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EVENTS 8.28 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

9.18 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! The Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television, a project of Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for the Arts in Society. Tickets $10 / $8 Members & students

9.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TELEVISION Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with WYEP 91.3FM Tickets $30 / $25 Members and students

Get the real story. Only at The Warhol. PEARLSTEIN I WARHOL I CANTOR

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

From Pittsburgh to New York • Through Sept 6, 2015

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08.26/09.02.2015 A WATCHOF VIDEO ME E TR EX RGH PITTSBU at SPORTShcity www.pg m o .c er pap

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 34

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns JESSICA HARDIN, JOSEPH PEISER, AARON WARNICK

Welcom e to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 3 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week.

{ART}

GE T TO KN OW

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[MAIN FEATURE]

you need to leave town for 16 Think heart-pounding thrills? Think again. Photographer Heather Mull takes you on an extreme journey.

[NEWS]

need to have it on site at 06 “They the pharmacy.” — Karen Hacker, of the county health department, on the importance of naloxone to treat overdoses

“The Angry Snapper maki was so exciting we wished for more.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Pan Asian Kitchen

lot of the stuff I used on 27 “A Blazing Arrow I found at Jerry’s.”

film shifts from an adventure 44 “The doc to an intimate examination of

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Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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The beginning. A classic. Our most po popular op beer. Its unique piney and grapefruit aromas from the use of whole-cone American hops have fascinated beer drinkers for decades and made this beer a classic.

{PUBLISHER}

risk-taking.” — Al Hoff reviews the climbing documentary Meru

STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] “On their respective dance floors, the contrast between one group and another is glaring.” — Lissa Brennan on one visual strategy of photographer Mark Neville in his London/Pittsburgh

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stay in touch with people 63 “IthatstillI knew here from 50 years ago.” — Patti Pitulski on the role the 100-year-old South Side Market House has played in her life

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} EVENTS LISTINGS 50 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 61

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— DJ Chief Xcel of Blackalicious on record shopping in Pittsburgh

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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This was Lagunitas first seasonal way back in 1995. The recipe was formulated with malt and hops working together to balance it all out on your ‘buds so you can knock back more than one without wearing yourself out. Big on the aroma with a hoppysweet finish that’ll leave you wantin’ another sip.

Sweet Baby Jesus Chocolate Peanut Butter Cho Porter is a complex, robust porter. It is jet black in color with a tan, rocky head, full body and creamy, luxurious mouthfeel. Its lightly sweet, malty It flavor is accented by strong notes of

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THIS WEEK

“THEY NEED TO HAVE IT ON SITE AT THE PHARMACY.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Think football and baseball are the only sports going on this time of year? We go behind the scenes with Pittsburghers who like their sports a little more extreme: from surfing the three rivers to diving out of perfectly good airplanes. More on our city’s extreme sports scene on page 16. www.pghcitypaper.com.

250 people died of heroin overdoses in Allegheny County last year, so why is it so difficult to get a drug that would save lives to the people who need it most?

#CPSteelersPreview We’ve been to training camp, and now it’s time for the season. Our CP Steelers Edition drops 9/2.

This week: Second City in this city, international performance art and a peek at burlesque. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

Here’s a sweet #CPReaderArt shot of the Brassero Grill food truck in Braddock by Instagrammer @oddzenenz. Tag your photos of the city as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win Lady Antebellum tickets on Sept. 18 at First Niagara Pavilion. Contest ends Sept. 3.

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{BY JESSICA HARDIN}

W

HY ARE MODERN cars equipped with airbags? Because, unfortunately, accidents happen — not to all drivers, but certainly to many. The vehicles owned by perfect drivers have airbags. The vehicles owned by careless drivers have airbags. Airbags are not just an accessory of the irresponsible. They are widely accepted security measures for all. Many public-health advocates dream of a day when the powerful overdose-reversal drug naloxone will be perceived the same way. “It’s not you,” says Traci Green, the deputy director of the Injury Prevention Center at Boston Medical Center. “The airbags in your car are not [there] because you’re a crappy driver.” Green and other medical professionals want to shift public perception away from demonizing intravenous drug users and toward keeping them safe. In one 24-hour period this past April, Pittsburgh police responded to 10 heroin overdoses. And last year, more than 250 people died from heroin overdoses in Allegheny County.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

The accessibility of naloxone could reduce that number. When administered red to an individual suffering from an overdose do of heroin or other opioids, naloxone reverses the overdose. rev The drug, commercially known as Narcan, is available as a nasal spray, an inNa tramuscular injectable or an intravenous tra injectable. inj “It blocks the receptors in your brain that th opiates attach to,” says Alice Bell, the overdose-prevention program coordinaov tor at Prevention Point Pittsburgh. “If your body is dependent [on opioids], you’re bo going to feel [like you’re] in withdrawal.” go A state law, known as Act 139, that allows first responders and families and all friends of intravenous drug users to carry fri naloxone, went into effect in November na 2014. 20 And in April, Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration announced that funds had been ist raised to ensure that Pennsylvania State rai Police troopers are equipped with the drug. Po While the act was a breakthrough, there are still barriers preventing naloxt th one on from getting into the hands of those who wh need it most. The cost can be prohibitive; tiv pharmacies and pharmacists are still

adapting to administering the antidote; and more training is necessary to ensure that opiate users are aware of the benefits of the medication and how to use it. These factors stand in the way of making naloxone the widely accepted airbag of intravenous drug users. FEW LEGAL barriers exist between nalox-

one and those who could benefit from its use and availability. With a prescription, an at-risk individual can acquire it. And Act 139’s “Good Samaritan” provision provides immunity from prosecution for individuals reporting overdoses. Moreover, on May 20, Karen Hacker, director of the Allegheny County Department of Health, issued a standing order for naloxone in Allegheny County. Under this provision, individuals can acquire naloxone in the form of nasal spray at participating pharmacies without a prescription. But so far, only 14 pharmacies in Allegheny County have opted to participate. While advocates say it’s not complicated for pharmacies to distribute naloxone, they are required to take a number of steps. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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DRUG TRIALS

Life can be tough for addicts and their families {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Laura Probst knows the worry that comes from a child staying out all night. Where are they? What are they doing? Unfortunately for the Hopewell Township mother of two, if her son or daughter were out all night, she knew what the two were likely up to. Both have struggled with drug addiction, and when they were out, she often wondered if she’d ever see them again. On one such occasion, Propst’s daughter returned home with bruises on her body. She said she’d been in a car accident, but Propst knew the truth: She’d overdosed on heroin, and the bruises on her body were likely the result of someone bringing her back to life with CPR. “You can’t sleep because you’re afraid you’re going to get a knock on the door saying your kid’s dead,” Propst says recalling days like that. “Every time you knock on their door, you slowly peek in the door to see if they’re blue. It takes such a toll. I had three mini-strokes from stress.” Today Propst’s two children are in recovery, and she’s the president of the Pittsburgh chapter of Not One More, a national organization dedicated to ending drug overdoses. The group was started in California in 2012 by two mothers, one of whom had lost her child to a heroin overdose. The Pittsburgh chapter was formed in April 2013. “One of the things we want to do is change the stigma and the way people view people who are addicted to this drug,” says Propst. “I think the general public has a view of addiction, and if you’re not affected by it, you don’t know.” For Propst, the public perception and stigma associated with drug addiction is a large factor in the thousands of heroin overdoses that occur every day throughout the country. It prevents addicts from seeking the help they need, and it keeps the parents of addicts from getting the support they need as well. “People think we must be bad parents,” Propst says. “The blame is on us.” Propst says she and her husband lost friends because of their children’s addictions. Through On Sept. 17, Not One More will host a vigil in Arsenal Park Not One More, she works to educate the public that addiction is the same as any disease and can in Lawrenceville. affect anyone. www.notonemorepgh.net “People think it can’t happen to them because we’re living in suburbia with nice homes and nice neighbors,” Propst says. “These are the kids who are doing these drugs.” Propst says that some of the harshest vitriol her family has faced sometimes came from the parents of children who were also using. Often, she explains, parents are unwilling to accept that this is happening to their child. “One woman’s daughter ended up committing suicide, and she was in such denial that this was even happening,” Propst says. “By the time you really grasp that this is a real problem, so many parents are losing their kids because they don’t know what to do.” Not One More provides resources for individuals and parents impacted by drug addiction. They educate families on how to spot an overdose and how to respond. “The disease of addiction will surround the whole entire family,” says Propst. “Society has so much of this backward. We need to stop punishing people for this addiction.” Propst’s experience made supporting Narcan, an overdose-reversal drug also known as naloxone, a no-brainer. Now she spends her time educating others on the benefits of the medication. “There’s a lot of myths. There’s a lot of people who think they know something and they don’t,” says Propst. “They think, because they’re not educated enough, that if you give somebody Narcan, that person is just going to use more drugs. But somebody who has an active addiction, they’re not even doing it to get high — they’re doing it not to be sick. They don’t want the Narcan because they automatically go into withdrawal.” Propst has heard countless stories about lives saved with Narcan. One that particularly struck her came from a Donora police officer who administered Narcan to a mother who was overdosing while her two children watched. As the paramedics took the woman away, Propst says the officer didn’t believe she was going to make it. But she did. “He said you’d be surprised how good it feels to save a life,” Propst says. “Everyone who has a loved one dealing with this addiction needs to get Narcan.” RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

“They need to have [naloxone] on site at the pharmacy,” Hacker says. “We ask them to provide a pamphlet, and we recommend that they have the training that the state offers.” And those aren’t the only requirements. The nasal spray covered by the county’s standing order requires assembly, which creates extra steps for naloxone providers and users. “That requires the pharmacy to stock naloxone, stock the syringes that naloxone goes in and stock the atomizer,” says Corey Davis, a lawyer with the National Health Law Program, a group that advocates for the health rights of low-income and underserved individuals and families. Advocates say the exclusion of injectable naloxone from the standing order also fails to cushion buyers and users from the drug’s variable prices. “For a long, long time, intranasal was more expensive than intramuscular,” says Green, who has helped develop first-responder naloxone toolkits and training. “Then it switched because there were shortages of the injectable and the actual cost of naloxone itself went up substantially.” Recently, “the price of these devices, of the intranasal for example, has skyrocketed,” says Janie Simmons, the creator of GetNaloxone Now.org. For those with health-care coverage, the fluctuating price is not a problem. “Many of the states have it covered,” Green says. “Medicaid is really encouraging naloxone to be covered on every state formulary. A lot of the private insurers tend to follow suit.” However, says Bell from Prevention Point, “For people with no insurance or a high co-pay on their insurance, the intramuscular is going to be a lot more affordable for them.” Additionally, the unstable price of naloxone creates a considerable obstacle for


organizations like Prevention Point, which has been providing free naloxone to intravenous drug users for more than 10 years. Prevention Point Pittsburgh is the only community organization in Pennsylvania, outside of Philadelphia, that engages in syringe exchange and naloxone distribution. “We’ve given naloxone to over 1,600 people and have had over 1,300 documented [overdose reversals],” says Bell. Funding such an operation is no easy feat. Two-thirds of the program’s funding comes from private donations and grant money. And currently, federal and state governments are not providing funding for naloxone. “Because [the prices have] not been consistent, it’s been one of the single most difficult things for community organizations to handle,” says Green. “We’ve had shortages in the past — it will probably happen in the future.”

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IN ADDITION to working to put naloxone

in the hands of intravenous drug users and their families and friends, public-health advocates are seeking to increase access to naloxone training. Simmons, a researcher with the nonprofit National Development and Research Institutes, in New York, responded to many states’ calls to require naloxone training by creating a short instructional course that both EMTs and laypeople can complete online. She intends to collect data from users of GetNaloxoneNow.org to evaluate its helpfulness, and says that since November the website has reached 8,000 individuals nationally. “There’s a lot of people dying from prescription overdoses, people who are using alone, who are isolated from other people who are using, and we need to reach those people. And the way to reach those people is not through the traditional channels,” Simmons says. “They’re not going to syringe exchanges. They’re not going to harm-reduction sites. They might not even be going to community agencies.” Getting opiate users trained on how naloxone can prevent overdose death is also key to making sure more people are taking advantage of the drug. And it’s important for users and their families to have the antidote before an overdose occurs, because if you have to go get it at the time of an incident, it’s too late. This information is also important for pharmacists, who have one of the best chances of engaging with drug users visiting the pharmacy to purchase syringes. Green says pharmacists should be trained to offer naloxone on a more regular basis. “Store by store, we visited pharmacies in a community to ask them to offer it to

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literally everyone coming in purchasing syringes, to offer them naloxone directly,” says Green. Pharmacists are particularly suited for increasing access to naloxone for several reasons. “They understand the pharmacology of what is happening in addiction,” Green says. And of the nearly 3,000 pharmacists she has trained in naloxone distribution, Green says, many “understand that this is no different from other chronic diseases in many respects.” And public-health advocates say an understanding of the effects opiods have on users is important for pharmacists and others who may be helping users transition out of rehabilitation or incarceration. “There is a lot of potential for death reduction by focusing on incarcerated populations, people leaving detox, and people who are transitioning from the emergency departments after having been medically treated for an overdose,” says Green. “Those instances and those transition points we know are very high-risk.” For example, periods without opioid use lower an individual’s tolerance. Thus, a typical amount used before a period of detox could be a fatal amount after.

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This kind of knowledge can be life-saving for an opiod user coping with addiction. But it’s difficult for public-health advocates to stay on top of the epidemic when the opiod drugs on the street are in constant flux. “The challenges that we have now are not the challenges that we had yesterday,” says Green. “Five years ago, we were dealing with prescription opioids and a little bit of heroin, and now we are dealing with a lot of heroin and a little bit of prescription opioids.” For instance, batches of fentanyllaced heroin have entered the supply in Allegheny County, causing almost two dozen deaths in 2014. New developments like these leave the public-health community struggling to get ahead of this deadly issue. But part of that effort also involves changing perceptions about users. Advocates say this includes a commitment to recognizing the humanity in intravenous drug users, and treating them like any other patients with a disease. “You can live with addiction — in your past, your present and potentially, you never know, in your future,” says Green. “You can succeed, and you’re human.”


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PEDAL AND PARK AND RIDE

Exclusive bike garage encourages riding bikes in conjunction with riding buses {BY RYAN DETO} THE WORD GARAGE is typically associated

with one other word: car. That’s not the case in East Liberty anymore. By the end of September, a garage built exclusively to house bicycles will be up and running as part of the revamped East Liberty Transit Center, which sits at the corner of Shady and Penn avenues, straddling the MLK Busway. According to Rebecca Schenck, project specialist at the Urban Redevelopment Authority, the garage will hold up to 80 bicycles behind locked gates. The bikes can be accessed using an electronic key fob and the garage will charge a stillundetermined annual membership fee. Fees for bike garages typically range from $100-150 per year. There will also be free bike racks just outside the garage for commuter use. “I think it is super great, and it is something that I would use,” says Anne Marie Toccket of the Highland Park/East Liberty Bike-Ped Committee. “I live in Highland Park, a bit more than a mile to the busway, which is just a bit too far to walk.” Bike Pittsburgh’s Dan Yablonsky says the advocacy group acted as a cheerleader and consultant for the garage. He is excited for the pneumatic and springloaded double-decker racks that offer minimal lifting and save space since bikes

{PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCA SHENCK}

The new bike garage at the East Liberty Transit Centrer

will be stacked. “It is such a sweet structure,” says Yablonsky. “And as the city becomes more dense, space is at such a premium.” Though bike garages are an increasingly trendy idea for cities, the East Liberty garage will actually be the third of its kind in the Pittsburgh. The first were two green shipping containers on Seventh Street in the Cultural District that offer 26 spaces for bike commuters, and are owned and managed by the adjacent Century Building. The other bike-parking facility is located in Pittsburgh Parking Authority’s Third Avenue Garage and has secure spaces for 24 bikes. But unlike these other bike garages, says URA chair and Mayor Bill Peduto’s chief of staff Kevin Acklin, the East Liberty garage is meant to encourage people

to ride their bikes in conjunction with using public transportation, particularly the busway. “The concept of riding from home to link to a bus to Downtown is a whole new idea for the city,” says Acklin. “This can unlock the whole epicenter of East Liberty.” But only if riders feel safe getting to the transit center in the first place. C u r r e n t l y, b i c y c l e routes with heavy bikefriendly infrastructure fall short of connecting all the way to the East Liberty Transit Center. The Beechwood Boulevard bike lane (the main route from Squirrel Hill) currently connects to paths in nearby Mellon Park and Bakery Living apartments, but these end more than half a mile from the garage. Schenck says there are plans to build bike-friendly infrastructure along Au-

“IT IS SUCH A SWEET STRUCTURE.”

relia Street and Shady Avenue that will eventually connect the transit center to the paths in Mellon Park. Construction is slated for spring 2016, with hopes that it will be completed by the end of summer 2016. Safe passage from the north might be a little farther off, however. North Highland Avenue is a designated bike-friendly road with sharrows (painted road signs reminding drivers that bikes often use the route) that start at Highland Park, and run south through East Liberty, but end two blocks short of the garage. “I think the biggest gap is East Liberty,” says Toccket. “People use that busway everyday. I think it is really difficult to access that busway where it is right now.” Toccket says the intersection of Penn and Highland avenues (where the sharrows end) is one of the most dangerous in the city, and that the area is not really safe for the crowd who would ride “dressed in their work clothes.” When asked if there were plans to make the East Liberty connection to the transit center safer, Schenck says, “Nothing set in stone right now, but we are currently working on the redesign to change Penn Circle and looking to make room for bikes in that area.” But Schenck, who has been managing the project since the URA got the funding in 2013, is hopeful that the East Liberty bike garage will increase ridership in the area and lead to more bikecommuting projects. “I hope that people will support the bike garage, and hopefully that will give us opportunities to do this other places in the city,” she says. RYA N D E TO@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[THE CHEAP SEATS]

Affordable Fun for f Everyone! y GAINING ACCESS {BY MIKE WYSOCKI}

ALTHOUGH THE Steelers preseason is in

Open Now thru Sept. 27 Weekends & Labor Day 10:30am- 6:30pm

full swing, the only games in this city that matter right now are being played by Pirates. On a recent trip to PNC Park, I took my customary trip up to my seats, but this time it was different. For the first time, I had a press pass — a golden ticket to infiltrate what I always romantically viewed as an enclave of stodgy, cigar-smoking men in suits drinking whiskey and pounding away on typewriters. The stodgy old men are still there, but there’s no smoking in PNC Park, they’re writing on laptops and tablets, and they’re drinking bottled water. In my excitement, I arrived two-and-half hours before the first pitch. Manny Sanguillen’s barbecue grill wasn’t even hot yet, and the rich folks who sit in the Lexus seats behind home plate had not even begun to arrive. These are the “good seats.” People in these seats are thrown peanuts and Cracker Jacks without even asking someone to buy it for them. Rich people are always looking for a handout. A fine-mustachioed gentleman in a vintage Pirates uniform, who looks like he comes from the bare-knuckles era of boxing, when pugilists struck intimidating poses with both arms outstretched and their fists curled up at the end, just throws free food to the corporate set. Ballpark fare for me consists of getting my niece or nephew to hook me up with $1 food from the Buckaroos food stand for kids. Or burying a $3 hot dog in nacho cheese and jalapenos intended for the slightly more well-to-do nacho eaters. But this day featured free eats — the press box offers unlimited potato chips and pretzels. Advantage: Me. Watching the game from the press box is quite an adjustment. When Gregory Polanco picked a Bryce Harper smash off the wall and fired a dart to Neil Walker to throw the smug superstar out at second, I had to fight my instinct to cheer. It’s like watching a game in a library. But in a library, the chances of sitting right behind Kent Tekulve are pretty slim. Good ole Teke! The man who threw the final out the last time the Pirates won it all, 36 long summers ago. We’re darn lucky to still have him around.

Some towns don’t have a treasure like Teke. For instance, if the Cubs’ postgame broadcast wanted the guy who threw the last pitch the last time they won a championship, they’d be screwed. That guy probably died of typhoid fever in 1938. Fortunately, in Pittsburgh we don’t have that problem. Nor do we have to endure endless summers losing in the best stadium in baseball. The Pirates beat the Nationals on this night and remain firmly entrenched in a playoff race. I’d write about what Pirates skipper Clint Hurdle said about that big win at his postgame press conference but, not knowing media protocol, I didn’t get my recorder close enough to tape him. I did my best to remember what he said. But needless to say, I could not remember what he said. And I know what you’re thinking, here we are in the second week of this column and the guy from the cheap seats is already leaving the nosebleeds and moving on to a better location in the ballpark. But the way I look at it, I sat up high and mooched free snacks. I think technically, they were still the cheap seats.

“WATCHING THE GAME FROM THE PRESS BOX IS QUITE AN ADJUSTMENT.”

LY! August 29 & 30

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Purchase Tickets Now at: or PittsburghRenfest.com

For information Call: (724) 872-1670

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I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Mike Wysocki is a standup comedian and member of Jim Krenn’s Q Morning Show each weekday morning on Q92.9 FM. Follow him on Twitter: @ItsMikeWysocki

See Mike Wysocki’s game-by-game predictions for the Steelers season in next week’s

STEELERS PREVIEW


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EXTREME PITTSBURGH

Looking for an adventure without leaving town? We visited six places that will bring you thrills in our own back yard. {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

SURF PITTSBURGH 412-720-1677 reservations@surfpittsburgh.com or www.surfpittsburgh.com

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A WATCHOF O E ID V H+ SURF PG T X REME MORE EBURGH PITTS S at SPORT hcity www.pg m paper.co

T

EST YOUR WAVE-RIDING SKILLS on the

Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio rivers with Surf Pittsburgh, the city’s first

recreation experience of its kind. The Surf Pittsburgh crew takes thrill seekers out on a 25-foot Centurion Enzo surfboat that is weighted on either side to create waves. The patient and experienced team will show you the ropes as you test your balance on one of its Hyperlite surfboards. Surfers are towed behind the boat until they get used to the swells, but once the boat has created a steady wake, it’s time to let go and ride the waves. The cost is $125 an hour for two people, and up to 10 people can join in the fun for $25 each.

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EXTREME PITTSBURGH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

presents

PET of the

WEEK

Photo credit: Linda Mitzel

Dottie This perky-eared pointer can’t wait to pack up her suitcase with her favorite toys and go to her forever home! Dottie is a people-oriented young gal who eagerly anticipates her next play date. An appropriate home for her would include children older than twelve who will respect this cute canine’s space. Dottie wouldn’t mind sharing her home with another dog, but would prefer a home without cats.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

THE WHEEL MILL 6815 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. www.thewheelmill.com

I

N THE PAST several years, Pittsburgh has worked to become more of

a bike-friendly city with bike shares and dedicated bike lanes. And those things are great for getting from point A to point B. But what

if you want to kick it up a notch? The Wheel Mill in Homewood is the city’s first indoor bike park, and it caters to both BMX riders and mountain bikers. Prices range from $10 for kids under 7 to $16 for adults. Professional BMX rider Chris Doyle, a Pittsburgher with four X Games medals, shared with us some of the more advanced uses of the park.

www.dayauto.com 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015


SUMMER RIDE DRAWINGS

WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST T IN

WIN A HARLEY-DAVIDSON® STREET 500 EACH WEDNESDAY!

PITTSBURGH DANCE CENTER

DRAWINGS AT NOON, 2PM, 4PM, 6PM, 8PM

E

VER DREAM OF FLYING through the

4765 Liberty Ave., floor 2, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111 or www.pittsburgh aerialsilks.com

GIFT GIVEAWAY STAGE

air with the greatest of ease? At the Pittsburgh Dance Center, that dream

can become a reality. Part fitness, part performance, the center’s aerial-silk classes include a mix of acrobatics and strength training to increase flexibility and tone muscle. Inspired by acts in the contemporary circus Cirque du Soleil, students learn how to SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM

climb and manipulate silk fabric by wrapping it around parts of their body to suspend and

DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

propel themselves through the air. The center also offers aerial yoga classes where students practice yoga poses while suspended above

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER.

the ground. Students can buy a 10-class pass

Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Must have a valid photo ID and be present to win. Every 25 base points equals 1 drawing entry. Entries earned 6AM on August 1 – 7:59PM on August 26 are eligible. Activate entries at a promotional kiosk from 10AM – 7:59PM each drawing day. Complete set of rules available at the Rush Rewards Players Club. Harley-Davidson® is a registered trademark of H-D U.S.A., LLC.

for $200 or drop in for $23. CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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SKYDIVE PENNSYLVANIA 496 Old Ash Road, Mercer. 1-800-909-JUMP or www.skydivepa.com

I

F SKYDIVING IS on your bucket list, Skydive Pennsylvania — which operates out of the Grove City Airport about an hour north of the city — makes it easy for first-timers. With about an hour’s worth of instruction, you can perform a tandem jump with an instructor for $239. That gets you what Andonios Kouninis of New Hampshire, who jumped on the day City Paper visited, calls the biggest thrill of all: “Man’s not really supposed to fall out of an airplane, so I thought I’d give it a try.”

RE SEE MO OF S O T O H P TREME OUR EX URGH B S T PIT at SPORTShcity g .p w ww m paper.co

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GO APE 10301 Pearce Mill Road, Allison Park. www.goape.com

W

ITH SITES IN A DOZEN CITIES around the country, the Go Ape Treetop Adventure Course first came to

Pittsburgh in 2013. The outdoor adventure challenges participants with five different ropes courses where they must traverse a set of obstacles before reaching the ultimate payoff: zip-lining through the trees. Make your way across a set of swinging steps or fly into a spiderweb-like net via a Tarzan swing. Adventurers are given a 30-minute safety tutorial and equipped with harnesses, pulleys and carabiners before being let loose. And leave your fear of heights on the ground. At the highest point, adventurers will find themselves 40 feet in the air. Prices range from $35 for kids 15-and-under to $55 for adults and older teens. CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

EXTREME PITTSBURGH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

- A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

LECTURE: ABANDONED AMERICA MATTHEW CHRISTOPHER WRITER & PHOTOGRAPHER The desire to gain a greater understanding of our past has driven archaeologists, artists, and scholars from across the world to study the vestiges of lifestyles and places that vanished. Through his collection of writing and photography, Matthew Christopher has spent the last decade documenting some of the ruins of America in our time. His work spans architectural treasures left to the elements and then all too often lost forever. This lecture is FREE to PHLF Members. Non-members: $5 Go to www.phlf.org for more information about PHLF membership.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 • 6:00 – 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

744 REBECCA AVENUE

412-471-5808

THE FACTORY

DIGITAL FILMMAKING PROGRAM LEARNING BY DOING THERE’S NO OTHER WAY TO BE TAUGHT THE ART OF FILMMAKING

JOHNNY BONES COMPANY: ARCHIMEDES MEDIA LAB, LLC JOB TITLE: CO-FOUNDER / CREATIVE DIRECTOR GRADUATION: SPRING 2010

OUR STUDENT WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF:

www.decshorts.com

DEC.EDU Financial Aid is Available for Those Who Qualify Housing is Provided Through bdihousing.com For more information about graduation rates, median debt of students who completed the programs, and consumer information, please visit: www.dec.edu/df

Students of the Pittsburgh CLO Academy present

BELLEVUE SKATE PLAZA 34 N. Balph Ave., Bellevue

W

ITH MORE THAN 20 skateparks

spread throughout the Pittsburgh region, skateboarding has

maintained a solid following with Pittsburghers over the past few decades. City Paper didn’t have to go far to find an avid skateboarder — CP Interactive Multimedia Manager Carlo Leo, who has been skateboarding for 18 years and helped start up the Plank Eye Board Shop in Bellevue. Leo says he sees more and more people skating around Downtown and other neighborhoods. “Skateboarding is pretty big right now,” he says, “especially with all the new parks being built.” One of the newer parks, the Bellevue

September 19 & 20 at The CAPA Theater $GXOWV‡&KLOGUHQ  XQGHU 

Skate Plaza, at Bayne Park, in Bellevue, opened in 2012 and has been consistently popular with skaters of all skill levels since. The best part? Most skateparks are free. All you need is a deck

TICKETS: pittsburghCLO.org/education · 412-281-2234 22

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and a helmet.


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THE ANGRY SNAPPER MAKI WAS SO EXCITING WE WISHED FOR MORE

DARK ROAST {BY RYAN DETO}

Black Forge Coffee House, Allentown’s new and only coffee shop, exudes more of an edge than most bean havens might. The walls are adorned with goat-skull sculptures and snake paintings. It feels dungeon-like, but in a comforting way: Customers gently nod their heads to lowvolume heavy metal, and the Oakland skyline is visible through black curtains. Ashley Corts, who co-owns the venue with her business partner, Nick Miller, says the edgy vibe was an intentional choice. “We both have had to work for someone who wanted you to look a certain way. Now, we can combine our passions of coffee and music,” she says. Black Forge offers typical beverages, such as cappuccinos, teas and lattes, but also others with a little bite. The Hellhound is a concoction of chocolate, espresso and a bevy of spices, topped with whipped cream and espresso beans. The cold-brew iced coffee has a smooth finish and an in-your-face name: God Damn Cold Brew. Allentown beckoned the pair (who both live nearby) in part because the community embraced the idea of an independent coffeehouse. They received a year of rate-abatement with help from the Hilltop Alliance community organization, and many Allentowners donated to the venture’s Indiegogo campaign. Since its Aug. 9 opening, Black Forge has served as a neighborhood gathering place. The coffeehouse hosts podcasts and other events, and local artists often meet there. “A lot of people in the community did not leave their houses, but that is changing now,” says Corts.

{PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Sichuan braised pork belly with a Japanese yam, carrot, and ginger purée accompanied by house-pickled heirloom tomatoes, and Blood Diamond martini

FAVORITES AND MORE {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. 412291-8994 or www.blackforgecoffee.com

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the

FEED

You know who has been enjoying the hot days? Tomatoes. Come hang out with them and their buddy, garlic, at the 11th annual

Red, Ripe and Roasted. Activities, cooking demos, tomato contests (smallest, largest, ugliest). Free admission with bag of fresh produce for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 30. Phipps Conservatory, Oakland. www.phipps.conservatory.org

AN ASIAN KITCHEN is a restaurant that challenges a Google search. Taken together, the three words seem more descriptive than nominative, and capture a broad net of Asian-ish restaurant results. But shortened to “Pan,” as it is on the restaurant’s sign and logo, the name plucks specific, pleasing synapses of both minimalism and double entendre. Opened in the former Tamari space on Butler Street by the group that runs the Andora trio of restaurants, Pan serves a decidedly upscale selection of — you guessed it — pan-Asian foods. The sushi creations are extraordinarily imaginative, with nary an option you might find at any traditional sushi house. The rest of the menu is rather more conservative, offering appealing, but not daring, updates of familiar dishes from the cuisines of

East and Southeast Asia. We think this is a wise approach. Classics don’t need to be reinvented, and versions such as chicken tom kha with noodles and bok choi, or char siu-style hanger steak with a bloodorange sauce, allow us to put the kitchen’s innovations in a familiar context.

PAN ASIAN KITCHEN 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-325-3435 HOURS: Mon.-Tue. 4-10 p.m.; Wed.-Thu. 4 p.m.-midnight; Fri. 4 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.-1 a.m.; Sun. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: $7-16 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Pan’s dumplings might be the most traditional of all, with ground pork and napa cabbage in a smooth, tender wrapper,

served alongside a sesame-soy dipping sauce. They were good, juicy inside and dense with ingredients. By contrast, wokblistered shishito peppers were served with Brussels sprouts in a pomegranatespiked soy sauce, a combination that seemed all over the place but held together pretty well. Though the sprouts, as is so often the case, could have been cooked a bit more. We were surprised when edamame arrived already shelled and tossed with a truffle soy sauce, but the smoky, earthy truffle flavoring nicely augmented the slight sweetness of the beans. It was a large serving, though, and best for sharing; to eat the whole thing oneself would have wearied the palate. Just the opposite with the Angry Snapper maki sushi, which was so exciting CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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FAVORITES AND MORE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

ALL DAY $5 Margaritas & Mojitos

WEDNESDAY BLG TRIVIA NIGHT 7-9 PM Win Free Drinks!

’s Best h g r u b s t t i P Hour! y p p a H y Frida

1014 Fifth Avenue • 412-281-2583 (BLUE) www.pghuptown.com • www.facebook.com/UptownPgh

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

ALL ABOARD Bloomfield’s new Station offers its own twist on cocktails

The bar at Station {PHOTO BY CELINE ROBERTS}

TACO TUESDAY

we wished for more. Spicy tuna and snapper, cucumber and avocado, tobiko and jalapeño, tempura crunch and gochujong sauce: To say there was a lot to this roll would be an understatement. But each ingredient was judiciously applied and cleverly balanced against contrasting components, as with the briny pop of the fish eggs against the vegetal spice of the paper-thin pepper slices, or the intense, fermented Korean condiment against the background crunch of the tempura. This was a rare big roll that worked just as well as the smaller, simpler sushibar classics. Pan also does excellent work on the grill. Salmon with seaweed salad and pad Thai sauce was perfect, with a succulent, translucent interior and a pale pink and lightly charred exterior; the tamarindinflected sauce (which we ordered on the side) was superfluous. Kurobota pork belly, from heritage Berkshire hogs — started as a Sichuanstyle braise, but, finished with the grill — took on a thin but intensely flavored layer of char that wonderfully counterbalanced the rich interior. (Although, truthfully, it was less rich than we expected from braised belly.) But if the belly was missing richness, the bed on which it was laid was missing flavor almost entirely. We expected a purée of carrots, Japanese yam and ginger to offer an interplay of soft sweetness and lively zing, but instead it was more like mashed potatoes. Blandness also kept the Chang Mai cauliflower from living up to its potential. Thai aromatic rice, roasted cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, crispy tofu, coconut and red curry sauce: It sounded like a vegetarian delight, packed with complex flavors and textures. But the tofu was unpleasantly mealy, the vegetables noticeably sulphurous, and neither the curry nor the meager single wedge of lime served with this dish packed enough heft to tip the balance. Shaved pork cheeks made an outstanding component of a dish that was like, but unlike, pad Thai. The tangy lime element was muted, and the crunch of bean sprouts was absent. But the pork cheeks were extraordinarily tender and smoky, presumably from wok hei (“breath of the wok”), the distinct flavor imparted when food flies above the rim of the wok and is briefly exposed directly to the high flame. Rare is the restaurant where you can’t go wrong with anything you order. Pan may not rise to this elusive height, but you are likely to find a favorite dish you’ll come back for, and sushi lovers, especially, should take note.

On Aug. 1, Station opened its doors in the Bloomfield space once occupied by longtime local haunt D’Amico’s. An olive-oilcured steel bar-top made by John Walter of Iron Eden sits just below the centuryold, polished-wood backbar. It’s a perfect reflection of the establishment’s desire to appeal to all comers: New meets antique. Bar manager Chris Matrozza, formerly of Grit & Grace and 1947 Tavern, describes the space as “a transient place to meet other people with a train-station type of atmosphere.” The large front barroom certainly has the space for comings and goings, already hosting soon-to-be regulars and, recently, a Magic the Gatheringthemed birthday party for chef Keith Fuller of Root 174. Clearly, this is a place that likes to have fun. The beverage program also offers range, from canned beers and drafts to a wine list curated by Kris Lichtenberger, Level 1 sommelier at Altius. A small selection of carefully constructed cocktails completes the tableau. Matrozza also wants to provide a culinary take on the latter aspect. Using Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s tome The Flavor Bible, Matrozza delves into flavor trinities and riffs on classics. Thus cocktails like the Zihuatanejo, based on the profile of strawberry, almond and cream cheese, results in a stylized flip, with the egg white standing in for the creamy component. Each cocktail went through many taste tests to eliminate redundancy and keep a balance throughout the program. While a few patrons have asked that the cocktail list be expanded, Matrozza is adamant about maintaining quality over quantity. Cocktails have no more than four or five ingredients each, and syrups, shrubs and infusions are made in-house. He hopes that this focus will translate into a strong base from which he and his bartenders can learn and build. Do expect a happy hour and an expanded collection of amari and vermouths “because Little Italy,” says Matrozza. “First, though, we need to get numbers under our belt.” CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4744 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412251-0540 or www.stationpgh.com


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-266-6362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern California-style Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An old-school continental menu and

Slice…Nice Because of our abnormal obsession with using the re BEST INGREDIENTS out the and making everything weH possibly can FROM SCRATC we created Award Winning Pizza, Salads, & Hoagies.

BEECHVIEW Craft Bottle, Domestic Beer & Wine Available! 2128 BROADWAY AVENUE Phone: 412-531-1068

Kasai PGH Japanese Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} a well-restored train station make this restaurant a destination. The menu leans toward Italian fine dining, plus steaks and chops. But well-charred chicken Louisiana and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE

slender, one-filling hosomaki and traditional rolls, to more elaborate multi-ingredient offerings — all with impressive attention to detail. Non-sushi items include crisp, flavorful gyoza dumplings and a craband-cucumber salad. KF

CARNEGIE BYOB, No Corkage Fee! 108 E. MAIN STREET Phone: 412-276-0200

@PGH_Slice

@sliceonbroadway

KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

Cenacolo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE KASAI PGH JAPANESE RESTAURANT. 146 E. Main St., Carnegie. 412-279-5500. Here, the menu is fairly sushi-centric, with a handful of cooked appetizers and entrees. Kasia offers a wide variety of sushi, from

For full menu visit us at

sliceonbroadway.com

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Monday & Thursday

LA TAVOLA ITALIANA. 1 Boggs Ave., Mount Washington. 412-481-6627. This family-run restaurant in Mount Washington offers Italian favorites in a warm, welcoming atmosphere. Entrees include classics such as parmigiana, marsala and piccata, prepared with either chicken or veal, as well as hearty surfand-turf fare. Be sure to try to pizza Margherita, on the antipasti list, or the superb appetizer eggplant Milanese. KF

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Visit us @ www.tamarindpa.com

Coriander $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

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NEWS

GREENTREE (412) 278278-4848 4848

CRANBERRY (724) 772-9191

LUNCH BUFFET EVERY DAY (11:30AM-3:00PM)

KUSUKA INDONESIAN CUISINE. Ponsi Plaza, 13380 Lincoln Highway, North Huntingdon. 724-382-4968. At this humble Indonesian restaurant, diners will find fare that has been influenced by China, India and the Middle East, but still remains distinctive. The menu spans appetizers like the crispy street-food pancake martabak and fish cakes to entrees such as Javanese fried noodles and spicy curry-like stews. J

LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy

@sliceonbroadway

Dine-In, Take-Out, Catering

MUSIC

412-224-2163

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3 OFF BUFFET ½ OFF ENTRÉE

$

Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Now Featuring!

FULL BAR OPEN TIL 10PM

2201 Murray Ave Ave, Squirrell HI HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM ARTS

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40 Craft Beers w

Serving Breakfast & Lunch

ontap w

BRUNCH

Now Hiring

10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

La Tavola Italiana. {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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2056 Broadway Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15216

412.344.4700

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4TH ANNUAL

11AM TO 8PM

SUNDAY, SEPT. 20

FEATURING FRESH AND DELICIOUS HATCH, NM CHILE PEPPERS ROASTING ALL DAY! BUY THEM FRESH OFF THE PLANT OR HOT OUT OF THE ROASTER. CASA REYNA AND VARIOUS OTHER LOCAL FOOD VENDORS WILL ALSO BE ON-SITE, OFFERING DELICIOUS MENU ITEMS MADE WITH THE HATCH CHILE PEPPER.

3314 WAGNER ROAD, ALLISON PARK

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

pghcitypaper

SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE

SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty . www per of well-prepared a p ty pghci m sushi, including .co specialty maki. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citruscured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE

WHITE OAK FARM

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RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF

ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include highquality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF

REYNA FOODS INVITES EVERYONE TO THE FARM!

JOIN US FOR A DAY OF FOOD, DEMONSTRATIONS, LIVE ENTERTAINMENT, ARTISTS, MERCHANDISERS, CRAFTERS, HAYRIDES, KIDS ZONE, WALKING TRAIL AND MORE. TICKETS $7 IN ADVANCE, $10 AT THE GATE. CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER FREE. FREE PARKING. RAIN OR SHINE. LIKE REYNA FOODS ON FACEBOOK OR VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.REYNAFOODS.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION. SPONSORED BY REYNA FOODS.

stewed pork) and sopes, thick cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF

SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF


LOCAL

“WE NEEDED A BIGGER SOUNDSCAPE TO EXPRESS WHAT WE WANTED TO EXPRESS.”

BEAT

{BY KIMBERLY OLSEN}

How does a Pittsburgh R&B artist go from performing at a suburban Moose Lodge to being featured in an award-winning film? Landon Thomas can tell you. In 2014, Thomas, 23, received an email from former Shadow Lounge owner Justin Strong saying there was a movie being filmed locally that was looking for new artists. So, with the pluck that has defined the early stages of his music career, Thomas sent the producers some songs. “They didn’t pick any of the songs. They actually looked me up, found the song that they wanted,” says Thomas, “and then made me go and re-edit it so there were no cuss words.” The song is an R&B ballad, “LSD” (for love, sex, drugs), and the movie is Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, which, like Thomas, has Pittsburgh roots; not only was it filmed here, it’s set here, too. The film won the U.S. Grand Jury Prize at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. The intersection of film and music has framed much of Thomas’ experience. He says he learned how to sing by watching the TV movie The Temptations (which was filmed a few blocks from where Thomas lives in East Liberty). A large influence of his is Usher, who was also featured in a film, Poetic Justice, before making it big. And Thomas even had a stint in film school, experience that comes in handy when making music videos for Vevo. Thomas grew up listening to his parents’ music — Prince, Tupac, N.W.A. — on his front porch in Braddock and credits his mom, also a singer, for his vocal talent. How does she feel about some of his more risqué lyrics? “I have a 1-yearold daughter. She knows what I’ve been doing,” he says, laughing. While he pursues his music career, Thomas works full time and runs a production company, LIE Productions, which he started with friends, “people who I know will work diligently with me.” He hopes to plan an all-R&B show by October. Will he be making any Moose Lodge appearances soon? Maybe. As an artist, says Thomas, “You have to be willing to perform anywhere. The moment you start taking yourself too seriously is the moment it stops being fun.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LANDON THOMAS with M. TOMLIN, HENDY and more 7 p.m. Thu., Aug 27. Most Wanted Fine Art, 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield. $10-15. 412-328-4737 or www.mostwantedfineart.com NEWS

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Landon Thomas {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK PALMER}

SOUND TRACKING

DEEP CUTS {BY ALEX GORDON}

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Blackalicious: DJ Chief Xcel (left) and Gift of Gab

LACKALICIOUS IS reliable. That

much is clear from the first couple of songs on Imani Vol. 1, the new album from the veteran hip-hop duo and their first since 2005. DJ Chief Xcel’s beats are as meticulously layered, soulful and satisfying as they’ve ever been, and Gift of Gab’s unmatched talent for speed, honesty and clarity in his lyricism has only gotten stronger. Spend a few minutes with the single “The Blow Up” to learn this firsthand. Over its 20-plus year career, Blackalicious has consistently produced progressive, challenging hip hop. It’s old-school stuff, rooted in pre-digital DJ culture, but somehow the relevance doesn’t waver (even Daniel Radcliffe is a fan, as he proved on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon). Like the duo’s first three records, Imani Vol. 1 is futuristic and retro, political and personal, and really, really fun to listen to. But Imani also marks new territory for Blackalicious. The album, due out

Sept. 18, is a self-released, crowd-funded affair to be spread over three volumes and released over the next few years. City Paper spoke with DJ Chief Xcel on the phone from South Carolina during a day off to ask what’s changed, what’s new, and the crate-digger’s prerequisite Jerry’s Records question.

fans who’ve supported us through all this time. You get everything digitally at the drop of a dime, but those physical things that you can get, those things that are personalized by us, those things are really, really special. You know? And me being a record collector, I’m always looking for things that are sought after. So it became an opportunity to do that.

BLACKALICIOUS

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT THIS PROJECT THAT INSPIRED YOU GUYS TO RELEASE IT IN THREE VOLUMES? We had amassed so much material. It’s very difficult to tell the whole story without certain songs, certain songs are key. We needed a bigger soundscape to express what we wanted to express. We didn’t wanna make it a triple CD or just a release with 48 songs, ya know?

WITH NEW BREED BRASS BAND, GEORGE HOLLOW, FORTIFIED PHONETIX 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 30. The Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

IMANI VOL. 1 IS YOUR FIRST ALBUM TO BE SELF-RELEASED AND FUNDED THROUGH A PLEDGEMUSIC CROWD-FUNDING CAMPAIGN. WHY THE CHANGE? With the Pledge thing, we really wanted to be able to give something special to the

WHAT DEFINES VOLUME 1? I’ve never been the type to really put a definition on things. One of the things CONTINUES ON PG. 37

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IT’S TIME TO WAVE GOODBYE TO SUMMER AND START SETTING THOSE ALARM CLOCKS.

REGISTER TODAY! Classes Begin September 8 ‡ Ages 3-18

Julia Cooper | Photo by Archie Carpenter

Students at Pittsburgh CLO Academy can choose from tap, ballet, hip hop, musical theater, voice, acting, piano & more!

NEW CLASSES INCLUDE: Acting for TV & Film · Directing · Dance Composition

pittsburghCLO.org · 412-281-2234

here Whether you are a seasoned-veteran, or a newbie, ned are some tips on how to help even the most refi year. l college student navigate through the schoo

5166 Butler St. Lawrenceville

PERFORM LIVE ON STAGE! · 2015/2016 CLO Academy Productions: Rehearses Mon-Thu eve. & Sat Aug 24 - Sept 20 Performs on September 19 & 20

Ages 7-18 © Disney

Ages 12-18

Rehearses on Saturdays Jan 23 - Mar 19 Performs on March 19

We’ve got you covered! -Gynecological Care -Birth Control -Pregnancy Testing -STD & HIV Testing -Emergency Contraception -Cancer Screenings $IIRUGDEOH&RQğGHQWLDO &RQYHQLHQW

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Rx Glasses • Sunglasses All frames $95 Contact Lenses • Doctor on site Chromos Cares give back program Hours: Mon-Thurs: 10am-7pm Fri-Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: 11am-4pm To schedule an exam call us at (412)-772-1473

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STUDY TIPS No matter what the age, all students need to study. Help yourself, or your children get focused this school year with these studying tips: FIND YOUR STUDYING “SANCTUARY” Finding the right place to study is key. Avoid having the television on, as this is too much of a distraction. Even worse, sitting on the bed only makes it easier

WE’RE HIRING!

to nap. Go to the library, or to a quiet room where you can sit at a desk and have limited distractions. Unplug yourself from social media sites and your cell phone (it won’t kill you, we promise).

FULL-TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

11 Parkway Center Pittsburgh, PA 15220

DON’T CRAM Set deadlines to avoid cramming for tests. Set aside a certain

• 12PM-9PM Shift • $11.50/Hour + $1.00 Shift differential

amount of time to study the week leading up to a test or essay. The earlier you start, the better!

TEACH Find a roommate or a sibling that does not know the material, and teach it to them. This forces you to organize yourself and tests your own knowledge of the topic. You will also find out what areas that still need focus. If you do not have anyone to test this out on, try typing it out on a word document.

TREAT YOURSELF Create goals and when you reach them treat yourself to a 5-minute break, a snack or a tweet.

• • • •

Paid Training, 8AM- 5PM Medical Benefits Regular Pay Increases Tuition Reimbursement Visit PHEAA.org/jobs to apply. PHEAA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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Smart Phone mobile applications now available!

CHEAP EATS & DRINKS: CHINA PALACE $6.50 daily lunch specials CASA REYNA Happy Hour M-F 5-7 P.M.

Moving is easy with Peoples e-Account. Peoples gas service is just one click away. You can start, stop or transfer your gas service, pay your bill, track usage and sign up for paperless billing. With e-Account, your account information is at your fingertips, 24 hours a day and accessible from anywhere.

BENJAMIN’S ½ Priced Wine by the Bottle on Tuesday DOUBLEWIDE Half Price Happy Hour M-F 5-7 P.M. JEKYL AND HYDE Karaoke Thursdays with drink specials LAVA LOUNGE 85¢ Tacos (Meat & Veggie) on Tuesday

EVERYDAY NOODLES Fresh noodles for under $10 MINEO’S Pizza starting at $1.70 per cut DOCE TAQUERIA $3 Taco Tuesdays TWELVE $4 Margaritas, $2 Coronas on Tuesdays SHARP EDGE BISTRO on Penn Ave. 1/2 off Drafts & 60¢ Bites, M-F 4:30 - 6:30

WE HOST FIELD TRIPS, TIES FUNDRAISERS, BIRTHDAY PA!R & CORPORATE EVENTS

SIGN UP TODAY: www.peopleseaccount.com/student

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Download the free Peoples e-Account app to manage your account on the go. It’s safe, secure and easy to use.

1041 Washington Pike | Suite #200 | Bridgeville | 412-564-0560

LOCATED BEHIND BURTON’S TOTAL PETS AT CHARTIERS VALLEY SHOPPING CENTER. A D V E R T I S I N G

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WORRIED ABOUT WHAT YOU EAT? HOW ABOUT YOUR BODY IMAGE? EXERCISING TOO MUCH?

VOLUNTEER: Volunteering can be a rewarding experience for the entire family. For those of you in college, this is a good way to become involved in the Pittsburgh community and is a great resume builder.

New Book!

ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE 412-345-7300 animalrescue.org UNITED WAY 412-261-6010 unitedwaypittsburgh.org

Lauren Lazar Stern

ANIMAL FRIEN DS 412-847-7000 thinkingoutsidethecage.org

MA, ATR-BC, LPC

Specialist in Eating Disorders Trauma and EMDR Certified

PITTSBURGH AIDS TASK FORCE 412-345-7456 www.patf.org GASP (GROUP AGAINST SMOG & POLLUTION) 412-924-0604 gasp-pgh.org

311 South Craig St. | 412.361.8040 laurenlazarstern@gmail.com

LAURENLAZARSTERN.COM PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 412-258-9561 volunteer@ppwp.org CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH 412-622-3114 carnegielibrary.org

NOW ACCEPTING MOST MAJOR HEALTH INSURANCE & STUDENT HEALTH PLANS

FEELING

DEPRESSED? DRINKING TOO MUCH

CITY PAPER STREET TEAM 412-316-3342 pghcitypaper.com

Celebrate the High Holidays at

Congregation Beth Shalom! Our vibrant, egalitarian congregation embraces people from all walks of life. We welcome the LGBT community, students who will be away from home for the holidays, and anyone of any faith who would like to attend our services.

Join us! Visit bethshalompgh.org for service times.

Contact our office for ticket information.

412.421.2288 x226 We are located in Squirrel Hill, close to university bus lines! 5915 Beacon Street PiƩsburgh, PA 15217 Affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism

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UPMC seeks adults for a research study involving study medications. You may be eligible if you:

• are age 18 to 30 • have depression and alcohol abuse Compensation is provided. S U P P L E M E N T

For more information, call

412-246-5189 All calls are confidential.


Simplify

YOUR RIDE. Visit

simple.portauthority.org and let ’s talk about a way to simplify your ride. If you complete the survey and qualify, you will be eligible to win a pair of Opus One tickets to a concert of your choice at Mr. Smalls Theatre, Club CafÊ or Brillobox. Winners will receive a follow up email from Opus One listing the upcoming concerts.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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TAKE OUT —— DELIVERY —— ORDER ONLINE

FEWER THINGS IN LIFE ARE MORE PRECIOUS THAN A STUDENT I.D.

PARTY ROOM AVAILABLE

(Call for Reservations)

So utilize it while you can! Here are some discounts that our great city of Pittsburgh has to offer with a valid student I.D. The Warhol Museum $10 (regular admission price is $20) Carnegie Museum of Natural Science / Art $11.95 (regular admission price is $19.95) Carnegie Science Center Carnegie Mellon University and Chatham College students receive FREE admission with their college ID. Any other college student receives $2.00 off their general admission prices , which is $18.95

online for $27 each during the regular season. Text RUSH to 32623 to get AE Student Rush text alerts! Pittsburgh Filmmakers Pittsburgh Filmmakers offers $3 admission to Point Park and Pitt students. Pittsburgh Pirates Save up to $10 on tickets to all Sunday-Friday games. Visit pittsburgh.pirates.mlb.com for the details.

SQUIRREL HILL 1900 Murray Ave.

Check out your Student Union for special deals!

Pittsburgh CLO $15 University tickets for all shows

Tel 412-521-1313 • Fax 412-521-1223

OAKLAND 328 Atwood St. Tel 412-621-6889 • Fax 412-621-6890 Mon-Thur 11am-10pm / Fri-Sat 11am-11pm / Sun Noon-10pm

www.sichuan-gourmet.com Pittsburgh Opera Starting 2 hours before every performance, students can go to the Benedum Center Box Office and purchase up to two tickets for half price

$

5 OFF

Any Purchase of $30 or more

Any Purchase of $50 or more

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT NOT VALID ON DELIVERY

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers.

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers.

We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

10 OFF A D V E R T I S I N G

8 OFF

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT NOT VALID ON DELIVERY

%

Pittsburgh Penguins American Eagle Student Rush tickets will be pre-sold

$

Total Purchase

FREE PARKING

With $30 Purchase or more

VALID ON DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT NOT VALID ON DELIVERY

2 HOUR MAX, 1 PER TABLE ONLY VALID ON DINE-IN

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

SICHUAN GOURMET SQUIRREL HILL / OAKLAND

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers.

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers.

We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

We reserve the right to explain the terms of the events.

S U P P L E M E N T


MC KINNEY PROPERTIES HAS OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING COVERED! THE CHALFONT APARTMENTS

LIVE SOUTH SIDE

Stop searching and start LIVING! www.livesouthside.com

You’ve Seen the Rest, Now Live at the BEST. www.chalfontapartments.com

412-683-8683 When you call Live South Side home, life just gets simpler. Located in the heart of the South Side and convenient to Duquesne, Pitt, CMU, Point Park and Carlow campuses! We’re minutes away from award-winning restaurants and shopping, with convenient access to public transit. Great Back to School specials on our spacious 4 bedroom floor plans $1,950/month. Our 2 bedrooms starting at just $1299/month

412-683-8683 Find your perfect floor plan today! Our beautiful apartments have quality options to make you feel at home. Feline friendly, Washer/Dryers in select units, Laundry facilities on site, Indoor Parking available. Our well-designed 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartments are now starting at $1599/month

THE CAMELOT

SHERWOOD TOWERS

Sleep In! Campus is just footsteps from bed www.camelot-apartments.com

You’ve Found Home. www.sherwoodtowers.com 412-683-8683 Conveniently located in the heart of Oakland! All of the comforts you expect and the amenities you deserve. Beautiful, bright and spacious 1 and 2 bedroom apartment homes, starting at $1,299/month. Feline friendly, Washer/Dryers in select units, Laundry facilities on site, Indoor Parking available

412-683-8683 Close by public transportation, laundry facilities on each floor, indoor and outdoor parking, and a 24 hour study lounge are waiting for you!

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DEEP CUTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

that I enjoy and that’s intriguing to me as a producer is seeing what the listener’s definition is [of] our art, what they walked away [from] it with, what their interpretation of it is, so I never really make a point to say, “This record is this.” You know what I mean? I want it to touch you how it touches you. AS A PROLIFIC RECORD COLLECTOR AND SAMPLER, IS THERE ANY GENRE OF MUSIC THAT YOU COMPLETELY DISLIKE? I can honestly say I’ve never found any genre of music that I haven’t found intriguing in some kind of way. If I go into the studio with the guys, we may spend the day playing all afrobeat; we may spend the day playing all samba; we may spend a day where we just trip off of Turkish jazz. Or we may spend the day, and say, “OK we’re gonna go in and we’re gonna clash Kenny Rogers meets ESG and see where that goes.” It’s just really about exploring, exploring, exploring … and that to me is the beauty in collecting records. DO YOU EVER CHECK OUT JERRY’S RECORDS WHEN YOU’RE IN PITTSBURGH? Oh, yeah! When I recorded Blazing Arrow, that summer I was living in New York because me and [recording engineer] Russell Elevado were mixing at Electric Lady[land Studios] and I was also going back and forth to Philly to work with ?uestlove, but that was during the week. On the weekends, I would drive from New York to Pittsburgh to go to Jerry’s and then I’d spend my whole weekend there, then I’d drive back to New York on Monday. That was through that whole Blazing Arrow period. ANY BIG FINDS? Yeah man, a lot of the stuff I used on Blazing Arrow I found at Jerry’s. There was like a Pittsburgh Pirates record that we cut, I think we used part of it on “Passion.” I came up with a lot of stuff at Jerry’s, Jerry’s is dope. Then after that, we hit it a few times when I was on the road with Public Enemy and Dilated [Peoples]. Me, Evidence and [DJ] Babu would roll through there and hit it up, too. OVER YOUR 20-PLUS YEAR CAREER AS BLACKALICIOUS, HAS YOUR PARTNERSHIP WITH GIFT OF GAB CHANGED? Creatively, it’s just a lot more efficient. We’re old men, you know? So when it’s time to get in and work, we get in and work. But that’s also the reason why we can go in and amass so many songs so quickly when we do sit down and work together. Because there’s not a lot of time spent teetering around the edges, you know what I mean? We just dive right in.

NEW RELEASES {BY MARGARET WELSH}

GREYWALKER BEYOND ALL MORTAL [SELF-RELEASED] GREYWALKER.BANDCAMP.COM

There’s always something a little cartoony about melodic death metal: That’s why Metalocalypse exists. And this release features all of the over-thetop hallmarks of the genre, from the dramatic album art to the grim subject matter to the assertively harmonic guitar lines and fast-motion riffs. Yet somehow Greywalker manages, impressively, to keep all of this from tipping over the edge. Beyond All Mortal is a time-bomb of a record: urgent, uneasy and over before you know it. Despite a slightly disappointing scarcity of immediately catchy riffs (these songs are growers), there’s an appealing hardcore bent here, and vocals hit an emotive sweet spot, hovering above guttural growls. Plus, recording engineer Matt Very provides, as always, exactly the right amount of aural size and polish.

BLUE SOUL TEN THE UNSPOKEN WARRIOR [GREENEHOUSE MUSIC] WWW.GREENEHOUSE MUSIC.COM

The Unspoken Warrior opens with a vintage sample: “What you’re going to hear about today is nothing short of a miracle … Living Stereo!” From here, Claye Greene — the composer/producer behind Blue Soul Ten and owner of locally based label Greenehouse Music — primes his listeners for more than just a record. This is meant to be a listening experience. Greene blends ambient trip-hop, lounge and jazz, and tracks are heavily interspersed with soulful female vocals. The Unspoken Warrior evokes the down-tempo electro space-rock of groups like Air and Everything But the Girl — which is to say, this is premium chill-out music.

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proudly presents

Be B e imm immersed mersed in a live ve laser la light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

Check out Lasermau5 & Laser Gorillaz !

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CRACKERFARM}

Della Mae as a four-piece (Celia Woodsmith, left)

WORLD MUSIC {BY CALEB MURPHY} WHILE YOU MIGHT not hear about them on

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

Think you’re the biggest Steelers fan? PROVE IT!

Tag your best fan photos on Twitter and Instagram with #CPSteelersFans and we’ll share our favorite images in next week’s #CPSteelersPreview

CNN, the United States has its own musical ambassadors, who expose people in other countries to American music, and aim to make cultural connections. And one such ambassador is Grammy-nominated bluegrass-folk band Della Mae. As a part of the U.S. State Department’s American Music Abroad program, the group, formed in Boston and now based in Nashville, has played concerts in Pakistan, Kazakhstan and many other places around the world. Della Mae has represented us well, too. Celia Woodsmith, lead singer, guitarist and one of the songwriters, says the group’s received comments like “I didn’t know Americans liked Pakistanis” and “Not all Americans are racists.” “We really try to bring people together,” she explains. “And we’ve played in areas that are a little trickier to play in.” Although they sing in English, the members of Della Mae — who currently also include Kimber Ludiker (fiddle), Jenni Lyn Gardner (mandolin), Courtney Hartman (guitar and banjo) and Zoe Guigueno (bass) — can still get international crowds into the music. “I think [people] connect with the rhythm and the harmonies,” she says, noting that listeners typically associate musical major keys with happiness and minor keys with being sad, no matter where they live. Along with its regular tour schedule, these State Department trips keep the group busy. “From the moment you wake up ... to the moment you’re on stage, mostly you’re going a mile a minute,”

Woodsmith says. “You’re going so quickly that sometimes you can step onto the stage, but you really don’t know you’ve stepped onto the stage.” Just as these women perform as diplomats for the U.S., others have served as unofficial ambassadors for them, trailblazing for equality in the musical world. Though Woodsmith still occasionally hears comments like “You play that well, for a girl,” but, overall, she thinks that this mentality is fading away. “We’ve had so many women go before us that really have had to do the dirty work,” she says. “Women [who] have totally attacked [inequality] head on.”

DELLA MAE

WITH AARON LEFEBVRE 8 p.m. Wed., Sept. 2. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

That doesn’t mean that they shy from talking about these issues. In the song “Boston Town,” from the band’s latest selftitled record, they sing, “But a girl like me was worked to the bone / your fingers bled and your body moaned / 14 hours a day and then / my paycheck was half that of the men.” But even with all Della Mae’s achievements — including three successful records — the members still experience occasional whispers of self-doubt. Woodsmith herself says that, for every song she writes, there are 20 more that she never wants to play for people. But, she adds, “For every success you have as a musician, there are ten other failures. If you let [doubt] hold you back, you’re not going to get anywhere.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Pgh, PA 15217 • 412-421-2909 pittsburgh.colormemine.com

301 SOUTH HILLS VILLAGE Pgh, PA 15241 • 412-854-1074 southhills.colormemine.com

Deadli ne to Enter: Septem ber 27th

Honey Island Swamp Band

[ROOTS ROCK] + THU. AUG 27

[METAL] + SAT. AUG. 29

It’s been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, and lately there’s been no shortage of think pieces on how the city has progressed over the past decade. The 10-year mark is also significant for the Honey Island Swamp Band, because the band’s New Orleans-based members met, coincidentally, in San Francisco while staying with various friends in the aftermath of the storm. There, they decided to start their own project, incorporating Delta blues, soul and roots rock — for comparison, The Band comes readily to mind — and soon they had a weekly gig at San Fran’s Boom Boom Room. The group is back in NOLA, but you can see it at Pittsburgh Winery tonight. Margaret Welsh 9 p.m. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-20. 412-566-1000 or Jake www.pittsburgh Shimabukuro winery.com

Those of you following along at home know of my deep love for Philadelphia’s Hivelords. It started several years ago when, thanks to van trouble, the band arrived hours late to its Pittsburgh show. In spite of — or perhaps thanks to — the members’ horrible moods, they proceeded to wow the tiny remaining audience with a cutting set of sludgy, atmospheric, blackened psychedelia. Since then, the band has undergone a couple of lineup changes, but its newest release, Tapered Limbs of a Human Star, finds Hivelords — appearing tonight at House of the Low Voice — at its doomy, hypnotic best. Clay Davis, from Maryland, and Sloths, from Oregon, will also play, along with locals Dendritic Arbor, edhochuli and Night Vapor. MW 8 p.m. 228 39th St., Lawrenceville. $10. Email maxwell beehner@gmail.com for information.

[POP] + FRI., AUG. 28 The ukulele is a little like the recorder in that most people can coax some sort of passable ditty out of it. But Jake Shimabukuro is something different: a virtuoso who can {PHOTO COURTESY make the uke sound OF EONE MUSIC} like something much more complicated than the four-stringed apparatus that it is. When he was a teen growing up in Hawaii, his friends marveled at his ability to incorporate electric-guitar riffs and classical phrases, but it was a viral video of Shimabukuro playing “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” that made him a sensation. Check him out tonight at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, and don’t be surprised if you’re inspired to pick up a ukulele of your own. MW 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $29-59. 412-368-5225 or www.librarymusichall.com

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[BLUES] + SUN., AUG. 30 Taj Mahal is a grandiose title, but the 73-year-old multi-instrumentalist — who says he adopted the alias after having instructive dreams about Ghandi — has done a valiant job of living up to the name’s legendary connotations (and yes, despite recent Internet death rumors, he is alive and well). Always a man with impeccable style, both musically and sartorially, he made the blues his own, bringing in elements of reggae and calypso, as well as Caribbean and West African roots music. See the man himself, 50 years into his career, when he appears with John Hiatt & the Combo at the Palace Theatre tonight. MW 7:30 p.m. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $49-69. 724-836-8000 or www.thepalacetheatre.org

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WIT THIS AD GLAS GL ASS AS S WO WORL RLD RL D CE CENT NTER NT ER

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

VAPING KONG, VIVA & MORE

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 27 BENEDUM CENTER. The Piano Guys. Pop music w/ classical sensibility. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Mystery Skulls w/ Man’DANCE. Bloomfield. 412-821-4447. RIVERS CASINO. The Lava Game Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Fritz. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 28 31ST STREET PUB. Cotton Jackson, Whiskey Daredevils, Boiled Denim. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Slim Forsythe & His New Payday Loners. Strip District. 412-251-6058. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Buku w/ Beauty Slap, DJ 2Rip, & DJ Bamboo. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. Darryl & Kim. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMALLMAN GALLEY. André Costello & the Cool Minors, Beni Rossman & Ben Sherman. Strip District. 978-302-5570. SPIRIT. Universal Beat Union, Scattered Planets, Ivenfaint, Hepcat Dilemma, God Hates Unicorns, Onewayness, Radio for the Daydreamers, Hellenbach, Space Merchants. Lawrenceville. 419-603-3109. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Heard. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SHORTY’S ON CARSON. Dying Breed. South Side. 412-488-6969. SMILING MOOSE. Post Season, Such a Mess, Brosef Gordon-Levitt, August Ruins, We’re Almost Home. (Early). Leprosy, Bless the Child, Ambiance of Chaos, & Hericide. (Late). Pop Punk Night. South Side. 412-439-5706. SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS BAR. theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1001. THREE RIVERS HARLEYDAVIDSON. Steeltown Band. Glenshaw. 412-487-3377. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THE R BAR. Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Red Western, Lone Wolf Club. Shadyside. 412-251-6058.

SUN 30

CLUB CAFE. Della Mae w/ Aaron Lefebvre. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Luke Wade. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

CLUB CAFE. JMSN w/ OMNE. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Weird Paul Variety Show Reunion w/ host Scott Fry. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PALACE THEATRE. John Hiatt & The Combo, Taj Mahal Trio. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

MON 31 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cryptic Hymn, Tyranny Enthroned, Egality. Cryptic Hymn, Tyranny Enthroned, Egality. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 01 CLUB CAFE. Matthew Schuler w/ Nick Guckert. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 02

DJS THU 27 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Futurism. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

MP 3 MONDAY MY CARDBOARD SPACESHIP ADVENTURE

SAT 29

THIS WEEK 8/28:

GATHERING FIELD + NAMELESS IN AUGUST Bill Deasy and Friends -2015 Finale!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

31ST STREET PUB. Benn Dumm & The East Side Band, Torn Apart Hearts, Photo Joe. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BRILLOBOX. Kid Durango, Bassette, Young Fox, Swiss Army. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Audios, Westward Hollow. (Early). That Summer, Northern Gold w/ Round Black Ghosts, John Robinson. (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Hawkeyes. Robinson. 412-489-5631. IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. 412-564-5292. JOSE & TONY’S. King’s Ransom. Mt. Lebanon. 412-561-2025. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Driven. Ross. 724-212-7468. RIVERS CASINO. Kevin Howard. North Side. 412-231-7777. SEVEN SPRINGS. Totally 80s. Seven Springs. 800-452-2223.

Each week, we bring you a new song by a local artist. This week’s track comes from My Cardboard Spaceship Adventure. Stream or download “I Lost Again” from the new record Seeker for free on FFW>>, our music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.


EARLY WARNINGS

FRI 28 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. RIVERS CASINO. DJ NIN. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JABARI JACOBS}

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412- 231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825.

SUN 30 FOX CHAPEL YACHT CLUB. Ras Prophet. O’Hara. 412-963-0640.

COUNTRY

{TUE., SEPT. 15}

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

The Internet

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

HIP HOP/R&B

{TUE., NOV. 03}

FRI 28

Cannibal Corpse

PITTSBURGH WINERY. Kinetic w/ Jeanette Berry & Shad Ali. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

The Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

BLUES

{SUN., NOV. 15}

Flamin’ Groovies

FRI 28 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Chelsey Engel & The Northside Vamps. North Side. 412-904-3335. MOONDOG’S. Anthony Gomes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 29 ARTS ON ALLEGHENY. Sweaty Betty. Ford City. 724-123-1234. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. THE BRONZE HOOD. Sweaty Betty. Robinson. 412-787-7240. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. The Eldorado Kings. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 30

THU 27

Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square

BISTRO 9101. Aaron Lewinter. McCandless. 412-318-4871. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. David Throckmorten. North Side. 412-904-3335. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Dwayne Dolphin. North Side. 412-255-2493. ROSALEE’S. RML Jazz. New Brighton. 412-370-9621. WICKED FOX. Eric Johnson & Dan Wasson. Fox Chapel. 412-794-8255.

paper pghcitym .co

FRI 28 ANDYS WINE BAR. J. Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Swing Allstars. North Side. 412-904-3335. LATROBE ARTS CENTER. Neon Swing X-Perience. Latrobe. 724-537-7011.

NEWS

CLUB CAFE. Judy Kasper, Mike Rodgers. South Side. 412-431-4950. ST. CLAIR PARK. The Stickers. SummerSounds series. Robertshaw Amphitheater. Greensburg.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Tim McGraw w/ Billy Currington & Chase Bryant. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400.

CLASSICAL THU 27 MT. LEBANON HIGH SCHOOL STRING QUARTET. Light classics & music from movies, Broadway, more. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

412-321-1834. HARTWOOD ACRES. River City Brass Band. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HIGHLAND PARK. Wilson/Barnes, Throckmorton Trio. Reservoir of Jazz series. Highland Park. 412-255-2493. RIVERS CLUB. Jessica Lee & Friends. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

MON 31 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 01 KATZ PLAZA. Thomas Wendt. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 02 ALPHABET CITY TENT. Roger

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Humphries & RH Factor. North Side. 412-323-0278. RIVERS CLUB. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 27 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SPOONWOOD BREWING COMPANY. Right Turn Clyde. Bethel Park. 412-833-0333.

FRI 28 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800.

MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. “Schubert on the Bluff.” Mixing the music of Schubert w/ that of Pittsburgh composer David Stock. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080. ORGANIST ALISTAIR STOUT. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

AMPLIFY CHURCH. Joel Ansett. Strip District. 616-889-5083.

WED 02 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

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JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

New MENU New COCKTAILS New MUSIC

OTHER MUSIC THU 27

FRI 28

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

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PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Join over 80 community brass musicians, performing alongside the Pittsburgh Symphony brass & percussion sections. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-392-4900.

THU 27

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aye d S R THaUraok

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Classic pieces such as Brahms’ Concerto in D major for Violin & Orchestra, the Armed Forces Salute, “Danny Boy” & “God Bless America.” Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-392-4900.

REGGAE

FRI 28

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$ 3 fi

MON 31

PITTSBURGH WINERY. Honey Island Swamp Band. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

CLUB CAFE. Stationary Pebbles, Wanyama. South Side. 412-431-4950.

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TUE 01

SAT 29

ngs i l g Yuen eers B Mini

$3 y davia s E hts g N i i L D s WeEud Tr Coor ball re

SUN 30

SUN 30 SAT 29

SUN 30 FULL ELKS LIST E ALLEGHENY LODGE #339. The ONwLwIN . w Swingtett. North Side.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri, Daniel May, Tony DePaolis. Downtown. 412-553-5235. PLUM ST. Neon Swing X-Perience. 412-384-7771.

2.50

FRI 28

WED 02

JAZZ

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Roots Reggae Festival. W/ DJs Original Dangsta, Selecta, Soy Sos, The New Sheriff, Jimmy Phingaz. Live Performers Oriel Barry, Jah Ques. Strip District. 412-251-6058.

The Internet

SAT 29

PARADISE ISLAND. Shot O’ Soul. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

SAT 29

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. J.D. Eicher & the Goodnights w/ Vineyard Junction. Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. SCHENLEY PLAZA. Apache Relay & Son Little. Oakland. 412-682-7275. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Duquesne University Tamburitzans. South Park.

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– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

JAMESSTREETGASTROPUB.COM ARTS

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What to do Aug 26-Sept 1 Lake Street Dive / Holy Ghost Tent Revival MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 27 The Piano Guys

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Pittsburgh Comedy Festival

HENRY HEYMANN THEATER Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghcomedyfestival.org. Through Aug. 29.

The Fritz

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 28 The Second City FULLY LOADED

Brian Regan

O’REILLY THEATER Downtown. 412-316-1600. Tickets: ppt.org. Through Aug. 29.

AUGUST 29 THE PALACE THEATRE, GREENSBURG

WYEP presents Son Little and The Apache Relay

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival WEST NEWTON. All ages event. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. Through Sept. 27.

Rhythm and Brews

TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER Monroeville. Over 21 event. Featuring Rusted Root. Tickets: showclix.com. 2p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

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TUESDAY 1

Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars

Bakery Living PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

Tim McGraw

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Free admission. Through Aug. 30.

Where to live 42

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The 19th Annual Shadyside Art & Craft Festival

Station Square Summer Jam Gathering Field & Nameless in August

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Blackalicious

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7p.m.

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. Tickets: 7springs.com. Over 21 event. Through Aug. 30.

Jake Shimabukuro

SUNDAY 30

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Brian Regan

Seven Springs Wine Festival

MAIN STREET STAGE Station Square. Free event. All ages show. 6:30p.m.

Brit Floyd - Space & Time World Tour 2015

SATURDAY 29

SCHENLEY PLAZA Oakland. Free show. For more info visit wyep.org. 7p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: JMETELLUS

WEDNESDAY 26

IN PITTSBURGH

Matthew Schuler (From NBC’s The Voice) CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

find your happy place

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“MAYBE HE REACTS THIS WAY BECAUSE HE REGRETS WHAT HE DID.”

GIRL TALK {BY AL HOFF} What happens when a 15-year-old girl has an affair with her mother’s boyfriend, as depicted in The Diary of a Teenage Girl, the debut feature from Marielle Heller, adapted from Phoebe Gloeckner’s graphic novel? Perhaps not the hysterical freak-out you’d expect.

Minnie (Bel Powley) shops for comix.

CP APPROVED

This more sweet-than-sour coming-of-age dramedy is set in mid1970s San Francisco. Aspiring artist Minnie (Bel Powley) lives with her free-spirited, somewhat lackadaisical mom (Kristen Wiig) and her layabout boyfriend, Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Mutual flirting between Minnie and Monroe leads to a sexual relationship, enjoyed and sustained by both. (Diary snapshots a time and place in which adults acted like children and children acted like adults.) Minnie records her thoughts on poorly hidden cassette tapes, running the gamut of adolescent joys and miseries: She’s independent and insecure, confident and confused, thrilled and terrified. Mostly, she wants to be wanted, and is unsure of how to secure this. British TV actress Powley plays Minnie’s mix of vulnerability and moxie perfectly. Some viewers may take exception with Diary’s largely non-judgmental approach to this relationship. Yes, it’s inappropriate and will surely end in some tears, but Diary takes another tack: People, especially teenagers, do dumb things — but growing up is defined by mistakes, and what is learned from them. Starts Fri., Aug. 28. AMC Waterfront and Manor

Seeing clearer? A survivor of the 1960s Indonesian genocide

MEMORY HOLES {BY HARRY KLOMAN}

I

N THE ACT of Killing (2012), Joshua

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Show Me a Hero,

a six-part miniseries currently on HBO, which tracks the municipal and community strife when, in the late 1980s, Yonkers, N.Y., was court-ordered to build low-income housing. Also recommended for anybody who likes quality ensemble dramas.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO}

Urban-policy nerds should search out

Oppenheimer asked the perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide of the 1960s to don costumes and makeup and to re-enact the things they had done so many years ago following a military coup — and, almost incidentally, to reflect upon it all. The result was a quirky documentary disturbing in its mannered nonchalance. Now, Oppenheimer takes us back to Indonesia for the more straightforward The Look of Silence, wherein survivors share memories of the genocide and confront the people who perpetrated it. Early on, we see one elderly witness examined for eyeglasses to restore her vision, and then a little girl fools with a pair and giggles. “Playing with glasses?” her father tells her. “You’ll regret it.” We see a blind old man sing a silly song about a sexy girl. These are foundational metaphors as thick as the doctor’s test lenses.

The doctor is Adi Rukun, the film’s serene protagonist of sorts, born in 1968, three years after the rise of the junta that killed his brother. His mother recalls those days as she cares for her husband, age 103, who’s literally just skin and bone. As children learn lies about the past in their classroom, Rukun tries to teach one child the truth.

THE LOOK OF SILENCE DIRECTED BY: Joshua Oppenheimer In Indonesian, with subtitles Starts Fri., Aug. 28. Parkway and Regent Square

CP APPROVED In a brief moment of historic footage, we hear about Indonesia’s financial promise — dashed by the military overthrow of the country’s Communist government. But otherwise, the leisurely Look of Silence is exquisitely filmed in the present day of

a tropical paradise lost, its tranquility an ironic counterbalance to the turmoil it recalls. The bulk of the film revolves around Rukun questioning his brother’s killers, soliciting only excuses, denials and veiled threats. “You ask deep questions,” one says to him, catching on to his interrogation. Referring to his participation in the earlier film, he adds, “Joshua never asked such deep questions.” One aging assassin tells the story of ripping someone’s guts out and cracking his skull like he’s reminiscing about an exhilarating barroom brawl of his young manhood. “Maybe he reacts this way,” someone observes, “because he regrets what he did.” Or maybe he has no conscience, for what else could account for millennia of human cruelty? In the end, Oppenheimer teaches us nothing about why people do such things. And that’s the point: The reasons are as immutable as all of the lives that every genocide takes. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW THIS WEEK AMERICAN ULTRA. A pair of weed-indulging slackers — Mike (Jesse Eisenberg) and Phoebe (Kristen Stewart) — enjoy a quiet life in a small West Virginia town. Until Mike, who unbeknownst to himself is a super-deadly sleeper agent for the CIA, is in short order: targeted by Langley for extermination by a new manager (Topher Grace) and re-activated as a killer by his former handler (Connie Britton). So, it’s one deeply confused (and still stoned) assassin defending himself quite adeptly against other deadly agents (one memorable kill is via spoon), while also trying to lock down his relationship with his girlfriend. Nima Nourizadeh’s dark comedy supplies enough twists and turns (and laughs) to make this decent-enough late-summer entertainment. And there’s fun supporting work from John Leguizamo and Walton Goggins (Justified). The ultra-violence is a bit wearying, and the film could have been shorter (it takes a bit to get its wacky groove going.) But at least it proves some stoners can get stuff done. (Al Hoff) HITMAN: AGENT 47. Even for viewers who aren’t familiar with the Hitman video-game series, the basis for Aleksander Bach’s new film sounds intriguing. An evil organization is trying to revive a scientific program that created genetically engineered assassins, and the progeny of that original program are tasked with making sure that doesn’t happen. Rupert Friend and Zachary Quinto play dueling assassins with a common goal: finding a girl (Hannah Ware) who might hold the key to genetic modification, and getting her to trust them. It’s hard to say whether the film would be any more enjoyable for fans of the video games, but for franchise noobs it’s sometimes difficult to follow. Even the structure of the film feels like a video game, complete with a final boss mission. And at one point, it’s almost like Ware’s character is going through a video-game introduction tutorial. But it’s still an action thriller, which means there are explosions, fast cars, guns and carefully choreographed fight scenes. (Rebecca Nuttall)

(DOWNTOWN)

Gueros (2015)

8/26 @ 7:30pm Winner of 5 Mexican Ariel “Academy Awards” including Best Picture and Best Director! _________________________________________________

The Painter and Transience (2015) 8/27 @ 7:30pm

Two new independent films. Free to attend! _________________________________________________

Filmed By Bike Festival

8/28 @ 7:00pm, 8/29 @ 2:00pm & 7:00pm A collection of short films celebrating the love of two wheels. _________________________________________________

This Thursday, AUG. 27 • Noon-1pm:

THE HOUSE BAND

Last Concert - See you next year! 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

NO ESCAPE. An American family living overseas finds itself caught up in a coup. Pierce Brosnan, Lake Bell and Owen Wilson star in John Erick Dowdle’s thriller. Starts Wed., Aug. 26 REBELS OF A NEON GOD. Ming-liang Tsai’s 1992 crime thriller follows a young man in Taipei who becomes obsessed with a petty thief. In Mandarin, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 28. Harris

S E R I E S

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS!

Meru In 2008, three of the world’s best CP MERU. climbers — Conrad Anker, Jimmy Chin and Renan Ozturk — attempted to summit the Meru peak in the Himalayas. Meru is “only” 21,850 feet high, but it’s topped by a sheer rock “fin,” and reaching the top has remained elusive. It is considered an “impossible climb” because summiting requires a variety of climbing skills (on ice, rock and wall), at high altitude, and while carrying all one’s equipment. And in this case, while also filming the effort. (Chin co-directed Meru with his wife, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi.) The film follows the three as they prep and hit the mountain in 2008, and are eventually forced to turn back 100 meters from the top. As they ponder whether to try again, the climbers are sent reeling by life-changing events, and the film shifts from an adventure doc to intimate examinations of risktaking, the camaraderie of climbing and how to balance dreams with realities. Jon Krakauer, climber and author of the disaster-on-Everest account Into Thin Air, serves as a narrator of sorts, filling in more casual viewers on technical details (ice climbing vs. wall climbing), and helping to explain what forces drive climbers to seek “impossible” challenges. A must for armchair alpinists, who can come just for the spectacular climbing footage, but nearly everyone will find this thoughtful window into pursuing extreme vocations fascinating. Starts Fri., Aug. 28. Manor (AH)

Turbo Kid (2015)

8/28 @ 10:00pm, 8/29 @ 4:00pm & 9:00pm, 8/30 @ 5:00pm & 7:30pm, 8/31 @ 7:30pm, 9/1 @ 9/2 @ 7:30pm, 9/3 @ 7:30pm The orphaned Kid survives a drought-ridden nuclear winter, traversing the Wasteland on his BMX. A cult classic in the making.

TURBO KID. This indie Canadian film is an homage to the apocalyptic adventures of yesteryear, from biggies like Mad Max and Waterworld to dozens of straight-to-video actioners. This time, the action is set in the “distant future of 1997” (the first of many jokes rooting this film in a 1980s sensibility). Water is scarce, people are violent and damaged, and one tween boy known as “the kid” makes do by scavenging. Then two significant things happen: The kid makes a new friend, the super-hyper, bubbly girl named Apple, and they hook up with a posse (on BMX bikes) who are out to take down a villain named Zeus. There are chase scenes, disgusting kills (like using a winch to uncoil someone’s intestines), random superpowers and the dusty camaraderie of the wasteland. There are also references galore to this film’s antecedents, in costumes, music (an electronic soundtrack), cheesy dialogue and, well, BMX bikes. It’s done with a lot of affection, and will resonate deepest with those who learned of the coming apocalypses by watching VHS tapes or cable late at night. Starts Fri., Aug. 28. Hollywood (AH)


Turbo Kid A WALK IN THE WOODS. Ken Kwapis directs this adaptation of the best-selling Bill Bryson memoir about hiking the Appalachian Trail with his friend; Robert Redford and Nick Nolte star. Starts Wed., Sept. 2. Manor WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS. Max Joseph directs this musical dramedy, which tracks the personal and professional travails of a DJ (Zac Efron) who makes it big. Starts Fri., Aug. 28

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Final week of programming for the season. Guardians of the Galaxy, Wed., Aug. 26 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 29 (Riverview). McFarland, USA, Thu., Aug. 27 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 28 (Arsenal); and Sat. Aug. 29 (Grandview). DisneyNature’s Bears, Sun., Aug. 30 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-2552493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

American Ultra ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Surrealism series. Blue Velvet (David Lynch’s 1986 thriller in which things aren’t right in a seemingly nice small town), Aug. 26-27. Donnie Darko: Director’s Cut (a troubled teen is plagued by visions of a giant rabbit in this 2001 thriller), Aug. 26-27. Pi (a mathematician searches for a number in Darren Aronofksy’s 1998 thriller), Aug. 26-27. 8½ (Fellini’s 1963 classic about a struggling film director who slips into memories and fantasies), Aug. 27. Those Darn Kids series. Battle Royale (2000 Japanese dark comedy in which teenage schoolgirls fight to the death), Aug. 28-31 and Sept. 2-3. Matilda (in this 1996 comedy, it’s fun to be a naughty little girl when you have telekinetic powers), Aug. 28-Sept. 1 and Sept. 3. Rebel Without a Cause (disaffected teens spend a memorable night in the 1955 drama starring James Dean, Sal Mineo and Natalie Wood), Aug. 28-30 and Sept. 1-3. The Outsiders (1983 teen drama about a rivalry that turns deadly), Aug. 28Sept. 3. Special screening: Bigfoot the Movie (locally produced new comedy about a super-hairy creature terrorizing Elwood City), 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 28 (followed by Q&A). Call or see website for times and complete

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listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9 THE WARRIORS. Walter Hill’s 1979 gangsploitation flick was set in the urban cesspool that was New York City, a dark Gotham ruled by take-no-prisoners youth gangs. When a summit of gangs goes bad, one group, The Warriors, must fight its way from the Bronx to a final showdown at Coney Island. Come out and play. Screens as part of the Rooftop Shindig Summer Film Series, presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. Doors at 6 p.m.; music at 7 p.m.; film at dusk. Wed., Aug. 26. Top of Theatre Square Garage, Seventh Street and Penn Avenue, Downtown. Free and bringyour-own-chair. SPACEBALLS. In Mel Brooks’ 1987 spoof of Star Wars, Lone Starr (Bill Pullman) and Barf the Mawg (a furry John Candy) set their intergalactic RV to hyperspeed in order to save the Druish Princess Vespa (Daphne Zuniga) and her robot, Dot Matrix (voice of Joan Rivers), from the evil clutches of Dark Helmet (Rick Moranis). Brooks is on board as both President Skroob and Yogurt, a wizard wise in the ways of the Schwartz. May the puns be with you. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 26. AMC Waterfront. $5 THE POWER OF ONE VOICE. Rachel Carson is probably the 20th century’s most well-known environmentalist. But as this new, 51-minute documentary exploring her legacy argues, the radicalism of her insight in books like Silent Spring remains widely unappreciated. In interviews with everyone from Roger Christie, Carson’s adopted son, to her biographer, Linda Lear, locally based filmmaker Mark Dixon portrays a biologist determined to make a case for nature to a post-war society convinced of better living through chemistry, even when that chemistry gave us DDT. The screening continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 27. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org (BO) FILMED BY BIKE. A program of 11 short films about bicycles will screen in conjunction with Bikefest 2015. Among the topics: bicycle repair in Havana, Cuba; touring scenic Oregon; and classic WQED shorts on Big Savage Tunnel and the Dirty Dozen. 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 28; and 2 and 7 p.m. Sat. Aug. 29. Hollywood. $8 ($5 for BikePGH members) DO THE RIGHT THING. Spike Lee’s 1989 dramedy explores various tensions — racial, social, generational, economic — playing out on one Brooklyn street on a hot summer’s day. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 30. Regent Square CLUELESS. Amy Heckerling’s 1995 teen comedy is a clever adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma. Now set in Beverly Hills, it features a heroine named Cher (Alicia Silverstone) and kickier fashion. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 2. AMC Waterfront. $5

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[COMEDY]

EVERYTHING IS WORN AND TIRED AND RUSTED AND ERODED, BUT NOTHING IS QUITE FINISHED YET

FUNNY BUSINESS If you find yourself chuckling more often than usual this week, don’t be surprised: It’s officially Comedy Week in Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh City Council made its proclamation to celebrate the second annual Pittsburgh Comedy Festival, which takes over the Henry Heymann Theater, in Oakland, from Thursday through Saturday. The headliners are Todd Glass and improv troupe Bombardo, which includes Parks and Recreation favorite Aubrey Plaza. And with a wide array of local talent spread over a total of 12 shows, the festival looks poised to establish this showcase for funny men and women as a Pittsburgh institution. The inaugural festival, in 2014, was headlined by 30 Rock cast member Judah Friedlander. This year, the festival has expanded. “We found ways to incorporate more show slots into our short timeline (such as our late night show and #PghIsFunny showcase), we’re doing more marketing, and we’ve changed up passes to give audiences even more bang for their buck,” writes Anna Reilly, marketing director on the fest’s all-volunteer staff, via email. The festival is a nonprofit venture aimed at “elevating comedy and treating it as the art form that it is,” writes Reilly. The venue is a seated theater, rather than a bar or club, and the nationally known headliners are meant to bring new perspectives to the often straight-whitemale dominated genre. Glass came out as gay in 2012 in response to the growing number of suicides amongst gay youths. Bombardo is an improv team comprised entirely of women; both sets are sure to touch on cultural issues beyond standard gripes about married life. While the headliners are likely to attract big crowds, the festival is committed to showcasing local talent. The weekend’s grand finale, #PghIsFunny: A ’Burgh-Based Comedy Spectacular, includes performances by three local favorites: Lee Terbosic, Jeff Konkle and John Dick Winters. Kristy Nolen is a member of local improv teams including Warp Zone, which performs Saturday night. “[Pittsburgh Comedy Festival] is a great opportunity to reach out to unaware Pittsburghers and let them know, ‘Hey! See this!,’” she writes via email. “We’ve got world-class comedy going on right now in town every weekend, and it’s waiting for you to come and be a part of!’” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH COMEDY FESTIVAL Thu., Aug. 27-Sat., Aug. 29. Henry Heymann Theater, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-40. www.pittsburghcomedyfestival.org

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Improv troupe Bombardo

{BY JOSEPH PEISER}

[ART REVIEW]

NEIGHBORS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

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ARK NEVILLE’S exhibition London/Pittsburgh, now at the Silver Eye Center for Photography, is a tricky one to figure out. Neville is a London-based photographer who documents contemporary society in vivid, candid images and portraits. In 2012, he was commissioned by The Andy Warhol Museum for its Factory Direct project, in which artists were placed in residencies in area factories and subsequently created works generated by that connection. Neville produced Braddock/Sewickley, a slideshow installation of 50 images. The work focused on the two boroughs of the title and how the population of each has been affected by the steel industry, either benefitting financially from its profitability or existing as human fodder for its machines. Works from that

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

Dance the night away: “Woodland Hills High School Prom No. 3,” by Mark Neville

project were later paired with works from “Here Is London,” a 20-image photo essay commissioned by New York Times Magazine, shown first in England and now here. It is tempting to examine this show not in and of itself, but in relation to the

LONDON/PITTSBURGH continues through Sept. 12. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

books that provide a more comprehensive study of Neville’s work, particularly London/Pittsburgh. The temptation becomes harder to resist when considering the limited number of pieces on view:

just a dozen, due to the large scale of each print and the gallery’s intimate confines. The books have so much more material to peruse in search of a deeper personal immersion into the worlds into which Neville has plunged. Yet the exhibit is meant to function autonomously, the bound volumes serving (within this context) as an adjunct to the show, rather than the show functioning as a sneak peek preview for the published product. Neville investigates class, status, wealth, poverty and race, often by juxtaposing the haves and the have-nots, regardless of which side of the Atlantic he’s shooting. While the gallery offers a small pamphlet with the most basic of information on each work, there are no wall placards tipping us off to who we’re looking at and where, instead requiring us to


PLACEMENTS {BY FRED SHAW}

Although there are vacations and many innings of Pirates baseball still to be had, summer’s dog days can feel overlooked or transitional as the run-up to the school year begins. But in the final poem of his debut full-length collection, Advice From the Bed of a Friend (Main Street Rag, $14), local poet John Stupp asks anyone ready to concede the season to reconsider. “In an August That Is Forgotten Already,” Stupp writes: “Who cannot be inspired by endless blue waves / the horizon breaking as far as the eye can see — / wave-tops shattering beneath an undying sun / on the hottest afternoon / in an August already forgotten.” The poem continues in this vein, using repetition of the phrase “blue waves” to emphasize the powerful contemplation that often goes along with nearness to the ocean. These natural settings and the descriptions that follow play an important role in his work. For Stupp, a jazz musician, Ohio native and resident of Sewickley, both local and global travel seem linchpins for inspiration. And with poems set in Idaho, Vancouver, Mexico and Pittsburgh’s South Side, among other places, imagery gives a foundation and clarity to his lines. The small moments count for something less fleeting than mere impressions. A good example is “Idaho Winter”: “Near a junkyard / on the Payette / trout are swimming / down a rusty spillway / banging their fins / on the metal surface / of magnetic north.” Often in these 89 pages, the natural and civilized worlds overlap, and it makes for an interesting contrast that Stupp successfully employs throughout, with many poems taking place in or near bodies of water. In fact, much of the final section of the book centers on an emotionally moving visit to Mexico’s Pacific coast, highlighted in the poems “Lluvia Azul,” “Blue Pacific” and “Flash Flood.” While few poems touch on Stupp’s musical experiences, several baseballfocused ones seem timely with the Buccos contending. A favorite, the forgiving “What Ralph Terry Said,” concerns Game 7 of the legendary 1960 World Series, and the aftermath for the losing pitcher of that upset. Stupp writes: “If he’d live to be a thousand / he’d never escape / the prop wash / from Mazeroski’s drive — / a churning wake / blown like a nail through his heart …” It’s another powerful image powering Advice toward solid achievement.

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The Sounds of Summer with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and guests Come hear the sounds of the summer as played by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in the beautiful Elsie H. HillmanAuditorium. Featured Artists include Lawrence Loh, conductor, Jasmine Muhammad, soprano, Jennifer Orchard, violin and Lorna McGhee, flute. In addition to the symphony performance, the evening will include a new exhibit in the Kaufmann Gallery featuring artists Tina Williams Brewer and Bill Double titled, Dignity: Renditions and Inspiration, featuring photos by Mr. Double and Story Quilts by Ms. Williams-Brewer.

Tickets are available at www.showclix.com TickETS for adults and  for seniors and students in advance and  at the door For Info on events at the Kaufmann Center go to:

www.hillhouse.org or call 412.281.1026 Elsie H. Hillman Auditorium aTTHE+AUFMANN#ENTERs#ENTre Avenue, Pittsburgh P!

SALUTE TO VETERANS PRESENTED BY THE

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

ROCKY BLEIER MONDAY, AUGUST 31, 7 P.M. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland Free admission for veterans and active military with registration at pittsburghsymphony.org/vets

TICKETS ARE ONLY $15!

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[BOOK REVIEW]

Featured Soprano JASMINE-UHAMMAD

ferret it out ourselves if we so choose. Only a couple of photographs indicate their specific setting. One of these is perhaps the show’s most riveting piece, in which a man sits wearily on a red brick porch, U.S. Steel’s Edgar Thomson Works looming behind him. Both are smoking. Everything is worn and tired and rusted and eroded, but nothing is quite finished yet, and you’re not sure whether the surety of continuance is promise or punishment. In another photo, while a gaggle of boisterous youths and beleaguered adults reveals nothing of the image’s origins by the environment in frame, they seem unmistakably British, especially the lad dominating the shot and capturing our eye, for whom the term “cheeky” could have been invented. In some instances, Neville’s subjects pose with self-awareness; in many, they’re caught in the midst of engagement with something other than the camera. Often, the latter means they’re on the dance floor. Six of the images are devoted to these jampacked, throbbing, sweaty spaces. This is somewhat curious, as that number is half the total of works on view. That veers toward overkill in a show not specifically composed of images of dance floors. It’s apparent enough why one might gravitate toward including so many such shots: When poking at class distinctions, racial privilege and economic disparity, on their respective dance floors, the contrast between one group and another is glaring. Taking an image of a posse of moneyed London bankers and brokers glowing golden with affluence and setting it catty-corner to a now-shuttered South Side nightclub is irresistible, if maybe a little easy. Forgivably so: In the twin seas of writhing humanity — one with platinum jewelry, platinum cards, expensive haircuts and bespoke suits, the other with oversized gold trinkets, pockets full of cash, cheap tattoos and wearied Spandex — each features a reddressed Aphrodite standing tall front and center. But we don’t need four more shots of clubs and proms and raves, and we feel a little cheated that we were denied more range when presumably it was available. Reaching the end of this brief journey through London/Pittsburgh, we’re left moved, thoughtful, intrigued, but not satisfied. One way to look at this show is that it’s incomplete and doesn’t reach fruition. With a chaser of a glass half-full, we can regard this exhibition as a door cracked ajar, with more to be yielded if we’ll do the work of pushing it open to look further.

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Read for 6 minutes a day to reduce stress.

Finish three books during the summer.

Let us help you find Read with the family. your next read.

Read a book from the year I was born.

Tackle a classic. Try a new genre.

Finish that book next to my bed. Impress my boss that book about work. Tweet withwith #MyNextRead.

Cook through a cookbook. TRY POETRY R d b k

b tf dl @carnegielibrary

carnegielibrary.org Critics and peers agree, Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Brian fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations.

PRESENTS

SATURDAY AUGUST 29 7PM Tickets $47.50

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

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www.thepalacetheatre.org * * * FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS * * *

The Light in the Piazza

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA SMITH}

Becki Toth and Jeffrey Howell in The Light in the Piazza

[PLAY REVIEWS]

LIGHTING IT UP {BY TED HOOVER}

YOU’LL FORGIVE ME if I’m more smug than usual, but I told you so. Over the past few millennia I have, repeatedly, sung the praises of Becki Toth, an actress/singer who performs, mostly, with Stage 6, in Carnegie. “Carnegie?” people’d moan. “That’s somewhere beyond … the West End Circle!!!” Heaven forefend Pittsburghers should cross a river to see talent, or visit a theater without a marketing department. So Toth has, over the years, racked up a catalogue of astounding performances most people have never seen.

THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA continues through Sun., Aug. 30. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $24-30. www.frontporchpgh.com

And so my smugness was barely containable at Front Porch Theatricals’ presentation of The Light in the Piazza. At the New Hazlett Theater, the intermission buzz was: “Who is this Becki Toth? She’s a revelation!” I’ve spent 20 years telling you. Toth plays Margaret Johnson, an American matron touring Italy in the ’50s with her daughter Clara, whose childlike

nature conceals a secret. Clara attracts the attention of a local, Fabrizio Naccrelli, and Margaret is torn between her daughter’s happiness and … well, let’s call it “guilt.” Adam Guettel won huge praise, and a Tony, for this intensely lush, ultra-romantic score. It’s soaring in its lyricism, and beautifully executed by music director Camille Villalpando Rolla and her orchestra. But to tell the truth, I’m not particularly crazy about this show, its book by Craig Lucas. As much as I admire Guettel’s music, it’s a bit fatiguing, and the plot, taken from an Elizabeth Spencer novella, is, at best, hokum. But none of that matters. Director, and miracle worker, Stephen Santa has assembled a cast of absolute perfection featuring performers who can melt with their talent. Linsday Bayer and Joshua Grosso, as the young lovers, sing with a beauty that can drive you into the back wall. Jeffrey Howell, Patrick Cannon and Richard Kenzie provide definition to underwritten roles and, out of nowhere, Antonia Botti-Lodovico sings the role of an embittered wife with a voice that could fuel a small city. But even they can’t distract from Toth’s performance as a mother swimming in her own sorrow. When she sings (which, thankfully, is often), it’s a mesmerizing, life-giving experience only people who don’t care about theater would miss. I told you so. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ROOM SERVICE {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

WITH MISTAKEN identities, would-be infidelities and a possibly haunted guest room, A Little Hotel on the Side transforms Little Lake Theatre’s intimate stage into a slamming-door French farce. An ambitious production featuring a cast of 26, the story centers on two unhappily married couples: the Pinglets (Tom Protulipac and Jen Kopach), who loathe the very sight of one another, and the Paillardins, who, despite the protests of wife Marcelle (Stacey Rosleck), engage in zero bedroom frolics because her husband (Ned Salopek) doesn’t believe in “hanky panky.”

A LITTLE HOTEL ON THE SIDE continues through Sept. 5. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

Of course, as the title suggests, hanky panky is exactly what this story’s all about. Much of the humor dabbles in the lowbrow sexual variety, and despite its age — A Little Hotel on the Side was written

more than a century ago by Georges Feydeau and Maurice Desvallieres — this comedy holds up surprisingly well. The action opens and closes in the Pinglets’ home as plans for romantic affairs are made — and often dashed — while the second act is set in the eponymous hotel where most of the characters unwittingly converge one evening. Director TJ Firneno keeps the raucous slapstick moving without overpowering the stage, and the sparse yet suggestive set design maintains a perfect balance of the baroque and simplistic. The supporting cast features many standout performances, notably from two of the most unlikely lovers — naive philosophy student Maxime (Kent Hess) and the Pinglets’ feisty maid, Victoire (Greta Englert). Their seemingly mismatched pairing — he’s focused on the intellectual underpinnings of love, while she craves a more physical exploration of the topic — makes for the best chemistry of the production. By the final scene, the characters haven’t learned many lessons, but this isn’t a tale of redemption or profound introspection. This is a play that focuses on the laughs, and with a capable cast and a nearly three-hour running time, there are plenty of opportunities for the audience to do just that.

Would you like to Participate in a fertility study? Volunteering couples are needed to join a research study in Monroeville You may qualify if you and your partner are: • A monogamous, heterosexual couple • Between the ages of 20-45 years old • Sexually active • Trying to conceive or using a non-vaginal form of birth control You will receive compensation for your time and participation. The device is for home use, and has been cleared for OTC use by the FDA. You will be asked to use the device in the privacy of your home. It requires two physician examinations for female participants. Call 412-200-7996 to see if you qualify.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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{ART} In the history books concocted by artist Matthew Buchholz, T. Rex roamed the bucolic riverbanks of Hartford, Conn., and the occasional 19th-century Wyoming cowboy was a big-headed emigrant from Mars. Tonight, Buchholz’s Alternate Histories Project — which has been featured in media from NPR to Boing Boing and Entertainment Weekly, and exhibited internationally — marks its fifth anniversary with the 5 Years 50 States Pop-Up Art Show, at East End Brewing. The exhibit includes prints representing every state in the Union and the premiere of 14 new prints. Plus birthday cake. And beer. Bill O’Driscoll 4-8 p.m. 147 Julius St., Larimer. Free. www.alternatehistories.com

{COMEDY}

Red Hot Chilli Pipers

Julie Goldman, self-professed “worst lesbian in the world,�

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SEPT. 01

Boxheart Gallery is sure to raise some eyebrows as well as laughs during her performance tonight at Cruze Bar. Goldman is known for her observational humor and cultural criticism delivered in a brash style. (The Village Voice called her “charmingly deviant.�) Her standup has been featured on the likes of Showtime and Comedy Central, and she’s guest-starred on shows including The Mindy Project and Happy Endings. The show is presented by

iLaugh Pittsburgh; local comics Whitley Baker and Chrissy Costa will open. Joseph Peiser 8 p.m. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $20. www.brownpapertickets.com

{COMEDY} If there were a Harvard of comedy, Chicago’s Second City would be it, plus Yale too. Second City’s latest foray into Pittsburgh is Fully Loaded, at Pittsburgh Public Theater, a night of sketches, improv and songs performed by members of the legendary comedy troupe. Directed by Ryan Archibald, Fully Loaded blends new material as well as classic set-ups written by such Second City alums as Stephen Colbert and Tina Fey. The touring cast features Adam Schreck, who grew up in Bethel Park (and who is pictured here with fellow cast member Jo Feldman). JP 8 p.m. Also 5:30 and 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 29. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-30. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

+ SAT., AUG. 29 {ART}

PghIrishFest.org | 412-422-1113 1000 Sandcastle Drive West Homestead (Pittsburgh), PA 15120

AUG. 30

Pedal Pittsburgh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

One of late summer’s bigger art showcases here is Shadyside ‌ The Art Festival on Walnut Street. The 19th year of the two-day fest features original handmade art in a wide range of media by 200 artists from 30 states. The festival, which includes live music, is hosted by the Shadyside Chamber of


FreeEvent {PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY RIPPEL}

For a venue that hasn’t officially opened, Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center’s been pretty busy. The center, occupying Deutschtown’s historic former Immanuel Church, has hosted events including the recent Deutschtown Music Festival. But on Aug. 29, it’s wrapping its own summer season of concerts and art exhibits with its official, all-day Opening Celebration. The program includes a walking tour of Neu Kirche-related art and gardening projects Fallow Grounds and New City; the opening of art exhibition In the Making, about the creation those projects; and a wearable-art performance by Hannah Thompson. Another highlight is the latest iteration of artist Tom Sarver’s long-running series Art Olympics, which combines live art-making with theatrics borrowed from game shows, reality TV and arena sports. Starting at 4 p.m., three teams of artists — led by Maritza Mosquera, Darrell Kinsel and Craig Freeman — will have two hours to build sculptures out of “random junk materials.” (A scene from a previous AO is pictured.) Judges will rate the teams on their performances as well as the finished products; the family-friendly festival atmosphere includes art-making activities for the audience. Neu Kirche was purchased in 2014 by a group of artists who are especially committed to creating opportunities for women artists. Aug. 29 is a good chance to bid them welcome. Bill O’Driscoll Noon-10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 29. 1000 Madison Ave., Deutschtown. Free. www.neukirche.org

Commerce and put on by Florida-based, nationally operating Howard Alan Events. The event shuts down Walnut between South Aiken and South Negley. BO 10 a.m.7 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Aug. 30. Shadyside. Free. www.artfestival.com

{FOOD} The Pittsburgh-based Italian Garden Project works nationally to document the tradition of Italian-American gardening and spread its

curing and more. Tonight’s Terra Buona: A Harvest Dinner Party is a limitedseating five-course meal designed by Valozzi’s chef Josiah Henry, working with heirloom fruits and veggies from backyard gardens. Both events support projects including heirloom-seed and fig-tree preservation. BO Fig Fest: 3-6 p.m. ($40-45). Terra Buona: 7-9 p.m. ($110). 1055 Spring Garden Ave., Spring Garden. 412-244-2927 or www.wiglewhiskey.com

riverfront trails is perfect for young kids. A 25-mile option loops through Oakland, Highland Park, the Strip and the North Side. And for the hardiest riders, a 62-miler covers most of the city, including some of its steepest hills and finest views. (It’s also a tour of some of the new bike infrastructure BikePGH has spent 11 years advocating.) You can also do a custom ride of any length in between. Riding in groups is encouraged. The rides have staggered start times, but all start in South Side Riverfront Park and end there, with the Finish Line Festival. BO 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m. South Side. $35-40 (kids under 18: $15). www.pedalpgh.org

{MUSIC}

AUG. 28

Fully Loaded

lessons to a new generation. Today, the Project teams with Wigle Whiskey and Valozzi’s Pittsburgh for two events at the Wigle Barrelhouse and Whiskey Garden collectively titled A Celebration of the Late Summer Italian Garden. This afternoon, it’s Fig Fest!: fig-based treats, custom cocktails, live music, cooking demos, wine-making, olive-

NEWS

+ SUN., AUG. 30 {OUTDOORS} A few thousand bicyclists will take to the streets today for Pedal Pittsburgh. The city’s oldest and largest bike ride, organized by Bike Pittsburgh, marks its 22nd year with rides for every age and fitness level. A 2.5-miler along Mon

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M A I N F E AT U R E

Franz Schubert produced more than 600 songs in his 31 years, a creative output only possible in an age without Netflix. Duquesne University certainly reveres the Viennese master’s commitment to music: Today it debuts its three-year concert series Schubert on the Bluff in the PNC Recital Hall. Special guests include international opera star Sari Gruber and PSO clarinetist Ron Samuels. Each performance includes works of Schubert’s accompanied by the work of another composer; today, it’s Duquesne music professor David Stock. JP 3 p.m. 600 Forbes Ave., Uptown. $10. 412-396-6083 or www.duq.edu/schubert

Art by Matthew Buchholz

AUG. 28

5 Years ear arss 50 States Sta tate te Pop-Up Art Show Philip Sousa. But tonight’s eclectic program also includes everything from the big-band jazz of Glenn Miller to “Eye of the Tiger” and tunes by Chicago — “something for

{MUSIC}

From cornets to tubas, it’s a brassy night as the River City Brass Band visits the Allegheny County Summer Concert Series, at Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater. The longrunning group — 25 brass pieces, three percussion — is probably best known for its marches by the likes of John

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The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra ventures outside Heinz Hall and into community venues all across Pittsburgh over the course of its Neighborhood Week. The five-day series kicks off today at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall with a Salute to Veterans, featuring guest conductor Lawrence Loh leading the orchestra through a program that includes the “Armed Forces Salute” and “Danny Boy.” A full schedule of these affordable performances and their locations, from the South Side to the North Side, can be found at pittsburghsymphony. org/neighborhood. JP 7 p.m. (4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland: $1015). Series continues through Fri., Sept. 4 (admissions range

ARTS

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from free to $15). 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org

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everybody,” promises RCBB music director James Gourlay. The concert is free. BO 7:30 p.m. 200 Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. Free. 412-767-9200 or www.alleghenycounty.us

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If you expect nothing else from the new Boxheart Gallery exhibits by locally based artists Brenda Stumpf and Daria Sandburg, expect texture. Stumpf, a recent transplant from Denver, evokes “mythic and historic figures, sacred texts and alchemy” with materials ranging from the paper from steeped tea bags to torn old dresses; her Between Worlds summons women ranging from Pandora and Hatshepsut to the victims of Jack the Ripper. In The Journal of Repetitive Learning, Sandburg employs found historical objects, sculpted metal work, fused glass and more to evoke human narratives. The show opens today. A public reception is scheduled for Sat., Sept. 5. BO 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

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Eddie and the Rollers SATURDAY, SEPT. 5 END OF SUMMER OLDIES CONCERT

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

Scotsman is brought together with an uptight English woman by his ward & her niece deciding to go nuptial, sparks fly. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29. Apple Hill Playhouse, Delmont. 724-468-5050. EXIT LAUGHING. When the biggest highlight in your life for the past 30 years has been your weekly bridge night w/ the “girls,” what do you do when one of your foursome inconveniently dies? Thru Aug. 29, 7:30 p.m. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA. A romantic musical that finds Margaret Johnson, a wealthy Southern woman on vacation in the Tuscan countryside w/ her innocent daughter, Clara & Clara’s unexpected encounter w/ a young Florentine. Presented by Front

Porch Theatricals. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-718-4253. NO CLUE! The classic murder mystery presented by Musical Mysteries. Benefits St. Jude’s Research Center. Fri., Aug. 28, 6:30 p.m. Chestnut Ridge Golf Resort & Conference Center, Blairsville. 724-675-8157.

COMEDY

Second City in this city, international performance art and a peek at burlesque Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

LEVEL TWO IMPROV CLASS SHOW. 10 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 29, 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE SECOND CITY. 8 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 29, 5:30 & 9 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

SAT 29

BRIAN REGAN. 7 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-8368000. LAUGH & LYRICS. Live comedy & R&B vocalists. Last Sat of every month James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335.

NEO TRASH VIDEO. A live riff of the film ‘R.O.T.O.R.’ 8 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI

VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits JEANNE ROBERTSON. 8 p.m. on the Allegheny Palace Theatre, Greensburg. . w ww per Valley’s industrial 724-836-8000. a p ty ci h g p heritage. Tarentum. JULIE GOLDMAN. 8 p.m. .com 724-224-7666. Cruze Bar, Strip District. ANDREW CARNEGIE 412-471-1400. FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of LEVEL ONE IMPROV CLASS COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. the Grand Army of the Republic SHOW. 8 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 29, 8 Local & out-of-town comedians. served local Civil War veterans p.m. The Maker Theater, Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, for over 54 years & is the best Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. [STAGE] BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments & music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that brings together scientific fact & pop culture in a showcase of wearable & decorative arts related to outer space, space travel, the space age, & the powerful influence these topics have had on human civilization. Animal Secrets. Learn about the hidden lives of ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & more. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments spanning the Mesozoic Era & original fossil specimens. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & precious stones from all {PHOTO COURTESTY OF LISA JAKAB} over the world. Population Impact. How humans are Bunker Projects and The Mr. Roboto Project bring Performance Art Festival 15 affecting the environment. to Pittsburgh. Some 25 local and international multimedia artists give site-specific Oakland. 412-622-3131. performances and show artworks at both venues all day on Aug. 29. It’s the second CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. annual PAF; a planned documentary on the event covers local art and international H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover dialogue. Family-friendly performances are scheduled during the first part of the day, the relations between water, while shows for mature audiences take place in the evening. 11 a.m.–11 p.m. land & habitat. How do everyday Sat., Aug. 29. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. www.bunkerprojects.org decisions impact water supply

FRI 28

FRI 28

FULL LIST ONLINE

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AUGUST 27-29

LIVE AT THE HENRY HEYMANN THEATER

PITTSBURGH COMEDY FESTIVAL

funny n’at

LIVE BAND THURSDAYS! “Burning the Pinkerton Barges” (albumen print photograph, 1892), shot by Underwood & Underwood. From the exhibition Pittsburgh’s Point, at Photo Antiquities Museum of Photographic History, North Side.

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pittsburgh’s Point. Showing the first photo of Pittsburgh’s “Point” taken from atop Mt. Washington in 1896. See the low level city, antique bridges & river commerce. Many other historic photos & cameras. Opening September 1. Spirits, Good & Evil: Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. From the Victorian Era. Opening September 1. North Side. 412-231-7881.

ONGOING 4823 PENN AVE. Studies in Topophilia. Charcoal sketches on vellum by Carolyn Wenning. Garfield. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from these artists from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Treasure/Trash. Works by local artist Elizabeth A. Rudnick. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s & 1980s. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/ Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Landmarks. Pen & ink by Mary Jean Stabile. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ART SPACE 616. Summer Group Show. Features work by Atticus Adams, Kevin O’Toole, & Peter Mandradjieff. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic

paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. moonbaby. Welcome to Moonbabyland, a pop-up interactive department store set to discover the meanings of self mythologizing spaces & bodies. Garfield. 412-432-9127. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. Oakland. 412-622-3131. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRAMEHOUSE. As Good As the Guys: Women Photographers in Pittsburgh. 15 local artists practicing photography in the region w/ a small group of their forebears in the city, at a time when the medium was dominated by men. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Bird’s Eye View of

Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Environs. Showing James T. Palmatary’s 1859 print. Opening August 18. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Traffic Lights. A lightand-sound exhibition by Jakob Marsico. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Conversations from the Backseat. Mixed media by Luon St. Pierre. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Stranded in the Underworld. New works by Brian Holderman & Jeremy Beightol. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias & Ethan Frier created new roomsized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. North Side. 412-231-3169. MINE FACTORY. being (human). New works by Zack John Lee, Gianna Paniagua, Ben Quint-Glick & Rose & Sara Savage ask what it means to be human. Homewood. www.theminefactory.com. CONTINUES ON PG. 55

NEWS

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M A I N F E AT U R E

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TA S T E

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THURSDAY AUG 27/10PM FLAVOR

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EVENTS

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{PHOTO BY BRANDY LIEN WORRALL}

*Stuff We Like

Anderson Playground Merry-go-round Kids — and even adults — love to spin around. Try this one near the foot of Panther Hollow Bridge, in Schenley Park.

The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill

{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

If the last time you listened to this record was when it was raking in accolades in 1998, it’s time to revisit. Lauren Hill’s words sound as potent and fierce in 2015 as they were then — maybe even more so.

Carrot Cake at James Street Gastropub

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Rich and moist, drizzled with caramel sauce, it’s as good as this dessert gets — though honestly, the massive slice is probably meant for two. 422 Foreland St., North Side

Greyhound Online Fares In a world of discount upstarts, the old gray dog (still with the most cities and departure times) now offers competitive web-only prices. Round-trippers to Philly, for instance, can go for as little as $46 if snagged well in advance. www.greyhound.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 52

& the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & EuroAmerican communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China &

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Sixth Annual

Steel City Mods vs. Rockers, in Millvale CRITIC: Greg Ellis, 52, an auto-body technician from the South Hills WHEN: Sat., Aug. 22

It was awesome this year, and it’s awesome every year. They do a great job of putting this thing together. What I love about it is the fact that these people can get together and congregate, and they all have such nice machines and nice bikes. It’s not like a pure “Harley” kind of thing. Even though there are Harleys here, it’s more about the British bikes, the Triumphs and the BSAs and those manufacturers. The South Hills Cycle group I’m with brought several bikes; we have a shop over in the South Hills and we brought over a little display. The music was awesome, good venue, good guys and good music, and we all have a great time here. B Y J OS E P H P E I S E R

Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256.

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Maz’s Camera. See & touch the giant, heavy camera that snapped the photo of Bill Mazeroski rounding bases, winning the 1960 World Series that was made into his statue at PNC Park. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459.

RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS SAT 29 PERFORMANCE ARTS FESTIVAL 2015. Sitespecific performances & art interventions by multimedia artists from across the world. PAF15 will feature 20+ local, national & international performance artists. 11 a.m.11 p.m. BUNKERprojects, Garfield. 814-574-9844.

DANCE FRI 28 THE SMOKIN’ BETTIES. Burlesque troupe. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.


VISUAL ART

FUNDRAISERS THU 27 MACEDONIA FACE’S ANNUAL FRIEND OF CHILDREN BENEFIT BANQUET. Proceeds will benefit Macedonia FACE community programming. 6 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-281-2573.

SAT 29 HOT DIGGITY DOG DAY. A flea market, arts festival, advocacy & health fair, bake sale & live music feat. Dixie Nimitz, Matt Brown and Jeremy Caywood. All proceeds go to Nepal Relief. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, Carnegie. 412-279-3615. OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK. Raise awareness & funds to invest in new research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy, & support survivors of suicide loss. 10:30 a.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. 412-260-0789.

SUN 30 BEERS FOR BABES: NOT YOUR TYPICAL BABY SHOWER. Learn about Global Links’ mission to provide prenatal & infant/ maternal care; pack baby bags w/ care items for soonto-be moms & participate in a simulation game that illustrates what it takes to access healthcare when living in a remote rural community in a resource poor community. Beer & tacos too. 4-6:30 p.m. The Global Switchboard, Lawrenceville. 412-361-3424.

TUE 01

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. glassweekend ‘15. Work by Japanese Master Hiroshi Yamano, Robert Bender, Jeremy Lepisto, Chad Holliday, Matthew Day Perez, Wesley Rasko, Nathan Sandberg, Dolores Barrett, Lucy Bergamini, Jen Blazina, Jane Bruce, Melanie Feerst, Erica Rosenfeld, Melissa Schmidt & Beth Williams. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. Nemocolin. 412-337-4976. PERCOLATE. Audio/Visual: Four Artist/Musicians. Works by Christiane D, Ian Green, Rashad Jamaal (aka Billy Pilgrim), & Jenn Wertz. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Age-Specific. An exhibit by the Artist of the Year showing the aging of the 1960s generation. Printmaking 2015. An exhibit of new work by regional artists represents a wide variety of printmaking processes including intaglio, photogravure, wood cut, linoleum cut relief, silkscreen, collagraph & monotype. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now! Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd

PENGUIN BOOKSHOP WRITERS SERIES W/ JENNIFER STEIL. Fact to Fiction: Using a Journalist’s Eye to Bring Your Story to Life. 6 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

ORPHANS OF EBOLA FUNDRAISER. An evening of live music to support the 16,600 orphans in West Africa who have lost LOUISE PENNY. Lecture one or both parents to by the author of The Ebola. All proceeds Nature of the Beast. will be donated 7 p.m. Carnegie to UNICEF to Library, Oakland. support their 412-622-8866. work in Ebola www. per pa affected regions pghcitym .co in West Africa. KID’S BOOKS 6-11 p.m. Hard Rock FOR GROWN-UPS Cafe, Station Square. BOOKCLUB. First Tue 412-481-7625. of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. Young writers & recent 412-362-1250. graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. exhibit featuring activities inspired 412-687-8117.

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Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Out of the Archives & Into the Gallery. An exploration of history & historic artistic technique in glass. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINTBREEZEWAY. Kamili. An exhibition of work by Hannibal Hopson & Amani Davis that reflects their mission to use recycled materials & let the objects determine the form & message. Point Breeze. 412-770-7830. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves II. A juried exhibition of works by local artists based in Pittsburgh. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. London/ Pittsburgh. A solo exhibit w/ work by photographer, Mark Neville. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPACE. Wall Paintings. Large wall paintings by Steve Prince, Michael Pisano, Anna Mikolay, Derek Reese, Ramon Riley, Chris McGinnis, Julie Stunden, Pat Bellan-Gillen, Melissa Kuntz, Alphonso Sloan, Julie Mallis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Fast. A exhibition of drawings by Richard Claraval. Closing reception w/ The Eastend Mile on August 28, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-877-7394. THE TOONSEUM. Slinging

Satire: Political Cartoons & the First Amendment. A collection of political cartoons from more than a dozen Pulitzer-winner & work from magazines, websites & newspapers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. Bill Pfahl: A Retrospective. Oil & pastel paintings that will include urban landscapes, figures & portraits by Bill Pfahl. Glass Entomology. An array of glass insects & marbles by Michael Mangiafico w/ collaborative work w/ Ed Pinto. Iron Gate Gallery. Farmington. 800-721-0177. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. THE UNION HALL. Paintings Live Longer. New work by Zach Brown. Strip District. www.zachbrownart.com UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. If One Won’t Another One Will. Recent prints, video & collage by Stephen Grebinski. Braddock. www.unsmokeartspace.com. WILDCARD. 100 Days. Work by Rachel Arnold Sager. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. ZEKE’S COFFEE SHOP. New Works by Alberto Almarza. East Liberty. 412-670-6231.

by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Thru Sept. 20 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 29 LIVE LOVE LATCH FREE KIDS COMMUNITY EVENT. Activities for families & kids, kids music class, story time, face painting & fundraising raffle. 10 a.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. M3: MATERIALS, MEDIA, AND ME! Explore a new material & make a project every Saturday of the summer! For youth in 4th through 8th grade. Sat. Thru Aug. 29 Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

SUN 30

BIO BLITZ. Join a Park Ranger to develop your plant & animal identification skills, collect data & learn how to be a citizen scientist. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. White Oak

SuperMonkey Recordng Co. & Pat DiCesare present

Park, White Oak. www. alleghenycounty.us. FRONTIER FROLIC & GAMES. Calling all children to participate in popular 18th Century games & dancing. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Oliver Miller Homestead, South Park. 412-835-1554.

The PennRock Scholarship Sponsored by:

MON 31 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

August 29th, 2015

TUE 01

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FINALS Round 1, 2, 3 Winner 1 Saved Semi-Finalist

OUTSIDE SAT 29

Tickets available at Pennrockscholarship.com

MALAYSIAN FOOD HIKE. A scenic 5-km hike before returning to the Environmental CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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August 28 & 29

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

Learning Center for authentic, home-cooked Malaysian food. Registration required. 1-4 p.m. Harrison Hills Park, Natrona Heights. 724-252-7573. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Mushroom walk w/ WPMC President Richard Jacob at the Mansion Parking Lot. 10 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

WED 02

needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. MURDER MYSTERY NIGHT. Murder mystery fun for adults w/ two separate scenarios. 6-9 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

FRI 28 - SUN 30

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

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CODE: AJ44

A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://citydharma. wordpress.com/schedule/. Tue & Thu. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh @gmail.com. OFFICE OF PUBLIC ART BIKE TOUR. 6 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-391-2060. OVERCOMING TRAUMA. Join therapist, media contributor, & author, Támara Hill as she discusses the psychological, emotional, physiological, & neurological effects of trauma. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

FRI 28 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. DINING W/ THE DIVAS. Performers include Brooklyn Bottomvitch, VyVyan Vyxn, Ellie Vega, Divauna Diore & Jezebel Bebbington D’Opulence. 7:30 p.m. Restaurant UUBU 6, South Side. 412-706-3941. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner

23RD ANNUAL WINE FESTIVAL. 31 Pennsylvania wineries will converge on the mountain for a weekend of wine, music, more. Aug. 28-30. Seven Springs, Seven Springs. 814-352-7777.

SAT 29

BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. FOREFRONT FESTIVAL. Gathering of art enthusiasts & Christian creative professionals together to celebrate & enable excellent art. 2 p.m. Amplify Church, Strip District. 616-889-5083. HOW TO BE A SAVVY TRAVELER. Learn about booking flights & hotels, travel alerts, currency, customs & more to ensure you have the www. per best travel pa pghcitym .co experience possible. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. NEU KIRCHE OPENING CELEBRATION. A gallery exhibition, walking-tour, two artist performances & a selection of musical entertainment. Refreshments & food trucks. 12-9:30 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224. PITTSBURGH BREWERY TOUR. Visit the region’s three most iconic breweries w/ craft beer samples & guided tours at each brewery. 11:30 a.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-323-4709. PRESERVING THE HARVEST. Learn the basics of canning, drying & freezing. Recipes included. Registration required. Susan Marquesen, Penn State Master Food Preserver & Master Gardener. 10 a.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. RHYTHM & BREWS FESTIVAL. Live music from Rusted Root, Jenkin Brothers, Nacho Blues & Fungus. Breweries & food. A portion of the proceeds will go to

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local charities. 2-9 p.m. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 724-519-2145. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 29-SUN 30 SHADYSIDE ARTS FESTIVAL. Arts & crafts vendors, music, more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Walnut Street, Shadyside. 561-746-6615.

SUN 30 BUSHY RUN PICNIC AT THE BATTLEFIELD. Bring your own picnic lunch, or enjoy food from Franktuary, Pgh Crepes, Pgh Halal Food, & Kona Ice. Music from Penn-Trafford Community Band & 80 Degrees. Also face painting, arts & crafts, & games. 12 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. RED, RIPE & ROASTED. Delicious food & family fun abound at Phipps’ tomato & garlic festival benefiting Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 11 a.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 31 SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.


TUE 01 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://citydharma.wordpress. com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Thru Oct. 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.

WED 02 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Bring your knitting, crocheting or other needlecraft projects & join us for rowdy discussions on many topics, including the books we’re reading & the movies we’re watching. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

HARMONY SINGERS. All voices are needed. Performance experience & the ability to read music are preferred but not required. Thru Sept. 20. 412-833-6341. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Seeking young singers from 8th through 12th grades. Prepared solo of your choice, preferably a classical selection (art song, aria, etc.) Carefully selected works from musical theater may be performed, but these should demonstrate a classical singing technique rather than belting. To schedule an audition, call Emily Stewart at 412-926-2488. Auditions will be conducted on August 27, after 3:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Fall auditions for all voice

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY AQUATIC ALLIANCE The Allegheny Aquatic Alliance is seeking volunteers to help clean up Connoquenessing Creek on Sat., Aug. 29, and Sat., Sept. 12. Starting at 8 a.m., volunteers will get their hands dirty and have fun, collecting garbage out of the creek. All volunteers will be provided with a T-shirt and lunch. For more information or to volunteer, contact Christina at 724-371-0416.

THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

AUDITIONS CORITO CHILDREN’S CHOIR. For more info, visit www.corolapgh.org. August 30, 3 p.m. Saint Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church, Brookline. 412-345-1047. CORO LATINOAMERICA NO-PITTSBURGH. For more information, visit www.corolapgh.org. August 30, 5:30 p.m. Allegheny Unitarian Universalist Church, North Side. 412-345-1047. GREENSBURG CIVIC THEATRE. Musical auditions for parts for children & adults ages 8+. Cold readings, prepare 32 bars of an upbeat song to be sung a cappella. August 29, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.Walk-ins & visit gctheatre.org/auditions. html to make an appt. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757.

NEWS

parts for the 2015/2016 season on Sept 2. To schedule an audition, please review the audition criteria on our website: www.themendelssohn.org. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for Teen Dating Awareness Tour. Aug. 29, 10 a.m. - noon. Non-equity actors & actresses, ages 14 – 24. Prepare a two minute monologue & be prepared for cold readings. Bring resume & headshot. Auditions are by appointment. Primestage.com for more information. Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. 724-773-0700. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for The Crucible. Aug. 29 & 30, 1-4 p.m. Non-equity actors between ages 10-80, for all roles except Tituba. Prepare one minute monologue in the style of the piece. Bring a resume & headshot. Auditions are by appointment. Primestage.com for more information. Thru Aug. 30. Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. 724-773-0700. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Seeking new singers

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for our 30th Anniversary Season. Auditions will take place by appt. only. Contact Artistic Director Jeffry Johnson, D.M.A. at jbj@rccpittsburgh. com to request an audition. Professional training & experience are not required! Thru Aug. 31. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Call for artists for upcoming 2015 Member Show, MultiMedia Juried Art Exhibit. Artists can submit recent work (from the last two years) that has not been in a previous juried show at the NHAC. Artwork may be delivered to the center between 10 a.m. & 3 p.m. on Sept. 1-5. Submit no more than three pieces. Ross. 412-364-3622. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com Ongoing.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Please do a public-service announcement about the Ashley Madison hack, and request that NO ONE look up information on ANYONE other than their own spouse. I’m a former AM user. I’ve been married to my wife for 20 years. We met when we were both 20 years old. Seven years ago, I made a selfish decision to have an affair, and five years ago, my wife found out. She hated me for a while, but we worked things out. I have been faithful since then, and our marriage is better than ever. Since my wife already knows everything, I have no worries about her finding out. But what about every other person I know? It is mortifying to think about my colleagues or my wife’s family poring through my profile information. I’m going to assume the best — most people have the common decency not to snoop into their neighbors’ bedroom habits — but it would be great if you could ask people to respect other people’s privacy. REALLY ENRAGED GUY REQUESTING EVERYONE’S TACTFUL SILENCE

I’m happy to back you up, REGRETS, but I don’t share your faith in humanity. Most people are only too delighted to snoop into their neighbors’ bedroom habits — particularly when doing so induces feelings of moral superiority. And I like to think that the kind of puritanical busybodies who would go looking for names in the Ashley Madison dump are unlikely to be readers of mine, so they wouldn’t see my Ashley Madison PSA anyway. But I have to disagree with your suggestion that people should look for their spouses’ names in the AM data. If someone in a shitty, high-conflict marriage needs an excuse to get out — because no-fault divorce isn’t good enough for them — OK, sure, that person might wanna search for their spouse’s name. But people who are in loving, functional, low-conflict, happy-ish marriages might want to think twice. Finding out that your spouse cheated — or fantasized about cheating — is impossible to unknow, and it’s something many people can’t get over. Caveat coniunx.

had a good reason for being on the site … I’m one of the men caught in the Ashley Madison hacker net. But as pissed as I am about the bullshit — the company’s lies about the security of its site, the hackers’ self-righteous moralizing — I can attest to the fact that one can get what one is looking for on that site. Yes, there were a lot of fake profiles. Yes, there were a lot of pros. Yes, there were women looking to steal your identity. Seriously. But once you figured out the game, you could find a lot of real women on that site who were looking for someone to spend time with. I’ll be pissed if I get busted as a result of all of this, but joining that site helped me reclaim my sanity after a sexless 25-year marriage. DON’T ATTACK THIS ADULTERER

Slogging through the Savage Love mail for the last 25 years has convinced me of this: Some married people have grounds to cheat. Men and women trapped in sexless or loveless marriages, men and women who have been abandoned sexually and/or emotionally by spouses they aren’t able to leave — either because their spouses are economically dependent on them (or vice versa) or because they may have children who are dependent on both partners. It would be wonderful if everyone who felt compelled to cheat could either negotiate an open relationship or end the one they’re in now, but there are cases where cheating is the least worst option for all involved. Now, I don’t know the particulars of DATA’s marriage — why it’s been sexless for so long, what the damage is — but if seeking sex elsewhere allowed DATA to stay sane and stay married, and if the marriage is otherwise affectionate and low-conflict, and if DATA’s wife didn’t want to see her marriage end, DATA may have done her a favor by getting on Ashley Madison. Loyalty isn’t something we can demonstrate only with our genitals.

“LOYALTY ISN’T SOMETHING WE CAN DEMONSTRATE ONLY WITH OUR GENITALS.”

HAVE A GREAT PITTSBURGH PHOTO TO SHARE? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

I’m one of those morons who had an Ashley Madison account. But for me, and probably for many others, AM has been a strong antidote to the urge to cheat. Spending some time on AM taught me the following: (1) I’m nothing special — there are millions of other men looking for the same thing, and most of them are younger and betterlooking. (2) The women on AM are nothing special — the few who even bother chatting with you are often looking for money, and your wife starts looking damn good by comparison. (3) The whole thing is basically a scam to separate horny middle-aged guys from our wallets. And it doesn’t even have the relatively honest sleaze of a strip club. ASHLEY MADISON MARK

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There’s no way to tell the difference between an Ashley Madison member who came to his (or her) senses before cheating, like AMM here, and a member who fucked a dozen other people — or, for that matter, a member who

I’m an Ashley Madison user in an open relationship with a bi woman. I can assure you that a large number of AM users — hundreds of thousands — are also in open relationships. The hackers made no effort to distinguish between adulterers and people in consensual, honest relationships. They are smearing thousands of people as adulterers who are much more honest in their relationships than the average person. HEALTHY OPENNESS NOT EGREGIOUS SEXUAL TRYSTS

The hackers also made no effort to protect Ashley Madison members living in countries where adultery is punishable by death. Along with all the cheaters, wannabe cheaters, and people in honest open relationships, HONEST, the hackers exposed hundreds of people living in Saudi Arabia — some of them gay. Do the people out there saying AM members are getting what they deserve realize that some are going to get their heads cut off? On the Lovecast, you are COMMANDED to listen to Dan and Mistress Matisse: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.26-09.02

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At least for now, I suggest you suspend the quest for order and refinement and perfection. The wise course of action is to disengage from your fascination with control, and instead give yourself to the throbbing, erratic pulse of the Cosmic Wow. Why? If you do, you will be able to evolve faster than you thought possible. Your strength will come from agile curiosity and an eagerness to experiment. Do you remember when you last explored the catalytic wonders of spontaneity and unpredictability? Do it again!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This is the deepest, darkest phase of your cycle. The star that you will ultimately make a wish upon has not yet risen. Your pet monsters seem to have forgotten for the moment that they are supposed to be your allies, not your nemeses. Smoke from the smoldering embers in your repressed memories is blending with the chill night fog in your dreams, making your life seem like a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside a taco. Just kidding about that last part. I wanted to see if your sense of humor is intact, because if it is, you will respond resiliently to all the cosmic jokes in your upcoming tests.

that propitious moment, at least for a while. Even if you have merely been considering the possibility of signing a year-long lease, asking a cute mischief-maker on a date, or posting an extra-edgy meme on Facebook or Twitter, the next three weeks would be prime time to strike. Diving into a deep, heart-crazed commitment is sometimes a jangly process for you Aquarians, but these days it might be almost smooth and synchronistic.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

According to the poet Rainer Maria Rilke, here’s what God says to each of us: “Go the limits of your longing. ... Flare up like flame and make big shadows that I can move in. Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror. Just keep going. No feeling is final.” Whether or not you’re on speaking terms with the Creator, this is excellent advice. It’s time to give everything you have and take everything you need. Hold nothing back and open yourself as wide and wild as you dare. Explore the feeling of having nothing to lose and expect the arrivals of useful surprises.

Ready for a ritual? Get a piece of paper and a pen. Light a candle, take three deep breaths, and chant “YUMMMM” five times. Then spend 10 minutes writing down the qualities you would like your perfect lover to possess. Identify both the traits that would make this person unique and the behavior he or she would display toward you. Got that? When you are finished, burn the list you made. Disavow everything you wrote. Pledge to live for at least seven months without harboring fixed beliefs about what your ideal partner should be like. Instead, make yourself extra receptive to the possibility that you will learn new truths about what you need. Why? I suspect that love has elaborate plans for you in the next two years. You will be better prepared to cooperate with them if you are initially free of strong agendas.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

The sun and the expansive planet Jupiter are currently making a joyful noise in the sign of Virgo, which is your astrological House of Career and Ambition. This does not necessarily mean that a boon to your career and ambition will fall into your lap, although such an event is more likely than usual. More importantly, this omen suggests that you will influence luck, fate and your subconscious mind to work in your favor if you take dramatic practical action to advance your career and ambitions.

You like to run ahead of the pack. You prefer to show people the way, to set the pace. It’s cleaner that way, right? There’s less risk you will be caught up in the messy details of everyday compromise. But I suspect that the time is right for you to try an experiment: Temporarily ease yourself into the middle of the pack. Be willing to deal with the messy details of everyday compromise. Why? Because it will teach you lessons that will serve you well the next time you’re showing the way and setting the pace.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

On Aug. 28, 1963, Capricorn hero Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech to a crowd of thousands in Washington, D.C. In that address, he imagined what it might look like if African Americans were free of the bigotry and oppression they had endured for centuries at the hands of white Americans. In accordance with your astrological potentials, I encourage you to articulate your own “I Have a Dream” vision sometime soon. Picture in detail the successful stories you want to actualize in the future. Visualize the liberations you will achieve and the powers you will obtain.

Are you ready to revise your ideas about how love works? Would you consider re-evaluating your relationship to romance, your approach to intimacy, and your understanding of sex? I hope you will not only be willing but also excited to do these things. Now is a favorable time to make changes that will energize your love life with a steady flow of magic for months to come. To get the party started, brainstorm about experiments you could try to invigorate the dynamics of togetherness. Make a list of your customary romantic strategies, and rebel against them all. Speak sexy truths that are both shocking and endearing.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

If you have been patiently waiting for a propitious moment to buy a new yacht, pledge your undying love, or get a tattoo that depicts Buddha wrestling Satan, now is as close as you’ll get to

where you feel safe and authentic, or a situation that enables you to draw on extra reserves of strength and courage. It’s a special kind of home: an empowering shelter that makes you feel that you belong in this world and love your life. Can you guess where I’m going with this message, Gemini? These days you need to be in your querencia even more than usual. If you don’t have one, or if you don’t know where yours is, formulate a fierce intention to locate it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The art of effective communication consists of knowing both what to say and what not to say. It’s not enough to simply find the words that accurately convey your meaning. You have to tailor your message to the quirks of your listeners. For example, let’s say you want to articulate the process that led you to change your mind about an important issue. You would use different language with a child, an authority figure and a friend. Right? I think you are currently at the peak of your abilities to do this well, Cancerian. Take full advantage of your fluency. Create clear,

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Arthur Conan Doyle first used the term “smoking gun” in a story he wrote over a century ago. It referred to a time the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes burst into a room to find a man holding a pistol that had just been fired, along with the fallen body of a man who had been shot. Since then, the meaning of “smoking gun” has expanded. Now it’s any piece of evidence that serves as compelling proof of a certain hypothesis. If you can’t find the cookie you left in the kitchen, and your roommate walks by with cookie crumbs on his chin, it’s the smoking gun that confirms he pilfered your treat. I believe this is an important theme for you right now. What question do you need answered? What theory would you like to have corroborated? The smoking gun will appear. What new title, degree, award or perk will you have two years from today that you don’t have now? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

Querencia is a Spanish word with many nuances. At its simplest, it refers to your favorite spot, a place where you long to be. But its meaning can go even deeper. Querencia may be a sanctuary

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

NEWS

vivid impressions that influence people to like you and help you.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS

GOODS & SERVICES

We buy Sports Memorabilia

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

Sports World Specialties 645 Smithfield St, Downtown

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

AUTO SERVICES

ADOPTION

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

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Southwinds, Inc., a residential program for adults with developmental challenges is looking to hire reliable, caring, direct care employees. No experience necessary—starting rate is with education/experience. Generous time 10.00/hour, and increases incre offff package, k hhealth, lth ddental, and vision, retirement plan, life insurance and long term disability insurance included in benefit package. We also offer a CNA training program to our employees. Comfortable work atmosphere in South Hills areas. Full-time, part-time, and substitute positions available—weekday or weekend. EOE. Apply online at www.southwindsinc.org or email loril@southwindsinc.org with inquiries.

DO YOU SMOKE CIGARETTES BUT ONLY ON SOME DAYS?

Adopt

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AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-977-9537 (AAN CAN)

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HEALTH SERVICES Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS?

WE’RE HIRING!

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED

TALK TO SOMEONE WHO CARES. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN A RESEARCH STUDY FOR NON-DAILY SMOKERS. MUST BE AT LEAST 21 YEARS OLD. ELIGIBLE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE COMPENSATED FOR THEIR TIME.

FULL-TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

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Visit PHEAA.org/jobs to apply. PHEAA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text “NONDAILY” to (412) 999-2758 or visit smokingresearchgroup.com *Studies for non-daily smokers who do want to quit or who do not want to quit


MASSAGE

LOVE ME TINDER

MASSAGE

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Judy’s Oriental Massage

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Bodywork by Cindy Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower available. McKnight - $40 per hour. Table shower only $10. Table shower & unlimited sauna only $15. Imperial - $50 per hour, includes FREE table shower Open 7 Days a Week • 9:30am-10:30pm 7777 McKnight Road, Pgh, PA 15237 • 412-366-7130 180 Imperial Plaza Drive, Imperial, PA 15126 • 724-695-8088 CC Accepted.

ACROSS

1. Goalie Howard 4. Sports video game where players caught on fire 10. Place to get coffee and free WiFi 14. “Nice cape work!” 15. New Age practitioner 16. Taqueria freebie 17. Cartilage that covers the wind pipe when swallowing (Swipe) 19. Endorsing needs 20. Game with 32 cards 21. PED abuser and corked bat user Sammy 22. Watch an entire season in a sitting, say 23. Cheese in red wax 25. Memphis location where Elvis and Johnny Cash, among others, recorded (Swipe) 27. Unable to act prudently 29. They may cover two feet 30. Very nearby (Swipe) 34. Challenge in court 35. “Love Sneaking Up On You” singer Bonnie 36. ___ Plaines 39. “That’s beyond belief!” (Swipe) 43. Traffic problem

45. Number of beers in a big box 46. Utterly lost (Swipe) 50. Not quite closed 51. Kept adding to, as a bar tab 52. “Man ...” 54. Killed it, as a test 56. Soccer moms’ wheels 57. French white wine (Swipe) 59. Spicy take out 60. Kia midsize sedan 61. Wireless highspeed standard, for short 62. Is unable to make a decision 63. Just a little bit 64. Fleur-de-___

22. Former Oriole slugger Powell 24. “Komm, Gib ___ Deine Hand” (The Beatles’s German version of “I Want To Hold Your Hand”) 26. Winking phrase 27. L.A. Galaxy’s org. 28. Numbers on a door stoop? 31. Smidge 32. John O. Brennan’s org. 33. Guy in briefs?: Abbr. 36. Energizer rival 37. Humble request 38. Cloud’s milieu 39. Dances done with knees slightly bent

DOWN

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40. ‘60s militant ___ Brown 41. N.W.A.’s “F--k ___ Police” 42. Headcovering of all but the eyes 43. Wrap, as in bandages 44. Punch in time 46. “You’re singing my tune” 47. Skip all the bullshit and just get hitched 48. Actor Nick 49. Sink’s outlet 53. Turns the lights down 55. Union payments 57. Scribble (down) 58. Get the word out?

WELLNESS CENTER Grand Opening! Experience the best massage with this special offer

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412-432-5750

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

1. Does one better than 2. Words of affection 3. Ten times the serving of vitamins, say 4. Canucks grp. 5. Heckler’s cries 6. Some female voices 7. Jiu-___ 8. Like 60% of the world 9. Map abbr. 10. “Ya got me?” 11. Tommy Lee Jones “MIB” character 12. Athlete’s foot, e.g. 13. Relaxed 18. Stage of the Tour de France

NEWS

MASSAGE

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

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330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

SUBOXONE SUBUTEX WE TREAT: Opiate Addiction Heroin Addiction & Other Drug Addictions

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.26/09.02.2015

LOCATIONS IN

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{PHOTO BY JENNIFER SZWEDA JORDAN }

Market House seniors join a drum circle at the center.

MARKET VALUE

South Side Market House celebrates 100 years {BY JENNIFER SZWEDA JORDAN} “WHAT IS THIS PLACE?” “What happens in there?” Sarah Johnston hears these

questions quite a bit as director of the South Side Market House, a grand 100-yearold red brick building just off East Carson Street. The Market House has served as a grocery, a youth center and now a City of Pittsburgh-run senior center. This Saturday, the public is invited to stop by to learn what happens at the Market House and to celebrate the building’s centennial. The indoor/outdoor block party will feature live bands, ethnic foods, a health fair, kids’ corner and more.

“We did not have a telephone in 1946,” she says. “My sister and I came to the Market House with my aunt and received a phone call that my mother had a baby boy.” Pitulski’s eyes well up with tears as she tells the story, since that memory is now bittersweet — she is still grieving the recent loss of her brother. Pitulski’s days at the Market House were otherwise joyful, filled with playing table tennis with her sister and friends in the winter, after spending summers on a nearby playground. “I still stay in touch with people that I knew here from 50 years ago,” Pitulski says. On a recent day, Suzy McKain-Fallon was sitting in the basketball court while her husband, Michael, shot hoops. In the 1960s, McKain-Fallon played on one of the first area girls’ basketball teams to practice on this same court — a team from St. John the Evangelist elementary school. “We didn’t want to be cheerleaders, so we started a team,” she says. “We just thought, ‘Who wants to be a cheerleader?’” Sometimes McKain-Fallon still dribbles and shoots here. Eighty-year-old Georgia Boehm volunteers at the center, serving as vice president of its advisory council. She remembers coming to the Market House with her mom to shop in the days when live beef cattle were brought to the basement for butchering. “I like to be involved,” she says. “I volunteer a lot. Sometimes I get told I do too much. But that’s just the way I am.” Charlie Mathews, who is homeless after several years without work, has found his place at the center, too. Although he isn’t old enough to enjoy the facility as a senior, he volunteers there — serving food and moving tables. “I get happy when I help people and see the smile on their faces and know that it helped them out and it meant something to them,” he says. Lots of people come to the center for a free hot lunch, but the center fills other needs, including access to a neighborhood

“THAT KIND OF FACILITY CONTRIBUTED IN A VERY SUBSTANTIAL WAY TO THE OVERALL FEEL OF A COMMUNITY.” “That kind of facility contributed in a very substantial way to the overall feel of a community,” says famed coroner Cyril Wecht. He crossed the river to play basketball here when growing up in the lower Hill District. The Market House, he says, “provided something that was sorely needed and which regrettably seemed to pass from the scene in later years.” Many of the South Side residents who visit the Market House now have lived in the neighborhood through good times and bad. Today, seniors have mostly been priced out — or have aged out — of the trendy bars, yoga studios and boutiques that sprung up along East Carson Street. And several of the churches where people used to congregate have been closed. A number of the people who come here today are those who played basketball and table tennis decades ago. Now, amid the changes and challenges of life, they’ve found themselves connected to a community center that helps with housing and lunch. Some continue to use the basketball court — but there are also lowerimpact activities like ceramics, bingo and pool. The stories of the people and the center are a testament to perseverance and connection through community. Senior Patti Pitulski continues to visit the Market House after coming here since childhood. She has a particularly poignant memory of the Market House.

legal association. “I even have people call me to get phone numbers since they don’t have a phone book,” the Market House’s Johnston says.

MARKET HOUSE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., Aug. 29. 12th and Bingham streets, South Side. Free.

The center’s participation has dropped off in recent years — bingo games might draw 40 people instead of 160. Lately, Johnston has seen more of a need for food and assistance among people in the 50-plus age group who are seeking a place to spend their mornings and afternoons. So the center is considering extending itsofferings to that audience. “I have watched people age gracefully and not so gracefully, and it’s very much connected with how much they interact and use the center,” Johnston says. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Media producers Reid Carter and Heather McClain contributed to this story. NEWS

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

August 26, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 34

August 26, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 34