell. It’s all over-the-top pop, and it’s all good fun. Stranded in the Underworld has an extended run at The Gallery 4. The works on the walls are well worth the visit. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GYPSY

SEPT. 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 2015 Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00 PM, Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM Tickets are $18.00, $10.00 for students group rates available. Handicapped Accessible.

A musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and a book by Arthur Laurents. 1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS WWW.MCKEESPORTLITTLETHEATER.COM

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

CARPENTRY BASICS: BUILDING A BOX REGIS WILL VESTA HOME SERVICES A box is the basic form of many woodworking projects. Even seemingly complex projects like a chest of drawers are based on boxes inside boxes. Learn a simple and durable method of constructing a box while making a tool tote you can take home. About the presenter: Regis Will is a woodworker, craftsman, and owner of Vesta Home Services, a consulting firm on house restoration and Do-it-Yourself projects. He blogs about his work at The New Yinzer Workshop. This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Visit www.phlf.org to join! Non-members: $5.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 • 10:00 – 11:30 AM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

744 REBECCA AVENUE

412-471-5808

Season 21

Quantum Theatre’s The Winter’s Tale

Holiday Hijinks and Revue

Laws of Attraction

Sept. 16-Oct. 3, 2015

Dec. 5, 2015

Remainder | Northside

One Night Stand

The Down and Dirty Dance Party

Nov. 13 and 14, 2015

Feb. 13, 2016

May 20, 2016

April 1-16, 2016

Buy a SEASON PASS to attend every performance and event, plus access to exclusive perks! www.attacktheatre.com/seasonpass

Attack Theatre’s Season 21 is made possible in part by:

Photo: Copyright 2015 Craig Thompson Photography

The Benter Foundation, The Grable Foundation and PNC Charitable Trusts

STRANDED IN THE UNDERWORLD continues through Sept. 26. The Gallery 4, 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

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UPCOMING E V E N T S PLAYERS More Formal than Normal [PLAY REVIEWS]

{BY TED HOOVER}

Sunday Sept 27th

6pm wine tasting and chef prepared appetizers 6:30pm Tango Lesson Open dance till 9pm $15.00 BYO wine

Ladies Night Out!

Friday October 9th • 7-9:30pm Mini Lessons in Aerial Silks, pole dancing, chair dancing. Health & wellness vendors on site. Light refreshments included BYOB $15.00 age 21+ unless accompanied by adult

4765 LIBERTY AVE. | BLOOMFIELD 412.681.0111 PITTSBURGHDANC CENTER COM PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER.COM

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

TO MY WAY of thinking, there’s not a funnier gag-writer in Pittsburgh than F. J. Hartland. His lines can snap and crackle, and his plays are usually an occasion for unbridled hootin’ and hollerin’. So I was more than ready for his Games of the Mind, making its debut at Throughline Theatre. The play is set a decade ago and concerns students at a Catholic school and their attempts to win a local TV trivia contest. The head nun, Sister Bridget, is determined to break a 40-year losing streak, and enlists school nerds Margaret and Gregory to win the cup. Games of the Mind also takes place in the present day, when students return for a school reunion. We learn what’s become of them since the contest, as well as how various people influenced the outcome of the game. As usual, Hartland doesn’t disappoint in the laughs department — big jokes and small throwaway gags land repeatedly. And he has set up a tension-filled plot, a comedy essential. So I was wondering why I wasn’t having a better time. Since I’m assuming this is a first draft, there’s undoubtedly a lot of underbrush Hartland will be clearing away; on several occasions, the audience gets ahead of the play, waiting for the playwright to catch up, and that’s never good. Also, the play’s tone shifts wildly, from goofy skit to slamming-door sex farce to acid-dipped Durang-style confrontations; it makes the play feel like a hodgepodge of scenes rather than a cohesive whole with a focused dramaturgical purpose.

GAMES OF THE MIND continues through Sat., Sept. 19. Throughline Theatre at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. www.throughlinetheatre.org

Director Allison K. Weakland could also spend more time focusing the play, tightening the pace, rethinking the blocking and sharpening the playing style. All the laughs are played on top; at first, that can be funny, but it quickly becomes wearying. Karter Schachner and Katie Trupiano are bright, high-energy performers who easily move the show forward. Alaina Gilchrist gets her share of laughs as — what used to be known as — the girl of easy virtue, and Maura Underwood makes the comedic most out of her role as a

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICK MOORE/THROUGHLINE THEATRE}

From left: Karter Schachner, Derrick Shane and Katie Trupiano in Throughline’s Games of the Mind

drunken TV broadcaster. Hartland’s got something here, he just needs to start digging it out. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

REUNION DUES {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

THE TALE OF the prodigal son might be a

familiar one, but Theresa Rebeck’s Dead Accounts, now at Little Lake Theatre Co., transforms this well-worn premise into something unabashedly weird and modern. When we meet Jack (Gregory Caridi), he’s gorging on pint after pint of stolen Graeter’s ice cream with no explanation for his homebody sister Lorna (Danette Marie Levers) as to why he’s suddenly fled New York and turned up — in the middle of the night — in his hometown of Cincinnati. She asks, of course, but Jack is skilled at the art of distraction, his manic and foul-mouthed monologues talking around a problem rather than about it. Ironic, considering he prides himself on always telling the truth. Lorna and their mother, Barbara (Marianne Shaffer), are naturally concerned, especially once Jack starts flashing his oodles of cash and insists on buying everything from dozens of pizzas and Skyline chili cheese dogs to better health care for his father — who’s suffering from a debilitating case of kidney stones. Something’s different about Jack, and as Lorna

and Barbara try to unravel the truth, they soon realize that Jack’s secret will change the landscape of their family forever. Meanwhile, Jack’s blueblood wife, Jenny (Rebecca MacTaggart), tracks her estranged husband to Ohio, eager to hold him accountable for his mistakes. At times, it’s unclear where, if anywhere, playwright Rebeck’s story is going, and Jenny’s character is underdeveloped: Though MacTaggart has an impressive command of the stage, she’s often given little to do besides stand around and glower. While Jenny’s icequeen demeanor eventually breaks down as she mourns the loss of her marriage, the earlier lack of character development feels like a missed opportunity.

DEAD ACCOUNTS continues through Sept. 26. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Dr., Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

Yet overall, director Art DeConciliis and his first-rate cast keep the unsteady elements afloat, and the show’s finale delivers an irresistible combination of humor and melancholy. There are no straightforward answers here; for a play from 2012 so rooted in the struggles of middle America, anything else would be facile. This is a production that both celebrates and laments life’s general complications, and to that end, Dead Accounts succeeds with aplomb. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[ART REVIEW]

A LARGER-THAN-LIFE EPIC

LOOK AGAIN

with the famous chorus “Va, pensiero�

Standing in a contemplative pose before the paintings of Jacqueline Humphries is not enough. Rather than let the eyes do all the work, it’s better to move one’s whole body side to side, forward and back. This interactivity refutes the traditional two-dimensionality of painting and challenges a passive gaze. By layering background and foreground, building up and scraping back, Humphries renders paintings that are visually complex and dynamic. They have a cinematic quality that comes from her ability to manipulate perception through tricks of light and shadow. Humphries employs a vast visual vocabulary that borrows from many styles, including medieval icons, illumination, film noir, op art, pop art, Modernism and psychedelic art. Ultimately, her paintings are about painting itself. She uses gestural strokes, broad lines, truncated lines, vertical and horizontal lines, scratches, scrapes, smears, and globs and washes of color to create a cacophony of movement and shifting perspectives. Made up of new works, Forum 75: Jacqueline Humphries, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, was curated by Amanda Donnan, until recently a curator at the museum. On the outside wall of the Forum gallery are two untitled paintings that use silver paint, which Humphries has employed for the past 15 years. While silver paint appears in other works in the show, these two are distinguishable by visual frames painted within the image — one red and one black. Humphries integrates the frame to suggest a television, film or computer screen as commentary on the fact that all images, whether painted or digital, are types of fictions. Several dot paintings inside the Forum gallery further underscore this premise. The dots are arranged in off-kilter grids and irregular patterns. Here Humphries relies on perceptual tricks to disrupt the stability of the image. The dots overlap and change in size and color; they fall off the edge of the painting and are surrounded by paint splats, x’s of varying sizes, squiggles and scratches, all of which animate the surface while destabilizing and confounding the image. Visitors who feel uninspired by abstraction should head to the museum’s coatroom gallery to see Humphries’ black-light paintings, whose “ooh, ahh� luminosity registers immediately. Leave it at that or stay a while and let the paintings work their magic. The more you look, the more their surfaces seem transitory, illusory and inscrutable.

Tickets $12+

 

    †—�Š‘†›†“

—Š“ —†‰š˜

†“‰     ˜Ž‘‘†”—”˜˜ Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design.

An untitled 2015 painting by Jacqueline Humphries {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GREENE NAFTALI, NEW YORK}

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

†š—Š‘ Š’Š—‰�Ž†“

“The chorus scene in itself is worth the ticket. It can’t be missed.� – Opera Lively

OCT 10, 13, 16, 18 ÇŚ BENEDUM CENTER ÇŚŽˆÂ?Š™˜Č–ČœČ?†“‰š• ÇŚČ&#x;ČœČ?Ç‚Č&#x;Č ČĄÇ‚ČĄČĄČĄČĄ ÇŚ•Ž™™˜‡š—ŒÂ?”•Š—†ǀ”—Œ UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD!

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“Œ‘Ž˜�™Š�™˜•—”�Šˆ™Š‰†‡”›Š™�Š˜™†ŒŠǀ

FORUM 75: JACQUELINE HUMPHRIES continues through Oct. 5. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.1709.24.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. see www.radworkshere.org. BO Continues through Oct. 11.

{ART}

SEPT. 18

Come O Outt & Play Pittsburgh

+ THU., SEPT. 17 {ART} Air quality in Western Pennsylvania ain’t what it used to be — it’s much better — but it ain’t what hat it could be, either: It’s stilll among the worst in the country. ntry. For the exhibit In the Air: r: Visualizing what we breathe, e, curated e by Laura Domencic cic and Brian Cohen,, photographers Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson and d Annie O’Neill have spent a yearr documenting people ople and places that show how the environmental, tal, social and economic mic effects of air quality lity in Pennsylvania. The exhibit opens tonight night with a reception at Pittsburgh Filmmakers makers Galleries. Learn more at air. thedocumentaryworks.org. yworks.org. Bill O’Driscoll 6-9 -9 p.m. Exhibit continues through gh Feb. 26. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. e Oakland filmmakers.pfpca.org

+ FRI., SEPT. 18 {FREE STUFF} Starting today, and for the next three weeks, the

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

Allegheny Regional Asset District (funded by the county sales tax) offers free events at dozens of venues all over town. This week’s RADical Days include free admission to the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History and

Free your mind at Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art, a socially engaged art experience at the Society for Contemporary Craft. The exhibit, which opens with a reception tonight, explores mental illness’ impact on society through more than 30 artworks by artists who have been diagnosed with or affected by mental illness. A follow-up event on Sat., Sept. 19, includes a pop-up bake sale by Depressed Cake Shop. Kelechi Urama Reception: 5:30-8 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-261-7003 or www. contemporarycraft.org

{ART}

The Mattress Factory expands its big Factory Installed exhibit with new immersive artists-inworks by four art around residence from a overseas. Rob the U.S. and over Voerman, an internationally inte exhibited Dutch artist, “creates post-apocalyptic post structures from found materials” material (like cardboard cardboa boxes). Illinois-based Bill Illinois Smith “creates SEPT. 23 technology-based techn Bianca del Rio art inspired by in nature’s functional natu complexity.” comp Internationally Intern exhibited, Brooklynexhibi based Lisa L Sigal takes painting beyond pa the canvas to encompass walls w and other architectural forms. And Los fo Marnie Weber, Angeles-based M deploying curiously known for deplo mannequins, plans costumed manne a free concert by the young theatrical stage to create “a thea singers in Pittsburgh Opera’s set involving a ghost train and Resident Artists program, all many departing spirit effigies.” on Sun., Sept. 20. On Monday, The opening reception is visit Phipps Conservatory and tonight. BO 6-8 p.m. Exhibit Soldiers & Sailors Hall & continues through spring. Museum for no charge. And 500 Sampsonia Way, on Thu., Sept. 24, get a free North Side. $15. 412-231-3169 tour of Heinz Field. For a complete RADical Days line-up, or www.mattress.org


sp otlight Once bankrupt, and shuttered for more than a year, the August Wilson Center is poised for rebirth. The Center, which first opened in 2009, is now debt-free (thanks to local foundations), managed by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, and installing a new board. On Sun., Sept. 20, its new management offers new programming as the first season of the Soul Sessions Series for soul, jazz and rhythm-and-blues concerts begins. Opening it is Grammy-winning jazz vocalist Gregory Porter (pictured), a rising talent who has thrilled audiences from Broadway to Penn Avenue (during the 2014 Pittsburgh Jazz festival). But Porter’s just the start for the revived Center. On Sept. 25, the Trust’s quarterly Gallery Crawl includes the unveiling of I Am August, the series of portraits of everyday Pittsburghers by Brazilian artist Angelica Dass that will be a literal facelift for the Center’s façade. On Oct. 2, the Center’s concert hall will ring with the gospel sounds of the internationally acclaimed Jones Family Singers. Also scheduled are performances by heralded dance companies Philadanco (Oct. 9) and Ailey II (Nov. 10). And the Soul Sessions continue Oct. 10 with An Evening with Marsha Ambrosius, best known as one half of the duo Floetry and for her songwriting and production work. Bill O’Driscoll Gregory Porter: 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 20. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35-45. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

like). Sure, there are DJs and live music, a print sale from the AIR archives, an exhibition of art to be raffled at night’s end, a hot-dog bar, beer and more. But in addition, AIR’s screenprinting, lithography and letterpress facilities will be open to those who wish to print their own neighborhoodthemed T-shirts, tote bags, postcards and more. It’s Fundraiser, Ink. BO 4-11 p.m. 518 Foreland St., North Side. $15-20. 412-321-8664 or www.artistsimageresource.org

{ART} The Silver Eye Center for Photography opens Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. The exhibit highlights 130 works by emerging photographers and filmmakers from around the world, and features young men in city landscapes that break away from stereotypes of black masculinity. Tonight’s opening reception features a talk by curator Shantrelle P. Lewis, former curator for the McKenna Museum of African American Art. KU 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 14. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

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{WORDS} Art by Grace Kubilius

+ SAT., SEPT. 19 {ART} Artists Image Resource holds its annual fundraiser, and it’s a hands-on affair (if you

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Although it climaxes with next weekend’s two days of concerts, the annual Thrival Innovation + Music Festival actually begins today. The fest, organized by the nonprofit Thrill Mill and presented by UPMC Enterprises, offers some 30 free “innovation-focused programs” at 10 locations

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{COMEDY} The New York Times calls Bianca del Rio “the Joan Rivers of the drag world.” And if you

Photo by Daniele Tamagni

SEPT. 18

Share a drink and celebrate the launch of her new book, The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives (Algonquin Books), with author and New York Times opinion columnist Theresa Brown, at Classic Lines Bookstore. Brown’s memoir explores her job as a nurse in a Pittsburgh oncology ward, and the toll disease takes on her patients. Another launch event is scheduled for Tue., Sept. 22, at Pitt’s O’Hara Student Ballroom. KU 4-7 p.m. 5825 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. 412-422-2220 or www.theresabrownrn.com

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{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY, CHICAGO}

{WORDS}

Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art

& Lectures Monday Night Lecture Series event takes place tonight at Carnegie Music Hall. KU 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-25. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

promises Anderson. Events include designer showcases at Highmark Stadium, a fashion show at Macy’s and the Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Fame Luncheon. The shows will spotlight more than 25 designers (Bradford Mumpower, Mayfield Avenue, Faith N’Khaos and more) and 350 models. Rebecca Nuttall 7 p.m. (Highmark Stadium, South Side; $35-60). Events continue through Sun., Sept. 27 (various venues;

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{OUTDOORS} Pittsburgh’s City of Play furthers its mission of getting adults outdoors to play new games and sports by teaming with New York’s Come Out & Play Festival for the very first Come Out & Play Pittsburgh. The donation-based fest for people ages 13 and up offers two days of recreation including Circle Rules Football (played on a circular field with a yoga ball), Scattershot (a video game hundreds can play at once) and Counter Squirt (“a late-night live-action squirt-gun battle throughout the streets of Oakland”). It all starts tonight. BO 8 p.m.-midnight. Also 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Suggested donation: $10. www.comeoutandplaypgh.org

around town on topics including women in leadership, the inclusive economy and gentrification, new media and more. The target audience is “entrepreneurs, impact-makers, innovators, creatives and business leaders.” Tonight’s kickoff, at City Theatre, is a program titled 21st Century Cities and Global Leadership. BO Festival continues through Sept. 27. Almono site (off Second Avenue), Hazelwood. www.thrivalfestival.com

Dandy Lion:

(Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity

{FASHION}

admission: $15-75). www. pittsburghfashionweek.com

Starting with tonight’s Opening Night Extravaganza, at Highmark Stadium, Pittsburgh Fashion Week returns for a sixth year. Created by Pittsburgh-based model and actress Miyoshi Anderson, the event promises to treat guests to highfashion runway shows featuring wares from local designers, students and vendors. “It’s going to be fun-filled and action-packed,”

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{WORDS} Hector Tobar talks about his latest book, Deep Down Dark, which details the experiences of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for 69 days in 2010. Tobar won a 1993 Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Los Angeles riots, and The New York Times calls Deep Down Dark “greatly rewarding.” The Pittsurgh Arts

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don’t already know her from her winning season on RuPaul’s Drag Race — or even if you do — tonight’s a good time to catch up. The costume designer, insult comic and veteran of the New Orleans nightclub scene brings her raunchy, nationally touring Rolodex of Hate Comedy Special to the Byham Theater for one show tonight. BO 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25-83. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

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romantic comedy about what happens when you fall in love w/ a witch. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE COUNTRY HOUSE. At her Berkshire estate, Broadway Grand Dame-turned-summer stock star, Anna Patterson, hosts a houseful of guests on the weekend before rehearsals begin at the famed Williamstown Theatre Festival. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. DEAD ACCOUNTS. $27 million dollars & ice cream. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 26. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. EDUCATING RITA. A two-person Pygmalion-style drama that examines England’s class system, institutional education & the nature of self-development & of personal relationships. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. Stephen Foster Memorial,

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PIRATES OF THE MON Oakland. 412-561-6000. 2015. Presented by the THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY. Gemini Theater Company. A madcap adventure about Sun, 1-3:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. love, life & man’s eternal Thornburg Community Center, love affair w/ golf. Thu-Sat, Crafton. 412-243-6464. 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 19. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS Apple Hill Playhouse, Delmont. FESTIVAL. A festival of one 724-468-5050. acts from playwrights GODSPELL. The classic across the country. musical by Stephen For a full schedule, Schwartz, presented www.pittsburgh by Retro Red Theatre. newworks.org. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Sun, 2 p.m., and Sun, 3 p.m. www. per pa Sat, 4 p.m. Thru Sept. 21. Seton pghcitym .co and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Center, Brookline. Thru Sept. 27. 412-561-8400. Carnegie Stage, Carnegie. JERRY’S GIRLS. Broadway TRANS Q LIVE! A queer evening hit w/ some of the most of performance, dance, poetry, memorable songs for women comedy, resplendent from the songbook of acclaimed fantasies, music. Performances composer Jerry Herman. by Blakk Rapp Madusa, Cindy Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Wed-Sat, Crotchford, Jasmine Hearn/ 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 4. Red Alisha Wormsley, Moonbaby/ Barn Theater, Allison Park. Mario Ashkar, Bekezela Mguni, 724-773-7150. Slowdanger, The Bang Gang & KING LEAR. Shakespeare’s DJ Sassy Fri., Sept. 18, 8 p.m. classic presented by Shakespeare Andy Warhol Museum, in the Parks. Various locations. North Side. 412-237-8300. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 27.

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URINETOWN THE MUSICAL. Presented by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-405-8425. THE WINTER’S TALE. Attack Theatre, Chatham Baroque & Quantum Theatre join forces to present Shakespeare’s “A Winter’s Tale”. Wed, Thu, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 3. Union Trust Building, Downtown. 412-362-1713. WOMAN IN THE RAW. A one woman show that walks the audience through a morning of a woman, intermixing her musings & social media media posts. Sept. 18-19, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY FRI 18 CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER, EDDIE GRIFFIN, D.L. HUGHLEY, GEORGE LOPEZ, CHARLIE MURPHY. The Comedy Get Down. 8 p.m. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-642-1800.

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COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT. Mon, 10 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF JENNIFER SCHAUPP}

Sneak a peek into a woman’s mind with Jennifer Schaupp’s one-woman show

Woman in the Raw. With introspection and a touch of sarcasm, Schaupp leads us through the musings of a single morning with the help of social-media posts, blog entries and Facebook updates. 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 18, and 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 19. The Maker Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $10. www.themakertheater.com

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CONTINUES ON PG. 76


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“Shrimp Splash Bowls” (ceramic, 2015), by Eileen Braun. From the exhibition Second Nature, at James Gallery, West End.

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DIRECTANGLE PRESS. Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. Letterpress Poster Show. Meet the artist, see the process, grab a print. September 19, 1 p.m. Wilkinsburg. 267-254-2657. JAMES GALLERY. Second Nature. Works based on based on an organic reality- plants, pods, shells & cells by Eileen Braun, Carla Ciuffo, David Henderson, Pam Longobardi & Carrie Seid. September 19. West End. 412-922-9800. REVISION SPACE. Les Fleurs du Male. Photography & film by Steven Miller that pay homage to the French writer & political activist, Jean Genet. Opening reception September 18, 6-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. An exhibition distinguishing the historical & contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. Opening reception w/ the curator September 18, 6 - 9 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Mindful: Exploring Mental Health Through Art. More than 30 works created by 14 contemporary artists explore the impact that mental illness is having on society & the role the arts can play in helping to address these issues. Opening reception September 18, 5:30-8 p.m. Strip District. 412-261-7003.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures 4: Travis K. Schwab: Lost and Found. Three new paintings, large portraits of Warhol, flanked by a variety of smaller canvases painted from the lost photobooth strips & books. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s & 1980s. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. Dashain. Dashain is the kite flying & fighting celebration related to harvest time in Nepal. Katy DeMent, will be displaying the kites she made throughout the year while working w/ Nepalese refugees at Brashear High School, the Larimer Community Garden & the Mt. Oliver Community Garden. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Panoptica. Photos by Jessica Kalmar. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Donald Wonderling & Mara Rago. Works in acrylics & photography. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Brenda Stumpf & Daria Sandburg.

Multimedia works by the artists. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. HACLab Pittsburgh: Imagining the Modern. An exhibition of over, under architecture highlighting successive histories of pioneering architectural successes, disrupted neighborhoods & the utopian aspirations & ideals of public officials & business leaders. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Oakland. 412-622-3131. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Figurative 3. Featuring work by Steven Boksenbaum, Patricia Barefoot & Mary Weidner. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition.

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Hidden Kingdoms The BBC sort-of nature documentary looks at the lives of tiny creatures that often go mostly unnoticed. On DVD and Netflix

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 74

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in NATURAL HISTORY. Animal the surrounding park. Allison Park. Secrets. Learn about the hidden 412-767-9200. lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, HUNT INSTITUTE FOR raccoons & more. Out of This BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A The Mysterious Nature of fine jewelry exhibition that brings Fungi. An overview of these together scientific fact & pop mysterious organisms that culture in a showcase of wearable are found almost everywhere & decorative arts related to outer on this planet & are the cause space, space travel, the space age, of both bliss & blight. Oakland. & the powerful influence these 412-268-2434. topics have had on human KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the civilization. Dinosaurs in Their other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Time. Displaying immersive Mill Run. 724-329-8501. environments spanning the KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Mesozoic Era & original fossil Tours of a restored 19th-century, specimens. Permanent. Hall of middle-class home. Oakmont. Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems 412-826-9295. & precious stones from all MARIDON MUSEUM. over the world. Population Collection includes jade & ivory Impact. How humans are affecting statues from China & Japan, as the environment. Oakland. well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 412-622-3131. 724-282-0123. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. MCGINLEY HOUSE & H2Oh! Experience kinetic MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. water-driven motion & discover Historic homes open for tours, the relations between water, lectures & more. Monroeville. land & habitat. How 412-373-7794. do everyday decisions NATIONAL AVIARY. impact water supply Masters of the Sky. & the environment? Explore the power & Ongoing: Buhl Digital grace of the birds who . w w w Dome (planetarium), rule the sky. Majestic typaper ci h g p Miniature Railroad eagles, impressive .com & Village, USS Requin condors, stealthy submarine & more. falcons and their friends North Side. 412-237-3400. take center stage! Home CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast to more than 600 birds from over Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare demos & more. North Side. examples of pre World War II 412-323-7235. iron-making technology. Rankin. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 412-464-4020 x 21. 29 rooms helping to tell the CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant HISTORY. Explore the complex past. University of Pittsburgh. interplay between culture, nature Oakland. 412-624-6000. & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church Garfield. 412-223-7698. features 1823 pipe organ, FALLINGWATER. Tour the Revolutionary War graves. Scott. famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 412-851-9212. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. OLIVER MILLER FIRST PRESBYTERIAN HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany Whiskey Rebellion site stained-glass windows. features log house, blacksmith Downtown. 412-471-3436. shop & gardens. South Park. FORT PITT MUSEUM. 412-835-1554. Captured by Indians: Warfare & PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY Assimilation on the 18th Century MUSEUM. Trolley rides & Frontier. During the mid-18th exhibits. Includes displays, century, thousands of settlers of walking tours, gift shop, European & African descent were picnic area & Trolley Theatre. captured by Native Americans. Washington. 724-228-9256. Using documentary evidence from PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & 18th & early 19th century sources, BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer period imagery, & artifacts from Flower Show. Watch as model public & private collections in trains chug through living the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit landscapes & displays of lush examines the practice of captivity foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 from its prehistoric roots to indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens its reverberations in modern feature exotic plants & floral Native-, African- & Euro-American displays from around the world. communities. Reconstructed fort Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit houses museum of Pittsburgh highlighting some of Africa’s history circa French & Indian lushest landscapes. Oakland. War & American Revolution. 412-622-6914. Downtown. 412-281-9285. PINBALL PERFECTION. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Pinball museum & players club. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of West View. 412-931-4425. Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG classes & programs for all ages. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. animals, including many HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this endangered species. Highland Tudor mansion & stable complex. Park. 412-665-3639.

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Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRAMEHOUSE. As Good As the Guys: Women Photographers in Pittsburgh. 15 local artists practicing photography in the region w/ a small group of their forebears in the city, at a time when the medium was dominated by men. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Bird’s Eye View of Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Environs. Showing James T. Palmatary’s 1859 print. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Behind the Curtain. Work by Elizabeth Fortunato & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Stranded in the Underworld. New works by Brian Holderman & Jeremy Beightol. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Collections. Painting by Mike McSorely. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Art & Soul. An exhibit of spiritual & socially conscious art by Benjamin Creme, artist, author & founder of Share International. Garfield. 412-952-7974. JOHN HERMANN JR. MEMORIAL ART MUSEUM. Germany in War Time - What an American Girl Saw & Heard. Ten paintings by Mary Ethel McAuley. 100 years ago, in October 1915, Mary Ethel McAuley & her mother arrived in Berlin. For two years, the younger McAuley, at age 19, painted scenes &wrote about the lives she observed in war-torn Berlin for the Pittsburg Dispatch. Bellevue. 412-761-8008. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie

RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore

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Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias & Ethan Frier created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MERRICK ART GALLERY. The Beaver Art Group Exhibition. 20 local artists showing their work. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MINE FACTORY. being (human). New works by Zack John Lee, Gianna Paniagua, Ben Quint-Glick & Rose & Sara Savage ask what it means to be human. www.theminefactory. com. Homewood. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. glassweekend ‘15. Work by Japanese Master Hiroshi Yamano, Robert Bender, Jeremy Lepisto, Chad Holliday, Matthew Day Perez, Wesley Rasko, Nathan Sandberg, Dolores Barrett, Lucy Bergamini, Jen Blazina, Jane Bruce, Melanie Feerst, Erica Rosenfeld, Melissa Schmidt & Beth Williams. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. 412-337-4976. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. In the Making. An exhibition highlighting the creative processes used by ten local, national & international artists participating in Neu Kirche’s public art programs. North Side. 412-322-2224. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Annual Members Show. Feat. juried works created by North Hills Art Center members in oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel, pottery & mixed media. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Pittsburgh 10. New work from Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Kathy DePasse, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris Sickels, David Sparks, Susan Sparks, Dirk VandenBerg & Francine VandenBerg. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates

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PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pittsburgh’s Point. Showing the first photo of Pittsburgh’s “Point” taken from atop Mt. Washington in 1896. See the low level city, antique bridges & river commerce. Many other historic photos & cameras. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut, linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now! Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MEDIA ARTS GALLERY. Selections 2015. A media arts faculty exhibition w/ work by Christine Holtz, Cigdem Slankard, Jessica Kalmar & Lauren Zito. Downtown. 412-397-3813. THE TOONSEUM. Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons & the First Amendment. A collection of political cartoons from more than a dozen Pulitzer-winner & work from magazines, websites & newspapers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. Bill Pfahl: A Retrospective. Oil & pastel paintings that will include urban landscapes, figures & portraits by Bill Pfahl. Glass Entomology. An array of glass insects & marbles by Michael Mangiafico w/ collaborative work w/ Ed Pinto. Iron Gate Gallery. Farmington. 800-721-0177. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

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ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 18 BEAT CANCER PITTSBURGH. The Mike Medved Band, Paul Luc, Kevin Garrett, Daniel Ellsworth & The Great Lakes. 6 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 570-294-6450. LIVING THE LEGACY FUNDRAISING BREAKFAST. Have breakfast & learn about the work of the organization. Chairman of the Board, David Breidinger will talk about journey to the Philippines to meet his sponsored child, Romalyn. 7:30-9 a.m. Pearl S. Buck International, Allison Park. 800-220-2825. RIVERS OF STEEL HARD HAT BALL. Live entertainment by Soundwaves Steelband, Colonel Eagleburger’s Highstepping Goodtime Band, Run Forever & Cello Fury, cuisine from chefs Kevin Sousa & Matt McClelland, plus food from local purveyors, craft beer by Voodoo Brewery & a hard hat art show featuring local Pittsburgh artists in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the hard hat. 6 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. 412-464-4020.

benefiting HEARTH, presented by Reed Smith LLP. 6 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-366-9801. DONUT DASH. South Shore Riverfront Trail. Benefits PERSAD’S services to the LGBTQ Community & people living with HIV. 9 a.m. SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-441-9786.

wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

TUE 22

PASSAGES & PROSE COMMUNITY LITERARY FAIR. Meet & chat w/ local authors includingchildren’s authors & events in the Scott Family Reading Room. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cooper-Siegel Community Library, Fox Chapel. 412-828-9520. WARTORN HEART: POETRY & ART INSPIRED BY THE VIETNAM WAR. Kathleen Trew Swazuk presenting her work & poetry. 5 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253.

11TH ANNUAL VOICES CARRY. Local music legends Donnie Iris, Joe Grushecky, & WDVE’s Randy Baumann to help support Auberle’s at-risk children & families. 6:30 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-673-5856.

WED 23 AN EVENING W/ ISABEL WILKERSON. Meet & greet w/ the author of The Warmth of Other Suns. Proceeds benefit student scholarships for the incoming 8th grade. 5:30 p.m. The Neighborhood Academy, East Liberty. 412-362-2001.

LITERARY THU 17 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.

FRI 18 RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. This month’s selection is N or M? by Agatha Christie. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 19

SUN 20 THERESA BROWN. Celebrate the launch of local author Theresa Brown’s new book “The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives”. 4 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

MON 21 HÉCTOR TOBAR. Héctor Tobar, son of Guatemalan immigrants, CONTINUES ON PG. 78

SAT 19 AIR N’@. Hands-on, neighborhood-themed printmaking activities, live bands & entertainment, exhibition art raffle, print sale, hot-dog bar, beer & cocktails. All proceeds directly supports future artist residency projects. 4-11 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664. GREAT GATSBY GARDEN PARTY. Live jazz, mansion tours, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, badminton, croquet, lawn bowling, vintage automobile display & silent auction. Proceeds benefit the Allegheny County Parks Foundation Hartwood Mansion Restoration Fund. 2-6 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HARVEST TASTING. An evening of good eating from the harvest of the Eden Hall Campus farm, benefiting the Falk School of Sustainability Scholarship Fund. 6:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. JDRF ONE WALK PITTSBURGH. Walk to Cure Diabetes. 10 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-471-1414.

SUN 20 THE ART OF WINE & FOOD. Savory tastes & delicious treats from Pittsburgh’s finest wine & food establishments,

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is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist & Latin American scholar. He will be speaking on his book & life. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. ZACHARY HARRIS & SE SMITH. Wigle signature cocktails & drams available throughout the reading, w/ a portion of the drink proceeds going to the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

KIDSTUFF

TUE 22

SAT 19

STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 23 PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting is about poems by Toi Derricotte’s collection, “The Undertaker’s Daughter”. Fourth Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-928-9891. WRITERS SERIES AGENT NIGHT. Three highly-experienced & well-respected literary agents discuss the ins & outs of getting an agent. 6:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

THU 17 - SUN 20 VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Thru Sept. 20 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TOUCH-A-TRUCK. Check out local police, fire, & public works vehicles, buses, a replica “Back to the Future” DeLorean, ambulances & rescue vehicles, construction vehicles, a vehicle from the Animal Rescue League, more. 12 p.m. Avalon Borough, Avalon. 412-761-2288.

MON 21

GIRLS’ MAKER NIGHT. This girls-only program takes a fresh fun look at robotics, science, digital media & art. Grades 4-8. 6 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. BEYOND THE BRUSH. MAKER STORY Children in grades TIME. Explore tools, 6 & up can join an materials & processes arts & crafts instructor inspired by books. . w as she introduces ww per Listen to stories a p ty ci h a new project each pg read by librarianom .c month. Registration turned-Teaching required. 10 a.m., Sat., Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.Oct. 10, 10 a.m., Sat., Nov. 7, 12 p.m. Children’s Museum 10 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 5, 10 a.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Baldwin Borough Public Library, 412-322-5058. Baldwin. 412-885-2255. IMAGINE THAT! In Between Theatre &the Children’s IMAGINATIVE ENGINEERING. Museum of Pittsburgh present Explore your inner scientist a new collaborative series of or engineer. Grades 4-8. theatrical pop-ups where kids can 4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. contribute their idea to create a 412-432-9127. play. Generate ideas for costumes, choreography & characters. Come back to watch the play on TRAVEL LEARNING PARTY. September 26. and Sat., Sept. 26 Learn about all things old & Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, new. All ages. 6 p.m. Assemble, North Side. 412-322-5058. Garfield. 412-432-9127.

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 22

WED 23

OUTSIDE FRI 18

at Happy Hours, at Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District CRITIC: Courtney Patterson, a marketing strategist from Highland Park

SAT 19 LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. MINGO CREEK STAR PARTY. Observe the skies & stars w/ the Amateur Astronomers Association. 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. ORCHARD GARDENS. Tour the orchards. Meet at Latodami Nature Center. Pre-registration required. Call 724-935-2170. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766. WAGMAN STAR PARTY. Observe the stars & galaxies. Bring your own telescope or use one from the Amateur Astronomers Association. 7:25 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510. WESTERN PA. MUSHROOM CLUB FORAY. Walks, presentations, an auction, a book signing & a mushroom feast. Meet at Parish Hill. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WISE WALKS. 30 to 45 minute walks to enjoy fall. Water & snack provided. Meet at the Pie Traynor Field in North Park. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

WED 23 FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 17 2015 ADULT SWIM DRIVE IN. 8:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-665-3639. A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http:// citydharma.wordpress.com/ schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

EVENT: The Accidentals and Love Letters

MUSHROOM WALK. A walk in Cook Forest State Park led by Gary Lincoff. Meet at the North Park parking lot. 8 a.m. www.wpamushroomclub. org/lincoff-foray/. WISE WALKS. 1-2 mile walk around the neighborhood and learn a little about Oakland, & the Library. Fri. Thru Nov. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 22

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

WHEN: Fri., Sept. 11 This is just a really casual, fun space with music, barbeque and hanging out. It’s a hidden place in the city that feels like you could be in someone’s backyard. The bands I’ve heard tonight are sort of bluegrass and folk. People were dancing and twirling around. I’ve been here a couple of times in previous years, but this is my first time coming to a Happy Hours event this year. I regret not coming here more this summer, because it’s such a great setting. I came here with a couple friends, but there are all of these new faces, and I’ve been meeting new people. I feel like it’s a good reminder to me that, after all of these years of being in Pittsburgh, there continues to be awesome new places that pop up and make me feel excited about being part of this city. B Y K E L E C H I URA M A

CIVIL LI-BEER-TIES: A CONSTITUTION DAY PUB QUIZ. A quiz night all about the Bill of Rights, the Constitution & your civil liberties. 7-9 p.m. East End Brewing Company, Larimer. 412-681-7736. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: AMERICA’S GLOBAL INVOLVEMENT. Discussion panel w/ Dr. Jonathan Harris, Dr. John Stoner, & Dr. Soren Fanning. 6:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. HOW TO START A CHILD CARE BUSINESS. Join our panel of experts & learn the rules, regulations, & practicalities of opening your own child care small business. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. POPE FRANCIS: RESHAPING THE DIPLOMATIC ROLE OF THE VATICAN. A discussion on how the Pop is repositioning the Vatican on the world stage. 6:30-8 p.m. Power Center Ballroom, Duquesne University, Downtown. www.duq.edu.

THU 17 - WED 23 THE AMAZING ACRO-CATS. Samantha Martin & her Amazing Acro-Cats perform their feats of agility. Thu, 8 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. 512-378-3952.

FRI 18 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. ALLEGHENY INN BLOGGER BASH. Annual blogger bash at Pittsburgh’s newest BnB. 5 p.m. The Allegheny Inn, North Side. 412-478-2161. CITY OF PLAY GAME NIGHT. New board & card games, as well as a preview of some of the games in the upcoming Come Out & Play Festival. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. RECOVERY IN THE COMMUNITY DAY. Information, health screening & more celebrating those in recovery


from addiction. 10 a.m. Familylinks, Shadyside. 412-942-0521.

FRI 18 - SAT 19 COME OUT & PLAY PITTSBURGH. A two-day, donation-based festival of games that turns the city into a playground for grown-ups w/ brand-new sports, street games, & social games. 8 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 19, 11 a.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-467-9590.

SAT 19 BALKAN DANCE PARTIES. live music by the BMNECC’s Otets Paissii band & guest ensembles. Folk dance experts offer lessons during the first hour. Third Sat of every month, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 21 BulgarianMacedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188. CITIZENSHIP DAY. Attendees can receive free legal assistance, Naturalization interview prep, & connect w/ local service providers & financial resources. 10 a.m. Goodwill of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s Robert Foltz Building, Lawrenceville. 412-944-2572. GARDEN TALKS & CONVERSATIONS W/ THE COURTYARD GARDEN EXPERTS. The topic that Eileen Lovell will be speaking on is “Putting the Garden to Bed for the Winter”. Please meet in the courtyard garden. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HISTORIC HOUSE TOUR. Self-guided walking tour inside 4 historic homes, 2 galleries & 3 cemeteries in New Alexandria. 10 a.m.4 p.m. 724-532-1935 x215. MILLVALE MASHUP BREWERY TOUR. Tours & samplings at East End Growler Shop, Grist House Brewing, & Draai Laag. 12 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PITTSBURGH HISTORY & LANDMARK FOUNDATION HISTORIC PLAQUE UNVEILING. The West End is being honored w/ a historical plaque. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, West End, West End. 412-921-1717. PITTSBURGH PIEROGI FEST. Pierogies from over 30 pierogi vendors w/ live music. 1 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-874-0272. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m.

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Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WHAT IS THE CURRENT STATE OF MEDIA REPORTING ON LABOR ISSUES? A panel of journalists will look at how, in many cities, labor reporters are in short supply & anti-union voices seem to dominate the airwaves. 1:30 p.m. The Pump House, Homestead. 412-831-3871. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

MON 21

SAT 19 - SUN 20

ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TAI CHI. Please register. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Nov. 16 Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

COMPREHENSIVE SURVEY OF THE COMPLETE PSYCHOLOGICAL WORKS OF FREUD. Course taught by Thomas Janoski, Ph.D delving into Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Project for a Scientific Psychology, Studies on Hysteria, & many others. Every other Mon, 7 p.m. Thru June 21 Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center, Shadyside. 412-661-4224.

DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. CRANBERRY ARTIST’S NETWORK. All regional artists are invited to enter up to two pieces of original art that answer the question: “What are you thankful for?” This can be anything from loved ones or possessions to more abstract concepts like nature or health. For more information, visit www.cranberryartistsnetwork. com. Thru Sept. 30. FELLOWSHIP 16 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION. Call for submissions of photography from any eligible local photographers. For more information & to submit, visit www.silvereye.org/fellowship16. Thru Oct. 26. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. GAMES OF THE MIND. By F. J. Hartland. Thu., Sept. 17, 8 p.m., Fri., Sept. 18, 8 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 19, 2 & 8 p.m. The Grey Box Theatre,

THE KELLYSTRAYHORN THEATER The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater is seeking volunteers to assist with front-of-the-house theater duties and administrative support. All volunteers can enjoy performances for free. For more information, contact Desiree at 412-363-3000 or desiree@kelly-strayhorn.org.

SUN 20 OVER A BARREL BREW TOUR. Visit to Wigle Whiskey’s Barrel House in Pittsburgh’s historic Deuschtown & ShuBrew in Zelienople. 12:30 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PEPPER FARM FESTIVAL. Food, demos, live entertainment, crafters, hay rides, kid’s activities, more. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. White Oak Farm, Allison Park. www.reynafoods.com RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. STOOL BALL. Join the historic interpreters of Woodville Plantation in an 18th game of Stoolball, the forerunner of modern baseball. 1 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-221-0348. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223. WESTERN PA. MUSHROOM CLUB. Species identification & a program devoted to DNA-based identification of fungi. Parish Hill. www.wpa mushroomclub.org/lincoff-foray/. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

TA S T E

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY &

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PENN’S COLONY. Craftsmen & artisans showcase a variety of quality, handmade contemporary & traditional works. Plus horse-drawn surrey rides, food booths, sing-a-longs, & demonstrations of various trade. Sat, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 27 Saxonburg. 724-352-9922.

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com. Testing date September 19, beginning at 9:30 a.m. To schedule an appt. call Robin Peterson at 814-425-7185. Conneaut Lake Bark Park, Conneaut. 814-382-2267.

CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for dancers, boys & girls, for the Nutcracker. Audition slots on September 26 at for 5-12 year olds at 1 p.m. & 13 years old + at 2 p.m. Carnegie. 412-279-8887. HARMONY SINGERS. All voices are needed. Performance experience & the ability to read music are preferred but not required. Thru Sept. 20. 412-833-6341.

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THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for for “The Diary of Anne Frank”. Women ages 14 & up, men 16 & up. Cold readings from the script. Bring picture & resume. September 19 & 20, 1-4 p.m. Rector. 724-374-9200. THERAPY DOG TESTING. Therapy dog testing. Dog must be at least one year of age. Information on our testing procedure can be found on the web at www.therapydogs.

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

TUE 22 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http:// citydharma.wordpress.com/ schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. BIZ-ED BLITZ GOES BACK TO SCHOOL. Networking event connecting business & education professionals to share collaborative strategies for preparing students w/ the knowledge & skills needed for continued education & careers. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Technical Institute. 412-481-7320. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES DRAFTT BEERS $1 $1.50 50 & $2 $2.25 25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVERY NIGHT

WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS $2 WELL DRINKS + COORS LIGHT BOTTLES 2 FOR 1 LAP DANCES • 2 FOR 1 DRAFT BEERS ALL NIGHT LONG

FRIDAYS $4 VODKA MARTINIS ALL NIGHT LONG

WED 23 THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

OPEN LATE

Wednesday & Thursday 7pm-2am Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

clubcontroversy.com cl c u

AUDITIONS BAPTIST TEMPLE CHURCH.

1635 16 63 3 West Carson St.reet | 412 35 412-471-5764 471 5764

Auditions for vocalists. Sept. 19 & 26 at 10 a.m. Homewood. 412-612-0977.

M U S I C

Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhour review.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. MARKET SQUARE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM. A call to artists to submit new or already assembled artworks to the Market Square Public Art Program. Information session on September 10, 6-7 p.m. at the Greater Arts Council, at 810 Penn Ave., 7th Floor. Submissions are due October 5. www. marketsquarepublicart.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.

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BY POPULAR DEMAND, NOW OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS! S C R E E N

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My son, who is almost 30 years old, was married four years ago. He just shared with us that for the last three years, he and his wife have been practicing polyamory. They are committed to their relationship but have each had relationships with both men and women. We are trying to get our heads around this, as we come from a more traditional background (we’ve been married 40 years in a loving and respectful relationship), and we find ourselves feeling very sad. We are accepting and nonjudgmental, just trying to understand how he came to this decision. He feels that to make love “finite,” to love only one person, is “not being true,” and that their kind of relationship prevents dishonesty and is based on truth. He shared that his wife was the first one to broach this idea — and after many deep conversations, he eventually overcame his jealousy and is embracing this practice. They do not have children or plan to have children. I asked my son if he’s happy, and he says he is. SAD MAMA

If your son says he’s happy, SM, you should believe him and be happy for him. It’s unfortunate that your son framed the news about his choices and his marriage — which make him happy — in what sounds like a clumsy critique of your choices and your marriage. (If that’s what he did, SM. I’ve only got your characterization of his comments to go on, not a tape recording of them, and it has been my experience that monogamous folks sometimes hear critiques of their choices when we nonmonogamous folks talk about our own choices. “We’re not doing what you’re doing” ≠ “You’re doing it wrong.”) There’s nothing necessarily “finite,” untruthful, limiting, or dishonest about monogamy. If that’s what two people want, SM, and it makes those two people happy, that’s great. Monogamy is what you and your husband wanted, it’s what made you and your husband happy, and it worked for your marriage. You could see your son’s choice to be nonmonogamous as a rejection of everything you modeled for him, or you could see his choice as modeled on the fundamental bedrock stuff — for lack of a better word — that informed the choice you made. Your son and his wife are doing what they want, they’re doing what makes them happy, and they’re doing what works for their marriage. They’re not doing monogamy (or kids), but they’re doing what’s right for them and what works for them — just like his mom and dad did. There are lots of people out there in happy, fulfilling open/poly relationships, SM, and lots of people out there in happy, fulfilling monogamous relationships. (And there are lots of miserable people in both kinds of relationships.) There are also lots of people in happy, fulfilling monogamous relationships they will one day choose to open, and lots of people in happy, fulfilling nonmonogamous relationships they will one day choose to close. It’s happiness, consent and mutual respect that matters,

not whether a relationship is monogamous or nonmonogamous. If your son is happy, SM, you should be happy for him. But if he states — or clumsily implies — that you and his dad couldn’t be happy because you’re not doing the same thing he and his wife are doing, you tell him from nonmonogamous me that he’s full of nonmonogamous shit. Two pieces of recommended reading: the book Open: Love, Sex, and Life in an Open Marriage, by Jenny Block, and an informative interview that poly activist and frequent Savage Lovecast guest Diana Adams did with the Atlantic. But I don’t think you need to do a whole lot of homework about this. Love your son, respect his choices, don’t blame or shame his wife, and be kind to any partners they introduce you to. Having a poly kid is a lot simpler than you think. Many years ago, what was for me a bizarre sexual incident happened to me, and while I’ve largely laughed it off with no traumatic effects, the incident has always puzzled me. For the record, I’m a straight man in a good, loving marriage with no sexual issues to report. I was off on a golf weekend with a bunch of über-hetero buddies. We stayed in a condo that didn’t have enough beds for everyone, so I ended up sharing a bed with an ex-marine. In the middle of the night, I thought my girlfriend was waking me up with a blowjob, and a damn fine one at that. However, as I gradually became awake, I realized the mouth on my penis wasn’t my girlfriend’s. I called this guy’s name, and — this is the interesting part — he sprang up suddenly, like I just woke him up. I was also a little afraid, because he was a big guy who could have easily pummeled me to death out of embarrassment. But he jumped out of bed, went into the bathroom, and gargled before coming back into bed. Neither of us said a word afterward about what happened. Needless to say, I didn’t sleep too well after that. (And frankly, I was a little offended by the gargling.) So the question is: Can you fellate in your sleep? Can you sleep-blow and still be a straight guy?

“SEXSOMNIA IS A REAL THING — SLEEPWALKING PLUS SEX — BUT IT’S AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE THING.”

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

BLOWN LATENTLY ONE WILD NIGHT

Sexsomnia is a real thing — sleepwalking plus sex — but it’s an exceedingly rare thing. Closeted guys are a lot more common, BLOWN, and guys who seem über-hetero are often more successfully closeted than your lighter-in-the-loafer guys. Three other details lead me to believe this was a crime/blowjob of opportunity: It’s typically pretty difficult to wake a sleepwalker/sleepblower (it takes more than calling out a name), the skills on display during the incident (it takes practice to give a “damn fine” blowjob), and his actions after he woke up with your dick in his mouth (rushing to the bathroom to gargle) smack of overcompensation. Listen to Dan Savage every week at savage lovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.16-09.23

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Some people express pride in gross ways. When you hear their overbearing brags, you know it’s a sign that they are not really confident in themselves. They overdo the vanity because they’re trying to compensate for their feelings of inadequacy. In the coming weeks, I expect you to express a more lovable kind of self-glorification. It won’t be inflated or arrogant, but will instead be measured and reasonable. If you swagger a bit, you will do it with humor and style, not narcissism and superiority. Thank you in advance for your service to humanity. The world needs more of this benign kind of egotism.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The rooster is your power animal. Be like him. Scrutinize the horizon for the metaphorical dawn that is coming, and be ready to herald its appearance with a triumphant wake-up call. On the other hand, the rooster is also your affliction animal. Don’t be like him. I would hate for you to imitate the way he handles himself in a fight, which is to keep fussing and squabbling far beyond the point when he should let it all go. In conclusion, Libra, act like a rooster but also don’t act like a rooster. Give up the protracted struggle so you can devote yourself to the more pertinent task, which is to celebrate the return of the primal heat and light.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Since you seem to enjoy making life so complicated and intense for yourself, you may be glad to learn that the current astrological omens favor that development. My reading of the astrological omens suggests that you’re about to dive deep into rich mysteries that could drive you half-crazy. I suspect that you will be agitated and animated by your encounters with ecstatic torment and difficult bliss. Bon voyage! Have fun! Soon I expect to see miniature violet bonfires gleaming in your bedroom eyes, and unnamable emotions rippling through your unfathomable face, and unprecedented words of wild wisdom spilling from your smart mouth.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Adamites were devotees of an ancient Christian sect that practiced sacred nudism. One of their central premises: How could anyone possibly know God while wearing clothes? I am not necessarily recommending that you make their practice a permanent part of your spiritual repertoire, but I think you might find value in it during the coming weeks. Your erotic and transcendent yearnings will be rising to a crescendo at the same time. You will have the chance to explore states where horniness and holiness overlap. Lusty prayers? Reverent sex? Ecstatic illumination?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): One of your key themes in the coming weeks is “grace.” I suggest that you cultivate it, seek it out, expect it and treasure it. To prepare for this fun work, study all of the meanings of “grace” below. At least two of them, and possibly all, should and can be an active part of your life. 1. Elegance or beauty of form, movement or proportion; seemingly effortless charm or fluidity. 2. Favor or goodwill; a disposition to be generous or helpful. 3. Mercy, forgiveness, charity. 4. A temporary exemption or immunity; a reprieve. 5. A sense of fitness or propriety. 6. A prayer of blessing or thanks said before a meal. 7. An unmerited divine gift offered out of love.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Be good, but not necessarily well-behaved. Be ex-

tra exuberant and free, but not irresponsible. Be lavish and ardent and even rowdy, but not decadent. Why? What’s the occasion? Well, you have more-or-less finished paying off one of your karmic debts. You have conquered or at least outwitted a twist from your past that had been sapping your mojo. As a reward for doing your duty with such diligence, you have earned a respite from some of the more boring aspects of reality. And so now you have a mandate to gather up the intelligent pleasure you missed when you were acting like a beast of burden.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I am the least difficult of men. All I want is boundless love.” That’s the mantra that Frank O’Hara intoned in his poem “Meditations in an Emergency,” and now I’m inviting you to adopt a modified version of it. Here’s how I would change it for your use in the coming months: “I am the least difficult of passion artists. All I want is to give and receive boundless, healthy, interesting love.” To be frank, I don’t think O’Hara’s simple and innocent declaration will work for you. You really do need to add my recommended nuances in order to ripen your soul’s code and be aligned with cosmic rhythms.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I won’t go so far as to say that you are surrounded by unhinged maniacs whose incoherence is matched only by their self-delusion. That would probably be too extreme. But I do suspect that at least some of the characters in the game you’re playing are not operating at their full potential. For now, it’s best not to confront them and demand that they act with more grace. The wiser strategy might be to avoid being swept up in their agitation as you take good care of yourself. If you are patient and stay centered, I bet you will eventually get a chance to work your magic.

pure water and authentic love. And yet many of us get far less than our minimum daily requirement of nourishing stories. Instead, we are barraged with nihilistic narratives that wallow in misery and woe. If we want a break from that onslaught, our main other choices are sentimental fantasies and empty-hearted trivia. That’s the bad news. But here’s the good news: Now is a favorable time for you to seek remedies for this problem. That’s why I’m urging you to hunt down redemptive chronicles that furnish your soul with gritty delight. Find parables and sagas and tales that fire up your creative imagination and embolden your lust for life.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now is an excellent time to close the gap between the Real You and the image of yourself that you display to the world. I know of two ways to accomplish this. You can tinker with the Real You so that it’s more like the image you display. Or else you can change the image you display so that it is a more accurate rendition of

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Born under the sign of Leo, Marcel Duchamp was an influential artist whose early work prefigured surrealism. In 1917, he submitted an unusual piece to a group exhibition in New York. It was a plain old porcelain urinal, but he titled it Fountain, and insisted it was a genuine work of art. In that spirit, I am putting my seal of approval on the messy melodrama you are in the process of managing. Henceforth, this melodrama shall also be known as a work of art, and its title will be “Purification.” (Or would you prefer “Expurgation” or “Redemption”?) If you finish the job with the panache you have at your disposal, it will forevermore qualify as a souljiggling masterpiece. What’s your favorite method for overcoming the inertia of the past? FreeWillAstrology.com.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Many of the heroes in fairy tales survive and thrive because of the magical gifts they are given. Benefactors show up, often unexpectedly, to provide them with marvels — a spinning wheel that can weave a cloak of invisibility, perhaps, or winged shoes that give them the power of flight, or a charmed cauldron that brews a healing potion. But there is an important caveat. The heroes rarely receive their boons out of sheer luck. They have previously performed kind deeds or unselfish acts in order to earn the right to be blessed. According to my analysis, Taurus, the coming weeks will be prime time for you to make yourself worthy of gifts you will need later on.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): We humans need nourishing stories almost as much as we require healthy food, clean air,

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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the Real You. Both strategies may be effective. However you go about it, Cancerian, I suggest you make it your goal to shrink the amount of pretending you do.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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HEALTH SERVICES Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? TALK TO SOMEONE WHO CARES. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

STUDIES

CROP CIRCLES

Smokers Wanted!

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part research project.

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health • Be willing to fill out questionnaires • not smoke before two sessions. Earn $150 for completing study.

For more information call 412-624-8975

SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $85 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 www.smokingresearchgroup.com

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*Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.16/09.23.2015

ACROSS 1. Bruce Lee role 5. Survey’s result 9. Sweatshirt size 14. Word’s representation? 15. Plains native 16. Sardinia’s country 17. Receptionist’s cry 18. Moves to get you back on track, briefly 19. Elle rival 20. Common photo id 23. 2 letters 24. Dorm mentors: Abbr. 25. Duke and NC State’s div. 26. Make a person feel good 33. Ref’s dropping 35. Sammy with corked bats 36. Easter’s start? 37. “Familiarity breeds contempt” coiner 39. “Catch you on the flip” 40. Herb in a potpie 42. Gained a lap 43. Hymn word 45. Mishap reaction 46. Tennis tournament won 9 times by Rafael Nadal 51. TV actor Somerhalder

52. Link to, on Facebook 53. Trains above the road 56. Implores, as to a judge 61. Childish retort 62. Shrinking Sea 63. “You pig!” accompanier 64. “Wait ___ your father gets home” 65. ATM card 66. “___ bien” 67. Menial sorts 68. Like a piece of cake 69. Staycation stuff

DOWN 1. Sorta 2. Tart in tone 3. Plant detritus? 4. Broadcast 5. Wake-up time for those on the early shift, maybe 6. “Believe you me!” 7. Gallagher of Britpop 8. From southern India 9. Typing while Skyping, e.g. 10. “Quit stalling, do it!” 11. Poverty, figuratively 12. Art supply eaten as a kid

and sniffed as a teenager 13. Needle part 21. Misjudge 22. Big Mama? 27. Fifth word on “Sgt. Pepper” 28. Boy band with a star before its name 29. Job ad ltrs. 30. “No more takers?” 31. Frolic 32. “___ bien” 33. Put nothing away 34. Brandon & ___ (indie rock group associated with the Kardashians) 38. Sun protectors

39. Candidate Carson 41. Weedattacking tool 44. Office pulldown 47. Blends (with) 48. Dog 49. Big Beck album 50. Lickety-split 54. Measurers of logical reasoning, for short 55. Honoree of Mar. parades 56. Plexiglass sheet 57. “Render ___ Caesar...” 58. Turn into a parking lot 59. Cantata excerpt 60. Big druggie 61. Coffee container {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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{PHOTOS COURTESY OF ACRO-CATS}

ACRO-CATS

Circus cats bring their act to Pittsburgh {BY ERICA CEBZANOV} THIS WEEKEND, Pittsburghers might notice rolling into town a 1963 tour

bus adorned with giant decal whiskers and cat eyes. Inside it will be the Amazing Acro-Cats, a feline circus, coming to perform at Bricolage Productions, Downtown. Fourteen rescue cats, ranging in age from four months to 13 years, comprise the troupe. The Acro-Cats spend part of their shows using props, such as shopping carts, balls, flags and parallel ropes. Alley, a calico, demonstrates the 6-foot leap that earned her the Guinness World Record for longest cat jump. The Rock Cats band closes the show with leader Tuna playing cowbell, while other felines play guitar, drums and piano. A chicken and groundhog provide musical accompaniment.

not a lot of cat entertainment,” Martin says. “People came out in droves to see these cats.” Due to the cats’ unpredictable natures, each hour-long show is different and constantly evolving, says Martin. The felines sometimes venture into the audience areas, making themselves comfortable in guests’ laps. Martin attempts to adjust her expectations and uses humor to defuse these situations. She has learned through trial and error that the cats do not like the acts to feature clowns, balloons or people wearing animal costumes. For the cats’ comfort, they must perform against a wall, instead of in the middle of a crowd. Martin utilizes the clicker-training method, giving her cats chicken, salmon and tuna while simultaneously sounding a noisemaker when the animals attain their desired goals. With her veteran performers, she devotes 10 minutes before and after each show to rehearse routines; meanwhile, she spends 10 minutes, three times per day training the novices. It takes the Acro-Cats between 10 minutes and a month to learn new tricks, depending upon the degree of difficulty. “If I see a cat who is always racing around and leaping from perch to perch, I will come up with something that involves jumping,” says Martin of her choreography process. “If I see a cat who uses their paws a lot, I will come up with something that involves paws. It’s all based on what their natural instinct is to do.” While Martin says cats can learn new tricks at any age, she commences training her performers before they reach three months. The early training is key: first, because the Acro-Cats veterans are reluctant to accept adults into their troupe, and second, to acclimate the kittens to frequent car trips in preparation for the nine months each year they will spend touring. During shows, she also has the future performers sit near the stage to familiarize themselves with cheering crowds. Martin says the cats eventually learn to thrive on applause. Martin uses her platform to promote animal welfare, often donating a portion of each show’s proceeds to a local rescue organization and showcasing adoptable cats. Since 2009, the Amazing Acro-Cats show has helped find homes for 169 cats.

“THERE ARE A LOT OF CAT-LOVERS OUT THERE, BUT NOT A LOT OF CAT ENTERTAINMENT.” Fans line up after shows to get photos with the band. The circus has garnered national press attention and developed a social-media following. “That’s the beautiful thing about it: People from all walks of life come together in the same room for their love of cats,” says Samantha Martin, Amazing Acro-Cats’ “chief human,” founder and trainer. “We have these hipsters and the elderly and families with kids, and Goths and punk rockers and the whole gamut.” At age 10, Martin started training her family’s Labrador retriever while dreaming of a future animal-training career. Later, she earned an associate’s degree in animal husbandry and completed a Brookfield Zoo internship focusing on farm animals. She had stints working as a veterinary technician and groomer, as well as positions in a pet shop and animal shelter. During her 27year career as a wildlife educator, Martin created miniature-circus acts featuring rats and fowl before launching the Amazing Acro-Cats 10 years ago. From the beginning, the act drew sell-out crowds. “We had a phenomenal turnout. There are a lot of cat-lovers out there, but

AMAZING ACRO-CATS

The Acro-Cats reside with Martin in Chicago as her pets when they are not performing. If Martin decides that her animals are not Sept. 17-27. Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., ideal circus candidates, they join her filmDowntown. $22-27. and-television production company, Amazing www.circuscats.com Animals by Samantha. She challenges critics who might think she is exploiting the animals for profit by stating that she provides each cat a “life and a home,” while they provide her a “means to get that kind of life.” “Most people get to spend, maybe, two hours a day with their cats before they go to work,” Martin says. “Because I incorporate my love of animals into my work, I get to be with them 24/7.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 16, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 37

September 16, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 37