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INSIDE: MARGARET WELSH ON THE LESSONS KIDS GET AT ROCK CAMP 21

CITY PAPER BOX SET: COLLECT ALL FOUR MUSIC ISSUE COVERS! WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 04.22/04.29.2015


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Half Pint Prints 5.2 – 10am-12pm Education studio | Free with museum admission

This monthly silkscreen printing activity for families with children ages 1 to 4 years old takes place the first Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon. Families work with The Warhol’s artist educators during this drop-in studio program.

EVENTS 4.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AN EVENING WITH MADELEINE PEYROUX Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with WYEP Tickets $35 / $30 Members & students

Youth Youth Invasion: Invasion: 2015 2015 5.8 – 5-10pm

4.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ MEHMARI & TATJANA MEAD CHAMIS Warhol theater Co-presented with MCG Jazz and the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Latin American Studies FREE parking in The Warhol lot Tickets $15 / $12 Members and students

Tickets $5

Teens take over The Warhol. This multi-faceted project features teens’ unique take on Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable, with their points of view, ideas, and creative expressions energizing the entire museum. The event features a fashion show and youth performances such as bands, dancers, and poets.

5.1 – 5-10pm GOOD FRIDAYS SPONSORED BY COHEN & GRIGSBY Half-price admission and cash bar

Photo: Laila Archuleta

5.29 – 7pm OPENING CELEBRATION: PEARLSTEIN, WARHOL, CANTOR: FROM PITTSBURGH TO NEW YORK Join us for the reveal of our latest special exhibition Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York with cash bar and swing-era jazz playlist provided by Mike Plaskett and Dale Abraham of Rhythm Sweet & Hot on 90.5 WESA. Free with museum admission

KID CITY Dance Party with DJ KellyMom 5.16 – 10am Warhol entrance space | FREE

At KID CITY, Pittsburgh’s own DJ KellyMom spins indie rock kids love to dance to, featuring artists like DEVO, The Velvet Underground, The Cars, The Smiths, Blondie, Talking Heads, Beastie Boys, James Brown, The Clash, and Martha and the Vandellas, among others. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

These programs are presented in connection with “The Year of the Family”. Visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

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BEER DINNERS • FOOD PAIRINGS • GAMES • FLIGHT NIGHTS • TAP TAKEOVERS • FIRKINS • BEER & CUPCAKES SPECIAL TAPPINGS • COLLABORATION BEERS • TAP FEATURES • BEER RELEASES • LOCAL BEER NIGHTS BEER BRUNCH • BARREL-AGED BEER • SO MUCH MORE... 4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015


{EDITORIAL}

04.22/04.29.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 16

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[MAIN FEATURE]

21 City Paper 2015 Music Issue

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[NEWS] an unfair burden to say Port 06 “It’s Authority should eat the cost of that free fare.” — Transit advocate Molly Nichols on the Steelers and Rivers Casino ceasing payments for North Side T service

[TASTE] Cabinet is what you need 17 “Liquor when you have a finite number of ingredients in your real liquor cabinet.” — Celine Roberts on cocktail apps

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC]

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“I think they appreciated the fact that we had the cojones to get up there and play some Hank Williams.” — Raul Malo of The Mavericks on opening for Marilyn Manson in the 1990s

[SCREEN] a hard sci-fi drama powered by 48 “It’s theoretical arguments, a locked-box

{ADMINISTRATION}

set-up and ever-shifting psychodrama.” — Al Hoff previews the new film Ex Machina

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[ARTS] a willingness to experiment 51 “There’s with form, use of playful language

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

and the confident voice of a writer who found his stride years ago.” — Fred Shaw reviews the new poetry collection by Terrance Hayes

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[STAGE]

stellar cast rips each other to shreds 54 “A with elegant depravity.” — Michelle Pilecki reviews Kinetic Theatre Co.’s production of The Dance of Death

[LAST TRACK] B-sides of our four collectible 70 The Music Issue covers

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 56 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 64 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 65 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 67 NEWS

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“IT’S AN UNFAIR BURDEN TO SAY PORT AUTHORITY SHOULD EAT THE COST OF THAT FREE FARE.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Go behind the scenes of the making of our four City Paper covers inspired by four classic album covers. Our music issue begins on page 21.

Mayor Bill Peduto is in the studio with Lynn Cullen this Friday. Listen to the livestream every weekday at 10 a.m. on www.pghcitypaper.com/ pittsburgh/LynnCullenLive/Page Ever wonder what CP staffers are listening to? We share our playlists at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Could free rides to Allegheny Station become a thing of the past?

INTERACTIVE

FREE RIDERS W

Collect all four Music Issue covers and win a concert prize pack! Two ways to win: Tweet a selfie holding all four using the hashtag #CPMusicIssue or post and hashtag the photo on our Facebook page. (One winner per platform; one prize pack per household). Prize pack includes a restaurant gift card and concert tickets for a great night out. Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to see Indigo Girls, with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, on Thu., April 30, at Heinz Hall. Contest ends April 23.

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HEN PORT AUTHORITY an-

nounced at its March board meeting that it had reached a $1.2 million deal to keep the T’s North Side station free of charge, it came with a glaring omission. There was no announcement of a deal to keep fares free at Allegheny Station — the final stop on the North Shore Connector — which have been underwritten for the past three years by the Steelers and Rivers Casino. The notable absence of a deal with Rivers and the Steelers hasn’t generated much outcry, partly because fares have remained free, and top Allegheny County and PAT officials have maintained their optimism that a new deal will be struck.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

But weeks after the Allegheny Station contract expired, and with no new deal in sight, transit advocates and experts

For the past three years, the Steelers and the casino have been paying for T fares to their front doors; now that they’ve stopped, the ride could be on you. {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} are wondering whether the Steelers and Rivers will become the ultimate free riders: benefitting from a service that

brings paying customers to their front doors free of charge, and which accommodates thousands of extra riders during special events — all without paying PAT a penny in return. “The Pirates and Steelers games could not happen the way they do without public transit,” says Molly Nichols, who heads the advocacy group Pittsburghers for Public Transit. “It’s an unfair burden to say Port Authority should eat the cost of that free fare.” Others say it’s a matter of business. “There may well be a price tag that has gotten beyond their interest,” says Mark Fatla, executive director of the Northside Leadership Conference. “It’s easy to say somebody has an obligation, but at CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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what price?� But have the Steelers and Rivers pulled out because of an unreasonable price tag? Or have they simply realized they might be able to take advantage of the free-fare zone without contributing to it? Either way, says Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, “We might get to the point where we can’t do a free-fare zone anymore. Free isn’t free.�

childs communications / graphic designer jennifer habetler photographer michael sahaida

M TTM

THE North Shore Connector opened in March 2012, it was widely considered a $523 million “boondoggle,â€? as current PAT CEO Ellen McLean recently put it. The 1.2-mile extension under the Allegheny River, connecting the T to the North Side, was the remnant of a transit vision once ďŹ lled with optimism and grandeur. As recently as the mid-1990s, the transit agency had considered building the ill-fated “Spine Lineâ€? — a light-rail system that would have connected Oakland to Downtown and the North Side. A Republican-led coalition in county government effectively killed the plan — and the resulting North Shore Connector ended up being “the leastworst alignment,â€? says Chris Sandvig, regional policy director for the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group. “And that ended up going to the stadiums.â€? With lobbying from groups like the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, and with Fitzgerald chipping in political muscle to negotiate with the Steelers and casino, the idea was born to continue the Downtown free-fare zone to the North Side. PDP “saw this as an opportunity to expand the borders of Downtown,â€? PAT spokesman Jim Ritchie says. OfďŹ cials also hoped it would help ease trafďŹ c Downtown and on the North Side by encouraging people to park and ride the T — all while spurring development. The original deal was structured so that each of the two North Shore Connector stations would have sponsors for making fares at those stations free. The Stadium Authority and Alco Parking would pay $495,000 over three years to keep North Side station free. The Steelers and Rivers Casino split $615,000 over three years to keep Allegheny Station free. Alco and the Stadium Authority

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agreed to a new deal that took effect last month and is worth $1.2 million over ďŹ ve years to keep North Side station free. That’s a roughly 41 percent increase in payments over their original contract — perhaps an indication of the free-fare zone’s increasing value. But there was a crucial difference in the deal with the Steelers and Rivers — something that the transit agency says has essentially derailed negotiations. According to the original agreement, $40,000 of their annual payments guaranteed exclusive advertising rights at Allegheny Station, along with the promise that PAT would not sell the naming rights to the station. Advertising and naming rights were never part of the North Side station deal with Alco and the Stadium Authority. Today, advertising in Allegheny Station is worth at least $100,000 to $150,000 per year, Ritchie says, well above the $40,000 the casino and Steelers split annually. Naming rights are likely worth hundreds of thousands of dollars more. PAT realized the value of the advertising space and went to the Steelers and casino with an offer to continue sponsoring free fares with payment increases similar to those secured with Alco and the Stadium Authority — only without ad rights, Ritchie says. That proposal was rejected and the transit agency made another offer that was similar, Ritchie says, to the original deal, but without ad rights. Still, the Steelers and casino balked. That position from the Steelers drew criticism from transit advocates like the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group’s Sandvig. “You are a $1 billion-plus franchise, one of the most successful in professional sports ‌ why wouldn’t you do it?â€? Sandvig asks. It also makes good business sense, Sandvig adds, “because it makes getting to your venue easier and cheaper for those who will be using it.â€? The Steelers declined to comment for this story. Through a spokeswoman, Rivers Casino General Manager Craig Clark wrote, “Rivers Casino has been proud to support the T free-fare zone, which is a great convenience for guests visiting the North Shore. We have made a proposal to [Port Authority] to renew our sponsorship.â€? The casino would not elaborate.

“WE MIGHT GET TO THE POINT WHERE WE CAN’T DO A FREE-FARE ZONE ANYMORE. FREE ISN’T FREE.�

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015


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FREE RIDERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

AT FIRST BLUSH, the case that North Side

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behemoths like the casino and Steelers should pay something for free transit seems easy to make. The Steelers, for instance, are the beneficiaries of considerable public support: About two-thirds of their $261 million stadium came from public money, according to Stadium Authority executive director Mary Conturo. And they were given, along with the Pirates, development rights to the land between Heinz Field and PNC Park. It’s the least they can do, argue groups like Pittsburghers for Public Transit, to give back in a way that ultimately benefits them anyway. And aside from subsidizing free fares, Nichols says, “PAT offers more service to these institutions when they have games,” a cost that the transit agency absorbs. But Nichols and other transit supporters acknowledge complicating factors. For starters, PAT never structured the contracts to collect money to offset the cost of beefing up service during special events, including extra personnel and

maintenance costs. (PAT does not track how much the extra service costs.) “All we ever tried to do is recover the fare we’re not collecting,” Ritchie explains. N o t eve ryo ne ha s co nt r i but e d equally, even among the city’s sports franchises that directly benefit. The Pirates, for instance, have never supported the free-fare zone despite being approached by PAT. The team did not return requests for comment. It’s also tricky to assess the fairness of the dollar amount PAT is asking for. The agency doesn’t track the number of people who ride the North Shore Connector (though about 6,000 people use Allegheny Station on an average weekday, according to agency estimates). So how exactly is the value of a station’s-worth of free fares being calculated? The answer isn’t based completely on hard data. “We … made agreements based on willingness to pay and value of the service we provided, and that’s the dollar amount,” says PAT CEO McLean. That argument convinced the Stadium

“IT’S EASY TO SAY SOMEBODY HAS AN OBLIGATION, BUT AT WHAT PRICE?”

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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HEALTH. BEAUTY. ENVIRONMENT. Join New Voices Pittsburgh for a 5-day celebration beginning on Earth Day as local and national leaders explore a wide range of issues from toxic beauty products, urban farming, food access, health & wellness, green jobs, fracking and more!

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FREE RIDERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Authority and Merrill Stabile, president of Alco Parking, both of whom were willing to increase their payments to keep the North Side station free. Stabile, who has sold about 1,000 more of his roughly 6,000 parking spaces each day since the connector opened, says, “PAT has been more than reasonable” in asking for more money based on increased costs and higher-thanexpected ridership. “The value to the Pirates and Steelers is there. There’s no reason they shouldn’t be in support of it in every way possible,” Stabile says. Part of the problem’s complexity, Ritchie acknowledges, is that the current model relies on sponsors who directly benefit from free fares at nearby stations. Instead, the agency could seek sponsors for the naming rights to the free-fare zone itself. SO WHAT happens if PAT starts charging at Allegheny Station? For one, PCRG’s Sandvig argues, it could lead to extra cars on the road and less-productive use of land if, instead of taking the T, people insist on parking

Downtown for work and on the North Side for special events. It would also affect roughly 13,739 Community College of Allegheny County students, a quarter of whom use public transit to get to the Allegheny Campus on the North Side, writes CCAC spokeswoman Elizabeth Johnston. Though the school does not track how many students ride the T, she calls the free fares a “financial lifeline” for students. “Subsidized transportation has been extremely helpful in enabling them to get to their classes, clinical sites and places of employment,” she writes. But bottom lines aside, if organizations like the Steelers stop subsidizing free service, will it have any effect on the public’s perception of them? “It probably depends on who you ask,” Sandvig says. “If you’re a suburbanite and not from the South Hills, it probably won’t matter. If you’re a city resident and you already think the Steelers get enough as it is, you’ll probably be upset. “Will you stop watching football? Probably not.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10AM

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CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S B Y R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.

NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Cass Alder, 22, bought table napkins made with images of $100 bills on them, then cut out the images, glued them onto paper and tried passing one of the bogus bills at a convenience store. The clerk refused to accept it. Alder exited the store, but left the bill behind. It was used in evidence against him at his trial in Charlottestown, Prince Edward Island, where a provincial court judge sentenced him to 18 months probation. (Charlottestown’s The Guardian)

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Micah Hatcher, 36, was charged with auto theft after he drove a stolen vehicle into the Washington State Patrol district office parking lot in Bellevue. Hatcher had been arrested a few days earlier and came to the district office to retrieve some belongings that had been taken then. Troopers said they were alerted to the stolen vehicle by a witness who recognized it from a Facebook post and followed Hatcher to his destination. (Seattle’s KOMO-TV)

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The world’s first university licensed to grant doctorate degrees in unmanned systems said its students can learn to fly an unmanned aerial vehicle in less than three weeks. Instruction at Arizona’s Unmanned Vehicle University consists of three phases, provost John Minor said. The first two allow students to learn at home, using a flight simulator. Phase three requires students to travel to one of the university’s flight schools around the country and work with an experienced flight instructor. The school charges students $3,500. (The Washington Times)

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Military researchers plan to test whether drones can be placed on the ocean floor for an indefinite period and then be activated remotely to attack surface targets. The drone operation, named the Upward Falling Payload program, faces three challenges, according to Steven H. Walker, deputy director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which heads the project: how to remotely trigger the launch; how to get the drone to float to the surface; and how to power and protect the system on the ocean floor for more than a year. (The Washington Times)

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Drone operators won’t need a pilot’s license, according to draft rules for commercial drones announced by the Federal Aviation Administration. Instead, the agency proposed that drones weighing less than 55 pounds that are well maintained and checked before flight can be flown by operators who’ve passed a basic aeronautical test. The drones would have to stay below 500 feet, fly only in daylight and not over people, and remain in view of their operators at all times. Amazon said the last requirement would prevent it starting its drone-delivery service. (The Economist)

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After John Noble, 53, shot and killed himself at a Henderson, Nev., resort buffet, authorities said he left a suicide note blaming the resort for his death by withdrawing its offer of free meals for life. The M Resort Spa Casino awarded him unlimited meals at its buffet in 2010 for being an M “biggest winner.” Three years later, it banned him from the property for harassing

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some of the women working there. “I was unjustifiably kicked out,” Noble insisted on a two-hour DVD of him talking about his troubles that accompanied his note. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

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An Indian bride dumped the groom after he incorrectly answered an arithmetic problem. Tipped off before the arranged marriage that Ram Baran was illiterate, Lovely Singh asked him to add 15 and 6. He replied 17, according to a police official in Rasoolabad, Uttar Pradesh. Father of the bride Mohar Singh said the “groom’s family had kept us in the dark about his poor education.” (BBC News)

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Also in Uttar Pradesh, when the groom at a wedding in Rampur had a seizure during the ceremony and was taken to the hospital, the bride and her family learned that he was epileptic and had kept that information from them. The angry bride then asked a guest, a member of her brother-in-law’s family, to marry her instead. He agreed. When the original groom, 25-yearold Jugal Kishore, returned from the hospital, he pleaded with the woman to change her mind, but she refused. Kishore and his family lodged a complaint, police official Ram Khiladi Solanki said, “But since the bride is already married now, what can anyone do?” (BBC News)

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Sheriff’s deputies who stopped a vehicle in Lincoln, Neb., reported finding a 16-ounce container under the front passenger’s labeled “Not Weed.” It held

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11.4 grams of marijuana. The 21-year-old driver admitted it belonged to him and was arrested. (Lincoln Journal Star)

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After an assistant principal at a middle school in Bedford County, Va., found a plant leaf and a lighter in a sixth-grader’s knapsack, the boy was suspended for 364 days and charged in juvenile court with possession of marijuana. Repeated testing, however, determined that the leaf wasn’t pot. Prosecutors dropped the charge, but the school upheld the suspension, citing school policy prohibiting not only controlled substances, but also imitations. School officials ordered the boy evaluated for a substanceabuse problem, which he doesn’t have. The school system also tried to reassign the 11-year-old, who had been enrolled in a gifted-and-talented program, to a program for troubled kids before allowing him to return to a regular school on strict probation. (The Roanoke Times)

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The adult-video site Pornhub posted a promotional video announcing it is developing a wearable device so men can generate electricity while masturbating. Dubbed “Wankband,” it straps to a user’s wrist and makes electricity when moved up and down, then stores the power, which can be retrieved by using a USB port to charge laptops, phones, cameras and tablets. “We’re going to show men how they can save the planet while doing what they do best,” the Pornhub video said. (New York Daily News)


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THE TONGUE N’ CHEEK APPETIZER WAS STRENUOUSLY COMPLEX

NEW LOAF IN TOWN {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} The new Bread and Salt Bakery is on Pearl Street, tucked behind Bloomfield’s busy Liberty Avenue business district, and is built on three ingredients: flour, salt and water. The bakery offers three kinds of bread — pane antico, pane casereccio and pane locale — distinguished by the ratio of organic white flour to local stone-milled whole wheat flour. The wheat flour comes from Avella, Pa. “All are made entirely organic and undergo a slow, natural fermentation process,” says the owner Rick Easton. Easton sells the bread by the pound, partly because he is a solo baker and it’s easier to make larger loaves rather than several smaller ones (much like how cheese is produced in large wheels). But Easton says the main reason for large batches is quality. “Breads made with natural leavening actually have much better quality in larger loaves,” he explains. Easton trained in the United States, but also spent time learning breadmaking in France and Italy. “This is very much a model of how people do it in Europe,” Easton says. Though the crusty loaves of organic bread are the bakery’s main feature, other fare includes toast with topping choices, including: Italian cured pork fat, ricotta and honey and a combination of chocolate, olive oil and sea salt. Flatbread pizzas and pastries are also available at lunch time. Watch out for the uncharacteristic bakery hours: Thu.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 330 Pearl St., Bloomfield AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

In this new documentary from Nelson Campbell,

PlantPure Nation, Dr. T. Colin Campbell tests the merits of a plantbased diet on a small Southern town, more accustomed to eating processed food. See how it turned out in this preview screening. Both Campbells are scheduled to do a Q&A. 7 p.m. Fri., April 24. SouthSide Works. Tickets at www.plantpurenation.com

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HIGH ABOVE {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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T’S ACCEPTED that dining on Grandview Avenue comes at a premium price: It is, after all, a premium view. For a long time that meant either stuffy, old-school surf-and-turf or frankly mediocre fare that was clearly not, nor meant to be, the main event. But in recent years, Pittsburgh’s culinary awakening has touched the heights of Mount Washington, combining that famous view at last with exciting, modern cuisine. In this spirit, Altius opened last year to considerable local buzz. Its sleekly modern, two-level dining room clearly defines its style as current. Prices are as high as its exalted perch atop the mount, but as the best restaurants understand, special food should come with a sense of occasion, and that includes what happens inside the dining room as well as the view outside. Altius delivers with an array of professional servers bestowing attention without hovering or getting too familiar. In the kitchen is Chef Jessica Bauer, also of the excellent Bistro 19 in Mount Lebanon. The menu’s description of “elevated

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Chilean sea bass with saffron-lobster couscous, Swiss chard and carrot-ginger emulsion

cuisine” seems to combine a couple of contemporary trends: fairly traditional dishes, provenance noted (Skuna Bay salmon, Bershire pork chop), and what we can only describe as a ’90s tendency toward unexpected fusions (short rib braised in Mexican chocolate), with ingredients that read like grocery lists (lamb rack with chestnut purée, lingonberry compote, root vegetable comfit and truffled Madeira jus).

ALTIUS 1230 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-904-4442 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m.; Sun. brunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 5-9 p.m. PRICES: Starters $8-15; entrees $24-44 LIQUOR: Full bar

What might be a ponderous approach is lightened by bits of whimsy, such as the “Tongue n’ Cheek” and “Duck, Duck, Goose.” We also received little “gifts” from the kitchen, including a metal cone of popcorn (flavored with sundried tomato, quite tasty), an amuse bouche (chestnut puree on

a tiny, edible cracker-spoon) and a goodie bag containing a two-bite dessert (a blondie-like bar with macadamia and chocolate). It was all almost charming enough to justify the $36 average price for an entrée. The aforementioned Tongue n’ Cheek appetizer was strenuously complex: a slice of beef tongue, slow-cooked for tenderness and then crisped at the edges; topped with little beef-cheek pierogi, on a bed of leek and mushroom; and sauced with veal demi-glace and a token dollop of horseradish crème fraîche. The tongue had a bit of the earthy taste and texture of patê, and was well countered by the rich and slightly sweet dumplings and sauce, but it didn’t quite achieve balance. Had the horseradish been in evidence, its bite would have added welcome top notes. It was hard to say whether this dish was too much, or not enough. A nightly special of tilefish topped with shrimp — served with head and tail on — offered promising components: the thick, white filet deeply browned to form a crust on top, the shrimp intensely flavored, if not


quite succulent. But, despite several other components, including a lobster roe cream poured on at tableside, it failed to equal, let alone exceed, the sum of its many parts. This proved to be a theme. The Duck, Duck, Goose consisted of seared breast, confit leg and whipped pâté, respectively, plus challah crostini, huckleberry duck jus, polenta and kale. Even when it was possible to assemble a bite including each of these ingredients at once, the combination failed to sing. It seemed the faintly gamy leg was supposed to contrast with the sweet huckleberry jus, but with so many other components, the effect was muddled.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

DIGITAL BARTENDING Two apps make your home cocktail night more fun

Pear, walnut and gorgonzola ravioli, topped with balsamic cream, Swiss chard, wild mushrooms and diced butternut squash had a more uniform autumnal theme that enabled the ingredients to work together, rather than compete, to build a woodsy flavor profile. The salmon was the most straightforward dish we ordered, and possibly the most successful. The seeds and salt of the “everything bagel” crust added depth and savor to the rosy, juicy salmon, and fluffy Carolina gold rice was a satisfying accompaniment. A fennel-and-orange salad brightened the plate with its citrus sweetness, and sundried-tomato cream added further notes of both richness and acidity. Altius has reached for the sky with some of the most complex and original recipes we’ve seen. But while individual components of our dishes could be exquisite, they tended to confound as they compounded. We expected “elevated cuisine,” at corresponding prices, to be closer to sublime.

Drinking? There’s more than a few apps for that. As one of those people who (annoyingly) waxes poetic about the aesthetic experience of using actual books, I admit that even this Luddite has begun embracing the magic that a smartphone drink Rolodex can offer. Here are two examples sure to make your next cocktail night at home a little more fun. Mixology, for Android and iPhone, is currently the most downloaded cocktail-recipe app out there; it’s also free (you can upgrade to the ad-free Mixologist for 99 cents). Mixology is easy to navigate and offers features like interactive maps to the nearest bars and liquor stores, bartending tips and “Liquor Cabinet.” Liquor Cabinet is exactly what you need when you have a house full of people and a finite number of ingredients in your real liquor cabinet. The interface allows you to select all of the liquors and mixers you have lying around, and then spits back recipes of all possible and bar-vetted combinations. Its database boasts thousands of recipes, also searchable by categories covering everything from classic cocktails to serve your in-laws to Jell-O shots for your friends. If something strikes your fancy, add it to your “Favorites” folder for repeat drinking at a later date. Now that you’re ready to play bartender, you’ll want a drink to fit the mood. Created in 2011 and a bit of a dinosaur, Drinkify is a web app with simple interface based on a silly idea. Type in a music artist and Drinkify gives you a drink recipe, which is often half-joke, half-truth, to go with your jams. The program uses last.fm and The Echo Nest to pull artists’ data and stream a song from their repertoires. It’s an insane amount of data for such a simple purpose, and it can be a little glitch-y, but its utter frivolity makes it good for a few laughs. An updated version would have my vote.

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The Frick cocktail

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE

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BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

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CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J DINETTE. 5996 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-2622920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The

Kavsar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J EVEREST. 4042 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Brentwood. 877-650-2694. At this Nepalese restaurant, diners can expect momos, the region’s characteristic dumplings, here filled with chicken or vegetables, and served with dipping sauces. Also on the menu, variations on dishes associated with Indian cuisines, such samosas, sambar soup, rice pilafs and curries. JF

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant, situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-344-4123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE

Eden {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterraneaninspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF

KAVSAR. 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-488-8708 or 412-488-8709. The varied cuisine of the old Silk Road is available at this Uzbekistan restaurant. The menu reflects the country’s time as a Soviet Socialist republic, with beef stroganoff and blini-like crepes rolled around savory fillings, and its proximity to China, evident in many dishes based upon noodles and dumplings. K


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40 Craft Beers

The first hit is free. Everest {PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK} KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF

watermelon salad). LE SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet justright blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE

STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing www. per seasonal ingredients pa pghcitym MALLORCA. 2228 E. .co and house-made pastas Carson St., South Side. to flavorful meat entrees 412-488-1818. The ambience and vegetarian plates, the fare here is full of Old World charm, exhibits a masterful combination with just a touch of hipness of flavors and textures. KF bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. no mistaking the restaurant’s 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. signature dish: paella, featuring 412-394-3400. The venerable a bright red lobster tail. In warm Italian restaurant from Greensburg weather, enjoy the outdoor patio now has a Downtown outpost. along lively Carson Street. KE In this elegant space, some classic dishes are updated; a few NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. favorites, like turtle soup are Highland Ave., Shadyside. www. retained; and the fresh mozzarella noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky bar deserves to become a classic. atmosphere, Noodlehead offers Try the distinctive pizza, with a an elemental approach to the layered, cracker-like crust. LE delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., small menu offers soups, noodle Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. dishes and a few “snacks,” among Eschewing the epic list of them fried chicken and steamed dishes most Chinese-American buns with pork belly. The freshly restaurants proffer, this prepared dishes are garnished attractively decorated store-front with fresh herbs, pork cracklings venue sticks to a modest number and pickled mustard greens. JF of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or District. 412-281-0660. The Strip sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish District now has a swanky from China’s Gansu province) JF spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South suggests a cross between current Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique fine-dining culture (locally sourced décor you can buy and a massive, foods, sous vide meats), lounge convivial Sunday brunch make this favorites (sliders and fish tacos) a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For and Southern comfort (chicken the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ with black-eyed peas and greens,

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save the

planet in one

simple step: hop on the bus orT. Public Transportation is estimated to reduce CO2 emissions by 37 million metric tons annually. is cleaning up Pittsburgh’s air; Port Authority’s total particulate matter emissions fell by 66% between 2005 and 2013; emissions of nitrous oxide fell by 72% in that same time frame. reduces traffic congestion because 1 bus keeps an average of 60 cars off the road. reduces your energy consumption, because the average car on the road gets 19 mpg, while the equivalent per person on a Port Authority bus is 46 mpg. provides an affordable alternative to driving. Households that use public transportation save an average of $6,251 every year. reduces CO2 emissions for a solo commuter by 20 pounds per day by switching to commuting from a private vehicle to public transportation, saving more than 4,800 pounds per year. is doing its part, Port Authority has increased it’s fleet of hybrid buses to a total of 32.

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hind Go bsecenes the Paper ’s y of Cit OVERC R TS U O F SHO.O O T O w PH at ww er typap pghc.icom

As you can see from this week’s covers (collect all four!), some kids are just natural rock stars. Which makes sense: It’s easier to learn to play drums when you’re 12 than when you’re 32. Plus, with a more limited awareness of the larger musical landscape, artistic risks are slightly less frightening. As Rock School Pittsburgh founder Eric Brockschmidt puts it, “We get older and realize that we have to be more conscious of what the outside world thinks of us. A kid isn’t thinking about that stuff. They’re just worried about going up there and not messing up.” In this issue, we’ll explore the surprisingly diverse selection of rock camps this city has to offer: Maybe you have a budding rock star in your life who just needs a push in the right direction. (They can thank you later by using their royalty money to buy you a house … or at least hook you up with backstage passes.) Too old for camp? This issue also offers songwriting advice from local musicians; a real, live tour diary offering a glimpse of life on the road; and a guide for when you’re done writing and ready to record — handy for artists of all ages. You can also learn what some notable locals are listening to when they’ve got the headphones on. BY MARGARET WELSH

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{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Bill Earl (center) and Eric Brockschmidt help Rock School students set up.

KID ROCK O

NSTAGE AT THE New Bohemian — a church-turned-venue/tattoo shop in the North Side — a band called the Funktion launches into a familiar cover. “There is a house in New Orleans / they caaallllll the rising sun.” There are two lead singers, of notably differing heights: The taller one is dressed in black sequins and pink Doc Martens, while the smaller one looks a little like she stepped out of a Jane Fonda workout tape. Both have their hair in side ponies. As they trade off verses, the lead guitarist mugs at the audience from the background, and the floppy-

haired drummer keeps the beat with stonefaced concentration. Holding it all together is a bespectacled keyboardist/singer/guitarist, who seems to still be growing into his bulky white tennis shoes. It’s a pretty solid rendition, especially considering its being played by a group of slightly wound-up, slightly nervous 8- and 9-year-olds. This is the dress rehearsal for Rock School Pittsburgh’s end-of-semester concert, a chance for the program’s participants, the oldest of whom are in their late teens, to show off the songs they’ve spent the past

Music isn’t the only lesson p students learn at rock cam {BY MARGARET WELSH}

eight weeks learning. This semester’s show — set for Jergels, in Warrendale, on April 26 — is entitled “1984,” which means that most of the songs were either popular that year (“99 Red Balloons”), or have some loose theme of dystopian paranoia (“Every Breath You Take”). Some songs, like “House of the Rising Sun,” don’t really fit the theme at all: They’re just fun to play. Rock School Pittsburgh has been around for about seven years, but founder Eric Brockschmidt has been uniting young musicians in kids’ rock since 2004. Working as a guitar teacher at a music store in Wexford, he re-

calls, “We were like, ‘Hey, all these kids are taking lessons — we should put them together in a band.’” That year, the kids held their final performance on the front porch of the store. “It was really loose and really wild.” The store closed not long after, but Brockschimdt, along with a handful of instructors, continued the program. Though Rock School Pittsburgh emerged organically, the concept isn’t a new one. Paul Green started the Paul Green School of Rock Music, in Philadelphia, in the late ’90s; it later became the country’s best-known rock-camp franchise, The School of Rock. (It was also the CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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WE BUY RECORDS & CDS A concert by children featuring the violin folk music of the Americas and the world...to continue funding and supplying music education efforts to orphans at the Menri Monastery in Solan, India. The youth are taught as part of the Bon Dialectic School and sponsored with the Music for Menri outreach project founded by Olmo Ling Bon Center and Institute.

Friday Evening April 24, 2015 7pm

$20.00 at the door

MONDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-6PM SATURDAY 10AM-5PM

$15.00 Student Discount

First United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall 5401 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh PA

513 GRANT AVENUE • MILLVALE Questions? Call Us 412-821-8484

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Enjoy $5 Pints during Craft Beer Week! After Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week check out our Craft Beer Happy Hour featuring 1/2 off all Craft Beers from 5:005:00-7:00pm Monday - Friday 122 W. 8th Ave. • Homestead • 412-461-8124 • Dukesupperdeck.com 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

KID ROCK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

inspiration for Richard Linklater’s 2003 film comedy School of Rock, and the subject of the 2005 documentary, Rock School.) Many similar programs exist both locally and nationally. And while the particulars of each program vary, the concept is generally the same: Get a bunch of kids together, divvy them into bands and, with the support of their teachers, let them embrace their inner rock stars. Some students show up to Rock School with a few music lessons under their belt, but others have no experience at all. Many students return semester after semester. Fifteen-year-old Blair Nelson, who performs at the rehearsal in spandex pants and bare feet, has been in the program for three years. As the dynamic lead singer for a group of 14to 17-year-olds — “We don’t have a name yet, but that’s OK!” she tells the audience — she nails ambitious crowd-pleasers like Van Halen’s “Panama” and Queen’s “Don’t Stop Me Now.” “I never knew how fun it could be to be in a band,” she gushes later, noting the transformative effect of playing for an audience. “You’ve got these people who [you see at school] and they’re really quiet, and then they get up in front of people … it’s great to see. It’s a great experience all around.” The process can be a challenge, of course. Brockschmidt compares it to trying to build something with a bag of mismatched Legos. “Some pieces don’t necessarily fit together and you sort of have to force it,” he says. “Usually those are the best [situations], because you have people interacting who wouldn’t normally be interacting with each other. And you learn about being a human being to other people who you don’t necessarily know.” “REAL.LIFE.MUSIC Camp,” a “rock-star reality camp” and branch of Mr. Small’s Theatre’s nonprofit Creative.Life.Support, shares that goal of developing the confidence of young musicians, but takes a slightly different educational approach. Where Rock School instructors help students assemble a set of covers, Real.Life. Music Camp — which has been around for 12 years and begins on Aug. 10 — focuses on original songwriting, and learning what it takes to have a career in the music business. Campers record in Mr. Small’s professional studio, do photo shoots and put together press kits. “The majority of students are kids who are serious about it and want to actually form bands or [become] professional musicians,” says founder Liz Berlin, who has had plenty of experience in the music world as a member of the band Rusted Root. “Maybe they discover throughout the camp that they actually want to be a tour manager, or CONTINUES ON PG. 26

PERFECTipsTfor aspiring PITCH songwriters Sitting down to write a song can be a daunting process, so City Paper asked four local musicians to share their songwriting advice, and their own experiences with the craft.

I draw inspiration from other people’s work, usually a sentence or passage from a book, or someone else’s song or lyric that has affected me in some way. I don’t like to rush or force things, so it may take me several minutes www.rashadjamaal or several isbillypilgrim.com weeks. When I have the words down, subject to editing, I generally practice first without music as I am of firm belief in the power of words. They shape the world we live in, and if the words are truth, they should be able to stand on their own without accoutrement to be understood and felt. If your words have power, they will move. Next, I usually practice it over different music, rhythms, etc., to open up vocal possibility and option of style to the point I can “breathe” the lyrics naturally, no matter the backing music. I always work on multiple projects at once so I don’t get stagnant.

— BILLY PILGRIM, HIP-HOP ARTIST, AS TOLD TO CAROLYNE WHELAN

The best songs are honest songs. Whether you’re telling the truth or not from your own deepest heart … there’s kind of an honesty that can shine through a lyric in any song. Try to find your own story, and be as true and bold as you can possibly www.billdeasy.com be in telling it. Just give yourself that permission to express that story that only you can express. When you’re being your most honest and your most free, it’s bound to resonate [with] people. Try not to chase the fad of the moment or write a hit song: Find your own thing, because whatever you’re trying to be, it will change in two seconds.”

— BILL DEASY, SINGER-SONGWRITER, NOVELIST AND FORMER FRONTMAN OF THE GATHERING FIELD, AS TOLD TO SHAWN COOKE HEAR FROM TWO MORE MUSICIANS ON PG. 34


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KID ROCK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

“I think having a platform to express that and having techniques for expressing those things, and then actually getting to record and perform live … it kind of opens up their world a little bit.” LIKE BERLIN’S program, Girls Rock is a weeklong day camp. Band members write their own songs, and the week ends with a performance showcase. But rather than focusing on a future career, or even an end product — important as those things may be — Girls Rock is all about personal development.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

For those about to rock: Lucha Batera (left), Jasmine Liberty, program coordinator Madeleine Campbell, Lilliana Watling

a booking agent at a club. “We try to open up their world in terms of what career tracks are out there, and what is actually necessary to go in those directions.” During the winter, Creative.Life.Support also holds the We Rock Workshop, an in-

tensive 18-week, Allegheny County-funded program for kids who are part of the foster system. Like Real.Life.Music, We Rock centers on creating original music, and ends with a performance. The current group performs its final show on May 8 at Mr. Small’s Theatre.

“It really boosts their confidence,” Berlin says of the participants. “They come in not knowing what to do, and they learn how to collaborate and learn how to express themselves. The lyrics that come out sometimes are really stunning.

Autismspeaks.org, Famous by affiliation, media famous & Grind MGMT presents

“I do not consider us a music camp,” explains program coordinator Madeleine Campbell. “It’s really an empowerment camp.” Girls Rock Pittsburgh, which is entirely volunteer-run, held its first camp in the summer of 2013. A member of the international Girls Rock Camp Alliance, Girls Rock Pittsburgh is just one of many similar camps around the world, the first of which was formed in Portland, in 2001. “If [a] camper walks out and never touches a guitar again in her life, that’s fine. But we want her to know that she can, and she has the resources, she has people who will support her,” Campbell says. “We’re really trying to instill core life skills with music as a vehicle.” Enrollment is limited to girls age 8-18, and all instructors are female-identifying or gender non-conforming (though Campbell notes that there are many helpful dads and other men who volunteer behind the scenes). People often ask why the program isn’t co-ed, a question which Campbell says always makes her smile a bit: The answer seems obvious. In the still male-dominated music world, it can be challenging for any woman to feel completely at home. Girls Rock provides a chance to flourish in

Tune Up For Spring Time!

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DAILY, WEEKLY OR MONTHLY PA SYSTEMS SUBWOOFERS MONITORS DRUMS & PERCUSSION CYMBALS

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GUITARS BASSES RECORDING GEAR INSTRUMENT AMPLIFICATION

BIG DADDY KANE, KOOL G RAP BRANDPLUSNUBIAN, DAS EFX SPECIAL GUEST JOEY FATTZ, G HUFF, VICE SOULECTRIC & KENT LUCAS MUSIC HOST: DJ. NICK NICE

FRIDAY, MAY 15TH 2015

THE PITTSBURGH COLISEUM

Guitar Center Pittsburgh 1020 Park Manor Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15205 | 412-788-1071

7310 FRANKSTOWN AVE., PITTSBURGH PA 15208

Visit guitarcenter.com/rentals for details.

Tickets available at Dorsey’s. Son of Stedefords & Upbeat records. Order tickets online at thatshiphop.eventbrite.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

The Piano Hawk PIANO TUNING & REPAIR Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266


a different kind of space. “We want campers to see all of those roles fulfilled by someone who looks like them and feels like them and talks like them,” Campbell explains. After forming and naming bands on the first day, much of the week is devoted to musical instruction, songwriting and practicing. There are also daily workshops on subjects ranging from the theoretical — like gender and body image, and the representation of women in media — to the practical, including recording and screen-printing (every band makes its own merch, which members sell at the final show). Local female artists also stop by for daily lunchtime performances.

“WE’RE REALLY TRYING TO INSTILL CORE LIFE SKILLS WITH MUSIC AS A VEHICLE.” For one camper, 9-year-old Tellie, the guest artists were a major highlight. “I could see the energy in her when she spoke about them,” her dad, Ryan Keene, says via email. The other benefits were clear as well. “[Girls Rock strives] to develop in these girls a voice to express their ideas [and] opinions loud enough to be heard above the stereotypes that are so abundant in our culture,” Keene wrote. “I saw this in my own daughter. … We saw her gain confidence in her voice and beliefs. She grew strong friendships with other girls [who] supported each other and helped

[to] overcome barriers they struggle with every day.” Parents of Girls Rock participants are asked to sign an agreement saying that they will not censor their daughter for the week. “Whatever their child wants to talk about or write about, they’re not going to try to persuade them in either direction, which really adds to the idea that we’re trying to create a safe space,” Campbell says. That safety and freedom leads to some interesting artistic developments. While working with the two guitarists of one Girls Rock band, “one of them got so frustrated with chords, she grabbed a drumstick and started rubbing it up and down the neck of the guitar,” Campbell recalls with a laugh. “I was like, ‘I feel like Thurston Moore did that decades ago,’ but [this girl had] never seen that before.” Ultimately, the idea is to show campers that that there are no mistakes or wrong notes, which is a philosophy Campbell — as a classically trained cellist — is happy to be reminded of in her own life. “I have a degree in music, and I’m still getting myself back in the frame of mind of like, ‘I want to play music for fun with my friends,’” she says. “Sometimes I feel almost guilty because I’ve taken so much from Girls Rock — it’s helped me, and I’m a quasigrown person.” Rock School’s Brockschmidt agrees that the benefits goes both ways. “These kids have kind of an eternal hope and eternal joy and eternal love for life. Or,” he adds with a laugh, “you get these kids who have these attitudes because they don’t trust anyone. And the teachers can kind of relate to that.” And really, isn’t that what rock ’n’ roll is all about?

GET INVOLVED The City of Pittsburgh invites you to provide input on an action plan for transit improvements and community development in the corridor between Downtown and neighborhoods east. Tuesday, May 5, 2015 Uptown/Downtown, Noon – 2:00 pm Duquesne University, Power Center Ballroom 1015 Forbes Avenue. Wednesday, May 6, 2015 Oakland, 6:00 – 8:00 pm William Pitt Student Union, Kurtzman Room, 3959 Fifth Avenue. At these upcoming public meetings, the City of Pittsburgh will provide an overview of coordinated planning efforts in the corridor along Fifth and Forbes Avenues, including the Downtown, Uptown, Oakland, and other east end neighborhoods. This will involve a review of ongoing planning for transit improvements, including bus rapid transit (BRT), and upcoming planning for an EcoInnovation District in the Uptown neighborhood. Per the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, which govern transit planning, the environmental scoping process will include the opportunity for the public and agencies to provide comment on the purpose and need for transit improvements, as well as environmental issues that should be considered. Participants will also be able to provide preliminary input on possible station locations for proposed BRT alignments. The goal of the Uptown EcoInnovation District is a revitalized Uptown community, which is both environmentally and financially sustainable while promoting equity, and public and private sector innovation. The City of Pittsburgh has undertaken an effort to coordinate multiple complimentary planning projects in this corridor. The purpose is to capitalize on the community and economic development potential of the neighborhoods in this corridor while better connecting them, to each other and the region, through improved mobility. The City will knit together neighborhood-based planning projects, which will influence planning for improved transit service and infrastructure underway by Port Authority of Allegheny County.

MWELSH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

For more information, contact Patrick Roberts, Department of City Planning, Principal Transportation Planner at 412.255.2224 or patrick.roberts@pittsburghpa.gov The meeting locations are accessible to persons with mobility disabilities, a sign language interpreter will be available and the meeting document will be available to attendees in Spanish and Braille. Both meetings are accessible via Port Authority service. For more transit schedule information, go to PortAuthority.org or call 412.442.2000.

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SO YOU WANT TO MAKE A RECORD ...

L}

{BY MADELEINE CAMPBEL

YOUR BAND has written, arranged and rehearsed a new collection of songs that are now ready to record. What next? If you have not experienced a live recording session, entering the studio can be both exciting and daunting. Whether you have chosen to tackle the entire process yourself, or are tracking, mixing and mastering with a staff of studio engineers, the process of making records has the same basic steps.

Pre-production is an often overlooked, but crucial, element to any successful recording.

is a community-based intergenerational women’s choir with a mission to enrich and educate its singers and its audiences, by performing varied repertoire that features challenging compositions in wide-ranging musical styles and diverse languages, by composers from around the world.

Map out as many details as possible before you start. When, where and with whom are you looking to record? How many songs do you want on your record? What is your budget? What are your deadlines? Pittsburgh has a collection of great studios, but not all of them will be the best fit for you. Call and ask to take a tour, and see spaces for yourself. Many studios book weeks or months out, so schedule in advance and stick with those days. Offer the engineer demos to get an idea of your sound, even if they were recorded on your phone. If you are recording in a non-studio setting (i.e. your basement or garage), track a few demos to make sure everyone is comfortable with the sounds of the recording environment. Use this time to make sure all music is well rehearsed.

The term “tracking” means recording your songs.

Belle Voci is looking for new singers for the 2015-16 concert season!

Interested in getting involved? Women of all ages and backgrounds who are interested in singing with an ensemble that pursues musical excellence should e-mail us at:

belle.voci.pgh@gmail.com or check us out at BELLEVOCIPGH.COM 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

Take ample time in setup to make sure you feel confident about the sound of your tracks. Experiment with different microphones and signal processors to see what gear best suits your music. If you are not satisfied, speak up! Some bands choose to record live — meaning all instruments are playing together at once just as they would a live show — and some choose to record in stages starting with drums and guitar or bass. It’s common for bands to record many takes of each song before deciding on one performance, so never hesitate to take a break if you are tired or frustrated.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Madeleine Campbell

Once tracks are recorded, mixing begins. This process entails editing, sculpting and blending all the individual tracks into one cohesive entity. The mixer will incorporate tools like panning, EQ and compression to help the tracks fit seamlessly with each another. Reference bands whose production or sound you admire. It will help you maintain focus on your sonic goals.

Mastering is the last stop before duplication. Mastering engineers work with one stereo audio file, as opposed to many individual tracks. These days, many albums are recorded in five different places with five different engineers. Mastering helps ensure that your songs will sound uniform in volume, frequency response and dynamic range, and will usually make your songs louder. If your mixes have undesirable or extraneous pops, clicks or noises, most mastering engineers are equipped to remove them. Mastering engineers may handle mixes differently for vinyl or cassette versus digital download, so let them know how you intend to release your songs. Keep in mind there is no right or wrong way to make a record, and every recording environment is different. After all, experimentation is how recording technology has advanced so far in such a short time. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Madeleine Campbell is a recording and mix engineer at Treelady Studios.


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Fire K Studios World Class Sound, Right Next Door 5001 Curry Road {Suite # 3} Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412.655.3030 info@firekstudios.com

email us with the subject: Free Studio Time to enter a raffle for 6 hours of free studio time. *Visit our website for details

Tour Diary

y and Only The One r e ill M Matt

On the Road With Matt Miller {BY MATT MILLER}

Editor’s Note: Johnstown-based singer-songwriter Matt Miller — who performs under the moniker “The One and Only Matt Miller” — makes lo-fi

www.firekstudios.com

and warmly experimental music that wouldn’t sound out of place on the Elephant 6 roster. He recently joined fellow Johnstown act Stage Hands for a three-week Southern tour, and was kind enough to give us his unique take of life on the road.

ave . I will h on tour t o n d ds. 34 an ge Han to Sta I will be , t x is e h n t ring ead m” over time I r arianis ies, sno t it e n c h e ing t e m y h in B ite say s in n tablis s, desp 15 floor tidises e n n t a o t “ e t r d p r a sle cig the wo s many ve sung twice a d e I will ha . k g o in m s t sing es, and king, no o m 40 tim S . quit oing to I was g I will have hopefully forgotten how many times I forgot the second verse to that Brecht song I’ve been singing, or how many names I forget from the last time I toured. I’ll be home, worrying about my June tour. But today I’m on tour with Stage Hands, writing an article, while Becky, our host for the night, quotes Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. First day, I drove all day. Eight hours from Johnstown, Pa., our home, to Charlotte, N.C., our newest home away from our home. I haven’t driven since. I wasn’t in the parking lot more than five minutes before I was somewhere else. Ben’s advice: “Smoke as much as you can, the weed sucks here.”

the alley e Dumpster in The writing on th ce at least for dick pics sin has been asking in this alley. last time I was November, the tures of Dick was to send pic Robert’s idea ick Nixon. He Cavett and D Cheney, Dick ts. up in his contac er and it came dialed the numb

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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#Just

Summ

June 18 nes Quartet Sean Jo

er20

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CHAMBER MUSIC PITTSBURGH PRES

! R E M M U S T JUS 2015 June 29 Time for Three

MUSIC. FOOD. FRIENDS.

July 9 Pablo Villegas EA

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TICKETS $25 INCLUDES FOOD AND DRINK

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Just Summer! is part of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater’s East Liberty LIVE! series. NEWS

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TOUR DIARY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

UPCOMING SHOWS

tue apr 28 thu may 14 thu may 28 SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 4.22 Thu 4.23 Fri 4.24 Sat 4.25 Sun 4.26

SCOTT, ROB & GREG OF THE CLARKS // 8 pm // $9 NIGHTRAIN – GUNS-N-ROSES TRIBUTE // 8 pm // $10 THE CLINTONES // rock covers // 9 pm // $9 NEW WAVE NATION // pop covers // 9 pm // $9 ROCK SCHOOL PITTSBURGH // rock // 6 pm // no cover

CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

Inside, Scott yelled at the crowd until they applauded with enough enthusiasm to meet his approval. On the mic, he said we were some of the nicest people he books. I love that he feels that way because the feeling is mutual. The next day we met Katie, who said we were the worst. I’m sorry she feels that way, but the feeling is mutual. I hate her. I wasn’t in her yard more than five minutes before she wanted me to leave because I wouldn’t play beer pong. I wish I was oversimplifying that, but I’m not.

It’s much easier for d me to be misunderstoo in an onstage rather th no real life. In Columbia,

th one laughed at the ba y ntr cou my in salts line d ghe lau n eve song. No one y ntr cou a g at me for playin l nta ime song at an exper be electronic show. May

. that line’s not funny

isn’t. Maybe country music th. Maybe I’m too far sou

When I’m on tour, I’m me. hoping everyone likes too. I mean as a person, More so, I guess.

Otherwise, it’s a terrible night and next day. Tonight in Gainesville, Stage Hands played for a bunch of pretentious twerps, all of whom I wanted to like me. I’m still reeling from being Charleston’s least-wanted. I should have known it was going to be bad when no singer-songwriters were allowed on the bill. So all I had to do was dance and sing one song. Here’s how bad it was. I overheard someone say, “The touring band is from Johnstown.” Then a long pause. Then he said, “Pennsylvania,” like his unfortunate conversation partner should have known. Then his unfortunate conversation partner said, “Oh, right,” like he knew where Johnstown was. Joel, not Geoff (or Jeff), said no one dances worse than him but me. But then Thursday’s go-go dancer remembered my moves from November. So at least someone remembers something. It’s hard most days not to feel like, well … this article. One of many articles; one of many artists. Skimmed and surrounded. The Furr, Can’t Kids, Cult of Riggonia, Naan Violence, Stage Hands — all better articles; all better artists. I mean, in Tallahassee, the bartender free-styled, from behind the bar. “I ain’t in it for the tips / but y’all ain’t paying me shit.” That makes me want to quit. But I can’t quit now. Smoking, I will. Well, not now, but I will. Honest. Singing I won’t. I can’t. I can’t quit touring, because I can’t quit making songs I want to play, because I can’t quit writing. But I’d better go. Oh, and Emmy, please save me as many copies of this as you see. Maybe I’ll use it as artwork for a live album. See how it goes next time, too. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

PERFECTipsTfor aspiring PITCH songwriters City Paper asked four local musicians to share their songwriting advice and their own experiences with the craft.

Figure out your motive: Are you writing for yourself? For someone else? With others? I think songwriting is an iterative process that changes over time. If you hear something, put it down, whatever form it is in. Analyze the song structures of those you admire, www.shani listen to their banerjee.com instrumentation, find what you can do differently and take chances. If you are a lyrical writer, jot down your thoughts, even the sordid ones. Especially the sordid ones. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes, there is no perfection; it’s fine to leave [a song] behind and move on, but try to follow it through, even if you think it sucks. Sucking leads to awesome, and inevitably back to sucking, and then rinse, repeat.

— SHANI BANERJEE, GENRE-SPANNING SINGERSONGWRITER AND MULTIINSTRUMENTALIST, AS TOLD TO MARGARET WELSH (VIA EMAIL)

I like to listen to the beat first. To get the best feeling and capture the emotion for a song, I, at least, have the music mostly prepared. Sometimes when I work on songs and the beat gets changed too much later, it loses some of the feeling that I felt when I rapped the verses. Another thing I do is mumble: www.beedieland.com This is kind of weird, but a lot of people do this. Once [I] have the beat down, I brainstorm for a while and listen to it on repeat like 10 times. Sometimes I start writing right away if it comes to me. But I start usually [by] humming melodies first, try out different deliveries — then I figure out the cadence, and then I figure out the words.

— BEEDIE, HIP-HOP ARTIST, AS TOLD TO TREVOR LEARD


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Think outside the Bach.

2015 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Summer Concert Series 36

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C Classical BBQ: S Summer Spectacular! Sponsored by BNY Mellon S A August 2, 6:30 p.m.

CONCERT IN THE PARK:

Hartwood Acres July 5, 8:15 p.m.

CONCERT IN THE

PARK

(Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.) THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

BNY Mellon Presents Smokey Robinson July 9, 7:30 p.m.

Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival Monday, June 8, 7 p.m. Point State Park, downtown

NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: A Salute to Veterans August 31, 7 p.m.

C Classical BBQ S Sponsored by BNY Mellon J July 11, 6:30 p.m.

NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: Brass N’at September 1, 7 p.m.

(Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.) (C

NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: Play N’at at the Rex Theater September 2, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

Pittsburgh Jazz Celebration June 16, 8 p.m.

Johnny Mathis July 16, 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

FUSE@PSO: Brahms + Radiohead June 24, 6:30 p.m.

N NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: M Music Squared S September 3, noon

Diana Krall July 23, 7:30 p.m. A Night of Symphonic Rock July 25, 8 p.m.

Celebrate Pittsburgh: Sensory Friendly Concert June 27, 2:30 p.m.

N NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: S Sounds of Summer S September 3, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS:

N NEIGHBORHOOD WEEK: C Classical Standards S September 4, 8 p.m.

Randy Newman July 30, 7:30 p.m.

M Music for the Spirit JJuly 1, 1 and 7:30 p.m.

Distant Worlds: music from FINAL FANTASY August 1, 8 p.m.

CONCERT IN THE PARK:

South Park PARK July 3, 8 p.m. CONCERT IN THE

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/summer NEWS

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THANK YOU FOR VOTING US MUSIC STORE

#1

BUY, SELL & TRADE RADE RAD E NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

WHAT’S ON YOUR MP3 PLAYER? {COMPILED BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN, RAY} REBECCA NUTTALL AND ASHLEY MUR

You can tell a lot about a person by the music they listen to, though it’s probably not fair to judge the content of one’s soul simply by a playlist. After all, who hasn’t downloaded “Livin’ la Vida Loca” because it kept running through one’s brain at 2 a.m.? But, fair or not, we asked six notable Pittsburghers to put their music players on random and let us write down the first five songs that came up.

City Paper staffers share their playlists online at www. pghcitypaper .com

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Joe Negri: Josh Harrison: Third baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

LARGEST SELECTION OF HEADPHONES IN PITTSBURGH

MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: “I love music. I mean, I got a range from rap to R&B, a lot of gospel. I got a few pop [songs] on there, too. I got a little bit of everything.”

1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

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1. “Damn Liar” by Young Jeezy 2. “I Don’t Like” by Kanye West 3. “Still Got Love 4 Ya” by Don Trip 4. “Novacane” by Frank Ocean 5. “Never Again” by Trey Songz

Cameron McLay: Pittsburgh Chief of Police. MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: “[This list is] the kind of thing I listen to when I exercise. Classic rock was the current music when I was growing up. In the car and when I’m home, I listen to classical music. I really love baroque.”

FEATURING AUDEZE, BEATS, BEYERDYNAMIC, SENNHEISER, GERMAN MAESTRO & MORE! IN-STORE LISTENING STATIONS SET UP TO “TEST-DRIVE” HEADPHONES WITH YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC

21 Brilliant Avenue in Aspinwall 412-223-9747 www.musictomyear.com a division of

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1. “America” by Santana 2. “And You and I” by Yes 3. “Baba O’Riley” by The Who 4. “Canarios” by Gaspar Sanz 5. “Carolina in My Mind” by James Taylor

Lawrence Brownlee:

Renowned jazz guitarist, Duquesne University adjunct professor and former co-star of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: “I’m very disappointed with today’s popular music. I’m very much into theatrical music, American songbook and standards.”

1. “Angel Face” by Bill Evans and Jim Hall 2. “Barbados” by the Tommy Flanagan Trio 3. “Blame It on My Youth” by Nancy Wilson 4. “Pick Yourself Up” by Diane Krall 5. “I Never Knew” by Kenny Burrell

Ellen McLean: Allegheny County Port Authority CEO. MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: McLean is an avid runner and these are the songs she plays while running or at the gym.

1. “Son of a Preacher Man” by Tracy Chapman 2. “Thistle & Weeds” by Mumford and Sons 3. “Stronger” by Kanye West 4. “Waiting for Magic” by Ace of Base 5. “Rolling in the Deep” by Adele

Singer with the Pittsburgh Opera. MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: “The thing I like about music is you can be affected by so many different sounds. Yes, I’m an opera singer, but I appreciate the artistry, and what people sacrifice and what they do as far as their musical journey.”

1. “Danksagung an den Bach” by Franz Schubert 2. “Irimo” by El Gran Combo 3. “Celebrate the King” by Ricky Dillard 4. “Sweet Georgia Brown” by Take 6 5. “Lingus” by Snarky Puppy

Jared Hughes: Relief pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates. MUSICAL PERSPECTIVE: “I swear I listen to more metal.”

1. “Apartment” by The Significance of Simon 2. “Dry Ice” by Green Day 3. “Take Me to Church” by Hozier 4. Westerns by Louis L’Amour (“Do audio books count?” asks Hughes.) 5. “A Wonder” by Citizen Cope


A PITTSBURGH PREMIERE ACOUSTIC DUO

r u o T l u o S Tropical 2015

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Accepting booking inquiries at DDUHNKE4@YAHOO.COM

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The Semi-Supervillains

We are a Three Man Band with a Rock and Soul type sound with plenty of originals.

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“Celebrating the fusion of hip-hop, rock and trap beats”

“YOU’RE GOING TO LOVE WHYTE HENNY’S TOP 5 REASONS TO PEEP HIS ‘SHUT IT DOWN’ BANGER...” Sohh.com

W/TURNPIKE GARDENS

NEXT SHOW: FRIDAY, MAY 8TH, 9:30pm AT CHRISTINA’S IN WHITE OAK facebook.com/mamasmadnessband NOW BOOKING NEW SHOW OPPORTUNITIES.

/semisuper @tssvillains tssvillains TSSvision

ventsmagazine.com

Whyte Henny will be in town performing live April 24th.

THERE YOU ARE MAY 8 AT SMILING MOOSE | 6:30PM

Hear their debut album “Tricks”on Pandora, Spotify & iTunes.

Hypetrak.com

“Bringing an innovative flavor to the trap world...”

FACEBOOK.COM/THEJDABAND

semisupervillains.com

There You Are is a unique, independent rock band, known for high energy and unpredictable shows. They’ve opened up for Royal Blood and many others. Our debut EP is available for FREE on bandcamp.

THERE YOU ARE - TOM CHORBA (VOCALS, GUITARS), RYAN DRISH (GUITARS), JUSTIN TREVIS (BASS), MATT BEAN (DRUMS) ALTERNATIVE/GRUNGE/ROCK

THEREYOUAREBAND.COM

“Infectious Brit-pop style songs that would be a radio programmer’s dream”

Come Check out the trapp Metal movement. Punxsutawney Plugged In Festival Jackson Peter Center

–Scott Mervis, Post-Gazette

est. 2007

“…a tight post-grunge sound reminiscent of Built to Spill or Foo Fighters.”

You can check out Whyte Henny and his debut single “Shut it down on:

soundcloud.com/Whyte_Henny

TheShowOfficial @comeseetheshow

– Nick Keepler, City Paper

@theshowofficial

and

WhyteHenny.com

“…the chops and potential to make it BIG…. Smooth and assured… extremely likable and impressive…”

Booking and Industry Inquiries wakeuponfiremgmt@gmail.com

theshowofficial.com

– Joe Wawrzyniak, Jersey Beat

David and Clyde jammin’

New Album out NOW! “Songs from Wood Street” www.davidwilsonmusic.com www.facebook.com/officialmusicofdavidwilson

WHYTE HENNY | RON GOOD HOGAN | NICOLETTE | K-NYNE | FRANK VIEIRA | JORDAN YORK | IBNEZA | ARLEKIN | FLOWLIFE

Playas mob radio P In Conjunction with Shorty Produkshins

Introducing

Whyte Henny April 24 PAHS AUDITORIUM 7-11PM

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$7 ADVANCE | $10 AT DOOR | $15 FRONT SECTION | $25 VIP | TICKETS & INFO: PLAYASMOBRADIO.COM

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LOCAL

“PLAYING HANK SR. TO A MARILYN MANSON CROWD, IT DOESN’T GET ANY BALLSIER THAN THAT.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

EYES ON THE PRIZE

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Dollar and a Dream is due out in September on RBC/E1. “Get Rich” is available now. See www.facebook.com/ eddie.barnz for more information.

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w. Go to ww com aper. pghcityp ERICKS V for a MA nd read Ta PLAYLIS Raul Malo m more fro onesty on the h ing of record in mono

Eddie Barnz {PHOTO COURTESY OF XAVIER RODGERS}

“Get Rich,” the new single from Eddie Barnz, is not the big-money celebration you might expect from its name. The song is a slow, catchy, minor-chorded single, but far from a party song. Sure, Barnz name-drops Gucci, and money is mentioned more than once. But overall, the song feels closer to a call to action, more about the struggle and process of “getting rich” than the wealth itself. “You may be homeless today, but a month or a year down the line, you might be rich,” says Barnz, who himself spent part of 2007 homeless, sleeping on friends’ couches. “This is more the song to motivate people.” Last month, Barnz’s motivation paid off, as he signed a distribution deal with RBC Records/ eOne Music, whose roster includes artists like Tech N9ne and E-40. Under RBC, Barnz is set to release his debut full-length, Dollar and a Dream, this September, with “Get Rich” as its lead single. Barnz has been rapping since he was a kid. Growing up in the Hill District, he learned hip hop from his older brother, who introduced him to Big Daddy Kane and NWA, and his father, who showed him how to make beats on an old Boss Beat Machine. When he started listening to Nas rap about his neighborhood in Queens, or Biggie rapping about Brooklyn, Barnz was inspired to bring his neighborhood into his music in a similar way. “Chauncey Drive on the Hill District is like its own world, even though we’re in the Hill District. It’s totally different from other parts of the Hill [in] how we talk, the slang, how we was dressing,” says Barnz. “So I wanted to tell the story from my neighborhood to the whole world.” With major-label support and a lead single in the books, Barnz is feeling motivated. Ask him what he sees for his future and his answer is fittingly ambitious: a perfume line, a video game, movies, fast-food franchises, a documentary about his career. But that’s down the line, long-term. For now, Barnz is focused on “Get Rich.”

The Mavericks: Eddie Perez, Paul Deakins, Jerry Dale McFadden and Raul Malo

MUSICAL MAVERICKS {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

A

SK ANYONE familiar with the band what kind of music The Mavericks play and you’ll likely hear one word: country. And when the band started out playing shows in South Florida 25 years ago, that label certainly fit. In fact, at a time when country music was starting to morph into the nondescript, industry-tainted, popsounding, bro-rock mess that we now associate with the word, the Mavericks were playing traditional country songs. But spend just 10 minutes listening to Mono, and you won’t call it country. Recorded completely in mono, there’s a blues number, a ska tune, songs with the group’s driving Latin rhythms, a country shuffle and even a cover of Doug Sahm tune with that distinctive Southwestern feel. Without question, it’s like nothing this band — or likely any other — has done before, and for lead singer Raul Malo, that’s the whole point. “At this stage of the game, you can become a nostalgia act where you play nothing but your old stuff, but that’s not the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

case. People love the new stuff and there’s an energy there to the music, and I think it’s translating not only for ourselves, but to the audience as well. I think it’s catching everyone like a windstorm,” Malo tells City Paper. “I’ve been in the music business for 25 years, and I think there’s a little bit of an unwritten seniority rule where it’s like, ‘I’m fifty-fucking-years-old, I can do whatever the hell I want from this point on.’ So there’s definitely a little bit of that going on. “We have nothing to lose and nothing to prove anymore.”

THE MAVERICKS 8 p.m. Sat., April 25. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $45-70. www.librarymusichall.com

Malo says the new record comes from the natural evolution of the band that includes original drummer Paul Deakin and long-time guitarist Eddie Perez and keyboardist Jerry Dale McFadden. And if you look back at the band’s history, it

almost seems impossible that it could create any other record except for the eclectic Mono. When the band began playing shows in Miami in the early 1990s, the decidedly country band often found itself playing a lot of punk and alternative shows. At one point, the Mavericks were sharing a bill with goth-rocker Marilyn Manson, who at the time was huge in South Florida and about to break out nationally. “It’s the exact type of experience that makes you stronger,” Malo recalls with a chuckle. “I mean, you talk about laying it on the line. When you’re playing Hank Sr. to a Marilyn Manson crowd, it doesn’t get any ballsier than that.” Before Lady Gaga called her fans “little monsters,” Malo says, that’s what Manson called his fans. “And it’s true, they were like these little monsters,” Malo says, the laughs becoming louder. “They all had this jet-black hair and really pale faces, and I remember, for some reason, they all carried these lunchboxes, that was the big deal. I remember thinking,


‘Well, shit, I hope they don’t have stuff in those lunchboxes to throw at us.’ “But you know what, I think they appreciated the fact that we had the cojones to get up there and play some Hank Williams. We knew we couldn’t out-rock Manson, so we went the other way and played this straight-up country stuff as best we could, and it was awesome.” But even before that, Malo says he was drawn to all kinds of music growing up, and that helped shaped his sound. Both his parents were Cuban immigrants; his mother was an opera fan and exposed him to that music. He also recalls growing up in the ’70s and watching TV variety shows like Hee Haw, The Johnny Cash Show and even The Lawrence Welk Show just to hear music. “There wasn’t music television back then, so we would sit around on Saturday nights and sit through all the corny jokes and silly skits on these variety shows just to get to the players,” Malo recalls. “I didn’t care what it was because I just loved music. I loved having it around me.” Malo and the Mavericks started their musical journey in the early 1990s. They put out four studio records for MCA between 1992 and 1998, and a fifth on a smaller label in 2003. At that time, Malo says he was “a restless, musical soul. Everyone was pretty worn out and, creatively, we’d run our course.” Malo began working on a series of independent projects: “I toured the world, I made a symphony record and just had a ball. I was learning about music again and learning all this stuff about myself.”

But when he began writing songs in 2012, he noticed they had a certain feel to them. “The more these songs kept coming out, the more it felt like a Mavericks’ record,” he recalls. “And I realized I really missed playing with these guys.” The result was the genre-bending 2013 release In Time, along with a subsequent reunion tour. The band’s camaraderie would lead Mono, the second post-split record. “This record is the kitchen sink and everything in the middle,” Malo says. “It’s self-indulgent and we know that. But it’s also very gratifying that we can do a record like this because not everybody gets that chance. My philosophy is, just keep carrying on and let the chips fall where they may.” Malo says The Mavericks aren’t done yet. The current tour should stretch into 2016 before the members head back into the studio. “We’ve been talking for a while now about doing a Spanish record, which we’ve never done,” Malo says. “If you’re going to take risks and do this stuff, now’s the time. “Hell, we might even do a polka record for all I know.”

“THIS RECORD IS THE KITCHEN SINK AND EVERYTHING IN THE MIDDLE.”

CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

“Have Fun When You Can...” Advice from our brother Mike Riley (1950-2011)

ay, D l l A c i s Mu Every Day Hours of Operation Tuesday - Thursday: 11AM - 11PM Friday: 11AM - 1AM Saturday: 8AM - 1AM 215 East Main Street Carnegie, PA 15106 Phone: 412-279-0770 Website: www.rileyspourhouse.com Facebook: rileyspourhouse Twitter: @rileyspourhouse NEWS

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WORLD BEAT {BY MARGARET WELSH} EVEN IF YOU’VE never owned a Todd Rundgren record, you probably know his hits, including the bizarre anti-work anthem “Bang on the Drum All Day.” A songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and fearless experimenter, Rundgren has also produced records for everyone from The Band to Bad Religion. He released his 24th studio album, the electro-world-fusion-y Global, earlier this year, and plays a sold-out show at Stage AE on Saturday. He caught up with City Paper before embarking on his next tour.

GLOBAL HAS SOME REALLY CYNICAL MOMENTS AND SOME SINCERE-SEEMING MOMENTS. WHERE ARE YOU COMING FROM HERE? I was trying to be something of a cheerleader, I guess, particularly for the planet and for the people who care about the planet. [I’ve never] done a specifically ecological record before, and I just felt like it was time to do one. To try and get people to feel like they can work together on problems and get them solved, somehow.

The Palace Theatre Highlights! Apr 25 Apr 26 Apr 28 May 2

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8PM 7:30PM 8PM 2PM/6PM 7PM 8PM 7:30PM 8PM

Oct 2 Fri 8PM Oct 22 Thu 2PM/7:30PM Oct 29 Thu 7:30PM

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Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra Paris Dreams Drusky/Kirschner present Jeff Beck (SOLD OUT) JB Productions presents The Lettermen Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents Michael Martin Murphey John Noble’s Westmoreland Night of the Stars River City Brass presents City of Champions MICHAEL MARTIN MURPH EY WSO presents For Michael - The Music of Michael Jackson feat. Jeans & Classics, Inc. Elko Concerts: Weird Al Yankovic (SOLD OUT) Elko Concerts presents Steven Wilson Laurel Ballet presents Alice in Wonderland & A Midsummer Night’s Dream Latshaw Productions presents The Temptations Elko Concerts presents Merle Haggard MERLE HAGGARD Zodiac Productions: Robby Krieger - An Evening of The Doors Greatest Hits Elko Concerts: Whitesnake - The Purple Tour Latshaw: Peter Noone/Herman’s Hermits/The Duprees Elko Concerts presents Graham Nash JB Productions presents Yakov Smirnoff Live Nation presents Brian Regan ROBBY KRIE GER Elko: John Hiatt & The Combo/Taj Mahal Trio Latshaw Productions: The Bronx Wanderers Pat DiCesare Productions: Relive The Beatles ‘64 starring Beatlemania Now Elko Concerts presents Arlo Guthrie Latshaw: Vicki Lawrence & Mama Latshaw Productions: Chubby Checker w/guests The Vogues & The Latshaw Pops’ Orchestra BRIAN REGAN Latshaw Productions presents Amy Grant

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

“BLIND” HAS SOME SCATHING WORDS FOR CLIMATE-CHANGE DENIERS. ARE YOU VENTING OR TRYING TO CHANGE PEOPLE’S MINDS? I don’t know whether it’s possible to change people’s minds. It’s probably venting. When you ask [someone] a direct question like, “Do you think humans are having an effect on the climate?” And the first thing they say

TODD RUNDGREN 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 25. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

is, “Well, I’m not a scientist.” If that’s your answer, then you just shouldn’t have an opinion at all — just shut up from there on. It’s like, you’re making yourself seem more credible because you know less. I don’t understand why other people don’t get as angry as I do about it.

Venting for change: Todd Rundgren

that they’ve recorded, and I write and sing songs over top of that, and that’s going pretty effortlessly as well. I figure that as long as I have a clear head about what I want to write about, the material will come to me and it won’t be subconsciously a copy of something I’ve already done. Even though I realize that’s always possible. HAVE YOU EVER HAD THE FEAR OF ALIENATING YOUR FANS BY GETTING TOO WEIRD? Because I was a record producer, I never had to worry about the economics of my own music. I never had to fret that an album wouldn’t sell enough, and I’d be out of the business. It was never me consciously trying to tweak the audience — [I was just] taking full advantage of the freedom I had created for myself. That kind of attitude just never went away. [Laughs] I still try to think of my music-making as separate [from] where, more or less, the industry is at. The only purpose it serves is to satisfy my musical curiosity, and [hopefully] my fans enjoy watching that process.

“IT WAS NEVER ME CONSCIOUSLY TRYING TO TWEAK THE AUDIENCE.”

YOU’VE ALWAYS BEEN PROLIFIC … HAVE YOUR CREATIVE JUICES SLOWED OVER TIME? Not really. I don’t make as many records as I used to, but I’ve found that lately there isn’t any sort of bottom or limit to my ability to come up with new material. I’ve been working on a project with The Roots where they send me tracks

M W E L S H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


LOCAL LEGENDS ENDS {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT} T} PERFORMERS Donnie Iris and Lou Christie and a legendary DJ, the late Porky Chedwick, will be honored ed April 23 for their decades of contributions ibutions to the Pittsburgh music scene. ne. The trio has been selected elected to receive the 2015 Pittsburgh sburgh Rock ’N Roll Legends Awards. wards. Iris will be inducted as a Modern-era Legend, Christie as a Legacy Legend (more than 40 years in the industry) and Chedwick as a non-performrming contributor. The honors nors were voted on by 200 local ocal industry professionals known own as the Pittsburgh Rock ’N N Roll Legends Academy of Voters, along with an online public lic vote. The ceremonies will speak to the strength of the Pittsburgh urgh music scene, and the recipients and nominees show just how rooted music is in Pittsburgh’s history, as well as how deeply rooted Pittsburgh is in the lives of recipients Iris and Christie. “I started playing clubs in Pittsburgh on a three- or four-night basis when I was in The Jaggers,” recalls Iris. “This would have been in the late ’60s, early ’70s, and I always bragged about Pittsburgh when I was on the road to bands like Loverboy and Hall and Oates. We’ve always had a good music scene.”

2015 PITTSBURGH ROCK ’N ROLL LEGENDS AWARDS 5:30 p.m. Thu., April 23. Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $155 (concert only: $52). 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

Christie feels similarly, “I love Pittsburgh. I always have,” he says. “I’ve lived in many places — England, New Orleans, Hollywood, New York, but Pittsburgh is my home.” With such strong emotional ties to the city, it’s no surprise that both Iris and Christie are grateful for the recognition. “I feel honored to be chosen,” says Iris. “And especially to be nominated with people like Billy Price, Joe Grushecky and Rusted Root. Those are people that I admire and have followed their careers all along.” For Christie, being recognized satisfies a connection to a city beyond the music scene.

Donnie Iris (left) and Lou Christie

“Living in Pittsburgh was a total reality for me. I didn’t want anything to do with the steel mills,” he admits. “But I always had a deep respect for those who did. My father, uncles and brothers all worked in the mill, and it was a hard life for them. They built America. Pittsburgh is stamped all over this country.” Last year was the first year of the Rock ’N Roll Legends Awards (originally named the Pittsburgh Rock ’N Roll Hall of Fame, with promoter Rich Engler as the inaugural inductee). The induction process will occur every April, celebrated with a performance by the award recipients and others. This year, the performance will be held Thu., April 23, at The Hard Rock Café, in Station Square, with proceeds benefitting the Cancer Caring Center. While Porky Chedwick will be receiving his award posthumously — he died last year at the age of 96 — his presence will be felt at the ceremony. Iris recalls how important Chedwick was to the scene. “He used to play the B-sides!” Iris remembers. “You don’t have that anymore. The DJ used to be someone that you could rely on, and you could rely on Porky.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TARINA WESTLUND}

Portland Cello Project

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

CODE: AJ44

It’s as much a conversation as a music event tonight at the Altar Bar. Pittsburgh Artists for Social Change will present A Unity Concert to Benefit the Afro American Music Institute, which will include a diverse lineup featuring gospel, faculty jazz instructors from the Afro American Music Institute, Afro-Cuban duets, Puerto Rican standards, DJ sets and a wide array of hip-hop performers. In addition to the music, Tim Stevens, of B-PEP, and Anupama Jain, of the Pittsburgh Coalition for Racial Equity in the Arts, are slated to speak. Shawn Cooke 6:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. 412-263-2877 or www.the Pile altarbar.com

[ROCK] + SUN., APRIL 26 Much like in life, chaos can come out of nowhere in a Pile song. On the band’s third LP, You’re Better Than This, tracks like “Hot Breath” quickly swerve from Rick Maguire’s quiet singing over soft guitar noodling to his ugly, yet impassioned shout-singing. This stuff is designed for legions of punks to thrash and head-nod to in basements — the hard part’s just keeping track of when it’s time to start moshing. Local mainstay Legs Like Tree Trunks, Nouns and Derider round out the bill tonight at The Mr. Roboto Project. SC 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-345-1059 or www.therobotoproject.org

[INDIE ROCK] + SUN., APRIL 26 Have you ever wanted to hear an all-cello cover of “Shake It Off” by a group that affectionately

goes by “PCP” for short? If so, then Portland Cello Project might be the hottest ticket in town. The classically trained ensemble covers a lot of musical territory — including Beethoven, Taylor Swift, Kanye and Pantera — in its performances. PCP sets can be two to three hours long, and the group usually performs a brand-new set of covers and originals at its shows. But tonight’s show at Club Café will likely include some Elliot Smith tracks, since the cellists have been touring behind their recent studio album to e.s., which pays tribute to one of Portland’s most important musicians. SC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $13. 412-431-4950 or clubcafelive.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BAND}

Budlight girls & Fireball

[ROCK] + TUE., APRIL 28

Sadie Dupuis occupies a relatively small space alongside Courtney Barnett and Parquet Courts’ Andrew Savage: all three are razor-sharp indie-rock lyricists whose music sounds far more lackadaisical than the words flowing over it. Dupuis’ band Speedy Ortiz made something of a breakthrough in 2013 with Major Arcana, a raw, poetic slice of noisy pop that wasn’t shy about its nods to Pavement. Early singles off the Boston troupe’s next record, Foil Deer, suggest further refinement of that formula. Will Hannibal Buress fill in on the drums at Cattivo tonight, as he did at SXSW? You’ll have to wait and see. Fellow Boston indie-rockers Krill and Maryland’s Two Inch Astronaut are set to open. SC 6:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

CLUB CAFE. Elvis Perkins. South Side. 412-431-4950. LAVA LOUNGE. The Scarlet Son, Spare Arrows. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Mountain Goats w/ Ides of Gemini. Millvale. 412-821-4447. SMILING MOOSE. Incantation, Faithxtractor, Post Mortal Possession, Grisly Amputation. South Side. 412-431-4668.

w/ Jason Kendall & Joel Lindsey. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Kristeen Young. Strip District. 412-566-1000. PULASKI CLUB - LODGE 152. Moose Tracks. West End. 412-921-9410. ROCK ROOM. Concealed Blade, Mystic Inane, Drug Lust. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Turpentiners, Daryl Fleming & Public Domain w/ Ric & John. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 24

SAT 25

ROCK/POP THU 23

AMERICAN LEGION. Daniels & McClain. Monroeville. 412-233-9903. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Them Labs, Grandpa Egg, The Woosley Band, JR Fisher. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CLUB CAFE. Joe Crookston. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Children of October, VAGORA, Solarburn, 99 Guns. 740-424-0302. GOOSKI’S. The Lopez, OUAIS, The Funs, Sad Horse. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 6th Annual AcoustiCafe Beatles Tribute

GROWN & SEXY II. Flo Wilson & the Old School Band. Strip District. 412-728-4155. HAMBONE’S. Midge Crickett w/ First Person Sing-ular, Eoley Mulally, Ukulizzy, Weird Paul, Kingdom of Not. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Ridgemont High, Jess Laratonda. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. The Platinum. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. THE LOOSE MOOSE. King’s Ransom. Pleasant Hills. 412-655-3553. MOONDOGS. Den of Thieves. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. 31ST STREET PUB. MR. SMALLS www. per pa The Livingdeads, THEATER. Start pghcitym .co Boiled Denim, Under A Making Sense Nightmare. Strip District. (Talking Heads tribute), 412-391-8334. Hmfo (Hall & Oates CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF Tribute). Millvale. 412-821-4447. HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. REX THEATER. Jon Spencer The Mavericks. 412-368-5225. Blues Explosion w/ Danny & the CLUB CAFE. Six Organs Darleans, Nox Boys. South Side. of Admittance. South Side. 412-381-6811. 412-431-4950. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & GRILLE. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge. & MUSIC HALL. Carney Stomp, Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. the Lunatics, Black Souled Pope. SMILING MOOSE. Putrid Pile, McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. Liquified Guts, Incinerate Creation. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. South Side. 412-431-4668. Wine & Spirits. Robinson. SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS 412-489-5631. BAR. theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. 412- 422-1001. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ryan Montbleau Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY

SUN 26 {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARON DOMINICK PHOTOGRAPHY}

CHIP DIMONICK

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s song comes from Chip DiMonick; stream or download

“You Ain’t Punk,” from his new record, Uncaged, for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

CLUB CAFE. Portland Cello Project. South Side. 412-431-4950. PALACE THEATRE. Jeff Beck. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PAYNE HILL GRILLE. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-405-8561. SMILING MOOSE. Order of Leviathan,Tartarus, Egality. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 27 31ST STREET PUB. Solstafir, Ancient Wisdom, Dreadeth, My Captain My Sea. Strip District. 412-391-8334. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. Sessions w/ Forefront. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 28 CLUB CAFE. Matthew Mayfield. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Getting Dressed, Tentacle Boy, Mike Baltzer. Bloomfield. 412-682-0591. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Circa Survive, Balance & Composure, CHON. Millvale. 412-821-4447. PALACE THEATRE. The Lettermen. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

WED 29

WED 29

CLUB CAFE. Dirty Bourbon River Show. South Side. 412-431-4950. PRIMANTI BROS. Christine Havrilla & Gypsy Fuzz. Cranberry. 724-772-5757.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

DJS

HIP HOP/R&B

THU 23 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. DJ SMI. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 24

FRI 24 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Zo! w/ Carmen Rodgers. North Side. 412-706-1336.

BLUES

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. North Side. 412-304-2480.

FRI 24 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kevin Hindes Group. North Side. 412-304-2480. LEVELS. Antoinette Manganas & No Ordinary Soul. North Side. 412-913-3516. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Daniel May. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 25 FULL LEGION. LIST E AMERICAN The Witchdoctors. 25 IN L N O www. r Monroeville. 412-372-9713. SAT 3RD STREET GALLERY. Don pape pghcitym .co

ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REMEDY. Already Sweaty. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

KOLLAR CLUB. Cosmic Attack Blues Band w/ Dr. J’s Mojo Hand. South Side. 412-431-2002. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555. WOOLEY BULLY’S. Jimmy Adler Band w/ Charlie Barath. New Brighton. 724-843-4702.

SAT 25

JAZZ

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Dance Crush. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

THU 23 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. An Evening w/ Madeleine Peyroux. Oakland. 412-237-8300. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Fred Ho Tribute. Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

READING {FRI., APRIL 24}

Salt-N-Pepa Santander Arena

SUN 26

SAT 25

MON 27 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Jazz Ensemble & Jazz Workshop. Uptown. 412-396-6083.

TUE 28 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Palindromes. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ACOUSTIC THU 23 ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Kyle Fosburgh, Cristoph Bruhn, Pairdown. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3002. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Ed Auth. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

CLUB CAFE. Beauty Slap w/ Karma Darwin. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Marshall Street ‘Rents. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

PULASKI CLUB - LODGE 152. Bill Couch. West End. 412-921-9410.

FRI 24

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SUN 26

Aliquo, Reni Montiverde, Philip Salvato, Bob Hughes. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. André Mehmari & Tatjana Mead Chamis. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Flying Dutchmen, Gypsy Jazz. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM. Local Legends of Jazz Part 2. Hill District. 412-254-3844. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Ken Karsh & friends. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Andrea Pearl. Downtown. 412-392-2217. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

THE PRIORY. Leo Moran & Anto Thistlethwaite. North Side. 412-496-3260. SAHARA TEMPLE. Tony Campbell & Smooth Jazzsurgery. Braddock. 412-271-0502. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. RML Jazz. West End. 412-458-0417.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “Paris Dreams” performed w/ Louis Schwizgebel. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

CLEVELAND {SUN., MAY 17}

Pixies

Masonic Auditorium

WASHINGTON, D.C. HERSHEY, PA. {THU., JUNE 25} Jessica Pratt Rock & Roll Hotel

565 LIVE. Brian Belonzi. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Brad Yoder. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 29 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 24 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY THU 23 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

CLASSICAL THU 23 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Presents “Celebrate Wilkinsburg” w/ music from John Phillip Sousa, Gioachino Rossini, Josef Strauss, Domenico Cimarosa, Franz Lehar, as well as a medley of Duke Ellington music. Wilkinsburg High School, Wilkinsburg. 412-371-9500.

FRI 24 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. w/ The Texas Tenors. The one-of-a-kind classically trained country trio joins PSO. Downtown. 412-392-4900. VOCES SOLIS. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 304-639-1462.

SAT 25 BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Presents Le Roi David, made up of 27 vignettes, w/ guest artists Mukwae Wabei Siyolwe as the Witch of Endor, soprano Joanna Latini & Anthony McKay as the narrator. St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Oakland. 888-718-4253. THE HARMONY SINGERS. Chartiers Valley Intermediate School Auditorium, Scott. 412-655-1668. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. w/ The Texas Tenors. The one-of-a-kind classically trained country trio joins PSO. Downtown. 412-392-4900. RIVERS OF THE SOUL. Music from Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic & Russia. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-661-1245. TUESDAY MUSIC CLUB: RIVERS OF THE SOUL. Music by Schubert, Erkel, Stolz, Dargomyzhsky, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Fibich, & Dvorak performed by soprano Rosemary Pavlovsky, pianist Janet Stivanson, & clarinetist Allyson Edington. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-682-0439.

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Presents Le Roi David, made up of 27 vignettes, w/ guest artists Mukwae Wabei Siyolwe as the Witch of Endor, soprano Joanna Latini & Anthony McKay as the narrator. St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Oakland. 888-718-4253. ERIC PLUTZ. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-242-2787. THE HARMONY SINGERS. Chartiers Valley Intermediate School Auditorium, Scott. 412-655-1668. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. w/ The Texas Tenors. The one-of-a-kind classically trained country trio joins PSO. Downtown. 412-392-4900. PATRICIA HALVERSON & MARTHA MCGAUGHEY W/ SCOTT PAULEY. Suites & Sonatas for two bass viols w/ music by Couperin, Schenk, Handel & Locke. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-860-0227. TRIO NOVA MUNDI. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Performing Arts Center. Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-834-2200. WYSO PHILHARMONIC. Spring concert performing Weber’s Concertino for Clarinet, Massenet’s Meditation from Thais, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus Overture, Borodin’s Polovtsian Dances & Webber’s Selections from Phantom of the Opera. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

MON 27 BRENTANO QUARTET W/ TODD PALMER. Charpentier’s “Suite in D minor”, James MacMillan’s “String Quartet No. 3” & Brahms’ “Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115”. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

WED 29 DAVID BENNETT & DANIEL MAY. Andys Wine Bar, Downtown. 412-773-8884.

OTHER MUSIC THU 23 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Afro Asian Music Ensemble. Tribute to Fred Ho. Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

FRI 24 SYNOD HALL. Mac Martin & the Dixie Travelers, Allegheny Drifters, Border Ride, Brush Creek & Fern Hollow. Oakland. 412-471-0666.

WED 29 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny. A showtunes singalong. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


PAID PAI D ADVERTORIAL ADVERTO ADVE RT RIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do April

IN PITTSBURGH

22 - 28

WEDNESDAY 22 Kinks, Locks & Twists Environmental and Reproductive Justice Conference HILL HOUSE Hill District. 412-363-4500. Tickets: kinkslockstwists.org. Through April 26.

Everpower Earth Day Festival MARKET SQUARE Downtown. For more info visit everpowerearthdayfestival. com. 11a.m.

All the Names THE ORIGINAL FREE LIBRARY OF ALLEGHENY North Side. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412-362-17173. Through May 2.

THURSDAY 23 SOUND SERIES: An Evening with Madeleine Peyroux

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL Oakland. Tickets: warhol.org or 412-237-8300. 8p.m.

Mark Rose Comedian: Jersey, (of Spitalfield) / Shane the Haitian Sensation (As Seen on Comic View) Henderson (of Valencia)

Elvis Perkins CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Peter Pan BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghmusicals. com. Through May 3.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through April 25.

THE PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

SATURDAY 25

MONDAY 27

FRIDAY 24

WARHOL THEATER - ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol. org. 8p.m.

Brewski Festival SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT Seven Springs. 866-437-1300. Over 21 event. Tickets: 7springs.com. Through April 25.

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412462-3444. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Gallery Crawl CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org/ crawl. 5:30p.m.

Mark Rose (of Spitalfield) THE PITTSBURGH WINERY FRIDAY APRIL 26

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Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side TA S T E

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MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Bakery Living +

Circa Survive

An Evening with Portland Cello Project

OAKS THEATER Oakmont. 412-828-6322. Tickets: theoakstheater.com. Through April 26.

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Smallpools

TUESDAY 28

SUNDAY 26

Convergence Media Arts Festival

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale 412-821-4447. All ages show. With special guest Jonathan Tyler. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

An Evening with the Mavericks

Where to live NEWS

Butch Walker

SOUND SERIES: André Mehmari & Tatjana Mead Chamis

Roy Ayers Ubiquity CABARET THEATER Downtown. 412-325-6769. All ages show. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

find your happy place

walnut capital.com

MUSIC

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THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

47


DARK WEB {BY AL HOFF}

A SIMPLE “FUN” WEEK OF TALKING TO A ROBOT GROWS INCREASINGLY FRAUGHT

Plot-wise, Unfriended is standard teen horror: Kids do something dumb, don’t repent properly despite warnings and are killed off in variously baroque fashions (e.g., death by blender). In Levan Gabriadze’s film, the killer assumes the form of a blank Skype profile and torments its victims on a six-way video chat: five friends and “that creeper Skype dude.” (Like its J-horror haunted-videocassette antecedents, explanations for this killer technology aren’t provided.)

FACING THE FUTURE This screen is haunted.

What makes Unfriended fascinating for a hot minute is that the entire film takes place within the confines of a single laptop screen. The camera is essentially fixed, as the story unfolds through the five Skype screens (with their rizz-razz lo-res images) and pop-up windows running online programs such as Facebook, Spotify and Chatroulette (where one is ill-advised to seek help). It’s a visual language that’s spare and immediately knowable, in which backspacing conveys fear and the “setting” shifts on a click from private (messaging) to public (YouTube videos). It’s narrative by way of real-time online tiling. (For wandering eyes, there’s static directory and ad content around the perimeter, including a suggested video about “plating spare ribs.”) Ultimately, Unfriended is more of a laugh than a thrill, and its au courant riff on wired teens and its visual gimmicks will be stale in a matter of months. Click on it at your own risk, and remember its takeaway: DO NOT ACCEPT MESSAGES FROM THE DEAD. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE WATER DIVINER In 1915, an Australian farmer (Russell Crowe) travels to Turkey to search for his three sons, all of whom went missing in the Battle of Gallipoli. Crowe also directs. Starts Fri., April 24

{BY AL HOFF}

M

OVIES ABOUT robots, androids and other artificially intelligent .humanoid creations are always fascinating explorations. Can we create machines that look like us, think like, feel like us? What responsibilities, risks and rewards come with such god-like power? Isn’t the most successful AI the one with the potential to get smarter than us, and then what? All these thorny queries and more are forefront in writer-director Alex Garland’s debut feature, Ex Machina. It’s a hard scifi drama that finds its thrills not in space travel or laser battles, but through theoretical arguments, a locked-box set-up and ever-shifting psychodrama between its three characters. Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) is a coder for a Google-like Internet company and wins a workplace lottery. His prize: a week with the firm’s reclusive, brilliant founder, Nathan, at his very remote, off-the-grid home and private research lab. Once there, Caleb discovers the true awesomeness of the prize: Nathan (Oscar Isaac) has created a close-to-perfect AI woman named

Brain in a box: Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) studies varies AI components.

Ava, and would Caleb mind putting Ava through the Turing test to ascertain if she could pass for human? Typically, Ava (Alicia Vikander) has been created in an idealized female form: beautiful and curvy. It’s hard to know where to lay the blame: The default setting for female AI in films is sex object-like. But the narrative offers a few loopholes: Ava appears to be

EX MACHINA DIRECTED BY: Alex Garland STARRING: Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Isaac, Alicia Vikander Starts Fri., April 24.

CP APPROVED just the sort of sexy fem-bot that the aggressively macho and hedonistic Nathan would create for himself, and if one were building an AI to fool humans, attractiveness would be a useful tool. The representation of Ava is among the many open-ended queries of Ex Machina sure to generate lively postscreening discussions. (A side note: The

film doesn’t have many special effects, but the half-human, half-transparent-machine presentation of Ava is a good one.) Caleb begins questioning Ava, who in her attempts to read human, begins questioning him. After each Turing session, Nathan questions Caleb about Ava, while Caleb questions Nathan’s motivations. Thus, a simple “fun” week of talking to a robot grows increasingly fraught: Alliances form and splinter; control shifts depending who is currently drunk, powered down or being lied to; the electricity flicks off and on. So much mystery, distrust and real and/or programmed emotions — with three highly intelligent lifeforms locked up in a concrete bunker of a house, of course it will go bad. The question is simply how? Provocative, well acted (with another new, almost feral performance from Isaac) and full of timely, unsettling queries about the increasingly blurred line between humans and human-created machines designed to act and even think like humans, Ex Machina deserves a look — and a think. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK THE AGE OF ADALINE. A freak accident leaves a young woman ageless and alone throughout the entire 20th century … until she meets a man she wants to grow old with. Blake Lively and Michiel Huisman star in Lee Toland Krieger’s romantic fable. Starts Fri., April 24. ASPIE SEEKS LOVE. It isn’t often that autism is presented as a difference in neurology as opposed to a disorder in need of medical remedy. But that’s exactly what local filmmaker Julie Sokolow does in her first documentary feature, which focuses on Aliquippa native David Matthews’ search for love. The film follows 49-year-old Matthews, who was diagnosed with Asperger’s in his 40s, as he tries to figure out the awkward world of online dating, navigating the labyrinth of unwritten social rules that frustrate even the most socially adept among us. Sokolow’s intimate portrait is the opposite of schadenfreude — it comes from a place of curiosity about how people with different neurological wiring experience the world. Sat., April 25, through Wed., April 29. Harris. (Alex Zimmerman)

Do You Have

Uterine Fibroids?

CP

JFILM FESTIVAL. The annual film festival featuring works that highlight the Jewish experience continues through Sun., April 26, at various venues. See www.jfilmpgh.org for complete schedule.

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is conducting a research study evaluating the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug for women with uterine fibroids and heavy menstrual bleeding. She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry {PHOTO COURTESY OF DIANA DAVIES} focuses (black women, politics, street activists, health care, lesbians). First-wave feminists recount their experiences, with plenty of humor, and there’s ample archival footage depicting everything from small meetings to blockbuster street marches. The title is an apt bit of wordplay, reclaiming empowerment from a phrase often used by men to patronize women’s anger. And mulling over what has yet to be achieved, this film might inspire a new wave of productive anger. Starts Fri., April 24. Regent Square (AH)

SHE’S BEAUTIFUL WHEN SHE’S ANGRY. “The personal is political” in Mary Dore’s documentary about the women’s-liberation movement of the late 1960s and early ’70s. It’s necessary and illuminating history for anybody who didn’t live through it — and it’s worth noting how much changed simply because ordinary people rose up and demanded it. Dore traces the movement back to the activism of the civil-rights protests, then details the various offshoots women formed with more specific

CP

NEWS

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TA S T E

• Study-related services • Laboratory services • Compensation for time and travel

ANYWHERE ELSE. In Ester Amrami’s dramedy, a young Israeli woman named Noa, now living in Berlin and working on a project about “untranslatable” words, impulsively returns home to visit her family. Familiar domestic tensions resurface, magnified by Noa’s granny’s poor health, her brother’s disinterest in reporting for military service, and the equally impulsive arrival of Noa’s German boyfriend. (Granny is a Polish Holocaust survivor.) Essentially, the narrative

CP

THE ROAD WITHIN. Glen Wells directs this new dramedy about a man with Tourette’s syndrome who goes on a road trip to dispose of his mother’s ashes. His traveling companions also include an anorexic woman and a man with OCD. Starts Fri., April 24. Parkway, McKees Rocks

QUALIFIED PARTICIPANTS: For more • Women ages 18-50 information • In general good health and to see if • Not pregnant or breastfeeding With Uterine Fibroids you qualify call •• With heavy menstrual bleeding 412-363-1900 QUALIFIED PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE: • Investigational drug, including or visit an inactive placebo possibility ctrsllc.com for 3 months

MAN OF IRON. Amid Poland’s historic 1980 strikes, a corrupt journalist is hired by the secret police to discredit a Solidarity organizer. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 23, and 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 25. Harris. $5

LITTLE BOY. In this inspirational drama set during World War II, a son is determined to do anything to bring his father home safely from the battlefield. Kevin James and Emily Watson star; Alejandro Monteverde directs. Starts Fri., April 24. MERCHANTS OF DOUBT. Robert Kenner’s documentary looks at the rise of corporate disinformation and various PR strategies designed to counter potentially damaging research. Inspired by Big Tobacco’s success in slickly pushing back against concerns that smoking caused verifiable damage to health, now companies and even whole industries (like fossil fuels) employ many of the same sophisticated tactics to create doubt. Most of Kenner’s talking-head film focuses on arguments about climate change, and he provides some cogent explanation how and why climatechange deniers have achieved such broad support. Kenner’s arguments are well presented (with the help of a magician), but what emerges is a rather depressing portrait of a populace all too easily swayed by buzzwords, confusion and emotions. Starts Fri., April 24. Manor (Al Hoff)

THE MANY STOREYS AND LAST DAYS OF THOMAS MERTON. This new hour-long documentary from Morgan Atkinson looks at the last year of Merton’s life, in 1968, when the Trappist monk worked to establish ties with Eastern religions. The film will be followed by a discussion. The screening opens a monthly series of films about labor and social justice. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 23. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Dr., Munhall. Free. www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

Aspie Seeks Love

REPERTORY

Spring (2014) - 4/22 @ 7:30pm, 4/23 @ 7:30pm - An as-

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Altered States series: Blood, Sweat and Beer (new doc about craft beer), April 22-23. Dazed and Confused (1993 comedy in which the class of ’76 celebrates the end of high school with beer, weed, vans and rock ’n’ roll), April 22-23. The Big Lebowski (in the Coens’ 1998 dark comedy, it’s all about the White Russians. And the rug.), April 22-23. Vampires series: Twilight: The MST3K Version (Tom Servo and pals take on the sparkly vampires in this snarkily enhanced version), 7 p.m. Fri., April 24. What We Do in the Shadows (mockumentary about vampires living in modern New Zealand), April 24-30. Interview With a Vampire (1994 adaptation of the Anne Rice novel about New Orleans bloodsuckers), April 24-27 and April 29-30. The Lost Boys (teen vamps cruise coastal California in this 1987 film), April 24-30. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-9043225 or www.rowhousecinema.com

50th Anniversary Dr. Who and the Daleks Party - 4/24

+

M A I N F E AT U R E

tonishing genre-bender described as Richard Linklater

+

MUSIC

meets H.P. Lovecraft. _______________________________________________ @ 8:00pm - Prizes, goodies, and more! Just the film screens on 4/25 @ 9:30pm, 4/28 @ 7:30pm. _______________________________________________

Shlock Film Night- 4/24 @ 10:30pm - Fans have voted! We’ll be showing the 1968 black comedy/horror film Spider Baby. Admission is just $5. _______________________________________________ Barry Lyndon (1975) - 4/25 @ 5:00pm, 4/27 @ 7:30pm,

4/29 @ 7:30pm - Stanley Kubrick’s dramatic master-

piece set in the 18th Century. _______________________________________________

The JCCP Presents: Reefer Madness - 4/25 @ midnight

- The Junior Chamber of Commerce Players Presents their shadow cast of REEFER MADNESS: THE MOVIE MUSICAL! _______________________________________________

Swiss Miss (1938) - 4/26 @ 3:00pm - Join the Sons of

the Desert (Swiss Miss Tent) for its inaugural meeting with a screening of its namesake film. Meet local chap-

ter co-founder David Newell. _______________________________________________

Bayou Maharajah - 4/26 @ 7:00pm - A one-show-only

screening of this new documentary about musician James Booker. With live music beforehand by Tom Roberts, and a reading by Terrance Hayes.

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49


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

DIY WORKSHOP: DECK CONSTRUCTION PART I (FRAMING A DECK) Decks provide outdoor living spaces that are great for barbecues, gatherings, or some quiet book reading in the fresh air. It is essential that best practices in construction are used to build a safe deck. In this workshop, students will learn the procedures to build a deck that meets building code regulations and provides a safe outdoor space. Students will learn about deck layout, footers, setting posts and girders, and framing the deck. About the presenter: Michael R. Wetmiller is a Pennsylvania-Registered Home Improvement Contractor specializing in interior renovation. He grew up in a family of tradesmen and attended a four-year carpenter’s apprenticeship training program. He became a Journeyman Carpenter in 1999. Michael has worked in both commercial and residential construction in all phases from foundations to finish carpentry. This workshop is FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. NON-MEMBERS: $5 Go to www.phlf.org for more information about PHLF membership.

TUESDAY, APRIL 28 • 6:00 - 7:30 PM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

STORE CLOSING

50% OFF EVERYTHING

*

Birth control

BAYOU MAHARAJAH. Lily Keber’s new documentary profiles New Orleans musician James Booker, described by Dr. John as “the best black, gay, one-eyed junkie piano genius New Orleans has ever produced.” 7 p.m. Sun., April 26. Hollywood

BARRY LYNDON. The year-long look at the films of Stanley Kubrick continues with this 1975 period piece about the doings of 18th-century British aristocrats. 5 p.m. Sat., April 25; 7:30 p.m. Mon., April 27; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 29. Hollywood

is Planned Parenthood

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

DRIVE-IN MONSTERAMA. Riverside Drive-In offers its annual two-night April Ghouls Monster-rama, packed with classic horror films. Friday slate includes: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), The Evil Dead (1981), Night of the Demons and Demons. On Saturday, hunker down for: Dawn of the Dead (1978), Zombie, House by the Cemetery and Toxic Zombies. Gates open at 7 p.m.; films begin at dusk. Fri., April 24, and Sat., April 25. Riverside Drive-In, Route 66 N, Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein. com. $10 per night; overnight camping available for an addition $10 per person

ROAR. In this cult 1981 film — now in re-release — dozens of big cats (lions, tigers, cheetahs) live with a naturalist (director Noel Marshall), and get testy when his wife (then real-life wife Tippi Hedren) and children come to visit. A glorious mess filmed over 11 years at the couple’s California ranch, with their own kids and more than 100 of their own animals. There’s virtually no plot and the acting is abysmal, but you cannot look away from scene after scene of actors being attacked (somewhat playfully, but there’s blood) by lions, tigers and elephants. To top it off, the film, with its deluded lions-are-pets premise, is supposed to foster worldwide animal conservation. Um, that lion just ripped that guy’s shirt off. This film is bat-shit crazy, even if bats are about the only wild animal not in it. 9:30 p.m. Fri., April 24. Harris. $5 (AH)

11604 KELEKET DR | PENN HILLS | 412.243.5214

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as Jewish, and not Arab. And so gradually, and with legitimate concerns, Eyad begins to re-configure the very essence of who he is. Screens as part of JFilm. In Hebrew and Arabic, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Sat., April 25. Manor

DR. WHO AND THE DALEKS. Peter Cushing stars as Dr. Who in Gordon Flemyng’s 1965 big-screen treatment of the popular British television show. In it, the TARDIS transport Who and his companions to the Planet Skaro. 8 p.m. Fri., April 24; 9:30 p.m. Sat., April 25; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., April 28. Hollywood

*EXCLUDING BRAS AND SALE ITEMS ALREADY MARKED DOWN

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

Roar is an exercise in deciding to knuckle down to life, and it’s no coincidence that Noa’s untranslatable words speak to highly personal emotional states. Screens as part of JFilm. In English, and German and Hebrew, with subtitles. 9:15 p.m. Thu., April 23. Manor (AH)

1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA

A BORROWED IDENTITY. During the turbulent 1980s, a bright Palestinian boy named Eyad wins a place at a prodigious boarding school in Jerusalem. There, he navigates the usual travails of adolescence, while also bearing the stigma of being Arab. Yet he dates a Jewish girl and befriends another outsider — a punk-loving Jewish boy with muscular dystrophy. It’s these two relationships explored in Eran Riklis’ provocative feature that determine Eyad’s toughest lessons, and also its imperfect solution: It’s simply easier to live, be successful and treated well if one identifies

THE LAST PICTURE SHOW. In 1971, Peter Bogdanovich adapted Larry McMurtry’s bittersweet novel about some Texas teens coming of age in the early 1950s even as their small town dies around them. Picture Show has an excellent cast, including a number of young actors marked for stardom such as Jeff Bridges, Randy Quaid and Cybill Shepherd. Concludes a series of film about high school. 8 p.m. Sun., April 26. Regent Square. (AH)

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AN AMERICAN TALE. Among the many 19th-century immigrants to the U.S.A. was Fievel Mousekewitz, a Russian mouse. Don Bluth’s 1986 animated family comedy tells his story. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 29. AMC Loews. $5 CLEO FROM 5 TO 7. The absorbing Agnes Varda tells a story, in real time, of a woman waiting to find out whether she’s dying of cancer. Released in 1961, this is the first woman-centric New Wave film; the scenes of Paris are stunning, and Varda’s inventive camera work is cool or energetic as it needs to be. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., April 29. Melwood. $2 (Harry Kloman) HAIRY WHO AND THE CHICAGO IMAGISTS. Leslie Buchbinder’s new documentary ambles through the1960s art scene through the eyes of the Chicago Imagists, a loose network of art collectives born out of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Of primary focus is the Hairy Who, a group of six artists (mostly painters), including Jim Nutt and Gladys Nilsson, whose comic-book sensibilities and surrealist illustrations helped define the burgeoning scene. Buchbinder pairs talking-head interviews with animated re-enactments and stock footage to create a charming, unhurried narrative as distinct and laidback as the artists in the film. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 30. Hollywood (Alex Gordon) THE ILLUMINATION. Krzysztof Zanussi’s philosophically inspired 1972 film, incorporating collage, animation and documentary footage, follows the education of a young scientist. Continues a two-month series of digitally remastered Polish masterpieces, curated by Martin Scorsese. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 30, and 5:30 p.m. Sat., May 2. Harris. $5


[DANCE REVIEW]

TIME PASSAGES

IT’S A DELICIOUS CADENCE THAT EBBS AND FLOWS

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[BOOK REVIEW]

DRAWN IN {BY FRED SHAW}

The Pillow Project’s (a) Long Here {PHOTO COURTESY OF AARON JACKENDOFF}

Live dance, dance on film and art combined in The Pillow Project’s long-form performance installation (a) Long Here, which opened last week at the company’s loft venue, The Space Upstairs, in Point Breeze. The exhibit is inspired in part by Danny Hillis’ Clock of the Long Now (a 10,000-year clock). As seen on the second of its 16 consecutive nights, (a) Long Here focused on themes of duration and time and encouraged attendees to roam the loungelike venue and view more than a dozen works of art. Many of these sculptures, paintings, poems and films were created by Pillow Project artistic director Pearlann Porter. Three times during the loosely structured two-hour event, Porter informally gathered the audience to view improvised dance solos. These included a buoyant fiveminute solo by Ru Emmons-Apt in which she took her motivation from the contents of a note pulled from an audience-suggestion jar. In Porter’s own 10-minute solo, “Until They All Fall,” she danced around an oversized hourglass, watching the hourglass drain sand and rolling around on the floor as the loft’s lights were switched on and off. However, though they reflected the motif of the passage of time, Porter’s improvised movement choices were oversimplified and uninteresting, save an emotional ending section in which, realizing the sand was about to run out, she began panicking and whimpering as if her life were running out with it. The exhibit’s marquee work, “An Accumulation of Nows,” with concept and direction by Porter, was a 25-minute solo installation performed by dancer Taylor Knight to clock-like recorded music by PJ Roduta. In front of a white wall with two doors, Knight performed the fidgety solo laced with spastic outbursts in which he played off of a projected video image of himself recorded the previous evening. The idea is that each night of the installation’s run, more and more video echoes of Knight would be seen, even as the solo changed with each performance. But while Knight’s animated performance was appealing, the piece itself went nowhere and lacked craft. While the experimental (a) Long Here realized its goal of promoting thought about our relationship with time, sadly, its dance components proved largely unremarkable. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PILLOW PROJECT performs (A) LONG HERE nightly through Thu., April 30. The Space Upstairs, 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $10-15 (unlimited access exhibit pass). www.pillowproject.org NEWS

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF VICTORIA SMITH}

Terrance Hayes

prominent outlets, had poems published in The New Yorker, received a nod to edit the prestigious anthology Best American Poetry 2014, and won a MacArthur “genius” grant, among other accolades. It’s a long way from his early years in South Carolina — where, he claims in an interview, if he hadn’t received a hoops scholarship from Coker College, he might have become a prison guard like his mother. In the new collection, Hayes makes nice use of his mother’s profession, ruminating N MANY WAYS, Terrance Hayes’ new po- on the complicated nature of passion in etry collection, How to Be Drawn, picks “How to Be Drawn to Trouble”: up where his previous book, 2010’s She was a guard at the prison in National Book Award-winning Lighthead, which James Brown left off. In both, there’s the willingness to Was briefly imprisoned. There had experiment with form, use of playful lanbeen broken man-made laws, guage and the confident voice of a writer A car chase melee, a roadblock of who found his stride years ago. It’s a recipe troopers in sunblock. for success, even as the 95 pages of How to I, for one, don’t trust the police Be Drawn thoughtfully move in new and because they go around looking interesting directions. It’s been a whirlwind of well-deserved To eradicate trouble. T-R-oh-youachievements for Hayes, now a full probetter-believe fessor of writing at the University of In trouble. Trouble is how we learn Pittsburgh. Since 2010, he’s piled up more what the soul is. awards, done national interviews for

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His lines’ musicality keeps readers on their toes, allowing Hayes’ speaker to express a tone of acceptance as he explains an incident from his parents’ marital difficulties without melodrama: “For many years there was a dancing competition between / My mother and father though rarely did they actually dance. / They did not scuffle like drums or cymbals, but like something / Sluggish and close to earth.” The understated language lingers without casting blame.

HOW TO BE DRAWN By Terrance Hayes Penguin Poets, $20, 95 pages

Reading How to Be Drawn can be educational and, thankfully, the author’s website includes links and notes on inspirations ranging from photos and sculpture to obscure books and hip hop. As an undergrad, Hayes studied fine arts, and he possesses a high cultural IQ that seeps into his work through ekphrasis (or literary descriptions of artworks), name-dropping and epigraph. Some of those are more effective poems than others. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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DRAWN IN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

By Jacques Brel, English lyrics and additional material by Eric Blau and Mort Shuman

April 29 - May 9 Directed by Alan Stanford Music Direction by Douglas Levine Peirce Studio Trust Arts Education Center Downtown Series

Limited run. Limited seating. The second of two plays in PICT’s Downtown Series located at Peirce Studio | Trust Arts Education Center | 805 Liberty Avenue

PICTTheatre.org/Brel | 412.561.6000 | Discount CP5OFF* *For preview performances only. Some restrictions apply.

A P R I L 30, M AY 1, 2 & 3

Chatham Baroque and Attack Theatre join forces with up-and-coming vocal ensemble, Ping, to present Claudio Monteverdi’s story of love and loss on the battlefield of the First Crusade. Set against a backdrop of original video art, celebrated tenor Aaron Sheehan leads a charge of dancers, players, and singers in a multimedia recreation of this epic 17th-century madrigal. ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM at Kaufmann Center, 1835 Center Avenue FOR TICKETS: 888-718-4253 OR WWW.CHATHAMBAROQUE.ORG

A NATIONAL BOOK AWARD-WINNER MOVES IN NEW AND INTERESTING DIRECTIONS. By contrast, a favorite of these experiments is “Portrait of Etheridge Knight in the Style of a Crime Report,” in which Hayes filled in a three-part police form to pay homage to the late Black Arts poet by incorporating aspects of Knight’s life and his influential poem “The Idea of Ancestry” (“In the cell’s darkness, the code of ancestry breaks”). The form Hayes uses here functions as an important reminder about second chances, especially in the face of present-day rates of incarceration among African-American men. While Pittsburgh doesn’t play prominently in How to Be Drawn, the photographs of the Hill District’s Charles “Teenie” Harris do. In “Self-Portrait as the Mind of a Camera,” based on a retrospective at the Carnegie Museum, Hayes considers the role of the camera as eyewitness to the everyday lives of “people who would be anonymous.” In a book full of memorable verse, the ones here might be most sublime. “But I know there are three kinds of looking in every picture: / The way the photographer looks, the way the subject looks, / And, Brothers and Sisters, the way it all looks to you.” In an age of “selfies” and Snapchat, it’s a thought-provoking reminder about the nature of perspective. And while this poem mostly focuses on visual imagery, as a whole, How to Be Drawn greatly satisfies both ear and mind. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

[ART REVIEW]

DECONSTRUCTORS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Vlad Basarab’s The Archaeology of Memory (detail) {PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS}

Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris

“Wigphrastic,” written after a collage print by the artist Ellen Gallagher that aims to challenge stereotypes, works for its quirky use of free association that accumulates consonance and alliteration throughout. “The men all paws. Animals. The men all fangles, / the men all wolf-woofs and a little bit lost, lust / lustrous, trustless, restless as the rest of us.” It’s a delicious cadence that ebbs and flows throughout the poem. Hayes’ considerations of form make him something of an experimentalist. Some of his strongest previous works embraced pecha kucha, a fast-paced Japanese style of business presentation. In How to Be Drawn, he works poems into the form of a séance (“Instructions for a Séance with Vladimirs”), conceptual maps from the Arts & Language movement (“Some Maps To Indicate Pittsburgh”) and an Einsteinian logic puzzle (“Who Are The Tribes”). While it’s daring stuff in theory, the writing in these particular poems sometimes feels stifled and academic.

The nine solo exhibitions by area artists now at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, curated by Adam Welch, are all quite different in appearance and intention, but three have interesting affinities. Terry Boyd, Vlad Basarab and Joseph Lupo use different mediums to explore abstraction, pattern, visual language and memory through additive and subtractive methods. Each deconstructs, rebuilds or reconfigures in order to challenge comprehension. Boyd’s exhibition is titled Bowers & Embroideries. A 2007 video “Untitled (sewing sequence)” functions as a sort of introduction. In a split screen, the top focuses on a man’s hands — presumably the artist’s — as he embroiders camouflaged material held taut by an embroidery hoop. The bottom shows him loading an arrow attached to black yarn and shooting it through a white canvas. On display in neighboring galleries are Boyd’s actual bow-and-arrow pieces. The tension of simultaneously rending and stitching the canvas is interesting and follows a long line of artists who have pushed the boundaries of abstraction by cutting, piercing, shooting or throwing someone or something at or onto a canvas or the ground. Boyd’s effort to masculinize the process is a bit too essentialist, but the intensity is more palpable than in his other work at PCA, in which he uses technology to compress, pixelate and digitize images so that his sewing machine creates impromptu abstractions. Here the process is more compelling than the result. The anarchic messiness of Basarab’s exhibition, The Archaeology of Memory, resembles Boyd’s bow-and-arrow paintings in that he simultaneously destroys and preserves his materials. Using books as symbols, he covers them with clay or salt or partially disintegrates them with water. There are no visible words, just the suggestion of their presence. Basarab’s statement explains that the work concerns “the loss of collective culture and memory.” Lupo, too, plays with presence and absence. Like Basarab and Boyd, he deconstructs in order to glean new meaning. His exhibition, Comic Configurations, is based on “The Invincible Iron Man” volume 1, issue 178. By removing either text or image, Lupo explores the way we perceive visual and textual narrative. And by preserving a key word in an individual cell, or rearranging words or images to create new patterns, he echoes how the other two artists play with the subconscious and the coherence of our visual vocabulary. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NINE SOLO EXHIBITIONS continue through May 3. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org


in the Cultural District

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717 Liberty Avenue

601 Wood Street

The World Revolves Around You | HC Gilje After widespread critical acclaim of his 2011 show, HC Gilje returns to Wood Street Galleries with three North American premieres of installations Revolver and Spin, and the world-premiere of Flimmer.

2. SPACE

UNLOADED Curated by Susanne Slavick Unloaded is a group show organized by Susanne Slavick that explores historical and social issues surrounding the availability, use and impact of guns in our culture. Performance by Vanessa German at 7pm. Special screening of In Unlivable Times from Chris Ivey’s East of Liberty on street monitor. Music with DJ SMI Window SPACE | Sideways Museum, Organized by Tom Sarver A collection of works by Pittsburgh artists exploring folk and visionary art traditions. Featuring work by Jim Rettinger, Doug Hill, Dorothy Williams, Steve Smith, Tom Sarver and Joann Kielar “outside of SPACE” Easely is a Pittsburgh-based art startup that allows customers to rent ready-to-hang art from local artists and artists around the world.

3. 820 Liberty Ave

PIGDA presents Game Works Come experience a spectrum of experimental game works featured from local creators.

4. Tito Way

6. Shaw Galleries

Light from the Furnace Industrial themed artworks.

7. Trust Arts Education Center 805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

Soul Sessions DJ Nate da Phat Barber spins soul, and funk classics at 7pm. Mavis Swan Poole & Soul Understated at 8:30pm Second floor*

Carnegie Library Button Making and Books

Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week in the Cultural District

Each designated location on the crawl will be featuring a local, regional or national craft brewery specially selected for that location and a selection of their beers for your enjoyment. Brewery representatives will be at the selected locations to educate crawlers on the beers and the story and history of the brewery.

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Celebrate National Jazz Appreciation Month with live Music by George Jones New View Trio 5:30-7:30pm Art by Laura Petrilla

24. PNC Legacy Project 600 Liberty Avenue

The PNC Legacy Project is honoring our region’s veterans.

25. Boutique 208

27. Olive or Twist

15. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show

National Poetry Month Celebration Festuring The Sounds of Steel steel pan band.

140 Sixth Street

28. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

111 Ninth Street

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: 7:30pm Salsa, 8pm Bachata, 8:30pm Salsa

17. Future Tenant

107 Sixth Street

29. Braddock’s American Brasserie

Cooking demo featuring Shrimp and Grits at 7 and 9pm.

crawl after dark

musicSPACEpresents:TheEarlyMays+BenShannon Doors at 10pm, live music at 10:30pm, $5 SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

Now You See Me! presents paintings and drawings by artists from Creative Citizen Studios.

Roar 9:30pm, $5

Harris Theater, 807 Liberty Avenue

19. Bend Yoga

The infamous, rarely seen 80s cult classic starring Tippi Hedren and her teen daughter Melanie Griffith. (USA, 1981, 102 mins, DCP) After the Crawl Comedy Show 10pm, $10

808 Penn Avenue

Free mini classes from 5:30-6pm and 6-6:30pm.

MUSIC

23. Backstage Bar

655 Penn Avenue

Celebrate National Jazz Appreciation Month with live music by Yoko Suzuki Band.

20. 709 Penn Gallery

Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

709 Penn Avenue

Out of Many, One People | Tamara Natalie Madden This exhibition is an exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica.

Ruckus Improv 9:15pm, $10, 18+

21. 707 Penn Gallery

A Pittsburgh based improvisational comedy troupe. Karoake with Rock ’n Ray the DJ and YOU 10pm–2am

Vascular Caverns | Gianna Paniagua Featuring entirely handcut works.

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Café Con Leche: Brisas del Caribe-kid friendly Caribbean celebration “What does it mean to be a Pittsburgh Latino?”

LOCKED GROOVES | bombyx collective Dancers and aerialists perform to grooves from a live DJ.

707 Penn Avenue

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18. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership presents the first outdoor market of the season!

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142 Sixth Street, 3rd Floor

10. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

925 Liberty Avenue

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14. Sonoma Grille

Flash: A CMU School of Art Group Exhibition A visual exhibition of mixed media that features talent from Carnegie Mellon undergraduate students.

11. Spring Night Market

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26. Verve 360

Live Improv comedy every half hour! Every half hour catch a brand new improv show!

Process Masters High school students from the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild will exhibit visual art from various mediums, and several will give artist talks.

SEV

Live music by Jonathan Dull, art and other handmade items.

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Works of art by Brian Gonnella.

819 Penn Avenue

811 Liberty Avenue

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208 Sixth Street

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery.

Digital Media and 3D Forms An exhibition by Pittsburgh CAPA 6-12 visual art students.

9. Arcade Comedy Theater

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August, August, August! A collection of photographs, videos, set pieces, and artwork. Curated by Mark Clayton Southers FENCES Open rehearsal for August Wilson’s FENCES in the theater

8. Harris Theater 5:30 - 9pm (Free) Regionally Produced Short Films

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Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company 3rd floor

16. CAPA Gallery

are part of Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week.

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937 Gallery 2nd floor

914 Penn Avenue

809 Liberty Avenue

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7th St. and Penn Avenue

Play on a living board game, that makes collecting data fun!

Third Floor*/Fourth Floor

Pittsburgh Public Schools All City Showcase of the Arts

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22. Katz Plaza

Bricolage 1st floor

13. Tonic

212 Ninth Street

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

Venues with a

9 Lives | Cody Baker Surreal imagery designed to evoke a real emotion. Realistic portrayal by Max Flick. Music by Soccratee. 805 Liberty Avenue

812 Liberty Avenue

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Temporary States | Lori Hepner & Christine Lorenz Explores common threads through two bodies of work.

5. Social Status

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12. 937 Liberty Avenue

CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

1. Wood Street Galleries

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Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

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Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

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All information and locations are subject to change.

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This Friday, April 24 5:30-10pm

A Production of:

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Future Tenant, 819 Penn Avenue

August Henry’s City Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

Charley’s Aunt - a comedy written by Brandon Thomas

MAY 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 2015 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00 FOR ADULTS, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

Saturday, May 2 at 7:30PM

Kelly-Strayhorn Theater • 5941 Penn Avenue • Pittsburgh, PA 15206

TICKETS: Presents

Rear balcony $40 Front Balcony $50 *Orchestra $100

*(includes Black Tie Reception, Brochure Listing)

With master of Ceremonies, Christopher T. Moore

Call 412.431.0773, email newhorizontheater@yahoo.com or send check or money order to: New Horizon Theater, Inc. P.O. Box 40102 Pittsburgh, PA 15201

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Sam Tsoutsouvas and Helena Ruoti in The Dance of Death, at Kinetic Theatre Co.

[PLAY REVIEWS]

WILD DANCE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} IF THERE’S A MORAL to the story of August Strindberg’s The Dance of Death, it’s “beware of house guests.” The notes for the Kinetic Theatre Co. production of the 1900 dark classic reveals that Strindberg based his vicious married couple on his own dear sister and her hubby, for the crime of taking him in during a long illness. While he did indeed discuss death long into the night with his brother-in-law — himself ill — the playwright took, ahem, liberties in portraying the pair’s lively relationship.

Proceeds to benefit New Horizon Theater, Inc.

THE DANCE OF DEATH continues through May 3. Kinetic Theatre Co. at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-35. www.kinetictheatre.org

of furniture, denoting perhaps a funeral or the absence of the family. The theater seats are covered as well, with the play and the audience crowded on the stage. A stellar cast rips each other to shreds with elegant depravity. Helena Ruoti reigns as Alice, virago, succubus and thwarted beauty. As Edgar, her husband and a military man, Sam Tsoutsouvas moves from spiteful calumny to vulnerability in a blink. He’s very much the man both used to control and totally out of control. And sometimes of his mind. It might take two to tango but this “dance” is better with three. Mark D. Staley valiantly keeps up his credibility as old family friend/cousin Kurt, but we know that Edgar and Alice will, like harpies, feast on his bowels. The design/tech team adds another wealth of talent. This Dance of Death is a gorgeous must-see, if not for the faint-hearted. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

OK, that’s a bit facile. One can also say the moral is “house guests, beware.” The plot, after all, is about the mutualhatred society of husband and wife turning their venom on a seemingly innocent visitor. (Why, yes, it does sound like a forerunner of Edward Albee’s 1962 hit, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, but without the cusswords). Most of all, though, Dance is distinctly amoral, if not actually immoral. This 2013 adaptation by Conor McPherson is also very funny, and creepy, as directed by Andrew S. Paul, Kinetic’s producing artistic director. Much of the vaulting interior of the New Hazlett Theater is filled with shrouded bits

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

EXPRESS TRAIN {BY TED HOOVER} “THEY TOLD ME take a streetcar named

Desire, and transfer to one called Cemeteries, and ride six blocks and get off at — Elysian Fields!” So goes the immortal opening words of Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams’ classic A Streetcar Named Desire. And wasn’t it considerate of the city of New Orleans to have the foresight to give its streets names Williams could use to chart the emotional and spiritual journey of one of the greatest


female characters in all of theater? The Point Park Conservatory Theatre Co. production of Streetcar shows us Blanche washing up in the French Quarter in New Orleans: out of money, hope or ability to sustain the precious illusions keeping ugly reality at bay. She’s come to her sister Stella’s home; a two-room apartment overfilled with Stella’s husband Stanley Kowalski. Williams introduces him to the audience by having him blast into the apartment carrying a package of raw meat.

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE continues through Sun., April 26. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Almost immediately, Blanche and Stanley take up the recurring war in most of Williams’ work between the beauty of illusion and the soul-crushing effects of truth. Director Martin Giles pitches camp on that battlefield, and his version begins at a fevered pitch and maintains the intensity throughout. Such a reading certainly makes for explosive evening, and there’s not a single lazy or hazy theatrical choice.

But by infusing Stanley’s animal energy into every corner of the play, as Giles has, Blanche — and especially her poetry and the deceptive beauty of her fantasies — get bowled over. In a sense, Blanche’s weakness is what makes her such a strong character, but this production focuses more on the obvious pyrotechnics of Stanley’s power. Gianni Downs has created the perfect set for this show — a terrific mix of substance and shadow that seems to exist in Blanche’s mind. Brittany Dorazio and Nick McDonough, as Stella and Mitch, are spectators to the war and, not being the focus, have more emotional room to maneuver … which they do beautifully. Allie York and Tal Kroser, as Blanche and Stanley, are a perfectly matched pair moving in emotional sync with each other throughout the production. It’s a huge accomplishment in these mammoth roles. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

DISC JOCKEYS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THE BEST POINT about having the Duquesne University Red Masquers tackling David Rimmer’s Album is that the undergraduate actors are wholly credible as

high school kids. The down side is the 1981 comedy itself, a timeless story of privileged white kids “coming of age” — but supposedly set in the 1960s. No. Sorry: Been there, done that, suffered the flashbacks. Twanging the strings of nostalgia are mid-’60s rock tunes that are frequently (often awkwardly, even incorrectly) referenced. Yes,

ALBUM continues through Sat., April 25. The Duquesne University Red Masquers at Peter Mills Theater, Rockwell Hall, Duquesne campus, Uptown. $5-10. www.duqredmasquers.com

baby boomers at the time related very strongly to “their music.” Insufferably so at times. Yes, “insufferable” describes a lot of boomers themselves. But Album hits more than a few false notes with a 1960s free of racial tensions. (You think white people didn’t take notice of Watts, Detroit, Newark, etc.? For persons of a certain age, “long hot summer” is not a weather report.) Barely mentioned are the Vietnam War and the future-choking threat of The Draft — most boomers then were from blue-collar families, not candidates for a college deferment.

Enough with the soapbox. What we have are two pairs of friends, male and female, exploring old relationships from childhood and newer hook-ups with attainable members of the opposite gender. Peggy (strongly played by Abby Blackmon) is the aggressive, sometime bullying buddy of Trish (a sweet Erin Womer), who projects her adolescent passions onto famous rock stars. While they continue in their (probably upscale suburban) public high school, the guys are off to boarding school to become bad-boy preppies. Nathaniel Yost lives up to his character’s (Billy) senses of conceit and entitlement. Trevor Root lays it on thick as the dork nicknamed “Boo,” just like real music nerds at the time also took themselves way too seriously. Duquesne’s director of theater arts, John E. Lane Jr., designed the set and directed the ensemble and enthusiastic production staff. The title most readily refers to the LPs of the young music-lovers, but is more delicately interpreted as the family album that Trish trivializes, vandalizes and finally comes to cherish. Don’t take it as a period piece: For all the flaws of the play itself, this production makes the most of the power of raw youth. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

HC Gilje The World Revolves Around You Wood Street Galleries 04.24–06.21.15 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, April 24, 5:30–10pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of:

revolver, 2013

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FOR THE WEEK OF

04.2304.30.15

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. film.” The first of two screenings at the Harris Theater is tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. Also 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 25. 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5. www. theaters.pittsburgharts.org

Live Music Every Wednesday, Friday, & Saturday

{FESTIVAL}

APRIL 30 Tracy K. Smith

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL FRANZEN}

Roger Barbour

WEDNESDAY | APRIL 22 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

billy Price

FRIDAY | APRIL 24 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Olga Watkins

SATURDAY | APRIL 25 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mystic Knights

WEDNESDAY | APRIL 29 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Gresh

FRIDAY | MAY 1 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Neon Swing X-perience

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Rick Matt

WEDNESDAY | MAY 6 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

+ THU., APRIL 23 {TALK}

Scorsese Presents Polish Masterpieces, here’s a good place to start. Man of Iron (1981) is a film about the historic Gdansk shipyard strike that itself is credited with advancing Polish democracy. The film, which courageously

Fans of The New Yorker have long appreciated the angsty, insightful wit of cartoonist Roz Chast. Now Chast has made perhaps her biggest splash with her new book Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? The best-selling graphic memoir poignantly but hilariously depicts her relationship with her aging parents. Chast makes a {PHOTO COURTESY OF ULF rare Pittsburgh ANDERSEN SOLO} appearance tonight, discussing her book at Rodef Shalom Congregation. The event is a benefit APRIL 29 for Family Hospice & Richard Flanagan Palliative Care. Bill O’Driscoll 6:30 p.m. 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $75. 412-572-8812 or confronted Poland’s repressive www.familyhospicepa.org government, was directed by Andrzej Wajda, whom one {SCREEN} film historian has called “both If you haven’t yet checked the aesthetic grand master out Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ and moral conscience of Polish bargain-priced series Martin

Pittsburgh’s Thomas Merton Center continues its celebration of the 100th birthday of its namesake. Merton, a Trappist monk, was an author and activist for peace and social justice. His far-reaching influence is marked with Centennial of Thomas Merton Festival events including tonight’s screening and discussion of the film The Many Storeys and Last Days of Thomas Merton, at Munhall’s The Pump House. Other events continuing through Sunday include a discussion of Merton’s path compared to that of Martin Luther King Jr. (at The Pump House); and “Walking the Path to Peace With Thomas Merton,” an April 25 forum at the First Unitarian Church, in Shadyside. Most events are free. BO Many Storeys screening: 7:30 p.m. 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. Festival continues through Sun., April 26. For other events, see www.thomasmerton center.org.

{DANCE} Point Park University’s nationally recognized dance program showcases both its students and the work of its dance faculty this week with Conservatory Dance Company at Point Park University. The annual program, at Downtown’s GRW Performance Studio, features pieces choreographed by Doug Bentz, Ruben Graciani, Kiesha Lalama, Garfield Lemonius, Peter Merz and Ron Tassone. The first of six performances is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., April 26. 201 Wood St., Downtown. $18-20. www.pittsburghplayhouse.com


Art by Tamara Natalie Madden

FreeEvent

April 24’s Gallery Crawl includes a political touch: Students from the Pittsburgh chapter of the group MGR Youth Empowerment stage the #chalkedUNARMED Flash Mob, adorning Cultural District sidewalks with a series of chalk outlines to recall the deaths of unarmed black men and women killed by police. The flash mob complements the closing weekend of UNLOADED, a SPACE gallery exhibit about gun culture. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust-sponsored Crawl also includes art, live music and more at some two dozen other venues. At Sweetlix, there’s an experimental-game showcase. The Spring Night Market features food, drinks, and craft and clothing vendors. Bricolage Productions offers a “living board game”; Lori Hepner and Christine Lorenz open their photography show Temporary States at 937 Liberty Ave.; artist Tamara Natalie Madden explores blackness as a racial distinction in the Caribbean in Out of Many, One People, new at 709 Penn Gallery; and Brooklyn’s Mavis Swan Poole & Soul Understated rock the Trust Arts Education Center. The crawl goes till 10 p.m., but at the CrawlAfterDark, late-goers can sample events (some ticketed) including: more music, at SPACE ($5); a live sitcom at Arcade Comedy Theater ($10); improv comedy at Future Tenant (free); and a Harris Theater screening of 1981’s Roar, the cult fave featuring Tippi Hedren and more than 150 lions, tigers and other wild animals ($5). Bill O’Driscoll 5:30-10 p.m. Fri., April 24. Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

+ FRI., APRIL 24 {WORDS} Author Jennifer Morales doesn’t appear to include Pittsburgh on her list of the 10 most segregated U.S. cities she’s touring to discuss Meet Me Halfway (University of Wisconsin Press), her critically acclaimed new collection of interconnected short stories. But she might as well include it, and she’s coming here anyway. Tonight, the Wisconsin-based Morales visits Big Idea Bookstore to continue the conversation about race, sparked by these stories about an African-American teenager from Milwaukee who’s attending a high school in a white suburb. BO 7 p.m. 4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. www.thebigideapgh. wordpress.com

{STAGE} In a Pittsburgh premiere, Off the Wall Theater Co. stages Samuel Hunter’s The Whale. An emotional look into family relationships, the play follows Charlie, a 600-pound recluse desperate to reconnect with his long-estranged daughter. Reaching out to her, he finds only a sharp-tongued and wildly unhappy teen. The play, described as “riveting” by the New York Observer, depicts a man’s last chance at redemption. The first performance is tonight. Zacchiaus McKee 8 p.m. Continues through May 9. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

kicks off with a meet-andgreet this weekend. In this celebration of birds of prey, visitors can take a closer look at various species of eagles, owls, vultures and hawks. Special events include training demonstrations, feeding talks and flight displays. After this weekend, the season continues with events daily. ZM 11 a.m.3 p.m. Also 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun., April 26. 700 Arch St., North Side. $12-20. 412-3237235 or www.aviary.org

$10. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIA PETRUSKA}

{STAGE}

APRIL 25 Butterfly Forest

{EXHIBIT} An annual family favorite, the Butterfly Forest reopens at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens today. Brightening the Stove Room, the Butterfly Forest features species like the striped zebra longwing and orange-andblack Pennsylvania monarch, some of which are known to land on guests. The program also showcases the life cycle of some of nature’s most important pollinators and their favorite aromatic blooms. See the butterflies emerge from their chrysalides in an exhibit

that continues through the summer. ZM 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 7. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $11-15. 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

+ MON., APRIL 27 {SCREEN} Comedian Bill Hicks was a cultural hero, and his status

has only risen since his untimely death, in 1994. Tonight’s one-night-only theatrical screening gives fans a chance to see Hicks in his prime, at select area Cinemark theaters. Comedy Dynamics Presents: Bill Hicks documents a 1992 Montreal stop on Hicks’ Relentless tour, with the socially conscious comic ripping everything from musicians who don’t

APRIL 24 The Whale

+ SAT., APRIL 25 {EXHIBIT} The National Aviary’s new Masters of the Sky season

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use drugs to Operation Desert Storm. The evening includes such extras as clips from earlier standup shows. BO 8 p.m. Various Cinemark theaters. $10.50-12.50. www.fathomevents.com

+ WED., APRIL 29 {TALK} Completed on the day his father died, Richard Flanagan’s novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North was inspired by his father’s experiences in Japanese POW camps. The book follows 77-yearold Australian surgeon Dorrigo Evans from his POW experiences on the Thailand-Burma Railway during World War II through his life in contemporary Australia. The winner of the 2014 Man Booker Prize, Flanagan speaks about his novel and career tonight in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Lecture Hall. A book-signing follows the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures event. ZM 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland.

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Belgian singer-songwriter Jacques Brel was considered the master of the modern chanson, a lyric-driven genre of French song. His career lasted decades, and his songs were sung by artists like Ray Charles, Frank Sinatra and David Bowie. PICT Classic Theatre stages Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris, a cabaret-style musical featuring 25 songs written by Brel. The songs chosen explore a range of human emotion, sung by local talents including Daina Michelle Griffith and Justin Lonesome. With some performances at Downtown’s Trust Arts Education Center already sold out, the first performance is today. ZM 8 p.m. Continues through May 9. 805 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $7-54. 412-5616000 or www.picttheatre.org

+ THU., APRIL 30 {TALK} “There will be no edges, but curves. Clean lines pointing only forward,” is how Tracy K. Smith’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book of poetry Life on Mars opens. Smith, a creative-writing professor at Princeton, is the keynote speaker at Carnegie Mellon’s 2015 Adamson Student Writing Awards. The awards, a CMU staple, honor students for excellence in nonfiction, fiction, poetry, screenwriting and plays. Smith, who has written two other books of poetry, will give advice on the process of getting published. ZM 7 p.m. Baker Hall Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-2850 or www.cmu.edu/hss/english

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Music, Art, Cinema, Performance Art, Dance.

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Painting and a Movie PRESENTED ESE TE BY B Y ARTISSIMA ART A STUDIOS TUDIO PAINT A DELIGHTFUL PICTURE OF AUDREY HEPBURN WHILE WATCHING A MOVIE. ALL MATERIALS INCLUDED.

adaptation of José Saramago’s Nobel Prize-winning book. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru May 2. Carnegie Library, Allegheny, North Side. 412-362-1713. BOEING BOEING. A 60s farce feat. Bernard, a wannabeCasanova, w/ Italian, German & American fiancées, each a beautiful airline hostess w/ frequent “layovers”. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. Thru April 26. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE DANCE OF DEATH. A black comedy about a married couple who may have been together just a bit too long. Presented by Kinetic Theatre. Sun, 2 p.m. and Mon-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 3. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 888-718-4253. JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE & WELL & LIVING IN PARIS. A desperately romantic storytelling assisted by music, w/ two men & two women. Presented by PICT

Chinese folk dance, Ultimate Frisbee and Art All Night Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Thru Theater. The Peirce Studio Tue-Sat, April 25, 8 p.m., Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 3, 2 p.m. and Sun., May 17, 7 p.m. Thru May 9. Trust Arts Education Thru May 17. O’Reilly Theater, Center, Downtown. Downtown. 412-316-1600. OBLIVION. Uber-hip Brooklynites SHAKESPEARE’S MURDERS. Pam & Dixon take pride in Shakespeare reading night. their progressive approach to Actors & non-actors alike take a parenting. But when their crack at their favorite Shakespeare 16-year-old daughter Julie lies pieces. Kids welcome. Mon., about where she spent the April 27, 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, weekend, their cool façade Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. crumbles. Hamburg Studio. A STREETCAR Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Fri, NAMED DESIRE. 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Tennessee Williams’ Thru April 26. City classic play. Presented Theatre, South Side. www. per pa by Point Park. Rauh 412-431-2489. pghcitym .co Theater. Sun, 2 p.m. THE OPERA and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru WORKSHOP. DoubleApril 26. Pittsburgh Playhouse, bill “Dido” & “Aeneas” by Oakland. 412-392-8000. composer Henry Purcell & La Serva THREE SISTERS. Anton Chekhov’s, Padrona by Giovanni Battista Three Sisters, unveils the tragic Pergolesi, feat. director Guenko beauty of provincial life through Guechev. Fri., April 24, 7:30 p.m. a mixture of love, laughter & loss. and Sun., April 26, 2 p.m. Andrew April 21-25, 8 p.m. and Sat., Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, April 25, 2 p.m. Kresge Theater, Carnegie. 412-396-6083. CMU, Oakland. 412-268-2407. OTHELLO. William Shakespeare’s THE WHALE. On the outskirts classic drama. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Sat, of Mormon country, Idaho, a

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RANDY GALIOTO PRESENTS TRIBUTE TO THE KING

SATURDAY MAY 9

David Allan Coe FRIDAY MAY 8

The Miss Freddye 88PM | DOORS OPEN 7PM EVERY SHOW’S A WORLD PREMIERE!

Coming Soon! 58

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

THU 23 PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 24 DOC DIXON, TOM MUSIAL, RAY ZAWODNI. Fundraiser for Relay for Life of Alle-Kiski Valley. 8 p.m. Natrona Heights VFW Post 894, Natrona Heights. 412-920-5653. RACHEL MCDOWELL, DAVID KAYE, KEVIN DOWNEY JR. 8 p.m. West View Fireman’s Banquet Hall, West View. 412-920-5653.

JERSEY, THE HAITIAN SENSATION. 8 p.m. and Sat., April 25, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 25

Elvis Lives

FFRIDAY MAY 22

COMEDY

FRI 24 - SAT 25

SSATURDAY MAY 2

BLUES BAND

600 lbs. recluse hides away in his apartment eating himself to death. Desperate to reconnect w/ his long-estranged daughter, he reaches out to her, only to find a viciously sharp-tongued & wildly unhappy teen. Presented by Off the Wall Theater. Fri., April 24. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-71-TICKETS.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE RADDING}

Art All Night is a community-based, non-juried, uncensored art show, staffed by volunteers, that welcomes artists of all ages and types. Held in a giant warehouse in Lawrenceville, this annual event is free and open to the public. Hundreds of works in all mediums will be displayed, while live performances occur throughout the day, the night and the next day. Children’s activities also make the 18th annual AAN fun for kids. 4 p.m. Sat., April 252 p.m. Sun., April 26. 97 40th Street, Lawrenceville. Free. www.artallnight.org

JOHN EVANS, RACHEL MCDOWELL, RAY ZAWODNI. 8 p.m. Italian American Citizens Club. 412-920-5653. KEVIN DOWNEY JR., TOM MUSIAL, TRAVIS WALLING. 8 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. 412-751-6960. LAUGH & LYRICS. Hosted by Lee Davis, featuring Howie D Mac & Friends, J. Russ & Nesia Beatz. 8 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335. MAKE NICE BOOM. A team improv competition presented by Unplanned Comedy. Fourth Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Fourth Sat of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

SUN 26 FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. A melting pot of poets, singers, comedians, dancers, musicians & entertainers. Presented by Chicksburgh. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. CONTINUES ON PG. 60


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422 Foreland St.

Pittsburgh, PA

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FEATURING BEERS OF THE MONTH “Il Confronto” (acrylic and spray paint, 2015), by Laura D’Andrea. From the exhibition Two Italian Masters, at Christine Fréchard Gallery, Squirrel Hill.

NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. Vascular Caverns. Papercut sculpture depicting abstracted, anatomical imagery by Gianna Paniagua. Opening reception April 24. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. One Out of Many, One People. Works by Tamara Natalie Madden. An exploration of the vast cultural heritage of Jamaica. Opening reception April 23, 5:30-8pm. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 97 40TH ST. Art All Night. A community art show of many mediums w/ live music, no jury, no fees & no censorship. Lawrenceville. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Two Italian Masters. Works by Pier Luigi & Laura D’Andrea. Opening reception April 24, 5-8pm. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl. Free quarterly showcase of art & entertainment in the heart of the Cultural District. Garfield. 412-471-1496. SHAW GALLERIES. Light from the Furnace. Industrial themed artworks by Lyudmila Devlysh, Dawn Tekler, Mark Muse, Dave Kelsch, Sasha Williams & a mystery guest artist. Opens April 24. Downtown. 412-281-4884. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The World Revolves Around You. Work by HC Gilje. Opening reception April 24, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. Works from Pittsburgh based artist, Cecilia Ebitz’s “Good Intentions”, inspired by the work & teachings of Corita Kent. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART SPACE 616. Martin Prekop. A survey of work from the 1970s to the present. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery.

The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Vixens from the Vault. Pin-Up Photography by Laura Petrilla. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BE GALLERIES. Kate Joyce. Furniture, sculpture, paintings & selected period pieces from throughout her career. Back & Forth. Works by Kenn Bass, Dana Ingham, Lenore Thomas & Janet Towbin. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Spring - Flowers, Fields & Herbs. Work by Eileen F. Yeager. Verona. 412-828-1031. BUTLER ART CENTER. 2015 Spring Art Show. Works by many artists in the mediums of painting, drawing, photography & digital art, mixed media, sculpture, fiber art, ceramics & printmaking. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Visiting Van Gogh: Still Life, Basket of Apples. Van Gogh’s “Still Life, Basket of Apples” (1887),”Le Moulin de la Galette” (1886–1887), “Wheat Fields after the Rain” (1890), & Paul Signac’s “Place des Lices, St. Tropez”, visiting from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Will close temporarily on May 25 & reopen on June 6. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. dreamscapes. 20 pieces, free standing & wall mounted, all work by Tim Kelley. Monroeville. 724-797-3302. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Venezuelan Artists United. In collaboration w/ Luzardo Gallery in Venezuela.

Feat. work by Jesus Perez, Nerio Quintero, Freddy Paz Rincon, Alvaro Paz, Gustavo Paris & Johan Galue. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE. Houses of the Obsolete. From Carlos Gesualdo to Chittagong; a thematic selection of new paintings by Jacquet Kehm. Squirrel Hill. 412-436-0908. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Flash: A CFA School of Art Group Exhibition. Showcasing the talents from Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Fabrizio Gerbino. New paintings by artist. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Liz Goldberg & Patty Gallagher. Dual exhibtion w/ Goldberg’s painting & drawings for “Cigar Queens of Havana” & Gallagher’s wearable art, “Hot Tropics”. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2015. Annual group exhibition & competition. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772.

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(The Rainbow Jumpy). Bounce, more than 600 birds from jump, roll, run & walk through over 200 species. W/ classes, a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art lectures, demos & more. piece created by Felipe Dulzaides North Side. 412-323-7235. & on loan from The New Children’s NATIONALITY ROOMS. Museum, in San Diego CA. 26 rooms helping to tell the story North Side. 412-322-5058. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by University of Pittsburgh. COMPASS INN. Demos & Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-624-6000. tours w/ costumed guides feat. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & this restored stagecoach stop. 412-431-9908. BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 724-238-4983. JOKING OFF. A weekly stand indoor rooms & 3 outdoor CONNEY M. KIMBO up show hosted by Dick Winters. gardens feature exotic plants GALLERY. University of Wed, 9 p.m. Thru April 29 & floral displays from around the Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. world. Butterfly Forest. Watch Memorabilia & Awards from 412-904-1744. butterflies emerge from their the International Hall of Fame. chrysalises to flutter among Oakland. 412-648-7446. tropical blooms. April 25-Sept. FALLINGWATER. Tour the ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE 7. Tropical Forest Congo. famed Frank Lloyd Wright LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. An exhibit highlighting house. 724-329-8501. Thomas Espy Room Tour. The some of Africa’s lushest FORT PITT MUSEUM. Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 landscapes. Opening Reconstructed fort of the Grand Army of the gala on April 23 w/ live houses museum of Republic served local Civil War ww. r w entertainment & more. Pittsburgh history circa pe veterans for over 54 years & is ghcitypa p Call to register. Oakland. French & Indian War .com the best preserved & most intact 412-622-6914. & American Revolution. GAR post in the United States. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Downtown. 412-281-9285. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. Photographs & Jewerly. A FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CARNEGIE SCIENCE hundred years (1839-1939) of CENTER. Ongoing: tours of CENTER. H2Oh!. Experience photographs that incorporated Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ kinetic water-driven motion jewelry. Call for guided tours. classes & programs for all ages. & discover the relations between North Side. 412-231-7881. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. water, land & habitat. How PINBALL PERFECTION. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this do everyday decisions impact Pinball museum & players club. Tudor mansion & stable complex. water supply & the environment? West View. 412-931-4425. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG the surrounding park. Allison Park. (planetarium), Miniature AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 412-767-9200. Railroad & Village, USS Requin animals, including many KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the submarine & more. North Side. endangered species. Highland other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 412-237-3400. Park. 412-665-3639. 724-329-8501. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF RACHEL CARSON NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to PITTSBURGH. Missing Links HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, EVERY THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335 & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

TUE 28

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 29

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

Live Music

Swing Dance Every Friday to a Live Band

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – JAMESSTREETGASTROPUB.COM

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VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

HILLMAN LIBRARY. Get to The Point!. An exhibition of early drawings, paintings, postcards, engravings, maps, & photographs from the University of Pittsburgh Library System Archives Service Center that document the history of the Point & Point State Park. Ground Floor. Oakland. 412-648-3330. HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ART. Annual Hoyt Regional Juried Exhibit. Showcasing Pittsburgh area artists. New Castle. 724-652-2882. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Elements. Drawings & watercolors of bird nests w/ a focus on the natural & man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman, David Morrison & Kate Nessler. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. The Big Little Show. An exhibition curated by Sheila D. Ali w/ local & international artists: Abira Ali, Alberto Almarza, Bill Shannon, Douglas “Dougie” Duerring, Eliza Henderson, Etta Cettera, Katy DeMent, Lavern Kemp, Lisa Demagall, Michael “Fig” Magniafico, Ryder Henry, Sandra Streiff, Sheila Ali, Sherry Rusinak & Waylon Richmond. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Headliners. New paintings, mixed media works, glass & ceramics. Feat. Christine Aaron, Eileen Braun, Claire Cotts, Jamie Harris, Ben Johnson, Micheal Madigan, Susan Morosky & Scott Turri. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MARKET SQUARE. Jennifer Wen Ma: Installation. “A Winter Landscape Cradling Bits of Sparkle” 120 live trees,

200 kg of Chinese ink, wooden pathway & glass globes. Downtown. 412-471-1511. MATTRESS FACTORY. your heart is a prism. A video installation by Kevin Clancy. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Circus Animals Not Included. Work by Thad Dachille. Materials gathered from the street, signs, icons, symbols & the human body inspire & are assembled into imagery comprised of paintings & graphics generated on both mixed media canvases & wall prints. Earthly Delites // Boring Chores. Homemade Artwork by: K. Gould, M.Shalonis, & S.Neary. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots!. A mixed media show exploring the common teapot in uncommon ways. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Shades of Spring Craft Show. Featuring hand-crafted, unique items from more than 30 artisans. Proceeds benefit children’s art programs at the North Hills Art Center. Ross. 412-364-3622. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Nine Solo Exhibits. Feat. the work of Scott Andrew, Vlad Basarub, Terry Boyd, Oreen Cohen, Joy Christiansen Erb, Katie Ford, Joseph Lupo, Katie Murken & Hisham Youssef. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. ABC@PGC. A colorful exhibition feat. glass sculptures combined w/ an interactive illuminated word building piece that visitors can touch, rearrange & wear like apparel. Created by Jen Elek & Jeremy Bert. Friendship.

WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & cokemaking in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

DANCE COMPANY. Classical Chinese folk dance w/an orchestra. April 25-26, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 888-974-3698.

DANCE

FUNDRAISERS

THU 23 - WED 29

FRI 24

(A) LONG HERE. A dance performance that combines chalk drawings, music & video projection. Presented by the Pillow Project. Thru April 30, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze.

BLACK & WHITE PARTY. Salsa lessons & dancing to benefit Every Child, Inc. 7-10 p.m. Cavo, Strip District. 412-665-0600.

SAT 25 - SUN 26 SHEN YUN CLASSICAL CHINESE

SAT 25 BARK FOR LIFE. Walking event for dogs & their owners to raise funds & awareness for the American

412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. winterlong. Work by Caldwell Linker. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. THE SHOP. Jennifer Lee & Terry Young. New work by these artists. Gallery hours on Fridays from 12-6pm. Closing reception May 1, 5-9pm. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. A World Imagined: Kelli Connell & Sara Macel. Photography that reflects on authorship, on photographic construction & on the ways in which we define relationships through our subjective experiences of them. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. UNLOADED. A multimedia group show that explores historical & social issues surrounding the availability, use & impact of guns in our culture. Closing reception April 24. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Interior open for special occasions. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. WaterWorks 2015. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society members showcase new works in watercolor & other water media. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Selections From The Elgin Park Series. Photographs by Michael Paul Smith. Shaping New Worlds. A national exhibition of constructed photography. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. Unholy Smoke - City of Steel. Work by Steve Staso, Rebecca Zilenziger & Anne Delaney. Braddock.

Cancer Society. 10 a.m. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 724-222-6911. A DECO AFFAIR: PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ!. Dinner, floor show, auctions & dancing. Benefits Opera Theater Pittsburgh. 6:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-621-2353. KA-BLAM! A FUNDRAISER FOR THE TOONSEUM. Join Honorary Chairman Rick Sebak, YouTube sensation Pittsburgh Dad & other “Pittsburgh Characters” to support Pittsburgh’s museum of the cartoon & comic arts. 7-11 p.m. Teamsters Hall Local 249, Lawrenceville. 412-977-6344.


EVENT: An Experimental Space for Reconnection With the Natural World, by Lazae LaSpina, at Biddle’s Escape Coffee House, Wilkinsburg

WHEN: Sat., April 18 It was a sound walk, so we wore headphones and listened to a recording while walking down the street. I thought it was really cool that the cat was sitting there when they were talking about a cat because they couldn’t have staged that; cats do not sit still. I was very confused. I wasn’t sure what it was about. And then I kind of realized it was about a caterpillar and butterflies. I think the best art does that, though. You don’t have to know exactly what it’s about, it just made me feel kind of caterpillar-y. After the walk we entered a house and it was like being inside a cocoon. The house was like a peepshow. You looked through a hole in the wall and there was, like, a fairy butterfly on the other side, but it was awkward because she was holding full eye contact, which demanded I [hold] full eye contact. It was very claustrophobic in the house; it made me uncomfortable.

MON 27 ART FOR CHANGE 2015. Silent & verbal art auctions to benefit the PERSAD center. 6 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-441-9786.

B Y Z AC C H IAU S MC K E E

FRI 24

LOCAL WRITERS SHELF LAUNCH & LUNCH. Readings by local authors, live music & potluck. Hosted by the Taproot Writer’s Workshop, Inc. 12 p.m. Laughlin Memorial Library, Ambridge. 724-630-0918. SATURDAY NIGHT POETRY. Local poets Margaret Bashaar, Dan Nowak & Jill Khoury read from their new works. 7 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

PETERSON. Meet the authors of “Allegheny City: a History of Pittsburgh’s North Side”. 6:30 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. STORY NIGHT. Live, open mic storytelling w/ a different theme every month. Last Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770. STORYTELLING @ RILEY’S. Story telling on a theme every month. Last Tue of every month, 8 p.m. Riley’s Pour House, Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

SUN 26

WED 29

LITERARY

JENNIFER MORALES. Readings from her new book, “Meet Me Halfway”. 7 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. ROBERTA BEARY W/ DON WENTWORTH. An Evening of Haiku & Short Poetry. 7 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-622-3175.

THU 23

SAT 25

WED 29 MUSTACHES AND MICROBREWS. Drink some mircobrews to benefit the DePaul School. 6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-924-1019.

BOOKLOVER’S BASH. Amazing Books 2nd anniversary party. 7 p.m. Amazing Books, Squirrel Hill. 412-436-5535. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. POETRY INTERACTIVE. Reading, listening & discussing the art of Poetry. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. 7 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. A TRIBUTE TO CHARLES BUKOWSKI. 20 local writers read in honor of Bukowski. 8 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

CELEBRATE NEW BOOKS FOR KIDS. Meet & hear local childrens’ authors Elizabeth Segel & Sharon Flake. 2 p.m. Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220.

TUE 28 DAN ROONEY & CAROL

THU 23 CREATURE COSTUME MAKING. Find inspiration in the plants, animals, weather & bugs to create costumes & props w/ Emily Cross & Brooke Smokelin. 12-3 p.m. and Sat., April 25, 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 23 - WED 29

CRITIC: Penny Vozniak, 39, a filmmaker from Sydney, Australia

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. POEM-A-THON WRITE-IN & READING. Fundraiser benefiting Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Participants pledge to write a certain number of poems during April & collect donations from friends & family. Celebrate together w/ more poem writing & an open mic reading. 3 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-366-0409. SPRINGTIME ON BROADWAY. A luncheon to benefit the Women’s Guild. Union Ballroom. 11 a.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-5709.

KIDSTUFF

RICHARD FLANAGAN. Author discusses his novel, “The Narrow Road to the Deep North.” 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. SARA SHEPARD. Author talk. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon

ALLEGHENY COUNTY MARBLES PROGRAM. Free games & lessons for children 14 & under. Tournaments. Various locations. Thru May 27 412-821-5779. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Opera on Used Vinyl Great voices and great music are available in boxed sets, typically in splendid shape and often for $3 or $4 per disc. Tip: At local used shops, look for the beautifully packaged RCA Victor “Red Seal” stuff from the ’50s and ’60s.

SAT 25 ART OF ORIGAMI. An interactive workshop on origami folding. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. CREATURE COSTUME MAKING. Find inspiration in the plants, animals, weather & bugs to create costumes & props w/ Emily Cross & Brooke Smokelin. 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. DANCE ME A STORY W/ PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATER. 3-5 years olds can move to favorite childhood stories. Each 45 minute class will begin w/ simple stretches & warm-ups before journeying into each story & its characters through movement & song. Parents are encouraged to participate. Registration required. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru May 2 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PETTING ZOO. Animals, pony rides & lunch. 11 a.m.1 p.m. South Avenue United Methodist Church, Wilkinsburg. 412-371-7421.

Free Jazz at the Fairmont Hotel Wednesday through Saturday nights, check out sets from local jazz musicians in the lobby adjoining the hotel bar. 510 Market St., Downtown {PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

SUN 26

*Stuff We Like MUSIC EDITION

Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

LET THEM EAT CAKE. Midwife Center’s 10th anniversary fundraiser party & cake contest. Refreshments, a silent auction, photo booth, entertainment. Amateur, professional bakers & decorators from around the region will take you out for a night at the theater w/ incredible cakes based on films, film production & the excitement of going to the theater. 7:30-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412.321.6880 x208.

Galaxie Electronics Plug-in gear from turntables and tapedecks on up are treated lovingly here by “The Turntable Doctor.” For sales or service, the prices are right, and the turnaround time is quick. 2136 Murray Ave. Squirrel Hill

Impulse If you’re bummed there aren’t more LGBT spaces in Pittsburgh geared toward women, drop by this dance party that takes over a new venue each quarter. $5 gets you in; next up, Spring Fever at Altar Bar on May 30. www.impulsepittsburgh.com

MON 27 FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarianturned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 28 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades

Sound Opinions Writing professor Jim DeRogatis and music critic Greg Kot offer insightful criticism and fun segments on this radio show that spans music genres. From WBEZ in Chicago, it airs locally on WESA (90.5 FM) Thursdays at 9 p.m.

CONTINUES ON PG. 62

NEWS

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TA S T E

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PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 61

Mayor Bill Peduto, live with Lynn Cullen,

this Friday at 10 a.m.

www.pghcitypaper.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

OUTSIDE FRI 24 - SAT 25 APRIL STAR PARTIES. Amateur astronomers, students & the general public to observe spring sky, such as the galaxies in the Coma-Virgo Cluster, planetary nebulae & star clusters. Weather permitting. Wagman Observatory. April 24-25, 8:10 p.m. Deer Lakes Park, Tarentum. 724-224-2510. STAR PARTY. Hosted by the Amateur Astronomers Association. April 24-25, 7 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150.

OTHER STUFF THU 23 AMERICA INVENTS ACT (AIA) AT TWO YEARS. Panel discussion on the America Invents Act (AIA) two years in, discussing changes & impact on the invention landscape. 5 p.m. The Engineer’s Club, Downtown. 412-261-0710. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. AN EVENING WITH ROZ CHAST. Multi-media presentation by the renowned New Yorker cartoonist & author. Hosted by Family Hospice & Palliative Care. 8 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-572-8812. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. THE MANY STORIES & LAST DAYS OF THOMAS MERTON. Film screening w/ discussion by Molly Rush, Fr. Jay Geisler, Fr. Jack O’Malley & Peter Smith. 7:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House. Homestead. 412-831-3871. OAKMONT TOASTMASTERS CLUB. Speakers Sally Chopping, Sharon Anita Hill & Bonnie Artman Fox. Presented by Toastmasters. 6:30 p.m. Riverview Community Action Building, Oakmont. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WOMEN, MEN & MONEY: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE & WHY IT MATTERS. Discussion on the differences between genders & how women can assess & improve their decision-making as it relates to money. 12-1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library,

Mt. Lebanon. 412-779-2331. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

FRI 24 21+ SCI-FI. Enjoy the Science Center, kid free, with cocktails. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. ABRAHAM LINCOLN’S FAITH JOURNEY & OUR MINISTRY STORIES. Speaker: Ronald C. White, professor emeritus of American religious history at San Francisco Theological Seminary. 11 a.m., 2 & 4 p.m. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1345. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BREATHE PENNSYLVANIA TUBERCULOSIS CONFERENCE. Several speakers will present information about latent TB & treatment, TB & HIV

is transforming a favela named Candeal. Part of Sembene Film Festival. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-204-7291. MULTIGRAIN WHISKEY RELEASE. Mill your own grain, drink whiskey, & eat food from local bakeries. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

FRI 24 - SAT 25 BREWSKI FESTIVAL. Beer tasting, live music & food. 8-11 p.m. and Sat., April 25, 7-10 p.m. Seven Springs. 814-352-7777.

SAT 25 BUTLER PARANORMAL CONFERENCE. Guest speakers, vendors, book signings, raffles, more. 10 a.m.7 p.m. Tanglewood Event Center, Butler. 724-287-0021. COLA TASTING. Taste a variety of classic sodas from small companies. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Village Candy, Sewickley. 412-741-1490. THE KING OF THE CAGE. Mixed Martial Arts event & fights. 7:30 p.m. Meadows Casino, Washington. 724-503-1200.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TAIL WAGGIN’ TUTORS

Shaler North Hills Library is seeking canine volunteers for its Tail Waggin’ Tutors Program. Certified therapy dogs are needed to serve as listeners for children who want to practice reading in a low-risk and non-judgmental environment. Tutoring sessions are held on the last Saturday of every month from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Contact Caroline Hogan at 412-536-1057 for more information.

co-infection & screening for TB. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Oakland. 724-772-1180. EMERGING PHILANTHROPY CONFERENCE. Keynote Speaker, Gail Perry, MBA, CFRE. 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Hilton Garden Inn, Canonsburg. 412-694-4250. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. LADIES WHO NETWORK. Business networking mixer focused on women-owned business. 6-10 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-723-2414. “THE MIRACLE OF CANDEAL” SCREENING. Jazz legend Bebo Valdez fulfills a life-long dream to find his African roots in Bahia, Brasil & finds Carlinhos Brown & the school he founded that

PITTSBURGH THUNDERBIRDS PROFESSIONAL ULTIMATE FRISBEE. The Thunderbirds are a new team in the American Ultimate Disc League & are competing against Cincinnati. 7 p.m. Cupples Stadium, South Side. 330-979-9347. THE REBELLIOUS LIFE OF MRS. ROSA PARKS. Jeanne Theoharis will give the Margaret Morrison Distinguished Lecture in Women’s History on Rosa Parks. Baker Hall’s Giant Eagle Auditorium. 4 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. THINK SPRING FOUR SEASONS BREW TOUR. Visit Four Seasons


Brewing Company in Latrobe w/ PA Brew Tours. 12-5 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-323-4709. THOMAS MERTON & MARTIN LUTHER KING: TWO PATHS OF NON-VIOLENT SOLIDARITY FOR PEACE & JUSTICE. A discussion in the round will be held w/ representatives from the African American Church, Catholic Social Teaching, Protestant Social Gospel, & Jewish Prophetic Traditions. 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House, Homestead. 412-831-3871. WOMEN’S SELF CARE SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce stress, tackle anxiety & strengthen boundaries while building practical coping techniques & tools in a confidential, healing & supportive environment. Sat, 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300 ex. 129.

WED 29 COOKBOOK CLUB. Connect w/ other local food lovers as we dive into some of our favorite cookbooks. Bring a favorite potluck dish. Reservations required. Cafe. 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

AUDITIONS THE MENDELSSOHN

CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring auditions for all voice parts for the 2015/2016 season. Volunteer singers will be heard on May 11, 12 & 13. Professional Core singers will be heard May 17, 18 & 19. FINDING YOUR WAY AS For audition criteria & to AN INTERFAITH FAMILY. make an appt, go to www. Informal conversation about themendelssohn.org. Third the various issues that can Presbyterian Church, Oakland. emerge in fostering a Jewish 724-263-5259. identity in families from R-ACT THEATRE differing religious traditions. PRODUCTIONS. Seeking Registration required. 9:15 p.m. 5 men & 5 women for casting Temple David, Monroeville. in The Curious Savage. 412-372-1200. Cold readings. Head shots & SEEKING SPIRITUAL resumes are appreciated. SPACE. Westmoreland Auditions May 1, 7-9 pm LGBTQ Interfaith & May 2, 2-4 pm. For Network presents a more info, visit www. welcoming spiritual ractproductions.com. gathering. Walk 724-775-6844. a meditation THEATRE FACTORY. labyrinth, hear sacred Auditions for www. per a p texts,music & potluck pghcitym “O Sullivan Stew.” o .c picnic. Pavilion D. Men, women & children 3 p.m. Hempfield Park, ages 8 & up. Cold reading Greensburg. 412-518-1515. from the script, prepare 16 bars of music. April 24, 2-5pm. April 25 1-4pm. ALS 101. A seminar led Call 724-374-9200 or e-mail by Dr. Steven Perrin, the tfauditions@gmail.com. CEO & Chief Scientific Officer The Theatre Factory. at ALS TDI. Doherty Hall, THE WASHINGTON WILD Rm. 1112. 6:30-9:30 p.m. THINGS. Seeking national Carnegie Mellon University, anthem singers for the Oakland. 412-268-2000. upcoming season. Individuals BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. & groups. Prepare a traditional A support group for women version of The National 30+. Second and Fourth Mon Anthem w/ minimal styling. of every month Anchorpoint Bring a recent photo & resume. Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. Open auditions April 25, LAUGH & LEARN SESSION 11-1pm. Call 724-746-1178 ON ENERGY & PUBLIC to make an appt. CONSOL POLICY. Lecture & symposium Energy Park, Washington. on energy careers for Millennials. 6 p.m. Jerome Bettis’ Grille 36, North Side. 412-224-6287. 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Call for women artists. BEGINNING UKULELE. Learn Accepting two-dimensional the basics of selecting & & three-dimensional pieces playing a uke. 7 p.m., Tue., by for “THE NATURE OF THINGS” May 12, 7 p.m. and Tue., All work must be gallery ready May 26, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon to hang. Please include 5 jpeg images of your work along Public Library. 412-531-1912. w/ artist statement & resume to: CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 28westsecondgallery@gmail.com. 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Thru April 25. Greensburg. Center for Imagination, 724-205-9033. Garfield. 412-924-0634.

SUN 26

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ASSEMBLE. Open call for artists, makers & technologists w/ work related to new media art, process art, design, architecture, science & engineering, installation, interaction & social engagement for 2016 season of Unblurred. For more info www.assemblepgh.org. Thru April 26. Garfield. 412-432-9127. THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Accepting submissions for the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, showcasing independent authors from Southwestern PA & beyond. Entrants must complete the online entry form (www.theauthorszone.com) & submit payment by August 1, 2015 for their work to be considered. 412-563-6712. GIRL GOV. Open to all girls entering 9th-12th grade in the Fall of 2015 who live in southwestern PA. Girls will travel to Harrisburgh to shadow gov. officials, learn about civics, advocacy, philanthropy, community involvement, youth organizing, women’s history & leadership. Apply online. http://wgfpa.org/ what-we-do/activities/girl-gov/ Deadline May 15. THE MT. LEBANON ARTISTS’ MARKET. Lookinf for artists for a T-Shirt Design Contest for the 2015 event. The winning design will be printed on T-Shirts to be sold at this year’s market. The contest is open to everyone. For details visit http://www.cwpress.com/ art-prep/. Deadline May 15. PRINTMAKING 2015. Work must be original, created within the last three years & not previously exhibited within a 150 radius of Pittsburgh. A printmaking process – relief, intaglio, silkscreen lithography, monotype – must be central to the execution of all entries. Photographs, offset reproductions, or reproductions of artwork originally produced in another medium will not be considered. Deadline June 2. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 304-723-0289. SIDEWALL: A MURAL PROJECT. Submissions requested for a space dedicated to showing works by artists both local & abroad, creative collaborations, etc., w/ murals rotating the first Friday of every month. Apply at https://sidewallproject. wordpress.com. Thru May 1. sidewall, Bloomfield. THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open to new & emerging writers. No theme restrictions. Prizes include publication w/ Createspace & online distribution w/ Amazon & Barnes & Noble. Thru May 30. www.thewriterspress@gmail.com.

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63


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I’m an American woman living abroad and have started a relationship with a wonderful man from a Middle Eastern country. We are having a great time exploring what is a foreign country for both of us. The looming issue is sex, of course. He is a moderate Muslim, but he grew up in a strict conservative family and country. He’s 25 and has never even held hands with a woman. He is excited to change this now that he has broken away from his family. I have had many partners, both men and women, and am quite sexually experienced. Do you have advice on how to best go about taking a man’s virginity? GOING TO BE HIS FIRST

Be gentle, GTBHF. Also, make it clear beforehand that you’re his girlfriend and not his counselor or spiritual adviser. If he’s still struggling with the sex-negative, woman-phobic zap that his upbringing put on his head, he needs to work through that crap before he gets naked with you. He may have some sort of post-climax meltdown or crisis — like the ones so many repressed gay dudes have the first time they have sex with a man — and you’ll be kind and understanding, of course, but you won’t allow him to lay responsibility for the choice he made on you. As for the sex itself … Take the pressure off him by letting him know that his first time, your first time together, is about pleasure and connection, not about performance and mastery. And finally, GTBHF, let him know that you’re going to take the lead and reassure him that there’s nothing emasculating about being with — and being led by — a sexually empowered woman. Quite the opposite: A truly masculine straight man isn’t afraid of a woman who knows what she’s doing and what she wants.

those other partners, but sex with other partners will introduce some risk. I’m in a BDSM-centered relationship with my Master/boyfriend and wear his collar. We have a tumultuous relationship and argue often. The center of these arguments seems to be that I see myself as a strong female and in control of many aspects of my life, and he’d rather have me just go along with whatever he says. I like some BDSM play in the bedroom, but he wants me to be submissive to him 24/7. I’ve wanted breast augmentation for many years. He joined me at the first consult and was talking about the smallest implants possible. I have a small chest, and he is attracted to small chests, but I knew I wanted something more substantial — especially since I am paying for it and it’s my body. I ended up going bigger than what he wanted without telling him, and he’s expressed anger about what I did to “his body” (he believes he owns my body) without his consent. I couldn’t be happier with my boobs. He hates them. Now I just don’t know about my boyfriend. I love him, but I feel like he can’t remove himself from decisions I make for myself.

“MAKE IT CLEAR BEFOREHAND THAT YOU’RE HIS GIRLFRIEND AND NOT HIS COUNSELOR OR SPIRITUAL ADVISER.”

I have an open FWB thing going with a guy. He is my primary sex partner. We recently stopped using condoms when we’re together because we both passed STI tests several months ago and neither of us has been with anyone else since. But we are both free to have sex with other people, and it’s bound to happen sooner or later. If we always use condoms with the other people, is it safe for us to continue having condom-free sex with each other? WHAT’S THE RISK?

Condoms — when used consistently and correctly — greatly reduce your risk of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection. They provide excellent protection against HIV infection, gonorrhea and chlamydia; they’re slightly less effective at protecting you against herpes, HPV and syphilis. The condom-free sex you’re currently having with your fuck buddy can be regarded as risk-free because you’ve both been tested, you’re both STI-free, and you’re both not having sex with other people. But some risk will creep into your condom-free sex after you start having sex with other people, WTR — even if you’re using condoms. Your risk of getting an STI will be much, much lower if you use condoms — consistently and correctly — with

TITS IN TROUBLE

Your Master/boyfriend wants a slave/girlfriend — he wants (and seems to think he’s in) a total-power-exchange relationship. But you want a guy who’s your equal out of the bedroom (and who can’t dictate implant sizes to you because it’s not “his body,” it’s yours) and a fun BDSM play-partner/Master in the bedroom. You two need to have an out-of-role conversation/renegotiation about your interests in kink, and your limits and his expectations — and if you can’t get on the same page (if he can’t dial it way back), you’ll have to end things. I agreed with most of your response to ADULT, the woman whose boyfriend has a thing for diapers. She said she didn’t enjoy diaper play but mentioned that she got wet wearing a diaper. You wrote: “Something about being put in a diaper turns you on.” I have to disagree. I just finished a great book called Come as You Are, by Emily Nagoski, and she cites some compelling science in support of the idea that what our genitals do is NOT always indicative of what we find sexually appealing. It’s called “arousal nonconcordance.” Nagoski uses the example of a college boy who witnessed a rape: He was physically aroused by what he saw but emotionally disgusted. In the case of ADULT, it may be important to understand that just because your genitals are responsive, that doesn’t mean that you are “into it” on some level. LONGTIME READER AND FAN

Thanks for writing, LRAF — and I’m going to pick up Emily Nagoski’s book! On the Lovecast, it’s Dan vs. Cheryl Strayed in Advice Clash of the Titans: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.22-04.29

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I usually have no objection to your devoted concern (I won’t use the phrase “manic obsession”) with security and comfort. But there are rare phases in every Taurus’ life cycle when ironclad stability becomes a liability. Cruising along in a smooth groove threatens to devolve into clunking along in a gutless rut. Now is such a phase. As of this moment, it is healthy for you to seek out splashes of unpredictability. Wisdom is most likely to grow from uncertainty. Joy will emerge from an eagerness to treasure the unknown.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): There may be a flood-like event that will wash away worn-out stuff you don’t need any more. There might be an earthquake-type phenomenon that only you can feel, and it might demolish one of your rotten obstacles. There could be a lucky accident that will knock you off the wrong course (which you might have thought was the right course). All in all, I suspect it will be a very successful week for benevolent forces beyond your control. How much skill do you have in the holy art of surrender?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What is your biggest excuse? Or rather, what is your THICKEST, SICKEST, MOST DEBILITATING EXCUSE? We all have one: a reason we tell ourselves about why it’s difficult to live up to our potential; a presumed barrier that we regard as so deeply rooted that we will never be able to break its spell on us. Maybe it’s a traumatic memory. Maybe it’s a physical imperfection or a chronic fear. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Cancerian, you’d be wise to do an audit and reassessment of your own LAMEST EXCUSE. I suspect you now have insight about it that you’ve never had before. I also think you have more power than usual to at least partially dismantle it.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you were a supporting character in a popular TV drama, the producers would be cooking up a spinoff show with you in a starring role. If you were in an indie-rock band, you’d be ready to move from performing at 300-seat venues to clubs with an audience capacity of 2,000. If you have always been just an average egocentric romantic like the rest of us, you might be on the verge of becoming a legend in your own mind — in which case it would be time to start selling T-shirts, mugs and calendars with your image on them. And even if you are none of the above, Leo, I suspect you’re ready to rise to the next level.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Free at last! Free at last! Thanks to the Lord of the Universe or the Flying Spaghetti Monster or a burst of crazy good luck, you are free at last! You are free from the burden that made you say things you didn’t mean! You are free from the seductive temptation to rent, lease or even sell your soul! Best of all, you are free from the mean little voice in your head — you know, the superstitious perfectionist that whispers weird advice based on fearful delusions! So now what will you do, my dear? You have escaped from the cramped, constricted conditions. Maybe you can escape to wide-open spaces that will unleash the hidden powers of your imagination.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “To me, there is no greater act of courage than being the one who kisses first,” says Libra actress and activist Janeane Garofalo. I can think of other

ways to measure bravery, but for your immediate future, her definition will serve just fine. Your ultimate test will be to freely give your tenderness and compassion and empathy — without any preconditions or expectations. For the sake of your own integrity and mental health, be steadfast in your intention to always strike the first blow for peace, love and understanding.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It will soon be that time when you are halfway between your last birthday and your next birthday. I invite you to make this a special occasion. Maybe you can call it your anti-birthday or unbirthday. How to celebrate? Here are some ideas: 1. Imagine who you would be if you were the opposite of yourself. 2. Write a list of all the qualities you don’t possess and the things you don’t need and the life you don’t want to live. 3. Try to see the world through the eyes of people who are unlike you. 4. Extend a warm welcome to the shadowy, unripe, marginal parts of your psyche that you have a hard time accepting, let alone loving. 5. Any other ways you can think of to celebrate your anti-birthday?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As I climb the first hill along my regular hike, both sides of the path are dominated by a plant with glossy, three-lobed leaves. They’re so exuberant and cheerful, I’m tempted to caress them, even rub my face in their bright greenery. But I refrain, because they are poison oak. One touch would cause my skin to break out in an inflamed rash that would last for days. I encourage you, too, to forgo contact with any influence in your own sphere that is metaphorically equivalent to the alluring leaves of the poison oak.

paintings. He worked at a very gradual pace. The “Mona Lisa” took him 14 years! That’s the kind of deliberate approach I’d like to see you experiment with in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Just for a while, see what it’s like to turn down your levels of speed and intensity. Have you heard of the Slow Food Movement? Have you read Carl Honoré’s book In Praise of Slowness? Do you know about Slow Travel, Slow Media and Slow Fashion?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Modern movies don’t scrimp on the use of the fbomb. Actors in The Wolf of Wall Street spat it out 569 times. The word-that-rhymes-with-cluck was heard 326 times in End of Watch, while Brooklyn’s Finest racked up 270 and This Is the End erupted with an even 200. But this colorful word hasn’t always been so prominent a feature. Before 1967, no actor had ever uttered it on screen. That year, Marianne Faithfull let it fly in the film I’ll Never Forget What’s’isname. In the coming weeks, Pisces,

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TA S T E

ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you’re stumped about what present to give someone for a special occasion, you might buy him or her a gift card. It’s a piece of plastic that can be used as cash to buy stuff at a store. The problem is, a lot of people neglect to redeem their gift cards. They leave them in drawers and forget about them. Financial experts say there are currently billions of dollars going to waste on unredeemed gift cards. This is your metaphor of the moment, Aries. Are there any resources you’re not using? Any advantages you’re not capitalizing on? Any assets you’re ignoring? If so, fix the problem. Find out what you’ve been hiding from yourself — but be kind about it. Testify at FreeWill Astrology.com.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Today the French Capricorn painter Henri Matisse (1869-1954) is regarded as a foremost pioneer of modern art. Some critics say his innovative influence on painting nearly matched Picasso’s. But during the first part of the 20th century, his work often provoked controversy. When a few of his paintings appeared at a major exhibition in Chicago, for example, local art students were shocked by what they called its freakishness. They held a mock trial, convicted Matisse of artistic crimes, and burned his painting “Blue Nude” in effigy. I don’t expect that you will face reactions quite as extreme as that in the coming weeks, Capricorn. But it will make sense to express yourself with such forceful creativity and originality that you risk inciting strong responses.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Leonardo da Vinci had skills in many fields, ranging from botany to engineering to cartography, but he is best known as a painter. And yet in his 67 years on the planet, he finished fewer than 40

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I invite you to break a taboo that’s maybe not as monumental as Faithfull’s quantum leap, but still fabulously fun and energizing. Be a liberator! End the repression! Release the blocked vitality!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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66

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ACROSS 1. “Eff you, pal” 6. ___ soda 9. Grooming aid 14. Spanish province near Madrid 15. Morale boosting grp. 16. Eighth of a cup 17. Picture puzzle? 18. Singer Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie 19. Sucking tool 20. They’re always on the left 23. “Who do you think you ___?” 24. Tour jeté outfit 26. Dance similar to the Twist 27. It might take some X-rated insertions 28. Word said with a finger snap 29. Common video game setting 30. Spending ___ 32. Time to hit the salad bar 34. Little Camel 37. Falstaff’s buddy 38. Curry ingredient 39. “Take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ___!” 40. Big name in pest control 43. 21-Down’s genre 44. Go bad 45. “Fancy ___” (children’s book series) 46. Word on a sheepskin

48. Knock the socks off 50. Lollipop alternative 51. Centers of operation 52. Remove, as rollerblades 55. Alternative reporting magazine 56. Doing stuff, probably 57. Chrysler compact 59. Turned white 61. Butterfingers 62. She’s into hip hop 65. 2011 hurricane 66. Banana cream ___ 67. Fast times? 68. It ends with “next year in Jerusalem” 69. “One more thing ...” 70. Took the lead

Sweater Song”? 12. Few and far between 13. Lumberjack at work 21. “100 Miles and Runnin’” group 22. Showerhead? 24. Nursery powder 25. “Fuhgeddit” 29. Spur a horse on? 31. ___ avis 33. Chowder fish 35. Twitter event of 11/7/13 36. Make sure star pitcher has dinner? 41. Orange headphones for Google Music? 42. Where “FB” means Facebook: Abbr.

46. Space in a crossword 47. “I’ll take that as ___” 49. Get married 51. Pueblo builders 53. Parkinson’s medicine 54. Director’s direction 55. Pushed hard 58. More than competent 60. Houston-toBeaumont dir. 63. Meter maid’s assignment: Abbr. 64. If you take it more than seven times, you’re supposedly legally insane

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1. Place for buds to hang out? 2. “Hi, Claudius!” 3. The Dalai Lama yours truly rounded up? 4. Valentine message from the spelling impaired 5. Shock with a gun 6. Less-thanspectacular vehicle? 7. “Have ___” (“Get comfortable”) 8. Bugle’s sound? 9. Really awesome PDA? 10. Road to nowhere? 11. Act out the chorus of Weezer’s “The

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Open 24 hours

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

GENERAL FOR SALE Get CABLE TV, INTERNET & PHONE with FREE HD Equipment and install for under $3 a day! Call Now! 866-353-6916

Bodywork by Cindy Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

CLASSES

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Xin Sui Bodyworks

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE for TV, Film,Fashion. 40 % OFF TUITION for Limited Time. Train & Build Portfolio. One Week Course. Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818 980-2119(AAN CAN)

412-595-8077

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

9:30am-10:30pm 7777 McKnight Road Pgh, PA 15237

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-335-6111

412-366-7130

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4126 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

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$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted


Health Services

JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE WE TREAT: Opiate Addiction Heroin Addiction and Other Drug Addictions

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment LOCATIONS IN

R

MONROEVILLE AND WEXFORD, PA

Suboxone

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Acute Partial Program

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Outpatient Program

Immediate Appointments Available Individual and Group Counseling

NO WAIT LIST

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

• Group and Individualized Therapy

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Pregnant?

South Side Outpatient

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922

412-380-0100

For more information, call 24 hours

We can treat you!

1-888-694-9996

www.myjadewellness.com

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! This week our featured #CPReaderArt photos are from @downtown_pittsburgh and @state_of_mon.

Have a great spring photo of Pittsburgh to share? Tag your photos #CPReaderArt, and we’ll regram and print the best submissions!

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Let Us Help You Today!

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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PAUL STANLEY: GRACE GENE SIMMONS: MAGGIE ACE FREHLEY: ROSIE PETER CRISS: ROBIN MAKEUP: LEAH BLACKWOOD AND JULIE MULL

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pher a r g o ot

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Photographer: Sarah Wilson

Hair and Makeup: Kim Magill

Patti Smith: Makinley

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MICHAEL JACKSON: DYLAN

PHOTOGRAPHER: HEATHER MULL

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.22/04.29.2015

John bo Colom


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• FINALE • GRAND FINALE DRAWINGS! WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29 Drawings every other hour 12PM – 8PM with 15 winners each drawing!

7 5 TOT

WIN AL NER S!

TOP PRIZE OF $ , 2 500 CASH EACH DRAWING ROLL-OVER AMOUNT FROM PROGRESSIVE MACHINE FROM APRIL 11 WILL BE ADDED TO TOP CASH PRIZE AT 8PM.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Restrictions apply. Visit Rush Rewards Players Club or RiversCasino.com for complete details. Every 25 base points earned from 6AM, March 1 – 10PM on April 11 = 1 entry. Activate entries at a promotional kiosk beginning at 10AM through 7:59PM.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

April 22, 2015 - Music Issue  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 16

April 22, 2015 - Music Issue  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 16