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PERMANENT RECORD: DISPUTE OVER FRACKING NEAR MARS SCHOOLS COULD HAVE STATEWIDE IMPACT 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015


EVENTS 8.1 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.6 – 1:30-5pm ANDY’S BIRTHDAY Birthday-themed art activities Free with museum admission

8.8 – 2pm JOSH & GAB Warhol theater Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.15 – 2pm & 7pm SOUND SERIES: ANIME’BOP! ENSEMBLE The Warhol theater Tickets 2pm FREE; 7pm $15 / $10 student & senior

8.22 – 10am KID CITY DANCE PARTY WITH DJ KELLYMOM Warhol entrance space Presented in connection with Year of the Family. FREE

Get the real story. Only at The Warhol. PEARLSTEIN I WARHOL I CANTOR

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

From Pittsburgh to New York • Through Sept 6, 2015

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The future of transit is now and we are working to improve your ride. Look for bus tracking technologies and other innovations to keep you better informed. Getting around town has never been so easy.

FUTURE OF TRANSIT IS NOW THE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015


{EDITORIAL}

07.29/08.05.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, JESSICA HARDIN, JOSEPH PEISER, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 30

Good Times

{ART}

{COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY}

[NEWS]

{ADVERTISING}

should not be around schools, 06 “Itor residents, or farmland; I mean it’s

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

ridiculous, it’s industrial.” — Mars School District grandparent Laurel Colonello on the dangers of fracking

[VIEWS]

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“Many people seek to restrict the rights of women to their own bodies while at the same time dictating how physicians and other health-care providers practice medicine.” — Dr. Amesh Adalja on the banning of telemedicine for abortions

Olga Watkins 4pm-7pm Al Lardo 8pm-11pm SATURDAY | AUGUST 1

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eggplant-parm sandwich was 14 “The almost shockingly good, and the secret ingredient is ricotta.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Aviva Brick Oven

[MUSIC]

love to stay home and build ships 18 “I’d in a bottle, but I have to perform to save

Lyndsey Smith 4pm-7pm Neon Swing 8pm-11pm

SUNDAY | AUGUST 2

{ADMINISTRATION}

my life.” — Dick Dale on the necessity of touring at age 78

RML 1pm-4pm John Gresh 5pm-8pm

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[SCREEN]

film has all the usual hallmarks 28 “The of a prestige British period production.”

{PUBLISHER}

— Al Hoff reviews the World War I drama Testament of Youth

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS]

getting work pushed me to try 31 “Not other things and to challenge myself

in other ways.” — Kinky Boots star Billy Porter on how he started writing

[LAST PAGE]

can be a fun hobby, but there 47 “Chickens are some precautions that you need to take to protect yourself and your birds.” — Poultry educator Phillip Clauer on keeping urban chickens

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 12 EVENTS LISTINGS 34 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 41 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 42 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 44 +

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THIS WEEK

“IT SHOULD NOT BE AROUND SCHOOLS; I MEAN, IT’S RIDICULOUS.”

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Hear from parents north of Pittsburgh who are protesting fracking near their children’s schools. Read our news feature at right.

NOT WELL

www.pghcitypaper.com

Gun homicides in Pittsburgh this summer have doubled within the last week. See a map of where they happened and follow our Summer Gun-Homicide Report at www.pghcitypaper.com.

This week: Record-breaking dogs, a street fair for a good cause, and thousands of screaming 1D fans. #CPWeekend podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

This week’s #CPReaderArt is a great photo from the fountain at Point State Park by @pittsburghinpictures. Tag your photos of the city as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you! Download our free app for a chance to win $100 gift certificate to any Big Y Group Restaurant. Contest ends July 30.

{PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Parents rally in front of the Mars Area School District campus, where unconventional natural gas drilling development could take place less than a mile away.

O

N A HOT afternoon along a backedup, rush-hour-plagued two-lane road, parents rally in the front yard of a school, holding cardboard cut-outs of children that bear written phrases like “Don’t Frack My Future.” Some drivers honk in approval, while others yell “Frack, baby, frack.” But those parents standing along Route 228 are outraged that there’s unconventional natural gas drilling — or “fracking” — just about a half mile from their kids’ schools. “It should not be around schools, or residents, or farmland; I mean, it’s ridiculous, it’s industrial,” says Laurel Colonello, of Middlesex Township, where the contentious well pad is located. The Mars Area School District school campus, where 3,200 students attend, is in Adams Township, just over the border. One building straddles the line. Colonello, who wore a T-shirt reading “Keep Our Children Safe,” attended the rally, about 25 miles north of Pittsburgh, with her son and grandchildren, who will be the

third generation of her family to go there. Colonello made it clear: She’s against “fracking.” But, her sentiment about where natural-gas development does and does not belong is reverberating throughout this small Butler County community, and is the focus of a lawsuit that could set a statewide legal precedent.

Lawsuit over fracking near schools in Mars School District could have statewide legal impact {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} HYDRAULIC FRACTURING involves pumping water, sand and friction-reducing chemicals into the ground to break up rock formations and access natural gas. As the technology developed, the state government, under the Corbett administration, enacted its landmark oil and gas law, known as Act 13, in 2012. The law preempted municipal

zoning on these activities, among other controversial measures. The law also set impact fees — paid by energy companies to local governments for every well drilled to offset possible costs caused by the activity. (More than 8,000 unconventional wells have been drilled, producing nearly $ 850 million in impact fees.) Philadelphia-based environmental advocacy organization Delaware Riverkeeper Network and several municipalities challenged those zoning restrictions. The group invoked Pennsylvania’s 1970 Environmental Rights Amendment, which states that residents have a “right to clean air, pure water and to the preservation of the … natural environment.” The case wound up in the state Supreme Court, where municipalities won, partially. “Some of the old restrictions on municipalities still apply. You still may not ... pick a spot and say, ‘No drilling there,’” says Bruce Ledewitz, a law professor at Duquesne University. “Not every bit of it was CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015


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NOT WELL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

found unconstitutional.” Now some parents in the Mars Area School District say Middlesex Township misused its power when, in August 2014, it expanded zoning to allow oil and gas drilling and associated infrastructure — like gas compressor stations — throughout 90 percent of the township. That means drilling is now allowed on the farm adjacent to the Mars School District campus. Again invoking the Environmental Rights Amendment, the Delaware Riverkeeper Network and another Philadelphia-based advocacy organization, the Clean Air Council, along with four residents, challenged the zoning board’s decision in October 2014. The township upheld its own ordinance, and the organizations and residents appealed. This past July, a Butler County Common Pleas Court judge issued a stay on all activities on the well site until a September hearing. Drilling has already started on three of the five wells on the site. “The Mars ordinance is a municipal version of Act 13,” says Delaware Riverkeeper Network’s Maya van Rossum. “To allow drilling everywhere, in all variety of communities that we hold dear, it essentially backpedals on the protections that were secured in the Supreme Court victory.” The Geyer well pad is located behind the school campus on Bob and Kim Geyer’s 150-acre farm, which spans both townships. Bob Geyer told City Paper that he and his wife signed the lease with Rex Energy “five or six years ago,” but would not disclose for what amount. Their well permits date back to September 2014. “It’s approved by the DEP, and they’re responsible for the health and welfare of residents. … There was no problem until these people decided it was too close to the school,” Bob Geyer says. Kim Geyer, a former member and president of the Mars Area School Board, at one time rejected drilling on school property. “At that time, in 2009, oil and gas well drilling was not a regulated industry by the state. There were no rules, no state laws on the books, no state or department oversight, little data available, unanswered questions and so … we declined,” Kim Geyer told CP in an email. In March 2014, the school again rejected a deal — $1 million from Rex Energy for its mineral rights. Shortly after Act 13’s passage, Butler County hired Kim Geyer to study the law for its commissioner’s office. She’s now the county’s Marcellus Shale liaison and is a member of XTO Energy’s community-advisory panel. XTO is an ExxonMobile subsidiary with its Appalachian headquarters in Butler County.

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Laurel Colonello, of Middlesex Township, protests the nearby well site.

“In the past three-and-a-half years, I have educated myself on the state regulations, the gas industry, and how responsible drilling can be achieved in a safe manner,” wrote Geyer, who would not speak about her personal situation. She’s currently running for commissioner. She says the impact fees (which have more than doubled since 2012 and to date total more than $ 3 million), have been positive for Butler County. According to fund-usage records, the county has spent about $1.1 million on public safety, with smaller amounts for social services, road construction and judicial services. Only $100,000 was earmarked for land conservation. About $ 1.3 million has been placed in a capital-reserve fund for bridges and 911 center updates.

DEP’s issuance of the permits to Rex Energy. “We sat across the table from Rex Energy, and we requested them to move the well pad outside of a two-mile radius, because when we’ve seen in the past reasons for evacuation, it’s always been a mile or two miles,” says Patrice Tomcik, a member of the Mars Parent Group who has two children in the district. “They said that it was not feasible because they already had too much money invested in the well pad .62 miles away.” Rex Energy did not return phone calls to confirm that statement. The publicly traded, State College-based company had more than 100 wells in the Butler area as of August 2014. Federal financial filings indicate the company has assets worth $1.4 billion and annual revenues of nearly $200 million. In the case of well fires in both Greene and Mercer counties in 2014 and 2015, local news outlets reported evacuation perimeters set at a half-mile and one mile, respectively. One Chevron worker died in the Greene County blaze. As Act 13 stands now, the buffer zone for drilling near any building — a school or not — is 500 feet from the actual wellbore, or hole, not from the perimeter of activities. The DEP would not comment on possible interpretations of building definitions because of the ongoing litigation. According to environmental-advocacy organization PennEnvironment, more than 30 schools across the Marcellus Shale region — from New York (which has banned fracking) down into Maryland — are within a half mile of wells; more than 220

“OUR CLIENTS’ INTENT IS TO BLOCK THE WELL PAD BECAUSE OF CONCERN FOR THE SAFETY.”

WHILE LEGAL precedents and court decisions keep society ticking one way or another, the very real prospect of machinery just a half-mile away, pounding into the ground and releasing gas formed hundreds of millions of years ago, propelled Mars parents to organize. “You have allowed for the citizens of Pennsylvania to become the collateral damage for development of shale gas. The Mars Parent Group wrote to the PA General Assembly and Department of Environmental Protection in July 2014, after the auditor general released a report criticizing DEP’s oversight of the industry. The group’s website links to several studies on human health and proximity to natural-gas development; the homepage describes the group’s bafflement with the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

schools are within one mile. In Butler County, gas development sits anywhere from 900 feet to 2 miles from three elementary schools. “The industry has quickly become used to demanding permit applications and getting [them] without any serious review by local government,” says George Jugovic, attorney with the Harrisburg-based PennFuture, which brought cases against municipalities in Washington and Lycoming counties, where wells were proposed near residential areas and schools. The group advocates for safe gas development. “When a person says we have a right to develop land, that right is limited when that property is subject to local zoning. You don’t have the right to put in a drycleaning service [or] a steel mill. Those activities presumably get located in an industrial zoned district,” Jugovic says. “That’s the issue with shale-gas development. All indications are that it is plainly an industrial activity. How does government regulate that activity and still protect the rights of other property owners?” The DEP is in the process of rewriting regulations for the industry, to be released in 2016, and it could apply extra scrutiny if the perimeter of a well site is planned within 200 feet of a school. While the DEP wouldn’t talk, Jeffrey Sheridan, spokesperson for Gov. Tom Wolf, says that the administration is “committed to ensuring safety.” But advocates say that doesn’t go far enough. “There’s a fair amount of peer-reviewed literature of air impacts at much greater distances than what the DEP is considering,” says Nadia Steinzor of Earthworks, which is advocating for stricter regulations. “We’re calling on DEP to prevent oil and gas infrastructure near schools,” says Matt Walker of Clean Air Council. “DEP shouldn’t let it happen within a mile.” But David Yoxtheimer, a hydrogeologist with Penn State’s Marcellus Outreach Center, says that as long as “everything is done properly and according to regulations,” including air- and water-quality testing, “then yes, it can be done [that close] without having any direct health impact.” “There is another aspect here that when they are doing the drilling and fracturing, this tends to be a 24/7 operation, so you do have noise and light pollution. This is certainly where it does get tricky. You’re drilling near where people live and work,” he says. AND WHILE speaking out against drill-

ing projects is nothing new in this region, some companies and landowners who have financial interests in drilling want protesters to pipe down. In May, Dewey


Homes and Investments — a land developer that leased to Rex Energy its 36 acres adjacent to the Geyers — and 12 Middlesex and Adams township residents who lease to Rex Energy, and two other natural-gas developers, filed suit against the organizations and residents who sued the township and an additional resident not on the lawsuit: Amy Nassif, organizer of the Mars Parent Group. The Geyers are not involved in the lawsuit. According to the complaint, the plaintiffs are seeking damages for interference with their contracts. The complaint states that the nonprofits and residents acted “in concert … making false, misleading, or inflammatory public statements presenting improper and unfounded appeals and wrongful and/or unsupported affidavits before the Zoning Hearing Board.” Dewey Homes did not respond to CP’s inquiry. “When I realized that it was local residents who were demanding financial compensation for a delay in fulfilling a speculative lease agreement with Rex Energy, I was in complete shock and utterly devastated,” Nassif says. The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania calls it a SLAPP suit — or

a strategic lawsuit against public participation — and has demanded that the complaint be dropped. “What the Mars parents have done here is to protest the placement of a well that is 1,100 feet from some of their homes and .6 miles from the school,” says Witold “Vic” Walczak, legal director of ACLU Pennsylvania. “They’ve spoken at public meetings, organized allies, and they have taken available legal action, all of which is constitutionally protected activity under the First Amendment. These suits are especially dangerous because they not only chill the people being sued, but they have a similar effect on other people who might consider getting involved and exercising their own rights.” The ACLU has filed a brief in support of the defendants. “The only way that they could win this lawsuit is to show that the only reason our clients were doing this is to harass the plaintiffs and prevent them for getting money,” Walczak says. “Our clients don’t even know these people. There cannot be any doubt that our clients’ intent is to block the well pad because of concern for the safety and welfare of children.”

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BLOCK WATCH Neighbors say rash of summer shootings don’t define Marshall-Shadeland {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} broad strokes. Sure there’s crime, some say, Road in Marshall-Shadeland, one of the but it doesn’t mean the neighborhood is North Side’s two dozen neighborhoods. A unsafe. Others claim crime in the neighsmall business district runs along the street. borhood has increased in recent years, but There’s a bar, a pizza shop, a bank and a that development hasn’t caused business corner store. Two groups of adults are out- owners to flee. And either way, many agree side talking. One group surrounds a table it’s an improvement from the rampant in front of a barbershop and a few others gang violence in the North Side throughout the 1980s and ’90s. stand gathered in front of a specialty store. “The place has its problems,” says Dave The two groups are racially mixed, like the neighborhood. According to data from McCarthy, owner of Wise Guys Pizza. “I the most recent U.S. Census, the neighbor- generally feel safe. But we close at 10.” And Marshall-Shadeland residents’ hood’s racial makeup is split nearly down suggestions for how to address the the middle: 50 percent white and 43 violence there are just as varied. percent black. “The area is what the area Behind the business district verage is,” says McCarthy. “There’s not sits the Woods Run Branch of More co er of summ es one thing that’s going to fix it. the Carnegie Library of Pittsn homicid u g Maybe it’s low income. It could burgh, and behind that is a . w w w at aper be drugs. It could be the lack of playground where two men pghcityp homeownership.” are taking turns going down .com Another individual who the slide with young children. works in the neighborhood and But this area of the North Side asked to be referred to by his first isn’t as idyllic as it seems. Recently, four of the businesses on Brighton Road were name, Tyrone, says the recent shootings robbed within the same week. And the in the neighborhood are the result of playground behind the library is allegedly a open gun access. “When you have a weapon, it increases hotspot for drug activity. Twenty-two-year-old Stephen Flaherty your aggression level. No one’s addressing is on his way home from the corner store. A the weapons,” Tyrone says. “Our young few weeks ago he was shot multiple times. men are being pulled over every day with Lifting up his shirt he shows off his scars: stolen guns. Where’s a 16-year-old getting one just below his rib cage, what looks like a an M-16 with two banana clips?” Barber Eddie Bell, owner of Steel City recent incision running down his sternum, and a bullet still in his body just under- Cutz, says he thought the neighborhood was safe when he opened his business on neath the skin by his hipbone. “I think it’s a safe neighborhood,” says Brighton Road six years ago. But three years ago a shot was fired through one of the Flaherty. “I’ve lived here all my life.” Flaherty’s refrain is somewhat common windows of his barbershop, and since then in the neighborhood despite the fact that so things haven’t improved. “It’s crazy out here,” Bell says. “It’s been far this summer, Marshall-Shadeland has seen four people injured in three shootings a bad summer.” Bell says the neighborhood would see and one person killed. Two of the shootings happened within two days of each other. a decline in crime and violence if residents Twenty-two-year-old Christian Rash has were willing to cooperate with law enforcebeen charged in connection with those ment when they have information about shootings, which police allege began after an incident. “If I see it I’m telling, but everybody isn’t an altercation between Rash’s girlfriend and a family member of one of the victims. like that,” Bell says. “That’s the only way it’s The third shooting occurred eight days lat- going to be fixed.” But another local, who spoke with er, on July 25, days after City Paper walked through the neighborhood talking to resi- CP on the condition of anonymity, said he dents. Police say Lamar Thomas was found understands why residents tend not to dead with a gunshot wound to the head in come forward with information. “Say you see something and you go to his Stayton Street barbershop. The shooting remains under investigation; police haven’t the police and then the next day it’s your kid lying on the sidewalk,” he says. “People reported a motive. But these numbers mean nothing to are scared. “There’s a lot of knuckleheads. But many local residents, who use a diverse palette to describe the neighborhood in there’s a lot of good people here.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[GUEST OPINION]

MEDICAL OPINION Innovation at risk as states ban telemedicine for medical abortions WHEN I SURVEY all the technologies that

will transform health care of the future for the better, I always return to the tremendous potential of telemedicine. Much like how Amazon transformed how we shop, telemedicine can bring health-care providers to your town (or even your home) through your phone or your computer. Such technology diminishes the need to travel for consultation and follow-up, acting as a force-multiplier that will positively disrupt health care. Though still in its early stages of development, telemedicine is already used for myriad specialties, spanning from the obvious dermatology, pathology and radiology to trauma surgery, pediatric cardiac intensive care, maternal-fetal medicine, and even my ďŹ eld of infectious disease. In many contexts, telemedicine acts not solely as a mechanism to reach areas without access to advanced sub-specialists, but to augment the care of those with high risk and complex conditions, such as traumatic injuries and HIV. Because of its proven value, telemedicine has been embraced by the medical community for almost every facet of medicine, save one: medical abortions, where politicians in some states have increasingly sought to regulate it to the point of virtual unavailability. A medical abortion is the terminating of an early (seven to nine weeks) pregnancy via a medication called Mifeprex. It is a major advance in reproductive medicine, as it eliminates the need, in many cases, for more costly and complicated later surgical abortions. It is safe and effective. Often, during the process of going through a medical abortion, consultation with a physician or, in some states, a nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant, experienced in such treatments is needed to monitor the process and ensure that no further intervention is necessary. In areas of the country in which access to such providers is not

convenient or available, telemedicine brings this treatment to women who choose to employ it. However, states such as Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa and many others have banned the use of telemedicine for medical abortions. Unfortunately in Pennsylvania, abortion as such is so heavily regulated under the Abortion Control Act and the Abortion Oversight Act that new laws basically have nothing left to regulate. In light of this worrisome trend, the decision by the Iowa Supreme Court to strike down this ban in that state is encouraging. But why was this particular delimitation on the scope of telemedicine even pursued? Is it because of some inherent shortcoming of telemedicine unique to the area of reproductive medicine? No. There is not a justiďŹ able medical reason for this restriction. Many people seek to restrict the rights of women to their own bodies while at the same time dictating how physicians and other health-care providers practice medicine — a double injury to the causes of liberty and free enterprise. More than 20 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states cannot criminally ban early-term abortions, declaring this “a rule of law and a component of liberty that we cannot renounce.â€? That the Supreme Court has repeatedly upheld this ruling has stymied would-be theocrats who have sought to place every conceivable burden — short of an outright ban — on the right of a woman to obtain an abortion. Such burdens trample physician autonomy along with women’s individual rights on the road to foisting a religiously derived view of fetal rights onto the entire populace. This strategy of making the ending of a pregnancy as arduous as possible is apparent not only in telemedicine bans, but also in the efforts to dictate that physicians must have hospital admitting privileges,

THERE IS NOT A JUSTIFIABLE MEDICAL REASON FOR THIS RESTRICTION.

{BY AMESH ADALJA}

and must perform what is usually an ofďŹ cebased procedure in ambulatory surgical centers. Such regulations were the subject of a recent Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit ruling that upheld restrictions that even stipulate how many parking spaces are required for a facility that provides abortion procedures. This case is now heading to the U.S. Supreme Court. It does not matter that the medical service in question in these cases is abortion, because abortion is a right and the government’s circumscription of it is tantamount to the nulliďŹ cation of that right, as well as of a physician’s right to practice medicine. Telemedicine is path-breaking technology that will revolutionize health care and improve access to care, control costs and open up whole new avenues for innovation. It must not be left susceptible to government interference that clearly vitiates the once-sacrosanct U.S. Constitution’s principle of liberty. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Adalja is a quadruple board-certiďŹ ed physician in Pittsburgh. Follow him on Twitter: @AmeshAA

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET} EDITOR’S NOTE: Just before this issue went to press, City Paper learned that News Quirks compiler Roland Sweet unexpectedly passed away on July 24. Beginning next week, this column will no longer appear as we examine options to take its place.

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Police who accused Alexander Katz, 19, of stealing a car in Logan, Utah, said he and his girlfriend had to abandon the vehicle and call a cab because he didn’t know how to drive a stick shift. The car’s owner spotted the vehicle being driven off and called police, who found Katz and his girlfriend waiting outside a nearby convenience store for their cab. Police Chief Gary Jensen said that although Katz couldn’t drive a stick shift, his girlfriend could and was giving him directions while they tried making their getaway. “I’m not 100 percent certain why she doesn’t just get around and get in the driver’s seat so they can take the car and use it,” Jensen said. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

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A shoplifting suspect in Okaloosa County, Fla., managed to evade sheriff’s deputies chasing him, but only after his car hit several mailboxes, which ripped off the car’s entire rear bumper. The license plate was attached. Deputies traced the plate to Devin Ramoe Stokes, 20, who told them he was sorry for the deed and the damage. (Northwest Florida Daily News)

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Spas in Japan now offer ramen-noodle baths. The baths are filled with ramen pork broth and synthetic noodles. Soaking in the broth is said to be good for the skin and to boost metabolism. “Lately people are very concerned about having beautiful skin, and they know the

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S B Y R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE NT I C AT I ON ON D E M AN D.

effect of collagen, which is contained in our porkbased broth,” said Ichiro Furuya, owner of the Yunessan Spa House in Hakone. (Time)

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Azerbaijan’s Naftalan Heath Center now offers oil baths, which the spa’s doctor insisted cures up to 70 ailments. “Naftalan kills everything: viruses, bacteria and fungi. Its consistency is unique and pure. It does not contain any dirt,” Dr. Hashim Hashimov said, adding that customers are allowed only 10 minutes in the tub before scraping down and showering off the sticky substance, which is then used for the next customer. “Usually we lose some material on each person, and every time we add material for each person. But to dump the whole thing is impossible, as the material is expensive.” (International Business Times)

Roosevelt Johnson they were from the Masonic Fraternal Police Department and setting up operations in the area. The agency’s website claims jurisdiction in 33 states and Mexico and, through the Knights Templar, traces the department’s roots back 3,000 years. “When asked what is the difference between the Masonic Fraternal Police Department and other police departments, the answer is simple for us,” the website says. “We were here first.” Henry, 46, identifies himself as “Chief Henry 33,” and the website refers to him as “Absolute Supreme Sovereign Grandmaster.” Johnson said the purpose of the purported police department is unclear. (Los Angeles Times)

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The backlog of court cases in Florida is prompting people waiting for trials to turn to private judges. They promise speedy and private settlements, “not in open courtroom, where everyone and their brother is attending,” said Robert Evans, a public judge for 20 years before he went private. “My marketing motto is: ‘How would you like your trial tomorrow?’” Orange County Chief Judge Fred Lauten conceded that “private judging comes with a cost,” pointing out that people who “can’t even afford an attorney … they’re not going to be able to afford a private judge.” (Orlando’s WKMG-TV)

Canada’s National Defense decided to decommission a 45-year-old navy supply ship without a replacement because mechanics in Halifax were spending a “disproportionate amount of time” keeping the vessel operating, according to official documents, by trying to locate spare parts, “some of which have been procured via eBay.” The original manufacturers long ago stopped making the parts; some were reportedly “beyond acceptable limits” because corrosion was compromising structural integrity. The vessel, HCMS Preserver, had been scheduled for decommissioning but was kept afloat after the government canceled funding for its replacement in 2008. Building a new one will take at least eight years. (The Canadian Press)

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Los Angeles County authorities charged David Henry, Tonette Hayes and Brandon Kiel with impersonating police officers after the three showed up, two of them in uniform, as a “courtesy call” to inform sheriff’s Capt.

Utah Valley University has designated a lane for texting on the stairs of its Student Life & Wellness Center. Two other dedicated lanes, distinguished by neon-green stripes, are for walkers and runners. Amy Grubbs,

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1

the school’s director for campus recreation, acknowledged that not every texter sticks to the lane, noting some “don’t even see it because they’re so consumed in their phones.” (ABC News)

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Iran has launched a state-supported matchmaking website. Deputy Minister of Youth Affairs and Sports Mahmoud Golzari cautioned that “Find Your Equal” is not a dating site. Its goal is to produce 100,000 new marriages in the coming year. “We have high demand for marriage and 11 million [young single adults] who are increasing every day,” Golzari said. Marriages are necessary to overcome Iran’s declining birthrate, according to the government, which last year banned vasectomies and permanent birth-control measures in women. Officials, including supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, have publicly urged couples to have more babies to repudiate “undesirable aspects of Western lifestyles.” (The Washington Post)

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Haden Smith, 18, demanded that his mother intervene to mend his relationship with his girlfriend and threatened to kill her chickens if she didn’t. Deputies in Limestone County, Ala., said Smith vowed he’d kill a chicken every 15 minutes and gave her a deadline of noon. When the deadline passed, he started sending her picture messages of each dead chicken. He got to six before deputies arrived and arrested him. (Tribune Media Wire)

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SPECIALS, PRIZES AND GIVEAWAYS


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THE SECRET INGREDIENT IN THE EGGPLANT-PARM SANDWICH WAS RICOTTA

SPIRITUAL FOOD {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} Just off busy Fifth Avenue, in Shadyside, there is a small hidden paradise. Ivy, fig and cedars of Lebanon grow on one side of a garden; millet, cinnamon, olive trees and a tunnel of grape vines thrive across a miniature Jordan River. This is the Biblical Botanical Garden at Rodef Shalom, where plants with significance in the ancient Near East are curated by Rabbi Walter Jacob — a man who is a wealth of information. (He and his wife have visited more than 900 U.S. gardens, which resulted in the book Gardens of North America and Hawaii: A Traveler’s Guide.)

A CLASSIER

PIZZERIA {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Pork chops Calabrese

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Each sign in the garden indicates the plant’s significance in the Bible.

“Some things are going to look better if you came back in 200 years,” he says, tapping his hand on the trunks of the cedars, which are in their infancy at only 50 years old. Each plant in the garden is accompanied by a reference to where and how it is mentioned in the Bible. The garden is shaped like Israel, with water features representing the Galilee and Dead seas, desert springs and the Jordan River. The current exhibit features two garden iterations of visions of paradise: the Christian, with boxwood, roses, fruit trees and a grassy bed, and Muslim, with palms, almonds, mosaics and water. A past exhibit featured a Babylonian beer garden. Many things grown there are edible because, well, as Rabbi Jacob explains, “The Bible was not interested in describing horticulture. [The vegetation] was seen as a divine gift [with] practical uses.” AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Open until Sept. 15. Sun.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; Sat. noon-1 p.m. Free. www.biblicalgardenpittsburgh.org

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VIVA BRICK OVEN is located near the border of Warrendale and Cranberry, and also straddles the fine line between pizzeria and “nice” restaurant, which is to say, one with table service and a more than passing commitment to ambience. Aviva looks like a strip mall from the outside, but it’s actually one building divided into three distinct but interconnected sections: a takeout counter, which also houses the open kitchen; a bar and lounge; and a sit-down dining room, each with its own entrance. The ambience resides in the bar and dining room and consists of butter-yellow walls, espresso-dark furnishings, natural stone and tasteful, if generic, artwork. Aviva is the kind of suburban bistro you might walk into in flip-flops, then order a glass of good red wine. Also, the brick oven in the name is for real. In fact, there are two of them, anchoring the takeout and dining rooms and underscoring Aviva’s upscale-pizzeria vibe. Since the menu is par for the pizzeria course — pepperoni rolls and stuffed banana peppers, Italian hoagies and a handful of pas-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

tas alongside the pizza — we were relying on those brick ovens to set Aviva apart. Certainly, the kitchen doesn’t just fall back on rote preparations. Beans and greens, for instance, was made not with timeless escarole, but with current kale. It worked for a couple reasons: First, while escarole can melt into a brothy preparation,

AVIVA BRICK OVEN

16099 Perry Highway, Warrendale. 724-799-8849 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. noon-9 p.m. PRICES: $6-19 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED the kale, though wilted, retained its structure in a dish that was moist but not soupy. Second, the flavors were bold. Banana peppers and red-pepper flakes combined to give this beans and greens more than a little kick, which the robust kale could handle. Stuffed banana peppers were more traditional, but a quick finish in the brick oven

lent some browning to the melted mozzarella. The simple, straightforward tomato sauce took on a darker color as well, absorbing flavors from the peppers and meat. The menu notes the dish as a spicy one, but we found that, as always, it depended on the individual pepper, with Jason getting a fiery one and Angelique, one more mild. Eggplant parmesan can be a bit of an enigma: Unlike most vegetarian versions of well-known dishes, it’s firmly canonical, yet it rarely does much to distinguish itself. The best versions are crisp, not soggy, and get along unobtrusively with the sauce and cheese. Aviva’s eggplant-parm sandwich was almost shockingly good, and the secret ingredient is ricotta: The kitchen wraps the eggplant around it and then proceeds as usual with sauce, melted mozzarella and a nicely toasted roll that’s not too tall or bready. In most bites the ricotta didn’t stand out as a component, but it added creaminess to the crisp crust and a certain savor to the eggplant itself. Ricotta also worked its mojo on the housemade gnocchi, which were bigger


than bite-sized and almost creamy in texture. Though easier to get right than potato gnocchi, ricotta ones are still a challenge for most restaurant kitchens, but Aviva has the knack. The tomato sauce — the same bright, fresh-tasting one that came with the peppers — nicely showcased this wonderful pasta without overpowering it. Meatballs were standard-issue, suitably tender with a flavor that was balanced, but unremarkable. Pizza, of all things, failed to wow us. In addition to the classics and a broad list of a la carte toppings, Aviva offers a few distinctive pies with recipes borrowed from pasta favorites, like vodka sauce with basil and chicken pesto. In the latter, a thin smear of pesto was smothered by a thick blanket of housemade mozzarella, so that the pesto ended up acting more like a condiment than a sauce. We liked the big, juicy slices of tomato, the slices of chicken were fine, and the crust was medium-thin and deeply browned. But we’d hoped for more pesto presence.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

IF IT GROWS TOGETHER Livermore looks to Italian food — and wine In June, The Livermore in East Liberty closed its doors as a cocktail bar and reopened as a restaurant focused on hyperregional, close-to-the-earth Italian food and wine. “We’re restaurant people, and we weren’t feeling the energy we were at Bar Marco,” says Dominic Fiore, sommelier for both establishments. While Livermore still offers a handful of craft cocktails, most of Fiore’s attention goes to the expertly curated wine list. “We want to give a village-to-village, provinceto-province perspective,” he says, “almost like a mini tour of Italy.” Fiore and coowner and executive chef Justin Steel work closely to deliver seasonal, complementary flavors to the table. “It puts you in the region where the dish and the wine comes from, and that’s what we are trying to do here,” he says.

“WE WANT TO GIVE A VILLAGE-TO-VILLAGE, PROVINCE-TO-PROVINCE PERSPECTIVE.”

The bread was more deeply disappointing. The promise of a brick oven is great bread products, but the slices that accompanied the peppers and the gnocchi were one step above supermarket white bread. And, while not the brick oven’s fault, the Caesar salad wasn’t worth eating. It was a spiritless pile of chopped romaine and stale croutons with, yes, shaved Parmesan but also a bland, almost flavorless dressing, the sort of thing you’d expect from a salad kit in the produce aisle, not a restaurant kitchen. Those flaws notwithstanding, Aviva offers all the easy-pleasing appeal of a pizzeria with an atmosphere — and often recipes — clearly a cut above.

To keep his wine list as close to the plate as possible, Fiore follows the cardinal rule “if it grows together, it goes together.” This often means gathering wines that are more obscure to American markets, so Fiore works with representatives and suppliers who are passionate about spotlighting lesser-known varietals and vintages. He leans toward natural wines, made with minimal human intervention and low or absent in sulfates. Minimal processing creates wines with clarity, unencumbered by oaky, buttery notes. A light, crisp white, from the hills surrounding Rome, is a shining example of the wines Fiore will be putting on the menu: little known, interesting and easy to drink. He walks me through the list: a soft, slightly briny white from Marche on the Adriatic coast; a light-bodied, dry Sicilian red made from the endemic Nerello Mascalese grapes, perfect for summer drinking; and, finally, a Sangiovese Foglia Tonda blend from Tuscany that’s so smooth, it would be nothing to finish the bottle. There might not be quantity on this list, but there is certainly quality. With restaurants like Livermore bringing passion and diversity to their cellars, I’ll agree with Fiore when he says, “There’s never been a better time to be a wine drinker.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Chef Elaina Rallo puts housemade mozzarella on the Aviva pizza.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-8451844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic finedining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE

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BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE

Wednesday

10:30am-3pm

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

BRGR. 5997 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE 412-224-2163

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

Randita’s Organic Vegan Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donutsized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE

BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412-323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-than-average fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-andbleu-cheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-anddumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a standout Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay,

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Curry on Murray

EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-262-2920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastropub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and hand-crafted cocktails. LE MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey St., North Side. 412-322-6535. A welcoming neighborhood bar with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE


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Eggs N’at {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE

potato and peanut soup. Weekend-only dinner specials include fare such as casseroles and cabbage rolls. JF SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. 4407 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-235-7696. The menu here straddles traditional and updated approaches to Italian food. Thus, a caprese tomato salad might contain poached peaches, endive appears in the beans and greens, and rigatoni is spiced up with jalapenos. Diners can also expect meatballs, gnocchi and chicken Milanese. LF

SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue, where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American www. per and Continental dishes. hcitypa g p PITTSBURGH THAI The preparations .com RESTAURANT BY vary widely, from ultraBORIS. 321 South Ave., traditional offerings like Verona. 412-828-0339. Expect to crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant find with the standard array of updates like duck with orangeThai curries, noodle dishes and stir apricot balsamic glaze. LF fries, with more unusual offerings tucked away under “Specialties” SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. and “Chef’s Specials.” Appetizers 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. include corn fritters and steamed 412-741-1918. This little restaurant dumplings, and among the lesshas the charm of a bygone common entrees are tropical bird’s era and old-fashioned food nest (with a shredded potato whose pleasures are worth base) and tamarind tofu. KF rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like PROPER BRICK OVEN AND duck á l’orange and Virginia TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., spots, as well as more distinctive Downtown. 412-281-5700. This dishes, such as tournedos cozy Downtown spot offers a dijon bleu and French Acadian menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, porterhouse. LE but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can STEELHEAD BRASSERIE be. Some cheeses and pasta are AND WINE BAR. Marriott housemade, and many starters City Center, 112 Washington are closer to tapas or antipasti Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. than to pub grub. More than 30 In this upscale hotel restaurant, beers are on tap, as well. KE the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic RANDITA’S ORGANIC VEGAN name holds more than brand CAFÉ. 207 Commercial Ave., value. While entrées include Aspinwall. 412-408-3907. The seafood and other meat in all-vegan menu here spans almost equal proportion, the the range, from faux meats soups and starters are dominated like seitan “sausage,” and by the former, with old meat replacements like tofu, to favorites like jumbo shrimp meat-free classics like a hummus cocktail matched with more wrap and West African sweetcontemporary offerings. LE

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LOCAL

“DON’T LET THAT FEAR OF DYING AFFECT THE WAY YOU LIVE.”

BEAT

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

VIDEO GAME On Thu., July 30, Old Game (formerly Good Thing) will host a video-release show at The Mr. Roboto Project. The night will showcase not only Old Game’s video for its single “Hunter,” but videos from Jon Bindley and Derider as well. Brenda Leeds, vocalist and guitar player for Old Game, feels that music videos should be celebrated. “We were not aware of the amount of time, money and effort that went into creating a music video,” Leeds says. “And knowing that other bands have also put their heart and souls into projects like this, we really wanted to make sure the public had a place to see a project of this magnitude.” The video was shot by Jack Culbertson, Scott Almendigner and Joe Nelis of Ramming Speed Pictures. Culbertson and Leeds — along with Old Game’s lead guitarist, Thom Hunter — became acquainted with each other while on the set of the Pittsburghshot film Homemakers, where Leeds and Hunter worked as actors. “We knew we’d eventually collaborate on a project together,” Leeds says, speaking of the relationship between Old Game and Ramming Speed Pictures. “[The video] is something we were all passionate about doing.” Leeds has a fantastic singing voice with excellent range, lending “Hunter” an intriguing melody that climbs and falls from verse to chorus. Richie Gendek’s punchy toms and Greg Wojo’s thunderous bass lay an emotive tone — which the video seems to capture well, based on the short preview that was made available — and the spacey lead guitar floating in the background buoys the rhythm guitar; the song’s arrangement is superb. The single is available online, and Old Game plans to head into The Wilderness Recording Studio this fall, aiming to release a full album by next spring. For now, the band’s attention is on the song and the video. “Pairing an image with a song, the listener may hear something that otherwise could have been missed,” Leeds explains. “A strong visual also aids in creating a long-term memory, and this is a song we want everyone to remember.”

“A STRONG VISUAL ALSO AIDS IN CREATING A LONG-TERM MEMORY.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OLD GAME MUSIC-VIDEO RELEASE PARTY 8 p.m. Thu., July 30. The Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. www.therobotoproject.org

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ENDLESS SURF Playing through the pain: Dick Dale

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

B

Y HIS OWN admission, Dick Dale is a mess. The man hailed as the King of Surf Guitar has had rectal cancer twice. He’s currently in renal failure and refuses to go on dialysis, and he suffers from diabetes and from vertebrae that are so damaged “that every time I stand up it’s like a double-edge sword going into my spine.” During one bout with rectal cancer, part of his stomach and intestines were removed, and his bodily waste now empties through a stoma and into a plastic bag that he wears under his clothes. At 78 years old and with this many health issues, Dale should be dead, or at the very least resting at home. But he’s not. When he spoke with CP by phone from his California ranch on July 16, he was making the final preparations for a three-month,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

25-city tour stretching from Denver to Boston and back home. “I can’t stop touring because I will die,” Dale says. And he’s not saying that as the long-time performer who can’t give up the spotlight and the intoxicating adoration of his fans. Rather, he emphasizes, “Physically and literally, I will die.”

DICK DALE 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 9. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $30-35. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

He’s not kidding or overstating. Dale isn’t about to drive cross-country with his wife, Lana — herself in chronic pain due to multiple sclerosis — because he craves money to live high on the hog. He’s doing it to pay for medical patches and pouches

so he can change his colostomy bag more frequently than insurance will allow. “I have to raise $ 3,000 every month to pay for the medical supplies I need to stay alive, and that’s on top of the insurance that I pay for,” Dale explains. “The hospital says change your patch once a week. No! If you don’t change that patch two times a day, the fecal matter eats through your flesh and causes the nerves to rot and they turn black, and the pain is so excruciating that you can’t let anything touch it. That has happened to me because I was following the orders of the hospital.” They’ve also told him it’s OK to wash out and reuse the bags, but Dale says that the bacteria has nearly killed him and he won’t risk it. Because despite the pain, he’s a man who still loves life and wants to keep on living it — even if that means taxing CONTINUES ON PG. 20


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ENDLESS SURF, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

and stressing his body to the outer limits. “Sure, I’d love to stay home and build ships in a bottle and spend time with my wife in Hawaii, but I have to perform to save my life,” he says. “I’ve been living like this for the past 15 years, but I’m still here and opening my eyes each morning.” On this particular morning, Dale and I talked for a little more than 30 minutes, and in that time we didn’t really talk about his music. Not that we had to. Dick Dale’s place in music history is well documented and recognized.

THIS WEEK 7/31:

NEW RELEASES {BY MARGARET WELSH}

BRUCE IN THE USA + TIME TESTED Bruce Springsteen Tribute

8/7 The Outlaws + Sicksense

ROULETTE WAVES BLOWN OUT (SELF-RELEASED) WWW.ROULETTEWAVES.COM

proudly presents Dick Dale at the Harmony Park Ballroom in the early 1960s

Be B e immersed imm mersed in a live ve laser la light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

Check out Laser MGMT & Laser Michael Jackson!

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

He was born in Boston and learned to play the drums and guitar. In his late teens, he moved to Southern California, learned to surf and began to replicate the feeling and rhythm of surfing in his guitar-playing. His staccato picking style and use of reverb created what became known as the surf-rock sound. He also inspired and worked closely with Leo Fender to invent the first 100-watt amplifier because he played so loudly that he blew out every amp Fender had made to that point. This innovation is often credited as the birth of heavy metal. Dale enjoyed a career resurgence in the 1990s, when Quentin Tarantino used Dale’s classic song “Misirlou” to open the soundtrack of Pulp Fiction. But we didn’t talk about any of that. We talked about what motivates a man to go up on stage, jump around and attempt to play just as hard at 78 as he did at 28. We talked about the rectal cancer he first got in 1968, and which reoccurred 20 years later; and about the fistulas, or leaky holes between his internal organs, that cause him even more problems. We also talked about the love of his life, Lana, who also struggles medically, and whom he credits with saving his life: “We’re just two sickies taking CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

Consciously or not, it’s natural to look for clues to an unfamiliar band’s sound in its name: Roulette Waves suggests a wild, dangerous emotionality, and wild emotion is something this catchy, grungy, slightly gothy release has in spades. Singer-guitarist Heather Donovan walks a thin line between clean pop precision (think: Metric’s Emily Haines), and visceral abandon. The record’s best moments come when she’s unleashing her inner Courtney Love. With the just-scruffyenough production, everything sounds full and close. When Donovan sings softly, it’s like she’s whispering in your ear, making the occasional warmed-over lyrics (“I want to feel you inside of me”) sound almost too intimate for public listening. ROULETTE WAVES ALBUM-RELEASE SHOW 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 1. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

SIX SPEED KILL SIX SPEED KILL (SELF-RELEASED) SIXSPEEDKILL.BANDCAMP.COM

It doesn’t take long to pick up on this band’s sense of humor — the band bio includes lines like “using a fine tooth to remove bits of week-old pizza from his beard.” But rest assured, Six Speed Kill is as sonically heavy as it is lighthearted (or as lighthearted as a band with a song called “Love None Hate All” can be). Featuring members of Silver Tongued Devil and The Atomic Drops, Six Speed Kill mines familiar territory and owes great debts to Lemmy (who doesn’t?) and Phil Anselmo. There are a couple throwaway tracks — I could live without the jokey “Hardcore Song”— but this is a solidly head-bangable listen. MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SIX SPEED KILL ALBUM-RELEASE SHOW 10 p.m. Fri., July 31. 31st Street Pub, 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com


LISTEN UP! You read City Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days. Tune in while you read, and judge for yourself whether that indie bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guitar work is really angular, or if that singer actually sounds like Sandy Denny.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

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ENDLESS SURF, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Dick and Lana Dale

care of each other.” We discussed the trials that he goes through when he performs. Like the time right before a show in Las Vegas a couple of years ago when his colostomy bag broke as he was preparing to take the stage. He and Lana had forgotten to bring extras because they left home quickly that morning. “I had diarrhea coming all down my legs into my clothes and my pants, and my shirt. I’m supposed to be up on stage and I had to call Lana and go into the bathroom,” Dale explains with a laugh. “Lana washed my clothes out in the sink, I wrung them out and put them back on and did an hourand-a-half show soaking wet, and then I signed autographs for five-and-a-half hours after. “When I’m on stage, the pain can be excruciating. Someone has to help me up on stage because I can’t do it alone. There’s a part of my show where I play drums, and my drummer pulls my arm and my roadie pushes my butt to get up there. But I get up there.” Dale shares stories like this because he wants people in similar situations to see what can be accomplished through sheer willpower. “I’ll talk about it on stage,” he says. “I’ll tell them, ‘I don’t want to see anybody complaining about anything because I’m up here jumping around like a dummy.’” And that’s Dale’s other motivation for performing. He wants to reach out to people dealing with health situations like his, or even worse than his. He wants people to come to his shows to see what he endures. That’s why he’s so candid. “People come to my shows and they show me their scars. I’ve had paralyzed kids come in on gurneys because they want to see me, and I take time to talk with all of them,” he says. “I met a man who was sick

and dying, and began talking with him on the phone. He said, ‘Dick, you’re my idol and I plan to outlive these hospice workers if I have to, but I will be at your show.’ And he was. “I get that. Because I was told 20 years ago that I wouldn’t live much longer, but here I am. I believe our maker has kept Lana and I alive to give hope. We’re like Johnny Appleseed, crossing the country and sowing the seeds of survival.” If there’s one thing Dale knows, besides making some of the most beautiful guitar sounds anyone has ever produced, it’s survival. “When I go on stage, I’m in pain every night. But through the martial arts, I’ve learned to guide and deal with pain,” Dale says. “I play harder now than I ever have, and honestly when I go on stage I push a button. I swear at the pain. ‘Get out of my damn body; I’ve got to do a job!’” With the pain he’s currently in, Dale says Lana wanted to cancel the current tour, but he refused. He must work. For the money yes, but also, he says, for the people who come to see him. He has told many reporters, including myself, that when he dies he wants it to be “on stage in an explosion of body parts.” That could happen. Dying doesn’t scare Dick Dale; what scares Dick Dale is not living the life he wants. “You tell the people, ‘Don’t be scared of dying,’” he says. “When your mind leaves this body, it is a beautiful thing and it is not to be feared. Don’t let that fear of dying affect the way you live. “You take that fear and you use it as a driving force to keep moving forward, no matter how much pain you have. That’s how I do what I do on stage. I’m not afraid to die because it all gets beautiful from here.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

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24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

[ROCK] + SUN., AUG. 02

R. Ring is sort of like that experimental novel you write at night after coming home from your full-time job — for years, you slowly chip away, chapter by chapter, but the day job always takes priority. Well, for Kelley Deal, that day job is being part of one of the ’90s’ more successful indie-rock acts. The Breeders are still touring and seem to be working on new music, so Deal’s output with R. Ring (which is a duo with Ampline’s Mike Montgomery) has been limited to a few singles and an EP on the now-Pittsburghbased Misra Records. This year, R. Ring shared a split 7-inch with Protomartyr, and Deal guested on “Blues Festival,” one of Protomartyr’s best songs. R. Ring performs tonight at James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, with support from Essential Machine. Shawn Cooke 9 p.m. 422 Foreland St., North Side. $10. 412-9043335 or www.james streetgastropub.com

[FUNK] + SUN., AUG. 02

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

WIT THIS AD

Bootsy Collins rose through the ranks by playing alongside some funk and soul deities (James Brown, Parliament-Funkadelic), but now he’s settled into something of a family band. Collins plays with his wife, Patti, in Bootsy’s Rubber Band, which performs a free concert tonight at Hartwood Acres. Collins doesn’t just spread positive grooves and give back with his music; the Bootsy Collins Foundation supports musical, self-esteem and dental charity work in Cincinnati. SC 7:30 p.m. 200 Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. Free. All

ages. 412-767-9200 or www.alleghenycounty. us/summer

[POST-PUNK] + MON., AUG. 03

If you gave members of Total Control the choice of listening to only either Joy Division or New Order records for the rest of their lives, the band might not reach a consensus easily. On its great second record, Typical System, the Australian punks tread between detached, machine-gun post-punk and gleaming new wave. The band’s music has a cynical and incongruous vibe that offers little hope or reassurance — so, ideal content for a Monday night show. Tonight, Death From recent Sub Pop signees Above 1979 The Gotobeds and local punk act EEL join Total Control at The Shop. SC 8 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $10-12. 412-951-0622 or theshoppittsburgh.com

[ROCK] + MON., AUG. 03

When Death From Above 1979 resumed band activities in 2011, it wasn’t quite a reunion. With just 2004’s You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine to its name, the duo didn’t quite have the material to constitute a fullfledged “reunion tour.” So Sebastien Grainger and Jesse F. Keeler road-tested new material at some noisy, raucous shows (including a SXSW set that found the audience clashing with police). It all culminated in last year’s fuzzy, feedback-slathered The Physical World, which sounded like it could have dropped in 2006 instead of 2014. DFA 1979 performs tonight at Altar Bar with support from The Bots. SC 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $26-28. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com


Friday st

July 31

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

9pm-2am

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} SMILING MOOSE. Victims Noodles. Late show. South Side. 412-431-4950. Of Contagion, Tartarus, THE FALLOUT SHELTER. KARMA, Incinerate Creation. South Side. Black Souled Pop, the Dovewires. 412-431-4668. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & Aliquippa. 740-424-0302. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Ray Lanich TAVERN. MoJoJoJo. North Side. KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. Band. South Side. 412-381-7335. 412-322-1850. The Bo’Hog Brothers. SPIRIT. Rayland Baxter. CLUB CAFE. Hoots & Hellmouth Beaver. 724-728-0222. Lawrenceville. w/ Lone Wolf Club. South Side. MEADOWS CASINO. 412-381-6811. 412-431-4950. The Move Makers STAGE AE. Angel MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Band. Washington. Blue & the Prophets. Dean Ween Group. Millvale. 724-503-1200. North Side. www. per a p 412-821-4447. MR. SMALLS pghcitym 412-229-5483. o .c RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Ray Lanich THEATER. Out of the THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Band. Carnegie. 412-279-0770. Blue w/ Liz Berlin of Rusted Paddy the Wander, RIVERS CASINO. Joel Lindsey Trio. Root, Truth & Rites, Morgan Chet Vincent & the Big Bend, North Side. 412-231-7777. Erina, Jeremy Caywood, Proper People. Lawrenceville. Michelle & Jere Buck, Evan Smith. 412-682-0177. Millvale. 412-821-4447. 31ST STREET PUB. Six THE NIGHT GALLERY. 80 Degreez, Speed Kill, Lansbury, Elektro Wolfblanket. Lawrenceville. 31ST STREET PUB. Lycosa Moto-Men. Strip District. 724-417-0223. w/ The Ravenna Arsenal, 412-391-8334. OAKS THEATER. Johnny Vulture, Enhailer. Strip District. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Angel & the Halos. Oakmont. 412-391-8334. Cheer’ly Men & Shelf Life String 412-828-6322. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE Band. Strip District. 412-251-6058. THE R BAR. Artistree. TAVERN. Bad Custer, The Dark CLUB CAFE. John Moreland w/ Dormont. 412-942-0882. Lines, Chrome Moses. Bloomfield. Jordan McLaughlin. Early show. RIVERS CASINO. Sputzy. 412-682-0320. North Side. 412-231-7777. The YJJ’s w/ Horehound, Brahman BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Grogan Social Scene. Monaca. 724-728-7200. BRILLOBOX. Widowspeak, Leggy, Derider & Blød Maud. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. The Boogie Hustlers. Early show. Escape Pod & Drunken Sunday. Late show. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Hookstown Plan B. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The Jasons, Bottle Rat, The Scratch n’ Sniffs, DJ Bill Bechtel. Aliquippa. 740-424-0302. MOONDOG’S. Mickey & The Snake Oil Boys, Dick Whiskey & The Bottle Openers, Bill Tasper Acoustics, Aurora. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ray Lanich Band, Suite Mary, Spacefish, Get The Picture, dash City Skyline, Subsonic Blue. Millvale. 412-821-4447. REX THEATER. Bombino, East End Mile. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. John Sarkis Trio. North Side. 267-932-8760. SMILING MOOSE. Dan Swank & Nick Barilla. Early. iNCO FIdO, Ronald’s Ray-gun, The Tilt Room. Each week, we bring you a song by a Late. South Side. 412-431-4668. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE local artist. This week’s track comes from RESTAURANT. Johnny Smooth. ; stream or download Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Feastival from the band’s Afterparty w/ Chop Shop. new self-titled record, for free on FFW>>, Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TIKI BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. our music blog at pghcitypaper.com. Washington. 724-348-7022.

ROCK/POP THU 30

FULL LIST ONLINE

Fun Stuff

Partys favor

FRI 31

SAT 01

Drinlks! Specia Jager $ Shots $ .50 Bud & Bud light

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MP 3 MONDAY

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SIX SPEED KILL

Six Speed Kill “Hell in a Handbasket,”

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

Fri Jul 31

PADDY THE WANDERER

with CHET VINCENT & THE BIG BEND and PROPER PEOPLE

Sat Aug 1

FEASTIVAL AFTER PARTY

with GLENN STROTHER PROJECT

Mon Aug 3

BUTLER ST. SESSIONS

Tue Aug 4

MATTHEW E. WHITE with SLEEPWALKERS

Wed Aug 5

CHUCKIE CAMPBELL AND THE PHACTION with FORTIFIED PHONETIX & LUCID MUSIC

Thu Aug 6

CHUCK MEAD

& THE GRASSY KNOLL BOYS

Tue Aug 11

NE-HI

Fri Aug 14

WILD ADRIATIC

Thu Aug 27

THE FRITZ

Fri Aug 28

THE HEARD 4023 BUTLER ST Š LAWRENVEVILLE PITTSBURGH, PA Š ALL SHOWS 21+

THURSDAY AUGUST 20/10PM

IMPOSSIBLE COLORS, THE LENTILS FRIDAYS: ALT 80’S NIGHT 10PM SATURDAYS: SUPER FUN DANCE PARTY 10PM $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

26

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Hades Night. Goth/industrial/postpunk monthly BRILLOBOX. The Velvet Teen w/ w/ William Farham, DJ Christian, & Edhochuli, Atlas. Bloomfield. DJ Futurism. Lawrenceville. 412-621-4900. 412-251-0097. HEINZ FIELD. One ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, Direction. North Side. DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. www.heinz.fieldpittsburgh.com. RIVERS CASINO. DJ NIN. North JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Side. 267-932-8760. & SPEAKEASY. R. Ring w/ ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Essential Machine. North Side. South Side. 412-431-2825. 412-904-3335. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ THE NIGHT GALLERY. Curse Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. Words, Kid Kawaii, Wrap Around, Huffers, & Spooky Mulder. Lawrenceville. CATTIVO. Illusions. 724-417-0223. w/ Funerals & Arvin THE R BAR. Midnite Clay. Lawrenceville. Horns. Dormont. 412-687-2157. . 412-942-0882. w ww per DIESEL. DJ CK. South a p ty REX THEATER. ci h pg Side. 412-431-8800. .com Parachute, Jeff LeBlanc. RIVERS CASINO. South Side. 412-381-6811. DJ Digital Dave. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Arlo North Side. 267-932-8760. Aldo, Slide Worldwide, City Steps. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. ALTAR BAR. Death From Above

Strip District. 412-206-9719.

SUN 02

SAT 01

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 04 PALACE THEATRE. Graham Nash. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WED 05

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

BALTIMORE

1979, The Bots. Strip District. 412-206-9719. CLUB CAFE. Kristen Ford. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Pravada, Karma, Daily Grind, Paint31. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Round2Crew, Sweet Suspense, Carson Lueders, The Fooo Conspiracy, After Romeo, Chris Miles, Frankie Z, The Bomb Digz, Katelyn Jae. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THE SHOP. Total Control w/ The Gotobeds & Eel. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 05

TUE 04

BLUES

CLUB CAFE. Chief Scout, Concord America w/ Act Of Pardon. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. False, CANT, Wrought Iron. Bloomfield. 412-345-1059. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Delta Spirit & Friends. Millvale. 412-821-4447. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Matthew E. White w/ Sleepwalkers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

LORAIN, OHIO

WED 05 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Kristen Ford. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chuckie Campbell & The Phaction w/ Fortified Phonetx & Lucid Music. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 30 CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Futurism. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

FRI 31 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

{MON. AUG. 24}

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Lorain Palace Theatre

THU 30

CLEVELAND

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. J. Cole, Big Sean, YG, Jeremih, Bas, Cozz & Omen. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400.

{THU., OCT. 22}

DRINKS (Cate Le Bon and White Fence)

FRI 31

REX THEATER. Berner. South Side. 310-621-3321.

The Happy Dog

SUN 02

LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. Strange Brew. Bethel Park. 412-595-7953. SHELBY’S STATION. AndersonVosel. Bridgeville. 412-319-7938.

SAT 01 TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Witchdoctors. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

JAZZ THU 30 ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo & Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 31 ANDYS WINE BAR. J. Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Swing Allstars. Ballroom. Don

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Pier Six Pavilion

HIP HOP/R&B

FRI 31

FRI 31

Lauryn Hill

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. SoulCiety. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335.

REGGAE

{FRI., AUG. 07}

MON 03

Aliquo. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 01 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Jerry & Louis Lucarelli, Sunny Sunseri, Steve Trettel, Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-6593. GROWN & SEXY II. Floyd King & Company. Strip District. 412-251-0615. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jessica Lee, Mark Strickland, Eric DeFade. Ballroom. Rhythm Jazz & Blues Fusion Show feat. Eric DeFade. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERVIEW PARK. John Hall. North Side. 412-255-2493.

SUN 02

MELLON PARK. Tom Roberts. Part of the Bach, Beethoven & Brunch series. Shadyside. 412-255-2493.

MON 03 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Shannon McArthur. Downtown. 412-456-6666. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 04 KATZ PLAZA. Dwayne Dolphin. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 05 THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. W/ Eric Susoeff & Eric DeFade. New Kensington. 742-337-7008. RIVERS CLUB. Rachel B. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 30 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 31 CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800.

SAT 01 MOONDOG’S. Bill Jasper’s Acoustic Assault. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SUN 02 ALTAR BAR. Rich Robinson, Derek Woodz Band, The Hawkeyes.

SUN 02 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. #1 Flow Band. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

COUNTRY FRI 31 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Luke Bryan, Randy Houser & Dustin Lynch. 800-745-3000.

CLASSICAL THU 30 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA W/ RANDY NEWMAN. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FRI 31 PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE. Music by the great Zahabian master. City Theatre, South Side. 512-785-6255.

SAT 01 PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE. Music by the great Zahabian master. City Theatre, South Side. 512-785-6255. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Playing the music from Final Fantasy. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 02 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & CLASSICAL BBQ. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 31 ALLEGHENY CENTER ALLIANCE CHURCH. Urban Impact Smart Music Concert. In the Sanctuary. North Side. 412-321-4333. SCHENLEY PLAZA. The Soul Show, Poogie Bell, Waterseed. Oakland. 412-682-7275. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Red Baraat w/ Rachel B. An eightpiece dhol & brass ensemble. South Park.

SUN 02 HARTWOOD ACRES. Bootsy’s Rubber Band. Allison Park. 412-767-9200.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do IN PITTSBURGH

July 29 - Aug 4 WEDNESDAY 29 The Aristocrats

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:25p.m.

Delta Rae

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Old Crow Medicine Show

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

We Were Promised Jetpacks

SPIRIT Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 30 The School of Rock All Stars

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. All Ages event Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Thursday Night Icons: Randy Newman with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Rayland Baxter

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/icons. 7:30p.m.

SPIRIT Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Randy Newman with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Led Zeppelin 2

JULY 30 HEINZ HALL

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

An Evening with Dean Ween Group

Death From Above 1979

Feastival - Food, Music and Art Festival

MAIN STREET STAGE Station Square. Free event. All ages show. 6p.m.

MCKEES ROCKS. Free admission. For more info or VIP tickets visit pghfeastival.com. 3p.m.

WYEP presents The Soul Show’s 20th Anniversary Celebration

Distant Worlds: music from FINAL FANTASY with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

SCHENLEY PLAZA Oakland. Free show. For more info visit wyep.org. 7p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

SUNDAY 2

An Acoustic Evening NOW LEASING

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ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 4

Snow Tha Product

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

Berner

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MONDAY 3

SATURDAY 1

Station Square Summer Jam: Bruce in the USA + Time Tested

Where to live N E W S

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 6:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY 31

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Classical BBQ with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Blues Traveler

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8:30p.m.

with Parachute

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

An Evening with DELTA SPIRIT and Friends

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

find your happy place

walnut capital.com S C R E E N

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THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

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LOW SCORE {BY AL HOFF}

THE FILM HAS ALL THE HALLMARKS OF A PRESTIGE BRITISH PERIOD PRODUCTION

Chris Columbus’ comedy Pixels offers an amusing idea that is both too slight for a 105-minute movie and curiously underdeveloped despite the generous running time. The set-up: What if aliens saw screen footage of arcade video games circa 1982, and assumed those character shapes to attack Earth today? There’s something hilariously horrifying about seeing our world consumed by gigantic 8-bit-ish Centipedes and Pac-Mans. And it would naturally fall to the former Kings of the Arcade to defeat them.

Pac-Man panic

And so it does here, where viewers get a four-pack of man-boys: Adam Sandler (works as tech support), Josh Gad (lives in grandma’s basement), Peter Dinklage (jerk) and Kevin James (inexplicably president of U.S.A.). Through a lot of lazy plotting, we see them fight and defeat the aliens — and be awarded beautiful women as trophies. It’s a curiously hollow exercise in which only a dozen people worldwide seem to notice the attacks; no explanation is ever proffered for why the aliens attack Earth and kidnap exactly three people; and the central premise of beating arcade games by memorizing patterns doesn’t hold up in the “real world” battles. Even today, there is plenty of residual affection for those old arcade games, and Pixels drops the opportunity to deliver something more entertaining than another nerd-bro comedy starring the deeply unfunny Sandler and James. Save your quarters. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM R.COM

And now ow the winners! rs! The Best st

he of the Pittsburgh gh 48-Hour ur Film Project ct submissions ons screen tonight. Prizes awarded, tears shed, careers launched (maybe). A great way to support truly local filmmaking. 6:30 p.m. Fri., July 31. Hollywood. $7-9

WAR TORN {BY AL HOFF}

T

.ESTAMENT OF YOUTH begins Nov.

11, 1918, as the end of the Great War (later to be World War I) is being celebrated in the streets of Britain. But it’s clearly a day of anguish for one young woman, who ducks into a church, and reflects back to … … the halcyon summer days of 1914, where in the pleasant, peaceful countryside, the woman, her brother and his pals toggle between goofing off and planning their futures. Vera (Alicia Vikander) wants to sit exams for Oxford, though her parents (Dominic West, Emily Watson) think higher education isn’t the route for a nice upper-middle-class girl. r But B she finds an ally in one of her brother’s e friends: handsome Roland (Game of Thrones’ Kit Harington), who agrees to T swap sw poems while the lads are away at military school. Meanwhile, there are stirrings of trouble in Europe … James Kent’s handsomely produced film is adapted from Vera Brittain’s eponymous 1933 book, a memoir based on her coming of age during the war years.

No time for romance: Kit Harington and Alicia Vikander

While there have been many accounts of the war, Brittain’s was notable for relating its impact on the homefront, particularly illuminating the experiences of women.

TESTAMENT OF YOUTH DIRECTED BY: James Kent STARRING: Alicia Vikander, Kit Harington, Taron Egerton STARTS: Fri., July 31. Harris

CP APPROVED Even without the somewhat clunky foreshadowing of the film’s pre-war scenes — “At least you wouldn’t be buried alive in Buxton,” Vera tartly tells the young men — for us, it’s a painful wait until the inevitable. The war, which once seemed a grand adventure — Vera’s brother frets that if he doesn’t hurry he may miss it altogether — quickly grows horrific. Vera, now at Oxford, scans the newspaper’s multiple pages of tiny type listing the war dead; Roland, on leave, is

already psychologically damaged; and soon, the deaths come. Testament also flags as doubly distressing a strain of British stoicism that leaves those in Vera’s circle with few emotional outlets for their fears, grief and horror. Vera abandons Oxford (“Writing? That belongs to another life”), and becomes a nurse, eventually serving near the front. One senses that Vera joins up not out of patriotism, but simply to assuage her feelings of helplessness, and perhaps to counter the war’s futility by doing something. Kent’s film has all the usual, even predictable, hallmarks of a prestige British period production: The drama is relatively quiet, but the emotional impact is no less for it. The European losses in WWI were numbered, but incalculable — nearly an entire generation of young men killed, and each left behind survivors tormented by those lives unfinished. In that respect, Vera’s tale is no different from a million others, even today, and yet, that universality is what demands we take notice. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK A LEGO BRICKUMENTARY. Kief Davidson and Daniel Junge’s new documentary takes viewers deep into the world of the iconic small plastic bricks, from the toy’s somewhat fiery origins in Denmark to its big-screen incarnation in last year’s The Lego Movie. Some of the material will be familiar to even the casual assembler, but the film finds interesting angles amidst seemingly Mega-Marketing Movie-Tie-In World of Lego. Crazy creativity still abounds among hobbyists, and even Lego sponsors contests for players to come up with new designs. Among street artists, there is such a thing as Lego-bombing. And one Lego enthusiast makes a decent argument that Lego is a universal human language, in which everyone everywhere can, without any instruction, fit two or more blocks together and build something. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 30; 1 p.m. Sat., Aug. 1; 3 p.m. Sun., Aug. 2; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Aug. 3; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 5. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

Vacation I AM CHRIS FARLEY. This new documentary from Brent Hodge and Derik Murray looks at the life and career of comedian Farley, who rose to fame on Saturday Night Live before dying of a drug overdose, in 1997. Among those interviewed are Farley’s family and fellow SNL-ers David Spade, Adam Sandler and Mike Myers. Starts Fri., July 31. Parkway, McKees Rocks MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — ROGUE NATION. Ethan Hunt and the team from IMF must take on the Syndicate, an international organization of highly skilled trouble-makers. Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner and Rebecca Ferguson star; Christopher McQuarrie (Edge of Tomorrow) directs. Starts Fri., July 31 PAPER TOWNS. This coming-of-age comedy directed by Jake Schreier and adapted from a novel by John Green (The Fault in Our Stars) doesn’t quite find its groove. It sets up its protagonist, the somewhat nerdy high school senior Quentin (Nat Wolff), who has an obsession with Margo (Cara Delevingne), the wild and popular girl across the street. The two share a crazy night of pranking, during which Margo browbeats him into having fun, then promptly disappears. This initiates a teen-detective plot in which Quentin and his two pals search for Margo, even undertaking an epic road trip. There are lessons (bitter and sweet), hugs, curiously absent parents and an unsatisfying end. Much of the film follows the tired formula of examining the world of guys obsessed with unattainable girls, and though the final reel offers some reality about the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope, it’s delivered too late to be effective. (AH) SHAUN THE SHEEP. From Aardman Studios (Wallace and Gromit) comes a new stop-motion animated comedy in which Shaun the Sheep and some of his wooly cohorts escape the farm for a

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Paper Towns trip to the big city. Mark Burton and Richard Starzak direct. Starts Wed., Aug. 5 VACATION. A sequel-slash-rework of the eponymous 1983 Chevy Chase road comedy, in which the kid from the first film, now grown up, takes his family on the same cross-country trip to Wally World. In this contemporary version, co-directed by John Francis Daley and Jonathan M. Goldstein, Rusty (Ed Helms) loads up the wife (Christina Applegate) and his two boys into a rental van (a weird Eastern European model that comes with some very odd features), and drives straight into Crass Comedy Land. There is nothing in this film that viewers haven’t seen in dozens of other low-rent road-trip films, from the pubic-hair pile to projectile vomiting, naked breasts to a giant (prosthetic) penis, ridiculous car wrecks and romantic assignations that go wrong. (There did seem to be more pedophile jokes than usual, not that that’s a good thing.) Helms and Applegate give it a go, but this is pretty thin material, and Chris Hemsworth stops by to show off his pecs. At the end, Chevy Chase phones in a bit that is more apt to remind viewers of all the times he isn’t funny than it is to summon warm memories of the earlier films. (AH)

REPERTORY

MELLON SQUARE CONCERT SERIES IS BACK!

CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, Wed., July 29 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 1 (Riverview). Big Hero 6, Thu., July 30 (Brookline); Fri., July 31 (Arsenal); and Sat., Aug. 1 (Grandview). Earth to Echo, Sun., Aug. 2 (Schenley); Tue., Aug. 4 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., Aug. 6 (Brookline). Interstellar, Wed., Aug. 5 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

MELLON SQUARE

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

For more info visit:

www.bobfm969.com www.qburgh.com

SUMMER CONCERT

MELLON SQUARE PARK (D OWNTOWN) (DOWNTOWN)

S E R I E S

A Lego Brickumentary (2015) 7/30 @ 7:30pm, 8/1 @ 1:00pm, 8/2 @ 3:00pm, 8/3 @ 7:30pm, 8/5 @ 7:30pm - New documentary on the world’s favorite building blocks. ___________________________________________________

48Hour Film Project “Best Of” Screening 7/31 @ 6:30pm - Come see the results for this years awards! ___________________________________________________

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

7/31 @ 10:00pm - Live shadowcast by the JCCP at this special “early show”. ___________________________________________________

Can’t Stop The Serenity Pittsburgh

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS!

8/1 @ 5:00pm - Benefit for Equality Now with games, raffl e, and a screening of Serenity (2005). ___________________________________________________

The Warriors (1979)

8/1 @ 10:30pm, 8/2 @ 7:00pm, 8/4 @ 7:30pm, 8/5 @ 9:15pm, 8/6 @ 7:00pm - Walter Hill’s hip, super-stylized action film on the big screen!

TA S T E

EVERY THURSDAY - Now thru Aug. 27th • Noon-1pm

This Thursday, JULY 30: SKINNY TIE CLUB Next Thursday, AUG. 6: THE ANNAJAMES BAND

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

s n e e t o t s t n a f n i r o f y r t ” s ! i n t e n e e w t “D e b n i e and everyon

• Pediatric specialist • Modern, eco- friendly office • 2 story playroom • Major insurances accepted • Sedation available • Private treatment rooms with TV • Free WiFi and beverage bar

Winning Smiles P E D I AT R I C D E N TA L CA R E

5730 Ellsworth Ave. Suite 3 • Pittsburgh PA, 15232 412.404.2077 • www.winningsmilespgh.com 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

A Lego Brickumentary ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Kurosawa series. Rashomon (a samurai murder is recalled from different points of view in this 1950 classic), July 29-30. The Hidden Fortress (1958 tale of peasants unknowingly escorting a princess and a general), July 29-30. Stray Dog (1949 drama about two police detectives), July 29-30. Yojimbo (samurai pits two gangs against each other in this 1961 film), July 30. Teen Spirit series. Better Off Dead (John Cusack has girl trouble and more in this 1985 comedy), July 31Aug. 2 and Aug. 4-6. Bring It On (2000 comedy goes inside the cutthroat — and hilarious — world of high school cheerleading), July 31-Aug. 6. Clueless (1995 Jane Austen-inspired comedy of manners set in an affluent Los Angeles high school), July 31-Aug. 6. (The 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 2, screening features a live fashion show.) Pump Up the Volume (new kid in town starts pirate radio station in this 1990 comedy), July 31-Aug. 1, Aug. 3-4 and Aug. 6. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9

THE WARRIORS. Walter Hill’s 1979 gangsploitation flick was set in the urban cesspool that was New York City, a dark Gotham ruled by take-no-prisoners youth gangs. When a summit of gangs goes bad, one group, The Warriors, must fight its way from the Bronx to a final showdown at Coney Island. Come out and play. 10:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 1; 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 2; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Aug. 4; 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 5; and 7 p.m. Thu., Aug. 6. Hollywood VERTIGO. James Stewart loses his grip when he becomes obsessed with a beautiful blonde (Kim Novak) in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 thriller. Conflating sexual desire, memory and deception, Vertigo, shot in glorious color in the San Francisco Bay area, is regarded as one of Hitchcock’s finest works. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 2. Regent Square

EYES WIDE SHUT. A New York City couple (Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman) finds their relationship tested by a series of sexual encounters, in Stanley Kubrick’s 1999 drama. The iconic director’s final film concludes a year-long retrospective. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 30. Hollywood THE BLUES BROTHERS. Jake and Elwood Blues are on a mission from God — and no blues riff, neo-Nazi or cop car is safe. Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi take their SNL skit to the big screen in John Landis’ madcap 1980 musical romp. Guest musicians include: James Brown, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles and John Lee Hooker. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 29. AMC Waterfront. $5 MOTHER JONES: THE MOST DANGEROUS WOMAN IN AMERICA and UNVEILING THE SCARS. Two documentaries cover women working in human rights: Rosemary Feurer’s 2007 film depicts famed labor organizer Mary Harris “Mother Jones” Jones. And in a new work, Pauline Greenlick profiles Uganda’s Hanifa Nakiryowa, an acid-attack survivor, who today fights for women’s rights. The screening continues a monthly series of films about labor and social justice presented by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 30. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Free. www.battleof homesteadfoundation.org SERENITY: CAN’T STOP THE SERENITY. Celebrate the 10th anniversary of Josh Whedon’s sci-fi actioner, with a screening, games and raffle. Events are free, but a $10 donation to Equality Now is requested for the screening, which unspools at 7 p.m. 5-9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 1. Hollywood

Hiroshima, Mon Amour HARRY AND THE HENDERSONS. In this 1987 comedy from William Dear, a family takes in Bigfoot after hitting him with their car; John Lithgow stars. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 5. AMC Waterfront. $5 HIROSHIMA, MON AMOUR. A brief affair between a French filmmaker (Emmanuelle Riva) and a Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) during a stay in Hiroshima spurs memories of war and past loves, as well as examining the complicated processes by which people forget and move on. Alain Resnaud directs this 1959 drama. Screens in conjunction with the anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945; screening will be followed by a Skype discussion with Japanese participants. In French and Japanese, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Wed., Aug. 5. Melwood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[ART]

STEEL, SMOKE

HE JUST COULDN’T GET ROLES

{BY ONASTASIA YOUSSEF}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROLLING HILLS, SATANIC MILLS continues through Sun., Aug. 2. Frick Art & Historical Center, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-471-5605 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org N E W S

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NEXT STAGES FOR MR. PORTER [STAGE]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{IMAGE COURTESY OF AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS}

B

“The Bard,” by Thomas Jones

This summer, the former estate of steel mogul Henry Clay Frick hosts the sublime Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. Some might see both British landscape painting and views of the early Industrial Age as passé, but this exhibit is surprisingly broad in scope. Satirical engravings, post-modern industrial paintings and 21st-century land art shine alongside 19th-century masterpieces. Refreshingly, this major traveling exhibit highlights Welsh history and art. In fact, all 62 works are on loan from the National Museum of Wales, which organized the show along with the American Federation of Arts, and many works are Welsh in origin. “The Bard,” a 1774 painting by Thomas Jones, depicts the English conquest of Wales. Sarah Hall, the Frick’s director of curatorial affairs, describes the work as a “grand nationalistic history painting.” “You see the last bard with the dead bodies around him and he is going to plunge off the cliff and choose his own fate rather than wait for the English invaders,” says Hall. “It is a very supernatural feeling, the doves coming up as if they are the spirits of the ... dead bards themselves.” The exhibit’s all-star roster of artists also includes John Constable, J.M.W. Turner, Gainsborough and Monet, among others. One of the biggest surprises in Rolling Hills are two full-color photographs by Richard Long and David Nash. For “Snowdonia Stones” and “Ash Dome,” the artists constructed druid-inspired circles of trees and stones as “their way of going back and forming a more personal connection to the land,” says Hall. She says these images are visitor favorites. Hall hopes that Pittsburghers will have the same feeling of connection after seeing Rolling Hills. “All landscapes are meant as homes for our imagination,” she says, “We can go out to our own landscape and have a new sense of belonging.” The complementary mini-exhibit Hills and Mills enhances this sense of belonging with a set of rare prints from local collectors Bruce and Sheryl Wolf, depicting Pittsburgh at the turn of the last century, as steel mills were first defining the local landscape. Too many art exhibits fail to either educate or inspire. But Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills does both, and will be a highlight of your summer.

ILLY PORTER’S HAD a pretty decent

couple of years. In 2013, he won the Tony and Drama Desk awards for best actor in a musical, for playing the drag queen Lola in Broadway hit Kinky Boots. In 2014, while still starring in Kinky Boots, the Pittsburgh native released a solo album of standards titled Billy’s Back on Broadway, and his own play While I Yet Live received its debut production off-Broadway. Nor is Porter slowing up. This past April, during his hiatus from Kinky Boots, PBS aired his Live From Lincoln Center special. Porter even found time to guest-judge on So You Think You Can Dance. Porter, 45, is savoring such successes — including what promises to be a triumphant return to the local stage as Pittsburgh CLO hosts the touring production of Kinky Boots, Aug. 4-9. But he’s also looking ahead. It’s not just that his Kinky Boots contract ends in January; Porter recently told CP he has another Broadway role lined up, though he couldn’t yet divulge the show’s title. It’s also that he’s getting deeper into writing — a development that surprises even him. “I never ever ever set out to be a writer,” he says. Porter, after all, first made his name with his voice. He grew up in East Liberty and Homewood; he sang gospel, attended Pittsburgh CAPA and studied theater at Carnegie Mellon University. He graduated from CMU in 1991 and, thanks largely to the vocal chops that made him a 1992 winner on Star Search, transitioned to Broad-

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Billy Porter photographed in 2005 at City Theatre, in Pittsburgh, in rehearsal for his one-man show Ghetto Superstar

way. In the 1990s, he appeared in shows including Grease, Five Guys Named Moe and Miss Saigon.

KINKY BOOTS Aug. 4-9. Pittsburgh CLO at the Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40.75-140.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

Then came what Porter calls “the lean years.” He just couldn’t get roles. That might have had partly to do with his voice changing over time. But mostly,

Porter has said, he was both pigeonholed by showy roles like Grease’s Teen Angel and, as a gay black man, simply shut out of other opportunities. Porter worked the whole time, including acting and directing jobs back in Pittsburgh. (He starred, for instance, in City Theatre’s fine 2004 production of Topdog/ Underdog.) But for 13 years — a show-biz eternity — Porter was off Broadway. That set the stage for what The New York Times called “one of the most remarkable riseand-fall-and-rebound stories in New York theater in recent years.” CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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In 2010, Porter was cast as Belize in an Off Broadway revival of Angels in America, exactly the sort of great, high-profile role he’d been seeking. That led to his successful bid to originate the role of Lola in Kinky Boots, the Harvey Fierstein and Cyndi Lauper musical based on the 2005 film about a struggling, small-town British shoe factory that turns to making high-heeled footwear for drag queens. During those lean years, however, “Not getting work sort of pushed me to try other things and to challenge myself in other ways,” says Porter. He studied screenwriting at UCLA. In 2005, he premiered his autobiographical one-man show, Ghetto Superstar (The Man That I Am) at New York’s famed Public Theater (where he was then an artist in residence). While I Yet Live, his autobiographical drama based on his upbringing, drew mixed reviews in its premiere production at Primary Stages. But Porter says the experience of its staging was “life-changing.” “I didn’t know that I could write,” he said in a recent interview with CP, by phone from Manhattan. “The lack of [stage] work is what helped me discover that that can be a part of my creativity, a part of my art.”

“I DIDN’T KNOW THAT I COULD WRITE.” It’s now a pretty big part: He’s also “developing some television-show ideas,” he says, adding, “I’m writing a gospel musical. I’m also writing a book.” The latter is a memoir of those lean years. With that unnamed new Broadway role looming, Porter admits to some “separation anxiety” about leaving Lola and Kinky Boots, which he calls “the piece of art that changed my life.” Next week, though, what will be foremost are those eight performances at the Benedum Center, with a fabulously bewigged and sequined Porter belting numbers like the saucy “The Sex Is in the Heel” and the introspective “Not My Father’s Son.” Asked why he’s taking this special, Pittsburgh-only turn in the show’s touring version, he says it’s partly for local folks who can’t make it to New York. But especially, he says, it’s for children of color who, like him, grew up in disadvantaged neighborhoods. “I see those kids now, and I know that it’s important for them to have representation, and representatives from their community who have transcended expectations,” he says. “It’s important for me to come back to being in the midst of that, so that those young people can see that: There’s something different, there’s something to aspire to.” DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[BOOK REVIEWS]

LIT BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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Its title notwithstanding, A People’s History of Pittsburgh, Vol. 1 ($20) shares little with Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, the revisionist classic that unearthed forgotten grassroots struggles against injustice. This book, one product of a two-year project by local photobook gallery Spaces Corners, recalls The Family of Man, the famous 1950s photobook surveying the human condition. Except that, rather than polished exposures by professional shooters, its images are snapshots by everyday Pittsburghers — 200 of them, culled from some 1,500 donated images. Working with photos ranging from posed 1880s black-and-white portraits to cameraphone snaps, editors Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar smartly curate the sorts of scenes people have considered important, from mill landscapes (natch) and other workplace shots to tableaux of people swimming, boozing or posing with pets or cars. (There are lots of cars.) A few — like a fawn lying by a grave marker at night — are mysterious, others just baffling: Why are all those men milling in the street? Intentionally, and somewhat enticingly, all the images lack dates, credits or other identifiers. Still, because snapshots seldom document troubling events, the book’s effects tend toward the anodyne, without even the unhappy associations we might bring to a family scrapbook. It’s a history of Pittsburgh, yes, but through a rather narrow lens.

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In its effect as well as its lore, beer typically incites jocularity. And indeed, there’s no crying in one’s beer over Brewology: An Illustrated Dictionary for Beer Lovers (Skyhorse Publishing, $16.99). Aptly named local illustrator Mark Brewer’s new full-color hardback combines concise, straightword definitions of everything from “alpha acids” and “India pale ale” to “trub” and “wort” with wacky caricatures and goofy visual puns. Brewer (an occasional CP contributor) works rather in the style of the great Arnold Roth, with heavy but carefully rendered lines and a sort of benevolent dark edge to the humor. “Helles Bock,” for instance, is represented by sozzled winged goats yucking it up in Hades. “Final Gravity” finds astronauts clinking longnecks in space. Nominally, Brewology is for any beer-lover, but in practice it would surely appeal more to appreciators of craft brews (the folks Brewer seems to be addressing in his introductory “Brief History of Beer”). Most Budweiser aficionados, after all, probably wouldn’t be any more interested in knowing the definition of “oyster stout” than they would be in drinking it. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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[PLAY REVIEWS]

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{BY TED HOOVER}

HERE’S A theatrical curio — a musical version of the 1998 Adam Sandler/Drew Barrymore film The Wedding Singer, now at the Benedum Center thanks to the folks at Pittsburgh CLO. If you drew up a list of “The World’s Most Unnecessary Musicals,” The Wedding Singer would be somewhere near the top. Though the film was a success, I’m not sure anyone thought it deserved a second (singing and dancing) life. It’s amazing to think of the time and effort Matthew Sklar (music), Chad Beguelin (lyrics), and Beguelin and Tim Herlihy (book) put into this adaptation for its 2006 Broadway opening … and sad to think the show closed only seven months later. (There’s a light on Broadway for every broken heart.) Here’s the précis: Robbie Hart, a professional singer at weddings, is jilted by his fiancée and falls in love with Julia, a waitress engaged to an obnoxious Wall Street type. There’s laughter, tears, many merry mix-ups … and that, dear children, is the story of how I met your grandmother.

THE WEDDING SINGER

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carnegielibrary.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT POLK}

Jenna Ushkowitz and J. Michael Zygo in The Wedding Singer, at Pittsburgh CLO

fect counterpoint. His low-key demeanor is as endearing as Ushkowitz’, and he’s got a gloriously strong and supple voice. Jackie Burns, Brandon Espinoza, Greg Kamp and Kirsten Scott round out a finely polished cast. If the CLO is looking for a quote, it’s welcome to use this: “The Wedding Singer is better than I expected.” I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

continues through Sun., Aug. 2. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-65.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

OUT OF SEASON {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

Considering that you know the evening’s schematic from the first 10 minutes, I give Sklar, Beguelin and Herlihy credit for making this well-worn journey mildly interesting. One of their tricks is lampooning the story’s time period, the 1980s. Hair, costumes and music are a fun pastiche, and gags about Ivan Boesky, Starbucks, Mr. T. and Flashdance are gently amusing. But one joke about the battery size of old-school cell phones is all you can make. And when the spoofing runs out of gas, there’s nothing left to do. Jenna Ushkowitz (whom you’ll know as Tina from TV’s Glee) is an outstanding musicalcomedy performer. Charming and energetic, with a beautifully trained voice and a precise manner, she brightens every scene she’s in as Julia. J. Michael Zygo’s comfortable presence as Robbie is the per-

h

THE HOLIDAYS and family — is there any combination more awkward? That’s a question at the forefront of Pine, South Park Theatre’s latest production that follows the White family through a bittersweet Christmas as matriarch Rita (Joyce Miller) and her grown children mark the five-year anniversary of eldest son Colin’s death. Meanwhile, the ghost of Colin (David Craft) mills about the house, trying to speak to his family, albeit with varying success. Scenic designer Jill Ekis effectively sets the mood, crafting a rustic family home and adjoining Christmas-tree farm that evoke the spirit of the season. Staging a Christmas play in the middle of summer is an interesting artistic choice — one that could have paid off for director Vince Ventura and his cast if the source material had been stronger. Playwright Eugenie Carabatsos

IT’S A WELL-WORN JOURNEY THAT’S MILDLY INTERESTING.

attempts to paint family dysfunction with equal strokes of drama and comedy. But while the premise is certainly rife with possibilities, this story never quite gels. With jarring scene transitions and clunky character introductions, the first act is more uneven than the second, though one clever moment just before intermission does set up the story for its homestretch. While mostly disagreeable in the opening scenes, Rita turns a corner in the second act, delivering a poignant monologue amidst a field of discarded Christmas trees that leaves you wishing for more moments to match that intensity. Other standout performances come from Dan Spanner as beleaguered youngest son Teddy — who might or might not be able to see the ghostly Colin — and Ashley Rice as Colin’s former fiancée, Rachel, who’s at last ready to move on with her life. Both actors imbue their performances with a naturalism that helps anchor this sometimes overwrought story.

From theater to dance to the visual arts, City Paper offers

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every Wednesday in print and online at www.pghcitypaper.com

PINE

continues through Aug. 8. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $12. 412-831-8552 or www.southparktheatre.com

However, any shortcomings in the production are not the fault of the cast. The actors play the quiet moments well, and almost everyone turns in a heartfelt speech before it’s over. But too many scenes rely on superficial squabbling and trite emotions. Ultimately, like Christmas in July, this production feels out of place. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.3008.06.15

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. along the banks of the river for an unobstructed view of this rare second full moon in a single calendar month. Kayaking experience is necessary, and participants must be age 12 or older. JP 8-10:30 p.m. Beneath the Clemente Bridge, North Side. $30-40. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

AUG. 01

{STAGE}

A di Audio/Visual di /Vi dio/

+ FRI., JULY 31 {ART} Tucson, Ariz.-based artist Luon St. Pierre has a penchant for bright and vivid colors, for creating sculptures and furniture out of found objects, and for populating them with abstract figures reminiscent of Picasso’s portraits. She’s a strong supporter of outsider art, and her new mixed-media show, Conversations From the Backseat, opens tonight at outsider-art showcase Gallerie Chiz. Expect refreshments, and live music from Sean Barill on the banjo. Joseph Peiser 5:30-8:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 29. 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com

7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9. 1750 Clairton Road, West Mifflin. $15-17. 888-718-4253 or www. pittsburghnewworks.org

{OUTDOORS} A blue moon occurs only … well, once in a blue moon, so tonight make the most of the opportunity and view it from a kayak on the Allegheny River. Guides from Venture Outdoors lead a group on a dusk-to-dark paddle from Kayak Pittsburgh

It’ll be just like speed-dating, so dress to impress. But Mingled is really a work of immersive theater, in which some of your dates might not be fellow audience members, but rather actors improvising their way through the encounter — and, like everyone else, revealing more of their characters as the evening goes on. Mingled is the latest from Uncumber Theatrics, a new troupe with an impressive track record including Her Things and Professor Eldritch’s Asylum for Uncanny & Extraordinary Women. Mingled has five performances this weekend only, at ModernFormations Gallery. Reservations are

{STAGE}

The Pittsburgh New Works Festival is gearing up for its 25th season of presenting new one-acts. Starting tonight, at CCAC South Campus Theatre, it stages a two-week run showcasing past winners of its Donna Award, for best play. The plays include: “Twilight” (1992), by Eileen Enwright Hodgetts; “Just One Abiding Dearth” (1998), by C.P. Stancich; “The Fellowship of Actors and Directors” (2002), by Katherine Miller-Haines; and “A Skewed Nude” (2004), by Kim (Zelonis) Dale. The fest trots out this year’s new plays in September. Bill O’Driscoll

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AUG. 01

Wissahickon sahi hick kon Nature Club


sp otlight Oral storytelling is likely as old as language itself; whether it’s crafting a simple narrative of one’s day or a hero’s epic adventure, humans have always had a need to tell and hear stories. For 15 years, the Three Rivers Storytelling Festival has helped Pittsburgh celebrate this ancient tradition, and this year it returns for a week of programming sponsored by the nonprofit StorySwap Storytelling Guild. The entertainment begins off-site on Tue., Aug. 4, with a special edition of Kid’s Play at Market Square featuring storyteller and cartoonist Tim Hartman. Friday night, the action moves to the North Campus of Winchester Thurston School, with the return of the Liar’s Contest, with local storytellers competing to see who can deliver the most convincing half-truths and slick deceits. Nationally touring talents Alton Chung (pictured), Connie Regan-Blake, Lyn Ford and Jim May will all perform on Saturday afternoon, and sign copies of their books. Afterward, in Story Scrum, three teams representing distinct genres will compete against each other, with the audience selecting the final winner. And if you’re a storyteller seeking to improve your skills, try one of the four workshops open to teens and adults throughout the weekend for an additional cost, and covering everything from the basics to mastering the ghost story. Joseph Peiser Tue., Aug. 4-Sun., Aug. 9. 4225 Middle Road, Allison Park. $5-15. 412-449-9373 or www.3rstf.org

recommended. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 2. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $20. www. uncumbertheatrics.com

{WORDS}

guided nature walk through the Jennings Prairie, in Slippery Rock. Bring binoculars, lunch and sunscreen, as the prairie is hot and without shade. JP 10 a.m. 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock. Free. 412-523-0368 or www.wissa hickonnatureclub.com

McKees Rocks Municipal Lot, Route 51 and Furnace Street, McKees Rocks. Free. www.pghfeastival.com

Mingled Mingl Mi i le

{ART} You probably know them for the sounds they make on stage, but these local musicians are visual artists as well. At Wilkinsburg’s Percolate art space, Audio/Visual showcases the gallery-ready work of vocalist Christiane D; percussionist Ian Green (Ishtar, percussion Cello Fury); Rashad C Jamaal (a.k.a. hip-hop artist Billy Pilgrim); and Jenn Wertz (Love Child, and formerly of Rusted Root). The show, curated by Percolate’s Bob Ziller, opens with a reception today. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through c Aug. 30. 317 S. A Trenton Ave., T Wilkinsburg. Free. W www.facebook.com/ w percolateart p

“Yesterday I lost a country. I was in a hurry, / and didn’t notice when it fell from me / {FESTIVAL} like a broken branch from As so often these days around a forgetful tree.” So begins here, music, food and art Dunya Mikhail’s poem “I Was collide at Feastival. in a Hurry.” Mikhail, khail, born in The free, day-long Iraq in 1965, emigrated migrated to event organized by the U.S. in 1996 after being labeled a subversive at home. Her books are nonetheless Art by published Luon St. across the Pierre Arabic-speaking world. She’s now based in Michigan, and tonight she gives a free reading at City JULY 31 of Asylum/ Conversations ati tii tions Pittsburgh’s From the Backseat Alphabet City Tent. BO 8 p.m. 318 Sampsonia {{MUSIC} Way, North We won’t say W Side. Free. summer’s getting www.cityof sshort; technically, it’s asylum.org only half over. But the start the McKees Rocks Community of Citiparks’ Reservoir of Jazz Development Corporation Concert Series each August and Grey Area Productions features acts including national does remind you to enjoy long days and warm air while headliners Robert Randolph & {OUTDOORS} you can. The free series, in the Family Band and Big Sam’s The Blazing Star is a vibrant Highland Park, showcases the purple wildflower that blooms Funky Nation. The food is region’s abundant jazz talent. by a battalion of food trucks only in the dog days of The 2015 version kicks off with including Oh My Grill, Mac & summer in Pennsylvania’s rare a set or two by the Pittsburgh Gold and Pittsburgh Pierogi prairie ecosystem — yes, there Jazz Orchestra. Next Saturday, Truck. And the art is from is a prairie in Pennsylvania. To look for the trad sounds of vendors and exhibitors take in this gorgeous flower including the I Made It! Market the Boilermaker Jazz Band. as well as other late-summer Reservoir of Jazz continues and Assemble. It’s outdoors, blooms and birds of the through Labor Day weekend. it’s family-friendly, and VIP season, the Wissahickon BO 5-7 p.m. Highland Avenue tix are available. BO 3-9 p.m. Nature Club hosts today’s free,

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and Reservoir Drive, Highland Park. Free. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

Or, given the group’s Christian origins, for other non-Christians? Danae Clark says yes, and she’s telling how in her in-progress autobiographical book A Buddhist Goes to Rehab. The local writer hopes her experience can help others, from therapists

{MUSIC}

All summer long, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra has been working to reach new audiences. That initiative continues with its final Classical BBQ of the season. Join the PSO in the Heinz Hall Summer Garden for pre-show food and entertainment, followed by a performance incorporating selections from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 and pioneering American composer Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man. Afterward, the music continues with live jazz in the garden. JP 6:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

JULY 31

Dunya D Du nya ny a Mi Mik Mikhail ikh kh

to people considering recovery. But she needs funds to complete the book. Her Indiegogo campaign (which runs through mid-August) is complemented by tonight’s reading and discussion, at Biddle’s Escape. Another

{WORDS} Can AA work for Buddhists?

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reading is planned for Aug. 13, at Squirrel Hill’s Classic Lines bookstore. BO 7 p.m. 401 Biddle Ave., Wilkinsburg. Free. 412-909-9999 or www.biddlesescape.com

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The festival-style RAW: Pittsburgh showcase for local artists returns tonight with performances, installations and popup galleries arrayed throughout the former church long ago repurposed as Mr. Small’s. Paramount features more than 40 local artists, most of whom do 2-D visual art or photography, with others specializing in jewelry, fashion, makeup or performing arts, including contemporary dance and even fire art. Live music acts tonight include Different Places in Space, and Gene Stovall. The host is Kellee Maize. Fashionable dress is encouraged. BO 7-11:30 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15-20 (21 and over). www.rawartists. org/pittsburgh/paramount

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

310 Allegheny River Blvd. MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER CAPRICCIO. Words or music? This CALL FOR INFORMATION ON PRIVATE PARTIES.

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FRIDAY JULY 31

Johnny Angel & the Halos FRIDAY AUG 7 730PM

FAMILY MAGICC MAGIC SHOW SHOW

with Dennis Bowman & Dan Kuniak

SATURDAY AUG 8 8PM STEEL EEL EL CITY COMEDY TO TOUR featuring

is the dilemma that the Countess Madeleine must wrestle with, as two suitors (one a poet, the other a composer) vie for her love. Fri., July 31, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 2, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. CHILDREN OF EDEN. A musical performance about parents, children, faith & centuries of unresolved family business, by Center Theatre Players. July 31Aug. 1, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 2, 2 p.m. Rochester Theater, Rochester. 724-888-7054. DAMN YANKEES. A musical about summer baseball & love. Sat., Aug. 1, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. DISNEY’S PETER PAN JR. Based on the classic. Presented by the Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 8. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. EVEN MORE AWESOME PLAYS FROM THE PAST. Performances of Twilight, Just One Abiding Dearth, The Fellowship of Actors & Directors, & A Skewed Nude. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m.

Record-breaking dogs, street fairs and, yes, One Direction Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

Thru Aug. 10. CCAC South Campus, Aug. 1, 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century West Mifflin. 888-718-4253. Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. FIGARO REDUX. A shorter, edgier MINGLED. An interactive show modern-dress version of The that invites the audience to make Marriage of Figaro. You’ll follow deeper connections w/ themselves the cast around the building & others. Presented by Uncumber w/ each act set in a different Theatrics. Fri., July 31, 8 p.m. space. Thu., July 30, 7:30 p.m. and Aug. 1-2, 3 & 8 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, ModernFormations Gallery, Oakland. 412-386-9687. Garfield. 412-362-0274. GIRLS ONLY: THE SECRET PINE. A comedy about a dead COMEDY OF WOMEN. man who remains in his A show about what house & tries to interact women talk about w/ his family members. when men aren’t in Thru Aug. 8, 2 p.m. the room. Sun, 2 p.m., and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. www. per Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 8. South Park pa pghcitym .co and Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. Theatre, Bethel Park. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at 412-831-8552. Theater Square, Downtown. A PIRATE CHRISTMAS. 412-325-6769. Presented by South Park Children’s IT COULD BE ANY ONE OF US. Theater. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, As a thunderstorm beats down 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 8. South upon a windswept country house, Park Theatre, Bethel Park. a family of failures wrangles over 412-831-8552. a will. Thu, Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, RE-ENACT DISORDER. A 5 & 8:30 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 2, piece by Michael Koliner. This 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 9. Apple Hill performance displays a story Playhouse, Delmont. 724-468-5050. of extreme personal strife THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. that occurred in Pittsburgh. Mozart’s classic comic opera meets Community members turn into Downton Abbey. Upstairs meets actors & performers, as they downstairs in this glorious romp re-enact this powerful event. set in the early 20th century. Sat., Fri., July 31, 8:30 p.m. Neu Kirche

FULL LIST ONLINE

[DANCE]

Hosted by Gab Bonesso featuring Vinay Umapathy

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UNDERKILL: IMPROV SHOW. 10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 01

DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. An improv show feat. Second City alumni, Jethro & Kristy Nolen improvising w/ guests. BYOB. First Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

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COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. YAKOV SMIRNOFF. 2 & 6 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

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DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

withh UUke kke SSkywalker Skywalk Skywalke k llkk

THE OAKS THEATER IS AVAILABLE FOR SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH SERVICE RENTAL. CALL 412.828.6322 FOR DETAILS. TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253

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SATURDAY AUG 15

Great prizes!

COMEDY

COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-of-town comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MIKE WYSOCKI, CHUCK KRIEGER, MATT LIGHT & SEAN COLLIER

AUGUST 14 8:30PM MILLENNIAL MIL LLEN NNIIALL CO COMEDY OMEDDY SSHOW HOOW PM

Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224. SHARON’S GRAVE. Interlocking stories of family land inheritance, legend, & chances at love. Thru Aug. 1, 8 p.m. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. THE TRUE STORY OF THE 3 LITTLE PIGS. A production of the children’s classic. Sat, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 1. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SIMPSON}

After a week-long residency at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, choreographer and dancer Jasmine Hearn will present her in-progress piece memory keep(h)er. Melding performance art, postmodern dance, video and song, the piece strives to keep the memories and stories of black female elders alive. She draws on the influence of her grandmother and other women from her community to create the sound and choreography. A discussion will follow. 8 p.m. Fri., July 31. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Admission is pay-what-you-can. www.kelly-strayhorn.org

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts & exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic CONTINUES ON PG. 38


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“Dante in My Basement” (oil and tar on canvas, 2015), by Jamie Earnest. From the exhibition Great Waves II, at Revision Space, Lawrenceville.

NEW THIS WEEK GALLERIE CHIZ. Conversations from the Backseat. Mixed media by Luon St. Pierre. Opening reception July 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. PERCOLATE. Audio/Visual: Four Artist/Musicians. Works by Christiane D, Ian Green, Rashad Jamaal (aka Billy Pilgrim), & Jenn Wertz. Opening reception Aug 1, 6-9 p.m. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. FAST. A show of mixed media drawings by Richard Claraval. Opening reception August 8, 7-10 p.m. Closing reception w/ The Eastend Mile on August 28, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-877-7394. WILDCARD. 100 Days. Work by Rachel Arnold Sager. Opening reception July 30, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ONGOING 4823 PENN AVE. Studies in Topophilia. Charcoal sketches on vellum by Carolyn Wenning. Garfield. 709 PENN GALLERY. I’ve Been Out Walking. Ashley Jean Hickey’s solo exhibition featuring new work inspired by the woods. Downtown. 412-377-3786. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from these artists from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Treasure/Trash. Works by local artist Elizabeth A. Rudnick. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s & 1980s. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/

Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. Aqui. An exhibition curated by Maritza Mosquera of works that exude place, belonging & strength of vision & a premiere Cafe Con Leche’s short video “What does it mean to be a Pittsburgh Latin@?”. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BOXHEART GALLERY. Erin Treacy & Jim Studeny. Paintings & paper assemblages that explore time & fragmentation by Erin Treacy. Paintings inspired by Japanese woodblock prints by Studeny. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper. Collected works of Edward

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

Hopper & prints by Rembrandt & Charles Meryron, Hopper’s influences. Thru Oct. 26. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Landscapes & F igure Drawings. Ceramic plates & platters by Kyle Houser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Jack Ann Kate. Work by John McGinley, Ann Averback, Kate Bonello. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. served local Civil War veterans H2Oh!. Experience kinetic for over 54 years & is the best water-driven motion & discover preserved & most intact GAR post the relations between water, in the United States. Carnegie. land & habitat. How do everyday 412-276-3456. decisions impact water supply & BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large the environment? Ongoing: Buhl collection of automatic roll-played Digital Dome (planetarium), musical instruments & music Miniature Railroad & Village, boxes in a mansion setting. USS Requin submarine & more. Call for appointment. O’Hara. North Side. 412-237-3400. 412-782-4231. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie BOST BUILDING. Blast Furnace. Built in Collectors. Preserved 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 materials reflecting & 7 are extremely rare the industrial heritage . w ww per examples of pre World of Southwestern a p ty ci h pg War II iron-making techPA. Homestead. .com nology. Rankin. 412-464-4020. 412-464-4020 x 21. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF COMPASS INN. Demos & tours NATURAL HISTORY. Out of w/ costumed guides feat. this This World! Jewelry in the Space restored stagecoach stop. Age. A fine jewelry exhibition that North Versailles. 724-238-4983. brings together scientific fact & CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. pop culture in a showcase of University of Pittsburgh Jazz wearable & decorative arts related Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards to outer space, space travel, from the International Hall of the space age, & the powerful Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. influence these topics have had on DEPRECIATION LANDS human civilization. Animal Secrets. MUSEUM. Small living history Learn about the hidden lives of museum celebrating the ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons & settlement & history of the more. Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying immersive environments Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. spanning the Mesozoic Era FALLINGWATER. Tour the & original fossil specimens. famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Permanent. Hall of Minerals & Mill Run. 724-329-8501. Gems. Crystal, gems & precious FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. stones from all over the world. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass Population Impact. How humans windows. Downtown. are affecting the environment. 412-471-3436. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. This exhibit explores landscape painting in Britain form the Industrial Revolution to the eras of Romanticism. Closing celebration July 31, 7 p.m. w/ the screening of “Mr. Turner”. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. The Bryce Family & the Mount Pleasant Factory. Telling the story of the Bryce family & their contributions. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours,

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Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. sidewall: a mural project’s first annual group show. A show about the mural artists who participated in sidewall’s first year,celebrating their bodies of work beyond what they have already shared in their murals. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 724-316-9326. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Veiled Instinct. Work by Lauren Wilcox. At the Rum Room. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MATTRESS FACTORY. Factory Installed. Artists Anne Lindberg, John Morris, Julie Schenkelberg, Jacob Douenias & Ethan Frier created new room-sized installations that demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Dollirious- The Art of the Doll. Doll work of all mediums from more than 15 artists, celebrating the dark & unusual, spiritual, whimsical side of doll art. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. Nemocolin. 412-337-4976. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. Verklären. A 5-week, evolving exhibition by video/ sound artist Nathan Lorenzo. Closing reception August 14, 7-9 p.m. North Side. 412-322-2224.

gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Maz’s Camera. See & touch the giant, heavy camera that snapped the photo of Bill Mazeroski rounding bases, winning the 1960 World Series that was made into his statue at PNC Park. North Side. 412-231-7881.

NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Urban Gurlz III URBANRURAL. Photography by Mary Williams & Marylloyd Claytor. Ross. 412-364-3622. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now!. Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Out of the Archives & Into the Gallery. An exploration of history & historic artistic technique in glass. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINTBREEZEWAY. Kamili. An exhibition of work by Hannibal Hopson & Amani Davis that reflects their mission to use recycled materials & let the objects determine the form & message. Point Breeze. 412-770-7830. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves II. A juried exhibition of works by local artists based in Pittsburgh. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. RUNAWAY STUDIOS. Hi Lo. Work on the anxieties of both loss & reclamation of identity, by Dianna Settles. Bloomfield. SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY. Artists of Shaler North Hills Library. Art show of artists who teach at the library. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. London/ Pittsburgh. A solo exhibit w/ work by photographer, Mark Neville. South Side. 412-431-1810.

PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sips, Shots & Gulps. A national exhibition of handmade ceramic drinking vessels. W/ work by : Charlie Alessi, Mariana Baquero, Seth Charles, Christy Culp, Myka Hayden, Kyle Hendrix, Leslie Hinton, Molly Johnson, Madeline Klusmire, Lucien M. Koonce, Gretchen Kriner, Cassandra Loos, Carolyn Mimbs, Abbie Nelson, Maryann Parker, Caitlin Ross, Lindsey Scherloum, Ian Shelly, Molly Uravitch, Dallas Wooten & Lisa York. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons & the First Amendment. A collection of political cartoons from more than a dozen Pulitzer-winner & work from magazines, websites & newspapers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. Other Books Other Worlds. A mixed media group show feat. David Newbury, Brad & Stephanie Towell, Lena Loshonkohl & Co Bappe. Braddock. www.unsmokeartspace.com. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Feat. the art of local artists Carolyn Pierotti, Chris Galiyas, Elizabeth Claire Rose, & Lora Finelli. Shadyside. 412-913-4966.

whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic


EVENT: Station Square Summer Jam

TUE 04

FRI 31

mechanic from Penn Hills

JASMINE HEARN: MEMORY KEEP(H)ER. Hearn uses postmodern dance, performance art, video, & song to preserve the stories & memories of black female elders. 8 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 31

THE COMPILATION. An evening of art, music & fashion by Kathmandu Artifacts, Terry Jolo & The Samina Mughal Collection, more. Live music from Cello Fury, hors d’oeuvres & cocktails. Benefits the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Youth Education Program. 7 p.m. Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-562-1200.

WHEN: Fri.,

July 24

The concert was pretty awesome, I mean for as old as he is, [Edgar Winter] still can rock and it still sounds really great. I’m not a particularly big fan of his music, but I know a couple of his songs, especially the famous ones. We were down here last week for the Led Zeppelin cover band, and they mentioned that Edgar Winter would be playing next week, so we came back down to see him. My family, friends and I are all big concert-goers; we love music and my friend is a drummer in a band, so we’re always looking for bands to go see live. The best part of the show for me had to be “Frankenstein,” the drummer had an absolutely awesome solo and I love that riff. B Y JO SE PH PE ISE R

SAT 01 CAN’T STOP THE SERENITY PITTSBURGH. Games, raffles, music, trivia & a showing of the film Serenity, w/ performance by singer/songwriter Sean Faust. Benefiting Equality Now, which fights for the human rights of women around the world. 5 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. ST. BARNABAS 5K RUN/WALK. 9 a.m. St. Barnabas Health Care System, Gibsonia. 724-625-3770.

for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

FRI 31

CHE ELIAS. Launch for Elias’s new book, “Of Tire & Anonymity” w/ poets Evan Swanson & Don Wentworth. 7 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412 334-6264.

SUN 02

SUN 02 17TH STREET SPECTACULAR. Live music, food trucks, vendors, beer & silent auctions. To raise funds & increase awareness for the fight against Cystic Fibrosis. 2 p.m. Nakama Japanese, South Side. 412-381-6000. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA RIDE FOR KIDS. An escorted motorcycle ride to benefit the Pediatric Brian Tumor Foundation’s medical research and family support programs. Register online. 10:30 a.m. Seneca Valley Senior High School, Harmony. 703-298-1938.

LITERARY THU 30 THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking

SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. Presented by poetry.com First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412867-0827.

MON 03

STORY SWAP. Pittsburgh’s guild for local adult storytellers. An open forum to swap stories, practice the ones you may have or listen. 7 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100.

TUE 04 KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

The PNC Carousel For a cheap alternative to Kennywood, without the crowds, take the kids to Schenley Plaza in Oakland, for a ride on one of this carousel’s adorable animals for only $1.25.

WED 05

WRITING & ART W/ TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE SAT 01

KIDSTUFF THU 30

RAINBOW MAKER PARTY. 4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-254-4230.

THU 30 - WED 05

VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

PUP CRAWL 2015: THE BIG SIT. 6:30 p.m. Clemente Bridge, North Side. 412-321-4625. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Meet WPMC Officer Barb DeRiso at the Mansion Parking Lot. 10 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

TUE 04 ORIENTEERING, NAVIGATION & MAP READING. Learn essential navigation skills. Meet in Lodge parking lot. 6-8 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

CHALKTOGRAPHY. Students, grades 6-12,are invited to create outlines of various designs w/ sidewalk chalk on a paved work surface. Registration required. 1:30 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. CHEF IN THE KITCHEN. Learning the basics of cooking for 4th to 6th graders. 11:15 a.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

SAT 01 M3: MATERIALS, MEDIA, AND ME!. Explore a new material & make a project every Saturday of the summer! For youth in 4th through 8th grade. Sat. Thru Aug. 29 Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

MON 03

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore

Some might argue about whether something containing so much wholesomeness (organic oats, whole wheat flour, raisins, etc.) qualifies as a “cookie,” but these babies are a delicious and filling treat.

Mr. Robot Cynical and darkly funny conspiracy thriller about a hacker who might or might not be sane, or telling the truth. Surprisingly challenging TV for summer and the USA Network. Catch up at www.usanetwork.com/mrrobot.

WED 05

FRI 31

Macro Cookies from the East End Food Co-op Café

{PHOTO BY MARGARET WELSH}

CRITIC: Kevin Williamson, 56, a

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. KIDSPLAY. Free educational programming w/ music, dancing & hands-on activities for preschool aged children. New theme every week. Tue, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Aug. 25 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. TYKE HIKES. Parents or caregivers w/ children, ages newborn to 5 years old. Explore nature, touch the trees & look for critters on these easy walks in the park. Craft & snacks afterward. 10-11:30 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH SHATZ/USA NETWORK}

free concert series with Edgar Winter Group, South Side

DANCE

*Stuff We Like

tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & cokemaking in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

OTHER STUFF THU 30 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie

The Clark Bar & Grill Cozy, long-running North Side spot is a quiet place to pre- or post-game for the Pirates, and just a fiveminute walk from the park. 503 Martindale St.

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Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

THU 30 NATIONAL JAZZ WORKSHOP. Clinics & performances from The PJO Little Big Band, The Joe Negri Trio, Salsamba, The Sean Jones Quartet, The Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra w/ Sean Jones, The Firm Roots. Multiple venues. Thru July 31 Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-5872.

FRI 31 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. MESSAGE OF THE BEADS: THE ARTISTIC AND CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE OF WAMPUM’. The program features American

Indian art & culture related to the importance of items made using wampum beads. The program presenter ‘Ghost-in-the-Head’, will discuss the history of the beads, the symbolism of traditional motifs & demonstrate how to make a wampum belt. Registration required. 1-3 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x210. SUMMER FRIDAYS AT THE FRICK. Picnicking, tours, wine bar, yard games, music & different food trucks every week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

SAT 01 BEAVER FALLS COMMUNITY CRIME WATCH DAY. Free educational demonstrations from law enforcement & other emergency response teams, food, games & family entertainment. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Geneva College, Beaver Falls. 724-847-6737. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. FEASTIVAL. Music from Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Big Sam’s Funky Nation, Pandemic, The Commonheart, AFROHEAT, & The Clock Reads. Food trucks, craft beer, family friendly activities, I Made It! Market & much more. 3 p.m. McKees Rocks Municipal Lot, McKees Rocks. 412-331-9900. FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS. 9 a.m. Greater Works Outreach,

Monroeville. 910-399-5195. FREE SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP. All women & girls (16+) are welcome. 10 a.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 412-241-6519. LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET. Near Allegheny Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. RUST BELT CULINARY TOUR. Visit a renovated church hall, a modernized mill bar, & other revamped treasures. This 4-hour shuttled culinary tour provides more than enough food for a meal. 10:30 a.m. Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WHAT’S THE BUZZ ABOUT?. Local beekeeper, Christina Newman, will discuss the importance of the bee. Nature Center. 10 a.m.-12 p.m., South Park. 412-835-0143. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. WOMEN’S SELF CARE SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, tackle anxiety & strengthen boundaries while building practical coping techniques & tools in a confidential, healing & supportive environment. Sat, 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300 ex. 129. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City

Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

SUN 02

BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come alone or bring a team. Sun, 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. STEEL VALLEY BREW TOUR. Visit some of the newest breweries in the historic Steel Valley of the Pittsburgh region. 11 a.m., Station Square. 412-323-4709.

WED 05 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session w/ literary conversation. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. MOBILE ART W/ ROMIBO. An outdoor art program w/ ipads. Lily pond. 10 a.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

EXCEPTIONAL ADVENTURES is a nonprofit that plans trips, events and monthly dances for individuals with intellectual or physical disabilities. It is seeking caring, energetic volunteers to join participants as friends on these outings. Help create a fun experience for everyone involved. Training is provided at no cost and you must be 18 or older to apply. For more information, visit www.exceptionaladventures.com. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

TUE 04

Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

AUDITIONS

CARAVAN THEATRE OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for one CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, actor, African-American or Latino, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman between 40s & 50s age range; Center for Imagination, Garfield. Two actors, African-American 412-924-0634. or Latino, between 20 to 30 years DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. of age. Please email greshjf@ First Tue of every month yahoo.com for an audition Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. time. Kauffman Auditorium, 412-251-0097. Aug. 2 & 3, 7-9:30 p.m. Hill House, FALLOW GROUNDS & Hill District. 412-392-4400. NEU CITY ARTIST PANEL THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. DISCUSSION. Tom Sarver Seeking actors ages 10 to & Hannah Thompson adult. Prepare a short discuss performative & monologue & song for community practices & the musical, The Secret learn more about the Garden. August 9, projects they’ve been w. w w 7 p.m. at the Seton creating this summer. er hcitypap g p Center & August 10, 7-9 p.m. Neu Kirche .com 7 p.m. at the Schoolhouse Contemporary Arts Center. 412-254-4633. Art Center, North Side. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN 412-322-2224. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Seeking SOCIAL MEDIA 101. A brief young singers from 8th through overview of the features of major 12th grades. Prepared solo of social media networks like your choice, preferably a classical Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr & selection (art song, aria, etc.) Pinterest. Q&A session to follow. Carefully selected works from 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. musical theater may be performed, but these should demonstrate a URBAN HOMESTEADING classical singing technique rather SERIES: MITES, BITES & than belting. To schedule an BLIGHTS. Learn how to identify audition, call Emily Stewart at pests & safe ways to alleviate or 412-926-2488. Auditions will be eliminate the different pests & conducted on August 27, after pathogens. Urban Homesteaders 3:30 p.m. Third Presbyterian will leave the class w/ the Church, Oakland. knowledge to continue to produce MAKER THEATER. Auditions for their own food sustainably Maker Theater’s actor database. w/ a healthy understanding of the Submit a headshot, resume, & surrounding ecosystem. 6 p.m. your availability for the month’s of Office of Penn State Extension, September, October, & November Point Breeze. 412-482-3464.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

of 2015. August 1, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thru Aug. 1. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Seeking new singers for our 30th Anniversary Season. Auditions will take place by appt. only. Contact Artistic Director Jeffry Johnson, D.M.A. at jbj@rccpittsburgh.com to request an audition. Professional training & experience are not required! Thru Aug. 31. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722.

SUBMISSIONS THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www.theauthorszone. com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. HOME DECOR. Seeking artists who work w/ reclaimed metal, wood, etc. or create art out of vintage industrial pieces. Should be interested in up-cycling & recycling. No painting unless on barn wood. For more information, call Sal Greco 724-316-9326. Thru Aug. 13. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappy hourreview.com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thu of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. TOONSEUM. Seeking sequential artists to submit works for consideration for the upcoming exhibit, “Drawn In Pittsburgh: Local Cartoonist Showcase”. For more information, visit http://www. toonseum.org/. Deadline July 31. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I have always wanted to have a girlsonly sex party, but I’m not sure how I feel about actually organizing one. What’s the etiquette if I do organize one myself? Do I need to provide the dildos for people’s harnesses? Or just the condoms and lube? And how do I find people who want to attend? Do I just tweet out an invite? Is there a better way that makes me seem less sketchy? NO SNAPPY ACRONYM

What I know about hosting girls-only sex parties could fit inside what I know about the Marvel universe with room left over for what I know about the Higgs boson — and all of that could fit inside Lindsey Graham’s chances of being president with room left over for Donald Trump’s humanity. But luckily for you, NSA, I know someone who knows quite a lot about both girl sex and sex parties. “Hosting a play party is much like hosting any other party,” said Allison Moon, a San Francisco-based writer and sex educator. “You want guests to feel welcome and comfortable — this means you provide lube, safer-sex supplies, refreshments, and towels and/or puppy pads.” Moon is the author of two popular lesbian werewolf novels — more are hopefully on the way — and the really terrific memoir Bad Dyke: Salacious Stories From a Queer Life. Her most recent book is Girl Sex 101, a terrific sex-ed book “for ladies and lady-lovers of all genders and identities” that features girlsex wisdom from an array of sex-positive superstars. Moon has also hosted numerous sex parties, and says hosting a girls-only sex party does not obligate you to break open a piñata full of dildos as your guests arrive. “Toys are the responsibility of guests,” said Moon. “If NSA has a few sparkling-clean vibes and dildos that she doesn’t mind using as party favors, by all means put them out. I have a couple of Magic Wands that are great for getting the party started, because there’s always someone who’s wanted to try one. But she doesn’t have to spend a ton of cash outfitting her friends’ crotches.” As for finding people who might want to attend your sex party, Moon and I both agree that putting an invite on Twitter — or Facebook or Instagram or Farmers Only or Yik Yak — is a very, very bad idea. “NSA should stay away from social media to start,” said Moon. “Instead, she should make a list of friends who might be down and give them a call to see if they have friends they’d want to bring. Bonus points if she has friends who are up for being used as ‘ringers.’ Lady parties are notorious for taking hours to warm up — someone has to be the first one in the pool, and a ringer can help get the party started. Or she could consider some ice-breaking games, like spin the bottle.” But let’s say you don’t have any friends who might want to come to your girls-only sex party — or you’re too chicken to ask your friends. Is there another way? “If her slutty-friend pool is small, she could look at sites devoted to sex-positive folks, like FetLife or her local chapter of a leather women’s

group. But she should be super-explicit about her women-only policy if she does post anywhere online, and she should also consider screening guests with a phone call. And I strongly recommend a closed-door policy, i.e., folks must arrive by a certain time or they can’t come in. This keeps you from having to monitor the door all night so you can enjoy your own damn party.” You can follow Moon on Twitter @TheAllisonMoon — and you should listen to a really moving story she shared recently on RISK!, Kevin Allison’s amazing podcast, about her friend Hans (“Four Orgies and a Funeral”). You can find RISK! on iTunes or at Risk-Show.com. I’ve been my boyfriend’s girlfriend for two years. We recently graduated high school and are heading off to different colleges in the fall. Is it stupid for us to stay together? We’re in love, he’s my best friend, and he’s my family. But we haven’t had sex yet. We’ve made some progress (oral, hand stuff, etc.), but we’ve never had penis-in-vagina sex. I asked for it once, and he informed me that he had a moral conflict with sex. That hardly seems plausible: We’ve done so much else, and he’s not religious at all. Is he just not attracted to me? Is he gay? Sometimes I wonder if the difference we have libido-wise is a deal-breaker. I can picture a sexless yet emotionally happy marriage with him, but I’m not sure how to feel about that.

“YOU’RE 18 YEARS OLD, YOU’RE HEADED TO COLLEGE, AND YOU AND YOUR BOYFRIEND DON’T CLICK SEXUALLY. BREAK UP.”

CONFUSED, UNSEXED, NAIVE TEEN

First things first: Sometimes I create a sign-off that, once abbreviated, spells out something cute or funny or relevant. This is not one of those times: I did not come up with this letter writer’s sign-off. OK, CUNT, it’s entirely possible that your boyfriend is gay. Speaking from experience: It’s easier for a closeted gay boy to pretend his girlfriend is his boyfriend during (non-recip) oral and hand stuff than it is during vaginal intercourse. He could be claiming to have a moral conflict with PIV (penis-in-vagina intercourse) when what he actually has is a strong preference for PIG (penisin-guy intercourse). It’s also possible that your boyfriend isn’t that into you, or he’s terrified by the thought of impregnating you, or he actually does have some sort of moral qualm about vaginal penetration. Only your boyfriend knows what’s up with him, but here’s what we know for sure about you: You’re 18 years old, you’re headed to college, and you and your boyfriend don’t click sexually. Break up. You can get back together in a few years if you’re both still single, you’re both still straight and you’re both still into each other. But don’t settle for someone whose libido and/or sexual interests don’t come close to matching your own, CUNT, because a sexless marriage is only happy when sexless works for both spouses.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with Matt Baume about heroes of the gay-marriage fight: savage lovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

07.29-08.05

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I expect you to be in a state of constant birth for the next three weeks. Awakening and activation will come naturally. Your drive to blossom and create might be irresistible, bordering on unruly. Does that sound overwhelming? I don’t think it will be a problem as long as you cultivate a mood of amazed amusement about it. (P.S. This upsurge is a healthy response to the dissolution that preceded it.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Expiration dates loom. Fond adieus and last laughs and final hurrahs are on tap. Unfinished business is begging you to give it your smartest attention while there’s still time to finish it with elegance and grace. So here’s my advice for you, my on-the-verge friend: Don’t save any of your tricks, ingenuity or enthusiasm for later. This is the later you’ve been saving them for. You are more ready than you realize to try what has always seemed improbable or inconceivable before now. Here’s my promise: If you handle these endings with righteous decisiveness, you will ensure bright beginnings in the weeks after your birthday.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A company called Evil Supply sells a satirical poster that contains the following quote: “Be the villain you were born to be. Stop waiting for someone to come along and corrupt you. Succumb to the darkness yourself.” The text in the advertisement for this product adds, “Follow your nightmares ... Plot your own nefarious path.” Although this counsel is slightly funny to me, I’m too moral and upright

to recommend it to you — even now, when I think there would be value in you being less nice and polite and agreeable than you usually are. So I’ll tinker with Evil Supply’s message to create more suitable advice: “For the greater good, follow your naughty bliss. Be a leader with a wild imagination. Nudge everyone out of their numbing routines. Sow benevolent mischief that energizes your team.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Every time you resist acting on your anger and instead restore yourself to calm, it gets easier,” writes psychologist Laura Markham in Psychology Today. In fact, neurologists claim that by using your willpower in this way, “you’re actually rewiring your brain.” And so the more you practice, the less likely it is that you will be addled by rage in the future. I see the coming weeks as an especially favorable time for you to do this work, Scorpio. Keeping a part of your anger alive is good, of course — sometimes you need its energy to motivate constructive change. But you would benefit from culling the excess.

get your yoga on!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Much of the action in the world’s novels takes place inside buildings, according to author Robert Bringhurst. But characters in older Russian literature are an exception, he says. They are always out in the forests, traveling and rambling. In accordance with astrological omens, I suggest that you draw inspiration from the Russians’ example in the coming days. As often and as long as you can, put yourself in locations where the sky is overhead. Nature is the preferred setting, but even urban spots are good. Your luck, wisdom and courage are likely to increase in direct proportion to how much time you spend outdoors.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Has a beloved teacher disappointed you? Are there inspirational figures about whom you feel conflicted because they don’t live up to all of your high standards? Have you become alienated from a person who gave you a blessing but later expressed a flaw you find hard to overlook? Now would be an excellent time to seek healing for rifts like these. Outright forgiveness is one option. You could also work on deepening your appreciation for how complicated and paradoxical everyone is. One more suggestion: Meditate on how your longing for what’s perfect might be an enemy of your ability to benefit from what’s merely good.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

French and Italian readers might have no problem with this horoscope. But Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies might be offended, even grossed out. Why? Because my analysis of the astrological omens compels me to conclude that “moist” is a central theme for you right now. And research has shown that many speakers of the English language find the sound of the word “moist” equivalent to hearing fingernails scratching a chalkboard. If you are one of those people, I apologize. But the fact is, you will go astray unless you stay metaphorically moist. You need to cultivate an attitude that is damp but not sodden; dewy but not soggy; sensitive and responsive and lyrical, but not overwrought or weepy or histrionic.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Which signs of the zodiac are the most expert sleepers? Who best appreciates the healing power of slumber and feels the least shame about taking naps? Which of the 12 astrological tribes are most inclined to study the art of snoozing and use their knowledge to get the highest-quality renewal from their time in bed? My usual answer to these questions would be Taurus and Cancer, but I’m hoping you Pisceans will vie for the top spot in the coming weeks. It’s a very favorable time for you to increase your mastery of this supreme form of self-care.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I am very much in love with no one in particular,” says actor Ezra Miller. His statement would make sense coming out of your mouth right about now. So would this one: “I am very much in love with almost everyone I encounter.” Or this one: “I am very much in love with the wind and moon and hills and rain and rivers.” Is this going to be a problem? How will you deal with your overwhelming urge to overflow? Will you break people’s hearts and provoke uproars everywhere you go, or will you rouse delight and bestow blessings? As long as you take yourself lightly, I foresee delight and blessings.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In her io9.com article on untranslatable words, Esther Inglis-Arkell defines the Chinese term weiwu-wei as “conscious non-action ... a deliberate, and principled, decision to do nothing whatsoever, and to do it for a particular reason.” In my astrological opinion, the coming days would be a favorable time to explore and experiment with this approach. I think you will reap wondrous benefits if you slow down and rest in the embrace of a pregnant pause. The mysteries of silence and emptiness will be rich resources.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I always liked side-paths, little dark back-alleys behind the main road — there one finds adventures and surprises, and precious metal in the dirt.” The character named Dmitri Karamazov makes that statement in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov. And now I’m thinking that you might like to claim his attitude as your own. Just for a while, you understand. Not forever. The magic of the side paths and back-alleys might last for no more than a few weeks, and then gradually fade. But in the meantime, the experiences you uncover there could be fun and educational. I do have one question for you, though: What do you think Dmitri meant by “precious metal in the dirt”? Money? Gold? Jewelry? Was he speaking metaphorically? I’m sure you’ll find out.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Sometimes the road less traveled is less traveled for a reason,” says comedian Jerry Seinfeld. His implication is that rejecting traditional strategies and conventional wisdom doesn’t always lead to success. As a professional rebel myself, I find it painful to agree even a little bit with that idea. But I do think it’s applicable to your life right now. For the foreseeable future, compulsive nonconformity is likely to yield mediocrity. Putting too much emphasis on being unique rather than on being right might distract you from the truth. My advice: Stick to the road more traveled. Express gratitude for the enemy who has taught you the most. FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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MERKLE INC. (Pittsburgh, PA) programs and media strategies to meet client marketing objectives. Participate in business development initiatives with clients. Manage client accounts, ensuring that client relationships remain harmonious and quality of service is maintained. Develop actionable recommendations to be communicated to clients. Work cohesively with Sales and Operations teams. Manage a team of 1-5 individuals. Master’s degree in Marketing, Business or Economics plus 1 year of experience managing digital marketing programs for clients. In the alternative, the company will accept a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Business or Economics plus 5 years of experience managing digital marketing programs for clients. Experience must include work with: Media Platforms; MS Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Access); and at least one 3rd Party Tool (such as Google Adwords, DoubleClick, MediaMath, Bing Ads, ExactTarget, Hitwise, or BrightEdge). Position may require travel up to 40% of the time throughout the continental U.S. Employer may require drug testing/ screening, g, background g g checks,, and reference checks.

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SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

KING’S CROSS

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health • Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session You may earn up to $70 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit

Clinical Research Opportunity for Women Do you suffer from uterine fibroids? DO YOU EXPERIENCE? • Heavy or abnormal periods • Abdominal pain and pressure • Increased need to urinate with your periods

UTERINE FIBROIDS • Negatively impact your quality of life • Doctors in your area are looking for women to participate in a clinical research study. • All investigational medication and study-related care is provided at no cost. Compensation for time and travel may be available. To see if you qualify, visit

www.VenusResearchStudy.com or call

(800) 216-2057 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.29/08.05.2015

ACROSS

1. Tools with teeth 5. Annoying pest 9. Bowed, as to authority 14. Crucial swing state 15. Scintilla 16. Battle vehicle? 17. Empathetic zebu? 19. Violinist’s powder 20. Griffin’s weapons 21. Street sign on a safari? 23. Put on staff 24. Even ___ 26. Today in Tijuana 27. Like some car freshener smells 28. ___ polloi 29. New wave band who were also known as the Dukes of Stratosphear 32. Socal city, except even more laid back? 37. Cereal grains 38. Country’s David Allan ___ 39. “In ___ of ...” 40. Hussy’s stroke? 45. Lunch that requires two hands 46. Instagram, e.g. 47. Years of Spanish classes 48. Consumed 49. Still life vessel 50. Almost but not quite 62-Across 53. What all the Jurassic Park movies do?

57. Difficult to find 59. Classy individual? 60. Cite the “Communist Manifesto?” 62. Like someone with something to lose 63. “Giant” author Ferber 64. Leave off 65. Like income, generally 66. Babe 67. Some sneaks

DOWN

1. Vowel sound in “father” or “mom” 2. Up one, say 3. Throw around, as a sword 4. Goalie Hope 5. Root that boosts the immune system 6. Bribe to get one to stop “12 Days of Christmas” mid-song 7. Snorkeling spot 8. Uber alternative 9. Maize product 10. Bonding stuff 11. From India 12. Sports reporter/”Dancing With The Stars” judge Andrews 13. “Oh Lawd!” 18. Color, as a tattoo 22. Sounds of understanding 25. Ocular washing

device 27. Time traveler’s destination 28. Yokel’s laugh 29. Chapter 22 30. John Green book reader, likely 31. Basic story 32. Auction units 33. Honolulu International Airport island 34. Random guess 35. Tone ___ 36. Contributions to the poor 41. Told all 42. Letters under a 0 43. Like no-tell motels and restaurants with mice in the kitchen

44. Jedi’s “skill” 48. Get up 49. Ooze, as charm 50. One of ten in bowling 51. Acidic 52. Smartphone messages that aren’t emails, IMs, tweets, or Snapchats 53. Lend, for the moment 54. Opus played one in “Bloom County” 55. Pinnacle 56. Adjusted the levels 58. Running wild 61. “Based ___ T.R.U. Story” (2 Chainz album) {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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dreaming of raising chickens, in light of pittsburgh ’s NEWLY UPDATED zoning

a guide to raising city chickens

ordinance on backyard farm animals? worried about the recent CENTERS FOR DISEASE by em demarco

CONTROL warnings about kissing and snuggling your chickens? here are a few tips

july 29, 2015

from PHILLIP CLAUER, a poultry specialist with the penn state extension.

i ’ve been

decide what you want the birds for *

1

around chickens all my life.

veteran

some are bred for laying

poutry

many eggs ...

varieties of chickens!

the birds?

mille fleur

years

penn state

where to get

silkie

their fancy looks.

for 30

2

recognizes over 350 breeds and

... others for

educator teaches at

the american poultry association

d'uccle

university ’s

bantam

department of animal science

PHILLIP CLAUER

red

expect

sex-link

50-100 eggs

hen

from most heritage

“chickens can be a fun, rewarding

when well

hobby and experience for families in

cared for,

any setting. but there are some

they will lay

breeds.

* before you buy anything, make sure you understand

260-300 eggs

precautions that you need to take to

chickens need access to clean

"if you wouldn't

possums, dogs, cats …

draft, moisture.

sensitive to

table

have to drink it."

scraps

cat food

will get fat!

directly on your garden, you'll kill the plants.)

bread

surfaces.

manure properly. ( if you toss it

sodium. they

birds shouldn't slippery

young chickens.)

birds are very

do not feed them:

drink it, the temperature,

rats will eat eggs and

compost

water and feed at all times.

provide a coop that protects them from:

predators. ( raccoons,

certifies hatcheries.

development, make sure to check those rules, too.

raising healthy chickens requires a healthy environment

3

federal program that

the new zoning ordinance. if you live in a housing

a year.

protect yourself and your birds.”

the NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN is a

a covered, controlled area keeps them safe from from predators and

(those leg

... plus, just like dogs,

wild birds carrying

tendons are

chickens shouldn’t be

disease ...

delicate.)

wandering the streets of your

don't allow

neighborhood!

feed/litter to sit in a moist pile.

injury from openings or jagged parts. (curious birds may rip off a comb! )

minimum =

make sure the coop is

2 sq. ft.

big enough. ( during

per bird

winter, they ALL need

sickness can strike any flock, big or small

5

6

metal containers.

ground so nothing

pile up. if it's pine shavings, clean at least once a month.

biosecurity : traffic control

keep feed in sealed

keep coop off the

if the coop has a wire frame floor, don't let the poop

1 sq. ft. per pound of bird

to fit inside at once.)

4

recommended =

burrows under it.

... and kissing and snuggling? salmonella is present in almost any animals' feces

“check your for external parasites monthly,

chickens

never

may not be

introduce

resistant to

but if you wash your hands

that the

birds into

the vent.”

young children and the elderly are more suseptible,

the diseases

new adult

especially near

chicken,

reptile, cat, or gerbil.

your

birds regularly

thoroughly the chances of

new birds

your

getting sick are unlikely.

might be

flock.

carrying.

uh, the VENT? “the back entrance ... it's where the eggs and manure passes. check for mites and lice.”

don ’t allow visitors who have been among ANY birds, whether it’s the local duck pond or neighbors

why ?

with their own backyard chickens.

your neighbors just

“birds are constantly

visited the local duck

going to the bathroom in

pond. but they stepped in

their environment.

duck feces, which

everything you touch in

accidentally dropped in

"disease and

that environment could

your chicken run.

parasites are ‘equal opportunity ’

be contaminated.”

now your chickens are

when it comes to

infected. it’s that easy

poultry … they'll

to spread disease.

affect birds in the pasture, they'll affect birds in a cage in a house."

N E W S

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

July 29, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 30

July 29, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 30