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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


EVENTS 2.13 – 5-10pm YOUTH ART OPENING Free with museum admission

2.27 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BEYOND: MICROTONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL: FEATURING MAK GRGIC AND DANIEL LIPPEL WITH MICHAEL HARRISON Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

2.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BEYOND: MICROTONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL: FEATURING FLUX QUARTET AND MANTRA PERCUSSION Warhol entrance space Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

3.1 – 6pm SOUND SERIES: BEYOND: MICROTONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL: FEATURING RAY-KALLAY DUO, FLUX QUARTET AND ALIA MUSICA Warhol theater and entrance space Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music 6pm – Symposium Session; 8pm – Ray-Kallay Duo FREE parking in The Warhol lot Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

SOMEDAY IS NOW:

3.7 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS EDUCATION STUDIO Free with museum admission

THE ART OF CORITA KENT

THROUGH APR 19 • 2015

Image: Immaculate Heart College Art Department, Los Angeles, c. 1955, courtesy of Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


02.11/02.18.2015 VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 06 VO

{COVER PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, ZACCHIAUS MCKEE

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

IT’S A JUNGLE IN HERE.

{ADVERTISING}

[PULLOUT] picking out the perfect dress to 29 From finding the right vendors, City Paper’s 2015 Wedding Issue has you covered.

[NEWS]

of them are heroes of the AIDS 06 “Each epidemic.” — Ron Stall, director of Pitt’s Center for LGBT Health Research, on the work of four visiting HIV-health researchers

[TASTE] want to rescue every little bit of 16 “We food.”— Brazen Kitchen’s Leah Lizarondo, of 412 Food Rescue

[MUSIC] issue was that I was a classical 22 “The musician, and then I wanted to write music with words, but I had never done it.” — Kinetic bandleader Joe Sheehan on breaking into pop music

[SCREEN]

is no substitute for four girls, 47 “There giddy on youth and new stolen dresses, singing along to Rihanna’s ‘Diamond.’” — Al Hoff reviews Girlhood

[ARTS] the wisdom of architects 49 “Itwhoexhibits respond rather than dictate.” — Charles Rosenblum on Rothschild Doyno’s award-winning building in Haiti

[LAST PAGE] it with padlocks: Lovers enshrine 71 Say their romance with “love locks” on Downtown bridges. — A photo essay by Lisa Cunningham

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 54 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 64 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 65 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 68 N E W S

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

TROPICAL FOREST CONGO • Opens February 7 The beauty of the tropics will flourish in Pittsburgh this winter as Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens unveils Tropical Forest Congo, a brand-new exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s most majestic landscapes. See varieties of plants never before showcased at Phipps, including the stunning blood lily and the African tulip tree, and discover how the region’s indigenous people use nature to sustain and enrich their lives. Join the adventure by planning your expedition today at phipps.conservatory.org.

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“THEY’RE WORKING IN CIRCUMSTANCES THAT AS AMERICANS, WE JUST CAN’T IMAGINE.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Go behind-the-scenes of CP’s cover shoot with Lola LeCroix. www.pghcitypaper.com

On our #Blogh: Hear from the city’s #BlackHistoryMonth honorees. www.pghcitypaper.com/blogs/blogh {PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

International scholars meet with the University of Pittsburgh’s Ron Stall (center) to discuss their research. From left: Weibin Cheng, Eric Castellanos, Shery, Liesl Theron

SEARCHING FOR A

This week on #CPWeekend podcast: Treat your love to monster trucks.

BREAKTHROUGH

Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

T

O FOUR visiting scholars in Pitts-

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE Describe your wedding in five words using #CPWedding2015. We will print the best submissions here and online next week. Download our free app for a chance to win a Holiday Valley Gift Package for 2!

burgh, curing the global AIDS epidemic might have nothing to do with medicine. They’re not working in laboratories on the next generation of antiretrovirals, or looking for a breakthrough vaccine. They’ve been on the front lines of a problem that is at once both more elemental and infinitely complicated. Stigma. It’s why an engineer-turned-activist from Pakistan, who despite his attraction to men didn’t hear the word “gay” until he was 18, is trying to figure out why HIV-positive men in his home country often never seek treatment — even if

they know their status. Or why the first person to speak publicly about being HIV-positive in Belize is trying to understand the barriers to HIV-testing there, despite threats of assassination.

International researchers come to Pitt to battle HIV-related stigma back home {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} “They see the barriers in their work is not giving pills to people, it’s getting them to take the pills,” explains Ron Stall, direc-

tor of the Center for LGBT Health Research at the University of Pittsburgh. “We now have the tools that we need to stop the epidemic, but what we don’t have are ways to break through the stigma.” Under Stall’s direction, four visiting scholars from China, Pakistan, Belize and South Africa are spending the next five months devising research projects to address HIV-related health crises in their home countries. The projects range from understanding the barriers that keep people from receiving care to testing the efficacy of at-home HIV screening. The program, funded by the Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) and CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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SEARCHING FOR A BREAKTHROUGH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

presents

PofE T the

WEEK

Photo credit – Angie Pulice

CHANCE Chance is the kind of dog that defies the stereotypes we have of “older” dogs. Chance is 10-years-young and has energy and a bounce in his step. He loves to play fetch with soft, squeak toys. He’s a superstar in our play groups here at the shelter. Chance has let us know that he’d prefer an adult-only home. Chance is a spunky little guy who would make a wonderful companion.

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hosted by Pitt, is designed to take people who are already part of organizations that are connected to LGBT populations in their home countries, so they can take advantage of that social infrastructure to conduct research. “We get applications every year from people who say, ‘There’s a price on my head, and if you don’t pick me I might die,’” Stall explains. “One of the commonalities of the global HIV epidemic is that it’s a very rare country indeed where gay men are not doing worse than the background population. What we’re hoping, of course, is that the scholars we’re training turn into leaders.” But before they could begin breaking down the stigma that contributes to one of the world’s worst public-health crises, they had to first escape it themselves. ERIC CASTELLANOS remembers with a disarming smile the period in her life when she contracted HIV. She was 20 years old, just a couple years after she’d fled the small, heavily Catholic Belizean town she grew up in, a place where no one seemed to understand — let alone accept — her gender identity. (Though Castellanos sometimes identifies as a man, she says she is comfortable with female pronouns for this story.) She’d hitchhiked to Mexico City and fallen for a man whom she’d met while volunteering at a hospice care center. But they were growing apart, partly because he was HIV-positive and Castellanos wasn’t. “This was my first love,” Castellanos recalls, “he was so fearful of infecting [me] with HIV.” Castellanos gave him an ultimatum: “We either have to go our own way or I have to get HIV as well.” He eventually agreed to start having unprotected sex, and eight months later, on Dec. 24, 1995, she tested positive. “It was a conscious act on my part to be HIV-positive,” she says. “Love makes you do crazy things.” It’s not a story she often shares — “I don’t want to encourage anyone to be HIV-positive” — but she says it helps explain how in the seven years since her partner died, she became one of the most prominent activists in Belize and the first to talk openly about her sexuality and HIV status in the media. Castellanos hadn’t planned to leave Mexico. She had mostly bad memories of a childhood in Belize, where her gender nonconformity lead her parents to insist on testosterone injections and took her to a clinic that promised to “cure” her homosexuality. But she’d lost the health-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

care she’d gotten through her partner and had little choice. When she arrived, she began noticing how marginalized the LGBT community was compared with Mexico. There was nothing like the gay clubs she’d experienced there, and “The [HIV] medication I was taking in Mexico didn’t even exist in Belize.” The stigma associated with HIV-positive people was immense. “The image people had of HIV was someone in bed dying, which contributed so much to discrimination,” Castellanos says. Belize has the highest rate of HIV in Central America, with a prevalence rate of 2.3 percent, and the rate is thought to be much higher among gay and transgender populations, according to amfAR. Castellanos began devoting herself to reducing the stigma of HIV, laying the groundwork for an organization that would advocate on behalf of the positive population. She started work on a degree in social work (still in progress) and eventually founded the Collaborative Network for Persons Living with HIV in Belize (CNET+). Though it started mainly as a support group, over the past four years the organization has grown to include everything from condom distribution to a text-message system to remind people to take their medications. And now, armed with some of the research methods she’s learning at Pitt, she’s hoping to tap back into CNET+ and survey hundreds of people to better understand what the barriers are to HIV testing in Belize. “It will give us so many tools to work from and design projects to work with the population and make recommendations to the government,” she says. Still, Castellanos isn’t expecting progress to be easy. Since she’s appeared in Belizean media as an advocate for HIVpositive people, she’s received numerous death threats. She doesn’t walk the streets alone in Belize — and after pressure from the U.S. embassy, Belizean authorities offer some security. “As much as I love my country and am so committed to change things there, in the days I’ve been here, I’ve had dreams of never going back,” she says.

“If two men are together and they show romantic affection in public, no one actually gives it a second glance,” Shery says of his experience growing up in Pakistan, a culture he describes as “homo-affectionate.” “On that front, it’s a little more comfortable to live there.” But while they can be affectionate, they can’t adopt children, hold property together or risk telling their parents about their relationship. (Shery asked that his last name not be used.) And since it’s expected that “children [take] care of you when you get old,” Shery says, “there are no old-age homes. It is scary if you’re by yourself. There is no safety structure.” One of the four international scholars at Pitt, Shery has long struggled to reconcile his sexual identity with Islam, his parents and, most of all, himself. “For 19 years I thought I was the only gay man in Pakistan. I didn’t have any friends who were gay. I was a little effeminate; I was harassed in my school a lot — even in the college and university, I segregated myself,” the 31-yearold recalls. Still, Shery landed a coveted wellpaying job as an engineer at Siemens/Nokia in Pakistan after college — hating almost every moment of it. He’d begun to meet gay people in Pakistan; his first exposure came at 19, when he discovered online forums where men would arrange to have sex with other men. “I wasn’t comfortable having sex back then,” he says, but it was a relief that other people had the same feelings. After five years as an engineer, he quit, told his parents he got fired, and considered showing up at a meeting for Naz Health Alliance, an organization that provides resources to men who have sex with men, and to transgender people. Even though he worried there would be photos of him at the meeting, and that he’d be publicly outed, he attended. The organization was just getting off the ground in 2007 as the AIDS crisis in Pakistan intensified. Between 2005 and 2013, the number of people suffering AIDS-related deaths in Pakistan increased fourfold — just one of the problems Naz sought to address. The organization had enough funding to open six community centers in five cities across Pakistan. It offers snacks

“AS MUCH AS I LOVE MY COUNTRY, I’VE HAD DREAMS OF NEVER GOING BACK.”

IN A COUNTRY where homosexual acts are

outlawed — and, in some cases, punishable by death — Shery isn’t afraid to walk in public holding his boyfriend’s hand.

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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SEARCHING FOR A BREAKTHROUGH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Pittsburgh’s Indie Video Game Store

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

LECTURE:

A NEW DEAL FOR OLD KEY WEST: A CASE STUDY OF PRESERVATION AND POPULISM Matthew Hyland, PhD • Duquesne University

About the presenter: Dr. Matthew Hyland is an assistant professor of History at Duquesne University. His areas of specialization include historic preservation studies, public history, and American architecture. At Duquesne, he teaches courses in all of these fields and enjoys the public outreach he and his students do through service learning.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17 • 6PM - 8PM This screening is free and open to the public. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny at 412-471-5808 ext. 527 WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

dotal: “We are doing work, but we don’t know how to properly document it, how to publish it, analyze it,” he says. For Stall, the Pitt researcher who oversees each project, a project like Shery’s is an example of the program’s purpose: to support people who already have relationships with public-health organizations “where they could actually make something happen.” “These are the folks on the front lines, and we’re trying to give them some of the tools they need to create data, be able to interpret data, and use the data to be resources in their home countries for the fight against HIV,” Stall explains. Watch Stall interact with the international scholars long enough, and it’s clear he has a deep reverence for their research. They’re asking fundamental questions about HIV in their countries, to be sure, but they’re questions no one else has been brave enough to pursue. “They’re working in circumstances that as Americans, we just can’t imagine,” Stall says. “Each of [them] are heroes of the AIDS epidemic.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Come hear the story of how preservation of history and architecture played a fundamental role in the economic revitalization of Key West, Florida during the years of the Great Depression. This case study of how Key West engendered a new dimension in historic preservation practice, and cultivated an awareness of local history, holds lessons for all of us in historic preservation today.

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and STD testing and serves as “a place where they could mobilize easily without the threat of being harassed,” Shery says. It was also a place where he finally felt accepted. Shery rose through the ranks and says the organization often flies under the radar, which sometimes makes it difficult to do effective public messaging and get HIV-positive people into treatment. In addition to laws against homosexual behavior left by British colonizers, “The hardest is the Sharia law, under which people could even be sentenced to death if they are found having sex outside their marriage … and gay marriage isn’t legalized,” Shery explains. And even among the people who overcome the stigma of getting tested, many people who learn they are HIVpositive are never treated. That’s a problem Shery is trying to address while he’s at Pitt. He’s designing a study that asks why people who know their status are never treated, which could eventually lead to interventions to interrupt that pattern. Most of his theories about why people don’t get care are broad and anec-

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BEETHOVENFEST THE HERO February 20 & 22

CONDUCTOR: Manfred Honeck PIANO: Lars Vogt Quartet, Opus 18 No. 4 for String Orchestra, 1st Movement Arrangement by Manfred Honeck (Pittsburgh Symphony premiere)

Concerto No. 1 in C major for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 15 Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Opus 55, “Eroica” BNY Mellon Grand Classics

STRAVINSKY’S FIREBIRD March 6-8

CONDUCTOR: Manfred Honeck VIOLIN: Noah Bendix-Balgley VIOLA: Randolph Kelly Mozart: Sinfonia concertante in E-flat major for Violin, Viola and Orchestra, K.320d [364] Rautavaara: Cantus Arcticus, Opus 61 (Pittsburgh Symphony premiere)

Stravinsky: Suite from The Firebird (1919 revision) BNY Mellon Grand Classics

LOCATION CREDIT: CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

BACH’S COFFEEHOUSE

TCHAIKOVSKY AND PROKOFIEV

March 20 & 22

CONDUCTOR/HARPSICHORDIST: Jeanette Sorrell Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra soloists

February 27-March 1 HEINZ HALL CONDUCTOR: Manfred Honeck

Bach: Sinfonia from Cantata Bach: Suite No. 2 in B minor for Orchestra Vivaldi: Concerto for Two Cellos in G minor W.F. Bach: Fantasia for solo harpsichord in D minor Bach: Finale from Sonata nach Violin sonata in D minor Telemann:”Grillen” Symphony (Pittsburgh Symphony premiere) Bach: Concerto in C minor for Oboe, Violin and String Orchestra Vivaldi/arr. Sorrell: La Follia Concerto for 2 Violins

Tchaikovsky: Suite from Swan Lake, Opus 20a Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet, Opus 64 Let your mind dance with two of the world’s most popular ballet scores as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents: Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev. Manfred Honeck conducts suites from Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake and Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet. Part of the BNY Mellon Grand Classics series, Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev is one of the most graceful tickets in town.

(Pittsburgh Symphony premiere)

BNY Mellon Grand Classics

For tickets and times: 412.392.4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org N E W S

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It’s True.

You can now track your bus in real-time.*

Go to PortAuthority.org to learn more about TRUETIME, the routes currently available and which real-time apps use Port Authority information for mobile access on your smart phone. *If you don’t see your route, don’t worry. More routes will be rolling out soon.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


Celebrate Fat Tuesday, February 17th, at these locations: 5801 VIDEO LOUNGE

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NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

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Clayton Dial, 23, pulled a gun and demanded cash at a Japanese restaurant in Champaign, Ill., only to have chef Tetsuji Miwa thwart the robbery. “I instantly grabbed my sushi knife, walked up to him, wrapped my arm around his shoulder and asked him what he wanted,” Miwa said. “He saw the blade, got scared and started running.” Miwa and two co-workers wrestled him to the ground, and assistant manager Joe Pendzialek said he grabbed a stool “and cracked him over the head with it,” before calling police. (Champaign’s The News-Gazette)

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John Balmer, 50, was arrested at a Kmart store in Hudson, Fla., while wearing a T-shirt that read, “Who needs drugs?” Below that, it said, “No, seriously, I have drugs.” When a sheriff’s deputy entered the store, Balmer tried to hand a “bag of green leafy substance” to the person behind him, officers reported, but the person wouldn’t take the bag, which deputies retrieved and said contained marijuana and methamphetamine. (Tampa Bay Times)

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After Charlene Ross, 75, was accidentally shot in the neck with a “birdshot” pellet by her husband in Medina, Ohio, doctors treating her discovered she had an irregular heartbeat. They transferred her to an Akron hospital to have a pacemaker inserted. (The Medina Gazette)

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Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen warned that budget cuts could delay tax refunds, even for people who file electronically, but he added that fewer agents would be available to audit returns. Congress cut this year’s IRS budget by $346 million, leaving it with only $10.9 billion. (Associated Press)

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After Bill Kelly earned $600,955 as executive director of public-broadcasting station WVIA-TV in Scranton, Pa., he proposed a new position: raising money for the station’s new endowment fund. The board of directors agreed and notified its 15,000 station members, anticipating they would welcome the station’s continuing its ties with Kelly, an employee of 40 years. Instead, 6,300 members dropped out. About 2,300 of them specifically cited excessive executive compensation as the reason. The organization’s 22 board members cut ties with Kelly by donating $291,878 of their own money to buy out his contract. (Scranton’s The Times-Tribune)

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A year after Colorado legalized marijuana, a panel of doctors studying the health effects of marijuana and how people are using it concluded that the $8 million the state earmarked for its research isn’t enough. “We don’t have the answers yet,” said Mike Van Dyke of the state Department of Public Health and Environment, who heads the panel. Among the topics needing investigation: the health effects on pot-smoking skiers. (Associated Press)

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John Arwood, 31, and Amber Campbell, 25, told police who found them in a closet at Florida’s Daytona State College that they had spent two days locked in the closet before calling 911 to be rescued. Officers tracked the phone’s

location and simply opened the door, which they said had been unlocked the entire time. (Orlando Sentinel)

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When Rob Dorzek, 29, called 911 to report that he and three friends had been boating on Ontario’s Lake Wanapitei after dark and crashed into a small island, the dispatcher delayed alerting rescuers for an hour while she tried to figure out their location, despite being sent a map that pinpointed it using GPS. During this time, the dispatcher instructed Dorzek to start a signal fire. Dorzek told her he couldn’t because he was holding his girlfriend to keep her from slipping into the water. After the dispatcher insisted the fire was the only way to direct rescuers, Dorzek used a boat cushion to start one. It quickly spread to the underbrush and then to the boat hull, which ignited, killing one of the four. A rescue boat was finally launched after the crew, which didn’t know of the 911 call, spotted the fire and arrived in eight minutes. Another man and Dorzek’s girlfriend died from injuries. An internal report by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care commended the dispatcher who handled the call. (The Toronto Star)

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SuperNaturals Grafted Vegetables introduced seeds for “Ketchup’n’Fries,” a hybrid plant consisting of thin-skinned white potatoes attached to a vine of red cherry tomatoes, aimed at home gardeners with limited growing space. Also known as TomTato, it was created by Britain’s Thompson & Morgan and previously available only in Europe. (New York Daily News)

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Police arrested Paul Bennett, 45, for trying to have sex with a mailbox at a shopping arcade outside Manchester, England. A witness spotted Bennett approaching the mailbox with his pants down and making “sexual advances towards it.” He then rubbed himself against it while holding his hands in the air and shouting “wow.” After completing the act, he pulled up his pants and started swinging on a lamppost. The witness called police, who found Bennett again exposing himself. (Britain’s Manchester Evening News)

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Arkansas lawmakers rejected a proposal to remove Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the state holiday honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Arkansas is one of three states that jointly celebrate the two men on the third Monday in January. The proposal designated Nov. 30 as a state memorial day honoring Lee and Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne and would have repealed June 3 as a state memorial day honoring Confederate President Jefferson Davis. (Associated Press)

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Hong Kong authorities caught a man trying to smuggle 94 iPhones, worth more than $48,000 on the black market, into mainland China by strapping the devices to his body. The man’s luggage contained no contraband, but customs officials noticed him walking with a “stiff posture.” When he set off a metal detector, they searched him and found the phones taped to his chest, abdomen, thighs, calves and groin. (International Business Times)

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S BY R OL AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


VA L E N T I N E ’ S D AY M E N U F e b r u a r y 9 - 1 4 | $ 1 2 5 +tax p e r c o u p l e IN ADDITION TO OUR REGULAR MENU

APPETIZER D u n e S h a d o w O y s t e r s , C a v i a r, Pink Champagne Gelee

SALAD Winter Greens, Campari and Grapefruit Vi n a i g r e t t e , C a s h e w s , C h e r r i e s , G r i l l e d H a l o u m i

ENTRÉE Tw i n P e t i t e F i l l e t s , G r i l l e d M a i n e L o b s t e r Ta i l s , Yu k o n P o t a t o P u r e e , S e a s o n a l Ve g e t a b l e s , Tr u f f l e Ve a l J u s

DESSERT C h o c o l a t e F l o u r l e s s To r t e R E S E R VA T I O N S A R E R E C O M M E N D E D

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

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THE AROMATIC LEMONGRASS SALAD WAS THE INVERSE OF A TYPICAL PLATE OF BLAND LEAVES

WASTE NOT {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} What to do with a ton-and-a-half of unsalable sweet potatoes? If you’re Costco Wholesale in Homestead, on Feb. 3, you call 412 Food Rescue. The fledgling project of The Brazen Kitchen blog and Braddock’s Free Store 15104 connects fresh food stores and restaurants can’t use to people in need. “We want to rescue every little bit of food,” says Brazen Kitchen’s Leah Lizarondo. Some 40 percent of food in the U.S. is thrown out (an estimated 35 million tons a year). Meanwhile, one in seven U.S. households is food-insecure, say federal statistics. Costco’s sweet potatoes were in mislabeled 10-pound bags holding only six pounds of tubers each. That produce wasn’t necessarily landfill-bound; general manager Nalani Hunt says Costco also donates to food banks. But food banks can’t collect every donation, and 412 Food Rescue aims to fill the gap between donors like the Big Burrito restaurant-and-catering group, area soup kitchens and needy households. On Feb. 3, Braddock Mayor John Fetterman simply hauled the sweet potatoes in his pickup truck to the Free Store, founded by his spouse, Gisele Fetterman. The sweet potatoes were “gone in a few hours,” Lizarondo reports. Eyeing a formal launch this spring, 412 Food Rescue (412foodrescue.org) is recruiting volunteer drivers, and fundraising to buy a refrigerated truck. It’s also developing an app that would be like “Uber for food-rescue,” says Lizarondo. “There’s no reason why food should be going to waste,” she says.

“WE WANT TO RESCUE EVERY LITTLE BIT OF FOOD.” {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Avocado summer rolls

THAI AROUND TOWN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

the

FEED

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIE RAFFENSPERGER}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For your sweetie, Gaby et Jules bakery in Squirrel Hill has special Valentine’s Day treats, like decorated macarons, chouchettes topped with sugar-glass hearts and the interlocking “Head Over Heels” mousse cake for two (pictured).

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SIATIQUE THAI BISTRO’S website catchily bills the restaurant’s owner, .Ling Robinson, as “the High-Heeled Chef.” In this era of mostly male star chefs, it’s nice to see a woman claiming the right to self-mythologize, particularly since she’s come by it honestly. Originally from Chiang Mai, Thailand, Robinson started out in the American food-service industry as a caterer, then worked for more than two decades in Asian kitchens across Pittsburgh, both for others and for herself. She first came to our attention at Green Mango. An early entrant in the Thai scene in Pittsburgh, Green Mango began as a well-liked little takeout place in Edgewood, then moved to a proper storefront in Regent Square, and expanded to a Monroeville location. Robinson eventually passed the in-town shop to a protégé. Now, while maintaining the suburban Green Mango location, she’s added a sleeker new bistro in the East End’s Bakery Square.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

At first glance, it was not clear what distinguished Asiatique’s menu from the boilerplate at any Thai establishment. It contained the usual noodle, rice and curry categories, with various protein options for each one. But then, tucked within each

ASIATIQUE THAI BISTRO Bakery Square, 6400 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-441-1212 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. noon-8 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, salads and soups $4-15; entrees $9-14 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED list, we found innovations, like the avocado summer roll and the spicy lemongrass salad, the latter credited to the High-Heeled Chef herself. And there were certainly more soup options than usual, including roast duck, a couple versions of lak sa (a spicy

noodle soup) and roast pork with fish balls. The avocado summer roll was fundamentally very much like a typical summer roll: vermicelli and herbs in a tender, paper-thin rice wrapper. Not only did rich, firm avocado supplant shrimp, but the noodles — traditionally plain — were Singapore noodles, tossed with a relatively dry, curry-powder-based sauce. The curry flavor could have been a bit more forward, but it nonetheless contributed an additional dimension that sang against the creamy avocado and aromatic herbs. A final, novel touch was a light and fruity dipping sauce, flavored with orange and floating minced peanuts. The marvelous lemongrass salad was composed almost exclusively of boldly flavored ingredients like lemongrass — sliced into thin rings like scallions — mint and peanuts, all pulled together by a classic larbstyle dressing of lime, fish sauce and chili. A few leaves of mixed greens added body, but


this dish was the inverse of a typical salad of bland leaves and a few aromatics. That classic noodle dish, pad Thai, had a texture that leaned toward the clumpy and a sauce that, while good, was a touch unbalanced towards sweetness. Our order included a generous portion of shrimp, but some scrambled egg would have been nice. Spicy basil fried rice pulled together two more Thai classics, spicy basil stirfry and fried rice, into an utterly addictive dish. Translucent fried basil leaves studded well-flavored rice that was moist without being heavy. A few vegetables might have been welcome, but we were glad not to see the kitchen-sink approach of all too many stir fries.

On the RoCKs

Asiatique Thai Bistro owner Ling Robinson and family

Another refreshing characteristic of Asiatique was that our server never asked us about our spiciness preference on the 1-10 scale. Chef Robinson evidently feels that she has a good sense of how spicy her dishes should be, and while the kitchen will add or subtract heat when possible, some dishes are simply meant to be spicy. The panang curry Angelique ordered was exactly as she would have requested it: spicy enough to heat up her palate, but not so hot it dulled her ability to taste. It had the characteristic rich sweetness of this coconut-milk-based curry, balanced by the tangy perfume of keffir lime leaves and brine of fish sauce. Another entrée, “king chicken,” was steamed, dressed in “Ruby Red” sauce (available in bottles by the entrance) and served on a bed of steamed cabbage, broccoli and green beans. The sauce was unfamiliar to us, seeming to borrow from a variety of more common ones, like nam prik pao, a sweet chili sauce; Chinese sweet-and-sour sauce; and some of the more garlicky Thai dipping sauces. In its mildest form, it was well balanced, sweet with hints of tang and heat, but not at all cloying. The overall effect resembled a Chinese stir-fry, but with a far more complex and distinctively tangily Thai flavor profile. Overall, we liked the High-Heeled Chef’s new venture. Her preparation of tried-and-true favorites is solid. Given the exceptional nature of the original dishes we tried, we just wish there had been more of these in this new “bistro” location in trendy Bakery Square. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

COMMONER SENSE

New bar The Commoner stands out If you step out of the wind and through the doorway of The Commoner Restaurant & Bar, you’ll descend into a warmly lit atrium of glossy, forestgreen tile, brass accents and beautifully hand-finished floors. If you take a seat at the bar, you’ll descend into a robust menu of delectable libations fit for the cocktail enthusiast, beer aficionado or wine-lover. Having just opened its doors Jan. 20, Downtown’s The Commoner — located inside Kimpton’s Hotel Monaco — has already had several sterling local reviews. The enthusiasm of both staff and customers is palpable. “I’m happy to be back behind the bar,” says lead bartender Joshua Holliday, the driving force behind the beverage program he curated with executive chef Dennis Marron. “With all the food ingredients I use behind the bar, [Marron] has been a giant help,” Holliday says, grinning. “Most chefs would have kicked me out of the kitchen by now.”

“WE FOUND THE PERFECT BACON.” The care put into both food and beverage menus shows, with each tastefully balancing the other, even down to the bacon. “We found the perfect bacon,” Holliday says. “I do a renderingdown for a fat wash. We went through four different types before we figured out what we were going to use.” The result is The Commoner’s signature take on an old-fashioned, made with pork belly-infused bourbon and oaked maplebarbeque bitters. It’s a wonder of a drink, giving at first taste the sensation of warm bacon from the frying pan, directly followed by a perfect, clean-citrus balance after the ice has melted. For those who’d prefer something lighter and decidedly less piggy, a gin and tonic with choice of hibiscus, elderflower or the house tonics, all made in house, offers a bright, floral reprieve. Finally, a thoughtful wine selection and a hand-selected list of 50 beers, overwhelmingly craft and many from Pennsylvania, give even the most discerning drinker something to sip on. CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

458 Strawberry Way, Downtown. 412230-4800 or www.thecommonerpgh.com +

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Serving Breakfast & Lunch ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE

Did d yo you know you kno k now n ow we off ow offer... offer ffer... Breakfast Br B reakfast kf t All Alll l D Day • Vegetarian Options • Gluten-Free • Preservative Free • Sausage & Angus Beef • Locally Home-Grown Vegetables • And so much more 1718 Mt. Royal Blvd Mt. Royal Plaza | GLENSHAW Next to Shaler Middle School

www.colecafe.com (412) 486-5513

SAT:

Brunch 11am–4pm Reggae & Caribbean Music 10pm-2am

SUN:

Sunday Brunch from 11am-4pm All-Yinz-Can-Eat Sliders $15 4pm–Close (local, no hormones, no antibiotics)

WED:

All-You-Can-Eat Jumbo Grilled Wings $15 (free range, no hormones, no antibiotics, local)

THURS:

Vegan Night Darkwave 80s Night 10pm-2am

FRI:

MON:

SERVICE INDUSTRY BRUNCH 11am–4pm Half-Off Menu Mondays 11am–Close

TUE:

Burg Night - Half Off Burgers Plus Complimentary Bacon at the bar

Open for Lunch at 11am HOPPY HOUR Bourbon Night MON-FRI 4-6 $2 Off select Bourbon 1/2 OFF Drafts

Fri-Mon Open @ 11am • Tues-Thurs Open @ 4pm 4717 Butler St. • Lawrenceville • 412-315-7271 • facebook.com/Gusscafe

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BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

Hartwood Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} as varied as Chinese-style pot stickers and scallop tacos, while entrees include pastas, fish and chops. There is also a selection of burgers and sandwiches. KE IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-344-4123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE

DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF HARTWOOD RESTAURANT. 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500. This restaurant, situated in a charming reclaimed Victorian building, pulls off being both upscale and casual, with a fresh and original seasonal menu. Appetizers are

aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE

Il Pizzaioli {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KAVSAR. 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-488-8708 or 412-488-8709. The varied cuisine of the old Silk Road is available at this Uzbekistan restaurant. The menu reflects the country’s time as a Soviet Socialist republic, with beef stroganoff and blini-like crepes rolled around savory fillings, and its proximity to China, evident in many dishes based upon noodles and dumplings. K KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage

ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d expect, such as greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF SALUD CUBAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE. 4517 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-605-0233. This deep narrow bar is now a spot for Cuban fare, with a short and focused menu. Here you can enjoy from-scratch CONTINUES ON PG. 20


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Ramen Bar

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Reservation R T Take-Out Free Delivery F Catering C

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

$ 2 DRINKS

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

FRI-SAT

U CALL ITS

10PM-MIDNIGHT Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM 5860 Forbes Ave, 15217 • Squirrel Hill

D

412.481.0852

HAPPY HOUR 1/2 11/ /2 O OFF FF F FA ALL LL DRAFTS & $2 OFF MUNCHIES Mon-Thurs 5-7 • Fri & Sat 4:30-7:30

OPEN DAILY • 11AM - 11:30AM 30AM

862 WESTERN AVE. 412-321-4550 themoderncafe.com

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MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

RESERVATION • TAKE-OUT FREE DELIVERY • CATERING

NorthSide Sandwich ars Running! n i W ner 3 Ye

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

ontap w

Catering &

Party Room Rental

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too!

SOUTHSIDE

Salud Cuban American Restaurant and Lounge {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} empanadas, black bean soup, the island’s distinctive sandwiches (the Cubano and lechon), fried plantain chips and jerk chicken. Finish off with a cup of Bustelo coffee. JE

WINGS 2328 E. Carson 232 a so St. S

NNING SAND W WI

w

35¢

412-421-9529 412-421-2238

S! HE IC

AWA R

CALL (412) 521-5138 521-5899

Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

40 Craft Beers

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current fine-dining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) and Southern comfort (chicken with black-eyed peas and greens, watermelon salad). LE

and a mix-n-match, create-yourown section for mixed grill. KE SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE

SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/ 412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hotwww. per pa and-sour shrimp) in a pghcitym .co minimalist yet elegant

FULL LIST ONLINE

restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE SOCIAL. 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234. This casual eatery at Bakery Square offers upscale pub grub: Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy. Or be your own chef, with the checklist-style, build-your-own-salad option. For dessert, try a custom icecream sandwiches. KE SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The restaurant’s offerings include tapas, hearty meat dishes with an array of international seasonings,

STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ


Saturday, February 14

An Intimate & Romantic Valentine ’s Evening

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Entree & Dessert Combos Cocktail Specials Live Entertainment 6pm-10pm

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

Make your reservations now!

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

East Liberty

130 S. Highland Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412.362.7969

VALENTINES DAY

Prix-fixe dinner and LIVE performance by TRUTH AND RITES. Call for details!

Beechview

2056 Broadway Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15216 412.344.4700

casarastapgh.com

ALL LUNCHES

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

$

8-$10

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

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LOCAL

“INVITING PEOPLE TO PARTICIPATE AFFECTS MY MUSIC AND WHAT IT COULD BE.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

CLOUD MUSIC In late January, an online forum for the songwriting project February Album Writing Month (FAWM) received a cryptic post from its founder, Burr Settles. “FAWM intergalactic headquarters has been working on a top-secret project with a music tech startup that should make your FAWM collabs easier and more awesome,” he wrote. That startup is the Pittsburgh-based Nebulus, and the project is a month-long partnership between the two dynamic collaborative-music sites, which started Feb. 1. Last April, Carnegie Mellon University graduate Robert Kotcher founded Nebulus as an online audio workstation for long-distance collaboration. Nebulus has since shifted its focus to arrangement — as opposed to recording — but the underlying problem remains: It’s hard for musicians to collaborate effectively online. “We still want to solve this issue where musicians have trouble working together if they’re not in the same place,” says Kotcher. Instead of recreating a workstation like Garageband, Nebulus’ six-person team created a clean, simplified workshop where musicians can edit, arrange and collaborate on their demos online. Around the same time, Settles, who works full time as a software engineer at Duolingo, was working on a rebrand of his own. FAWM, which challenges songwriters to write 14 original songs in February, needed a new website. When Settles started FAWM with three friends in 2004, it was simply a way to jumpstart their musical output. But the project and its blog gradually caught on. Last February, FAWMers from 61 countries across six continents produced more than 10,000 songs in the short month. While online collaboration between FAWMers was always encouraged, it was not particularly easy. So when Nebulus reached out to FAWM in late 2014, Settles saw a mutually beneficial opportunity. FAWM needed simplified online collaboration; Nebulus needed user feedback. By Feb. 1, the new FAWM site was finished and Nebulus began hosting the demos through its own site, while providing users with new interactive songwriting tools. For the first time, FAWMers could comment, collaborate and interact on their songs all in one place. “We’re hoping it’s a good springboard,” said Settles. “Because we’ve already got thousands of motivated songwriters from all over the world who would jump at the chance to use this.” In the first 24 hours of FAWM 2015, they received more than 600 songs. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More at: www.fawm.org and www.nebulus.io

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MOTION {BY JEREMIAH DAVIS}

J

OE SHEEHAN is the main creative force behind Kinetic, the local jazz-inflected R&B band, which recently released its first album, World of Wonder. He’s joined in the group by vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield, guitarist Michael Borowski, bass player Jason Rafalak, percussionist P.J. Roduta and drummer Ryan Socrates. CP spoke with Sheehan, a pianist, composer and professor of music at Duquesne University.

YOUR BAND IS A VERY ECLECTIC GROUP OF TALENTS; HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT ESTABLISHING WHAT INSTRUMENTS AND MUSICIANS WOULD BE A PART OF THE GAME? It sort of evolved over time. I spent about six months studying West African music in Ghana, so that was the idea behind the music. My first thought was that I only wanted to write music with hand drums, because there’s a lot of hand-drum music in Ghana. So the first time we played [two years ago], we had two percussionists — but I realized the sound wasn’t quite right. So I just gradually pulled in people that I knew. I met Anqwenique, and as soon as I heard her, I felt like we had to get her involved. So, the band is comprised of musicians I met whom I felt fit the musical content and vibe.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL BAIDOO}

Joe Sheehan on a visit to Ghana

to five songs on the album. One of the songs’ lyrics actually come from the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech by Martin Luther King Jr. It’s the song “Proverb.” The song’s lyrics come from one line in Dr. King’s speech. So I can’t really get credit for that. That’s [more] poetry than song lyrics.

for a while, and then I wanted to write music with words, but I had never done it. I wrote the song, then I realized that I don’t know how to write words to music. So, I found two other people to do it for me. I soon realized I should try to write [lyrics], so I eventually wrote one song and then I just kept going.

KINETIC’S WORLD OF WONDER

YOUR SONG “SHOW ME” INCORPORATES A CALL-AND-RESPONSE SECTION — WHAT INSPIRED THAT SONG AND THAT PARTICULAR DEVICE? I don’t know — sometimes it’s hard to say where the songs come from. Usually I’m sitting at the piano and improvising and listening to what I play and trying to hear something that I like. The words from the song help me make the musical decisions that I make. That song in particular reminisces on several friends I made who really affected me while I was in West Africa. Anqwenique actually came up with the whole call-response idea, and that’s common in a lot of music from the

is available via iTunes and Amazon. To stream some tracks: www.soundcloud.com/kineticpittsburgh

NO, YOU DO GET CREDIT FOR THAT — BECAUSE YOU TOOK IT AND MADE IT SOMETHING CREATIVE. There are two more songs that [other] people wrote lyrics for. Track two on the album is entitled “Waiting for Giving,” YOU WRITE THE MAIN MUSICAL IDEAS [and] was written by Geña Escoriaza; and FOR THE GROUP. WHEN IT COMES TO the lyrics to track four, “My Everything,” WRITING LYRICS FOR ANQWENIQUE TO are written by Morgan Erina. Basically, the SING, DO YOU WRITE THOSE AS WELL? Yes, I did write most of them. I wrote lyrics issue was that I was a classical musician

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

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African diaspora. That’s a really great way to get people involved. SO IT’S SAFE TO SAY THAT WEST AFRICA HAS A LOT OF INFLUENCE ON YOUR MUSIC. WAS THAT JUST FOR THIS PARTICULAR ALBUM OR WAS IT ON YOUR SOUND IN GENERAL? Yeah, it affected a lot of my musical thinking, because I went to school as a composer and I wrote concert or classically styled music. After being in school [for] 10 years, I felt like I had to get out of that world. I went to Ghana for six months, and ever since then it’s influenced almost every piece that I have written. Also the approach to West African music-making is just more of a communal activity, and inviting people to participate affects my music and what it could be. My time in Ghana was a really important experience, and I’ve been fortunate to return a couple of times. I hope to keep going back to continue to listen to and study the music there. WHAT DO YOU WANT AN AUDIENCE TO PULL FROM HEARING AND SEEING KINETIC? I think just getting a positive and exciting feel from the music is what’s most important for me because we are exposed to so many negative images in the media. It’s easy to get a perception that the world is all falling apart. I think that [perception] has existed in every era. There’s always gloom and doom, but we forget that music can simply make you feel good, and at a basic level I’m cool with that. But, I also admire music that is more thoughtful and has a little more depth than a lot of commercial music. Much popular music is appealing, well made, and very clever, but I find the musical content to be lacking depth. By its nature, commercial music should appeal to the moment, but often it wears itself out quickly. So I hope that with Kinetic’s music, the more you listen to it, the more it pulls you back in. WHERE DID THE NAME KINETIC COME FROM? I WENT TO SEE YOU LIVE AND MOVED THE WHOLE TIME. That’s exactly why: because I was thinking of music that had energy and a propulsive spirit with a beat that might catch you. I chose “Kinetic” because it also implies dance, and a lot of the music I encountered in West Africa was linked to dance. Lots of traditional music in Ghana is not complete unless there is dancing, and music and dance are often inextricably linked. Usually if there is music there is dance, if there is music then somebody is singing. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES

STAGE HANDS STAGE HANDS (MY IDEA OF FUN) WWW.MYIDEAOFFUN.ORG/STAGEHANDS

Wildly prolific local artist Brandon Locher is fascinated with finding ways to fill the space. On his selftitled debut LP as Stage Hands, with drummer/producer Gerald Mattis, the songs are brimming with ideas to overwhelm the space. Stage Hands is in a constant state of motion — most tracks start with quiet, ambient passages, before picking up speed with jittery, throbbing pulses, glitches and clicks. Mattis’ drumming serves as a reliable anchor, adding a steady, jazzy backbone to much of the LP. Like most of the best current experimental electronic music, Stage Hands smoothly blurs the lines between jazz, ambient and IDM. BY SHAWN COOKE

WESTERBURG WESTERBURG (SELF-RELEASED) WESTERBURG1. BANDCAMP.COM

Westerburg brings 12 tracks of classic poppunk on its self-titled release, which came out in the latter half of last year. Simple and sometimes silly — “You’re out of luck, you stupid fuck / She’ll make you feel like you totally suck,” goes a line in “Pure Rat” — but that’s clearly the intention. Most songs deal in the standard ’90s pop-punk musical tropes, though there are nods to glam-rock and early rock ’n’ roll peppered in as well. There might not be a ton of new ground broken here, but at the same time, the whole thing is done with skill and intention, and there are tracks (like “Need Some Air”) that are sweet and mixtape-worthy. BY ANDY MULKERIN

WESTERBURG with SHIP CAPTAIN CREW, HARBOURS. 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 14. Ink Division, 218 Braddock Ave., Braddock. www.pittpunk.org


WE KNOW

PSYCH OUT {BY IAN THOMAS} TO HEAR JOY frontman Zach Oakley tell it, the band was a just natural extension of the sunny San Diego lifestyle: “Everyone just skateboards and surfs and hangs out and that’s it,” he says. “Jamming seems like the next step in a full day of doing whatever you want.” His explanation might speak to the freewheeling nature of Joy’s sound, characterized mainly by lengthy (and loud) instrumental excursions, but it undersells the band’s myriad technical proficiencies. To date, Joy’s approach has been uncomplex by design. There is an elegance and confidence to the bluesy foundation on which Joy builds its sound. Working with so few tricks up its sleeve, the heights Joy achieves are made more poignant, more sonically pure. Joy counts itself among a cadre of San Diego-based bands that embrace this open-ended, partially improvised approach. Through the mutual support of friends and colleagues like Earthless and Harsh Toke (both Tee Pee Records labelmates), the groundwork has been laid sufficiently, however passively, to call it a bona fide community. Or, you know, whatever. “I think it’s been here the whole time,” Oakley says. “We’ve kind of just been doing it for fun for a long time, but we never really thought to try to put an actual record out and do an actual tour.”

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ACTION PR}

Surfin’ and jammin’: Joy

most recent album, Under the Spell of Joy. Oakley’s own description of what Joy does, however honest, isn’t quite as sexy — though, in its unpretentiousness, it encapsulates the band’s happily outof-step nature in relation to the world outside of San Diego. “A bunch of the folks that are playing what everyone is maybe calling ‘heavy psych’ don’t really think of it as heavy psych, but [as] playing blues jams,” he says. “For the most part it’s just kind of playing blues jams, that’s it: 12-bar blues, Delta blues, and get together with some buddies and make it really loud just for the fun of it. “That’s kind of what makes it fun, too — the lack of pressure. Just being able to do whatever you want with your buddies.” For all the distinctiveness of its sound, Joy might be better defined on the merits of its guiding attitudes: relaxed and up for anything. Oakley feels no pressure to be an ambassador of the sound that brought the band this far. The opportunities that have arisen from this openness of Joy’s collective mind have been the band’s greatest reward. “We’re kind of just happy to be here,” he says. “We don’t think of it as taking it upon ourselves to make the sort of music that’s here already. I think it’s just something that’s been happening and is natural-feeling. I don’t think there’s a pressure to sound a certain way.”

“FOR THE MOST PART IT’S JUST KIND OF PLAYING BLUES JAMS, THAT’S IT.”

JOY

WITH CAROUSEL, SHAKY SHRINES 9 p.m. Thu., Feb. 12. 31st Street Pub, 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $6. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

The widely accepted term for the sound of Joy and its contemporaries has become “heavy psych,” pointing to the bands’ allusions to the likes of Led Zeppelin and Band of Gypsys-era Jimi Hendrix. While it’s an appropriate shorthand, it’s also limiting, as it casts the endeavor in a nostalgic light, downplaying the vibrance and immediacy of the sound. It also doesn’t account for the happy accidents that Joy indulges, as when the legendary Hawkwind’s Nik Turner contributed a blistering turn on saxophone for “Confusion,” on the band’s

live music, great wine

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Feb. 13 Miss Amber & the Cheer’ly Men - 7PM Feb. 13 Clinton Clegg and the Commonheart - 9PM Feb. 14 The Gathering Field - 9PM SOLD OUT! Feb. 15 The Gathering Field - 3PM Feb. 17 Sol Driven Train Mardi Gras Party - 6PM Feb. 21 Dharma Sons Feb. 27 Poogie Bell presents Smooth Jazz with Bob Baldwin SOLD OUT! Feb. 28 Brooke Annibale - Full Band with Morgan Erina

HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

Mar. 5 City Dwelling Nature Seekers Mar. 7 “Songwriters in the Cellar” Hosted by Max Somerville with Jordan DePaul, Brittany Kennell, and Spencer Marshall Mar. 8 River City Extension 7PM Mar. 10 Tattletale Saints w/Guy Russo and Ali Sperry - 7PM

Mar. 12 The Mulligan Brothers Mar. 13 Big Jim and The Ravens

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S C R E E N

- Songs and good aul Irish Craic.

Mar. 19 Mouths of Babes w/Julie Weldon - Doors at 7:30, Show at 8PM

Mar. 20 Kuf Knotz Mar. 21 Good Brother Earl w/Joshua Powell

Mar. 26 Matthew Perryman Jones Mar. 27 Kevin Garrett w/Owen Danoff Mar. 28 Ballon Ride Fantasy w/Wicked Cheif - Record Release

Apr. 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 4 Apr. 7

American Opera The Red Western 10 String Symphony The Last Bison w/Gypsy and his Band of Ghosts and Neulore - 7PM

Apr. 18 Buzz Poets Apr. 24 The Shift - EP Release May 5 Lowland Hum w/The Weathered Road Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+ 2815 PENN AVE. | PITTSBURGH PA 15222

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CRITICS’ PICKS

You Blew It!

The largest vocabulary in rap is coming back to Pittsburgh — with no new album in sight. Aesop Rock, who last performed at the Altar Bar in 2012 to support Skelethon, caught some extra attention last year, when data scientist Matt Daniels found that the artist used more unique words among his first 35,000 words of published lyrics, than did 84 other rappers in his sample. The garrulous rapper comes back to the Altar Bar tonight with Rob Sonic, DJ Abilities and Homeboy Sandman. Shawn Cooke 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20. All ages. 412-263-2877 or www.the altarbar.com

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., FEB. 13 Brill Bruisers, last year’s new offering from The New Pornographers, The New isn’t a huge aberration from the band’s general modus, but does see the Canadian supergroup sounding even more like … a Canadian supergroup. The group’s trademark hooks, courtesy of head man A.C. Newman and his rotating cast of stars remain, but there’s a bit more of that ethereal, synthy sheen to the new record, bringing to mind others in the same league: Arcade Fire, and the Broken Social Scene-related stable. The band (in a touring lineup that doesn’t include Neko Case) comes to Mr. Small’s Theatre tonight; opening up is Dan Boeckner’s Operators. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $30. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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[OLDIES] + SAT., FEB. 14 “Jay” is sort of like James Bond — they both debuted in the early ‘60s, and a small handful of people (not necessarily born as “Jay”) have filled the role since then. The doo wop-influenced harmony masters Jay and the Americans had a steady string of hits throughout the decade with Jay Traynor, and then with “Jay” Black (David Black) at the helm. (Most notable: “Come a Little Bit Closer,” and the band’s 1968 version of “This Magic Moment.”) The band’s current lineup consists of three original members (Sandy Deanne, Howie Kane and Marty Sanders) and its third Jay: Jay Reincke, a megafan who covered Jay and the Americans in Chicago for 30 years before his 2006 leap to the real thing. The band plays the Palace Theatre tonight. SC 7:30 p.m. 21 West Otterman St., Greensburg. $35-65. All ages. Pornographers 724-836-8000 or www.thepalace theatre.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS BUCK}

[RAP] + THU., FEB. 12

[EMO] + WED., FEB. 18 You Blew It! makes earnest, emotive indie punk — which can easily be denoted by a certain three-letter word. However you want to label the band, it’s among the best of the genre, and this year’s Pioneer of Nothing EP continues the trajectory. After a minor breakout year in 2014 with the strong Keep Doing What You’re Doing and an almost too-faithful Weezer covers EP (aptly titled You Blue It), the Orlando natives continue an extensive touring schedule tonight at the Smiling Moose with Tiny Moving Parts and Rozwell Kid SC 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

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Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF MR. SMALLS THEATER. The New Pornographers, Operators. HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Cary Brothers Joshua Radin. RAMADA INN HOTEL & 412-368-5225. 31ST STREET PUB. Joy, Carousel, CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. CLAIRTON AMERICAN Shaky Shrines. Strip District. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. LEGION. Daniels & McClain. 412-391-8334. SMILING MOOSE. Trophies, Clairton. 412-400-1141. BYHAM THEATER. ABBA Color Me Blind, Across State Lines CLUB CAFE. Stainless, the Concert. Tribute show. Suite Mary, Milk & Honey, Mothers Little Downtown. 412-456-6666. Future Hot Dads. South Helpers, Get To The CLUB CAFE. Miss Tess & the Side. 412-431- 4668. Chopper. South Side. Talkbacks, The Armadillos, TAMBELLINI 412-431-4950. Douglas Lowell Blevins. BRIDGEVILLE HOWLERS COYOTE . w ww per South Side. 412-431-4950. RESTAURANT. Tony CAFE. Paul Collins a p ty ci h pg LEVELS. No Bad Juju. North Side. Janflone. Bridgeville. Beat, 45 Spider, Boss .com 412-231-7777. 412-221-5202. Mustangs. Bloomfield. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. PENN STATE GREATER 412-682-0320. Pure Cane Sugar, Brush ALLEGHENY. Levi Stephens. LEMON TREE LOUNGE. Valley Rumblers. Lawrenceville. McKeesport. 412-675-9000. The Dave Iglar Band. 412-682-0177. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. LEVELS. Yolanda. North Side. The Red Paintings, Murder 412-231-7777. for Girls, Super Fun Time LINDEN GROVE. NightLife. 31ST STREET PUB. Calabrese, Awesome Party Band. Castle Shannon. The Biters, The Cheats, Bottle Rat. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. MOONDOG’S. Sourmash. Strip District. 412-391-8334. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. THE MR. ROBOTO The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls. 31ST STREET PUB. Sleepy PROJECT. Roulette Waves, 724-843-7576. Kitty, Jamaican Queens, Doctor Smoke, khees, CLUB 206. E Z Action. Braddock. The F*ckies, Blod Maud. Strip Annakarina, Ugly Blondes. 412-646-1203. Bloomfield. 412-420-0992. District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Sugar Daddy & the Big Boned Girls. Candy Hearts A Valentine’s Day Musical Review. Feat. Poems of Love by Brian Siewiorek. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Waiting For Ray. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARVEY WILNER’S. Random Play. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Proper People, The Neffs. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KRETZLER’S. The Kardasz Brothers. Ross. 412-821-1606. LEVELS. Darryl & Kim Askew. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE LOOSE MOOSE. King’s Ransom. 412-655-3553. MOONDOG’S. Squeezin the Shaman. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jukebox The Ghost, Secret Someones, Litte Daylight. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Jay & The Americans, Brooklyn Bridge. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PIZON’S. Shotgun Jack. 724-677-2737. Each week, we bring you a new MP3 RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Switch. from a local band. This week’s offering Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Rumpke comes from , which Mountain Boys, Shelf Life String plays Fri., Feb. 13, at the Pittsburgh Winery Band. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCK ROOM. Company Fuck, LXS, (2815 Penn Ave., Strip District). Stream Saint James Saint, Wreck League. or download Polish Hill. 412-683-4418-. SLOVENIAN HALL. Code from the band’s debut EP, for free on our Whiskey, Martyr Kanin. music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. Pleasant Hills. 412-657-2642.

ROCK/POP THU 12

Tickets at www.jergels.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 14

FRI 13

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN BOYD}

THE COMMONHEART

The Commonheart

“Can’t Forget You,�

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Randall Troy Band. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Beagle Brothers, Lac La Belle, Elliott Sussman. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WILKINS ELKS. Soul Searchers. 412-823-6300.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ortner/Marcinizyn Duo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip.

SUN 15 ALTAR BAR. Flyleaf, Adelitas Way, Framing Hanley, Fit for Rivals. Strip District. 412-206-9719.

SUN 15

TUE 17

WASHINGTON, D.C.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Johnson III Organ Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LATITUDE 360. Marcus Anderson. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH. The Jazz Conspiracy. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

{MON., APRIL 06}

MON 16

Jolie Holland

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Dixie Doc & the Pittsburgh Dixieland Allstars. North Side. 412-452-1724. CLUB CAFE. The Districts, Pine Barons, Coronado. South Side. 412-431-4950.

CLEVELAND {FRI., MARCH 06}

Juliana Hatfield Three Music Box Supper Club

WED 18 CLUB CAFE. Current Swell, Nameless In August. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. TR3. Station Square. 412-481-7625. SMILING MOOSE. You Blew It!, Tiny Moving Parts, Rozwell Kid. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 12 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night 19 - Valentine’s Edition. South Side. 412-431-5282.

FRI 13

THURSDAY FEB 12/10PM

EMO NIGHT THURSDAY FEB 19/10PM

THE NEXT MONTH THURSDAY FEB 26/10PM

COMFORT TECH $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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9:30 Club

Courtney Barnett BLUES FRI 13

SAT 14

SAT 14

BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bridgeville. THE GALAXY LOUNGE. The Rhythm Band. Wilkinsburg. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Lyndsey Smith. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE R BAR. The Rythym Aces. Dormont. 412-942-0882. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

WED 18

SUN 15

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THE GALAXY LOUNGE. Jam Sesson w/ The Rhythm Band. Wilkinsburg. THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

THU 12

TUE 17

ALTAR BAR. Aesop Rock, Rob Sonic, Ron Sonic, DJ Abilities. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

WED 18 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Nic C & the Blue Tops. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ ANDYS. Paul Cosentino. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GIANNA VIA’S RESTAURANT & BAR. RML Jazz. Overbrook. 412-370-9621. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries, feat. Spanky Wilson. North Side. 412-904-3335.

www. per pa pghcitym .co

SAT 14 ANDYS. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

WED 18 PALACE THEATRE. Josh Turner. Greensburg. 517-214-4592.

CLASSICAL FRI 13 JACKIE EVANCHO W/ THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 14 THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Romancing the Baroque St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-661-1245. WASHINGTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Trinity High School, Washington. 1-888-71-TICKETS.

SUN 15

MON 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band, Reggie Watkins Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. OAKS THEATER. James Rushin & Casey Deely. Oakmont. 412-828-6311. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Kenia. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, Candy Mountain, Pete Freeman & Tricky Mannion feat. Jennie Kay Snyder. “Scorchin’ Duets & Heart-wrenchin’ Ballads”. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

ACOUSTIC PALACE THEATRE. A Band Called Honalee. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall w/ John Parrendo violin. Downtown. 412-515-5082.

FRI 13

SAT 14

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. RIVERS CLUB. Jerry & Lou Lucarelli, Harold Betters, Sunny Sunseri, Bob Hughes, Peg Wilson. 412-391-5227.

THU 12

THU 12

COUNTRY

CARNEGIE BRASS. Old St. Luke’s, Scott. 412-851-9212. DUQUESNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & COMBINED CHOIRS. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. St. Bernard Catholic Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-279-4030.

WED 18

Union Transfer

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PITTSBURGH DANCE CENTER. Sweaty Betty. Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. THE R BAR. Billy The Kid. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SHELBY’S STATION. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. 412-319-7938.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Book Exchange. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

{MON., JUNE 15}

THE CLOAKROOM. DJ SMI. East Liberty. 412-779-2624. DRUM BAR. VDJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

HIP HOP/R&B

TUE 17

PHILADELPHIA

System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

SAT 14 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 15

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachan Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 18 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834.

WORLD WED 18 BYHAM THEATER. Tiempo Libre. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

REGGAE FRI 13 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound

JERUSALEM QUARTET. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

TUE 17 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S PLAY N’AT. Chamber music series. The Livermore, East Liberty. 412-361-0600.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 14 AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 701. The Holidays. McKeesport. 412-872-4125. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SUN 15 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Robert Ray’s Gospel Mass. East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

MON 16 HAMBONE’S. Jazz Standards & Showtunes w/ Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 17 PITTSBURGH WINERY. Sol Driven Train. Strip District. 412-566-1000.


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CP WEDDING ISSUE 2015


The

WEDDING ISSUE A new look at a classic affair {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Do not double-check your calendars. This is not an April Fool’s joke. City Paper really is putting out a wedding issue — in time for Valentine’s Day, no less.

Groom Travis Hunt, whom you’ll hear from elsewhere in this issue, says he and his fiancé, Stephen Simpson, were “a little bit stumped” about their ceremony when they began planning it. But they, and others you’ll read about in the coming pages, figured out one very important thing: It’s “whatever you want.” From the food to the dress to the cake, personalize it and make it your own.And that’s what we’ve tried I know it seems unlikely. But the idea of to do with this issue — from the front cover to the marriage is not what it was a year ago. Last Go behindstory selections — make it our own. year, at this time, we were a state with a sitting the-scenes The front cover was conceptualized by of CP ’s cover Republican governor who was not only against shoot at www. CP’s art director Lisa Cunningham, and brought same-sex marriage, but vowed to challenge pghcitypaper to life by photographer John Colombo and it all the way to the Supreme Court. .com Kevin Nelson, a.k.a. Lola LeCroix, a local drag All of that changed on May 20, 2014. performer (and wedding-makeup artist). Nelson A federal judge ruled the state’s ban on same-sex portrayed both the bride and groom for this photo shoot. marriage was unconstitutional. A day later, to the We thought it was a fun concept, putting a new shock of a lot of people, then-Gov. Tom Corbett announced spin on wedding traditions, and one we tried to carry throughout he would not appeal the ruling, and marriage equality this issue — from upcycling your wedding gown to throwing a arrived in Pennsylvania. (That’s only half the battle, of vegan reception. course. Pennsylvania is still one of the few states that allows both same-sex marriage and discrimination against LGBT individuals.) The face of marriage has changed. Wedding customs, however, are another story. A lot of the time-honored customs are still in play, but couples today are making them more personal: making them fit in more with their own sensibilities and beliefs.

It’s your wedding day. Make it your own.

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elegant, intimate… the perfect location for your wedding reception. Celebrate under soaring beams or in front of the stone fireplace of this 19thcentury historic site. The Barn at Fallingwater offers a selection of premium services including caterers, florists,

Wedding Cake photographed by Heather Mull and provided by Oakmont Bakery 5 3 1 AL L E GHE NY AVE ., OA KMO N T W W W. OAKM ONTB A KE RY.C OM

and rentals to ensure a glorious affair.

Bride and groom cover photos by wedding photographer John Colombo W W W. J OHNC OLOM B O.C OM

Bride and groom model: Lola LeCroix a.k.a. Kevin Nelson I N S TAG R AM.C OM/ LOLA _LE C R OI X

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CP WEDDING ISSUE 2015

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{PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON}

Jen Rocket in her Highland Park Studio.

WEDDING CUSTOMS

Highland Park designer says the right dress can be a ‘life-changing’ experience {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} AS A FOURTH-GENERATION seamstress, you

could say sewing is in Jen Rocket’s blood. The 32-year-old wedding-dress designer first got her hands on a sewing machine at age 5 and has been at it ever since. “From the age of 3, I was with my mom in her studio begging to get on the [sewing] machine,” says Rocket. “She likes to tell the story of how when I finally got on the machine, I lit up and she didn’t see me smile like that again until my wedding day.” At Rocket’s Highland Park studio, racks

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are filled with wedding dresses of all shapes and sizes. Some are her original creations; others are store-bought and in need of alterations; Rocket’s custom dresses start at around $1,300. Even though she only opened her studio in 2012, Rocket has gained notoriety as a go-to seamstress for wedding alterations and custom gowns. Surprisingly, though, she says she never had her sights set on the wedding industry. “I always thought, ‘Why would I do


wedding gowns? It must be really high stress,’” says Rocket. “But after I made my wedding gown, it was just abundantly clear that there was magic in this.” That dress was a pink satin gown with a detachable ruffled train. It was inspired by a 15-year-old Vogue pattern she discovered years ago. “I saw the design and something sparked,” says Rocket, who’s been married for four years. “The night I was engaged, I ran to my studio and pulled that pattern out and I knew it. That’s the feeling you want.” It’s a feeling Rocket sees often when brides visit her studio for dress fittings. “Some girls are very emotionally attached to their dresses and the closer we get to the final fitting, the more excited they get,” she says. “There’s so much feeling that goes into a wedding gown. Whether it’s a big puffy cupcake dress from David’s Bridal or a chic bohemian soft creation from one of the designers at Glitter and Grit. It can be life changing.” But in the age of websites, like Pinterest, that let users collect wedding inspiration for everything from dresses to color schemes, holding on to that feeling can be difficult. Today’s brides are constantly bombarded with images of dresses, and Rocket advises brides to steer clear of such sites after they’ve decided on a gown. “Try not to have dress envy,” Rocket says. “To this day I still know [my dress] was the right one. Here I am working on dozens and dozens of gowns and living in that space online where I’m seeing all of them, but I’m never jealous.” Another piece of advice for budding brides: Don’t be too concerned with trends and customs. “I love that fashion can be whatever the girl wants it to be now,” says Rocket. “It depends on the girl and I love that. I don’t think there should be any rules.”

“I LOVE THAT FASHION CAN BE WHATEVER THE GIRL WANTS IT TO BE NOW.”

R NUTTA LL@ PGHC ITYPAP ER.O M

For more information on Rocket’s designs, visit www. jenrocket.com.

Size of U.S. Wedding Industry billion in in 1978: $8 billion ($29 2014 dollars) Size of U.S. Wedding Industry in 2014: $51 billion — 1978 TRENDEX MARKET STUDY (PER AUTHOR VICKI HOWARD); IBISWORLD MARKET RESEARCH

SWEET CHOICES

Traditional wedding cakes don’t have to be so traditional {BY MARGARET WELSH} Let’s face it: Most of your wedding guests are just there for the cake. (And maybe you are too!) Fortunately, current wedding-cake trends are all about making everyone happy. Though Pinterest abounds with offbeat nuptial offerings like cupcakes, cake pops and elaborate fruit pies, Oakmont Bakery owner Marc Serrao — who has been in the wedding-cake business for almost three decades — says that the customary multitiered, fondant-covered cake is still king. Modern couples are, however, mile-high less likely to select sel e e a mil mile-h e- ig mass of e-h white whi te e fro ffrosting. s “At my m bakery, we [often] recommend re that people have a pe twotwo or threetiered cake, t tie and an a bunch of different desert cakes,” he d explains. “So, the ex dessert is really a d dessert and not d just, ‘everybody A wedding cake designed gets a piece of by Oakmont Bakery {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} white cake.’” While Serrao doesn’t advocate ditching a primary, centerpiece cake, he suggests offering a variety of other non-cake pastries as well: Think of your traditional cookie table, with even more options. “At my daughter’s wedding we did that, and it was the talk of the wedding. People love to have all those choices at their fingertips,” he says. Serrao also notes a relatively recent gender shift when it comes to choosing cakes. “It used to be very much bridethemed, and now the brides and grooms both seem to care about the style of cake,” he says. Grooms in particular show concern over the cake’s shape and color. Many couples opt to showcase their interests — the Oakmont Bakery team has made cakes with themes ranging from cowboys and the beach to Pittsburgh sports. Even those with more traditional tastes are more inclined than ever to make distinctive choices. “One thing’s for sure,” Serroa says, “where almost all cakes used to be white almond with cherry nut filling, now people are not afraid to have chocolate icing, chocolate cake, lots of different fillings, way more personality.” And while these changes might not qualify as a confectionery revolution, it’s easier than ever to have exactly the kind of cake, and the kind of wedding, you want. And that’s the sweetest part.

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Oakmont Bakery, 531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com

CP WEDDING ISSUE 2015

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Actual Origin Dates of American Wedding “Traditions”* Gift Registry: 1924 (at Marshall Fields department store, Chicago) White wedding gown: 1920s Diamond engagement ring: Late 1930s Double-ring Ceremony (ring for groom as well as bride): 1940s Package-deal catered affair: 1960s *TIME OF THEIR WIDESPREAD ADOPTION, ACCORDING TO VICKI HOWARD, AUTHOR OF BRIDES, INC.: AMERICAN WEDDINGS AND THE BUSINESS OF TRADITION (2006)

Modern Love

An Allegheny County marriage license costs $ 80 — $29 of which is a “computer fee.”

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Madhur Paharia and Brittany Kregiel are holding their vegan wedding at Oakland’s Twentieth Century Club.

THEIR BIG FAT VEGAN WEDDING

Local couple finds a venue up to the vegan-wedding challenge {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} WHEN VEGANPITTSBURGH.ORG alone lists

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROB ELLIOTT}

Wedding Favors: Now that the “Our Favorite Songs” mix-CD is dead — did anyone ever play these? — offer these more useful commemorative items: magnets (pictured), thumb drives, self-packing tote bag or travel mug.

some 50 vegan-friendly restaurants, you’d think throwing a vegan wedding here would be easy. But as Brittany Kregiel and Madhur Paharia learned, most venues’ in-house caterers seem less than thrilled with the prospect of an all-vegan sit-down dinner for 200. When the couple would ask, venues would say, “We’re open to it,” says Kregiel. She adds, “‘Open to it,’ kinda like, eye roll.” Then Kregiel and Paharia fell for the Twentieth Century Club and thought, “You know what, we just have to do it.” In his four years overseeing event dinners at the Oakland landmark, general manager Andrew Hutchinson had previously arranged only the occasional vegetarian option. But he and chef Bennie Parker embraced the vegan challenge — to make a meal without using any animal products, including dairy. “It was an interesting experiment for him to do something a little out of his comfort zone,” says Hutchinson. Kregiel shared recipes and websites (including her favorite, olivesfordinner.com). For the December tasting, Parker even devised a seitan-based version of the Club’s

signature chicken piccata. Also on the menu were vegan versions of crab cake (from hearts of palm), “baconwrapped scallops,” spanakopita, stuffed mushrooms, and spinach and ricotta ravioli (with tofu ricotta). Parker also made a port-wine vegan cheese encrusted in slivered almonds. And? “It was delicious. They totally outdid themselves,” says Kregiel. “I’m kind of mad at [Parker], ’cause he’s cooking better vegan food than I am.” The banquet’s price, Hutchinson says, was “pretty close” to the usual, because while some special ingredients were costlier, they saved (obviously) on meat. A lesson for other vegans: “Even if the place doesn’t advertise as vegan-friendly, just asking them, reaching out, was more productive than we thought,” says Paharia. The Mexican War Streets couple’s “cruelty-free” wedding mandate extends to choosing makeup and hair artists who shun

animal-tested products; vegan cupcakes instead of cake, and also as centerpieces; and alcohol made without animal products. So they’re set for April — sort of. Kregiel, a 28-year-old social worker, is a New Kensington native who stopped eating meat at age 11, and went vegan at 21. Paharia, 27, is a Westinghouse engineer who was born in India and has lived in the U.S. since age 12; as a Hindu, he was raised vegetarian. But neither family is especially veganfriendly. Paharia’s Indian relatives like their dairy. (Udipi restaurant is supplying a couple vegan Indian dishes for the wedding.) Kreigel’s old-school Italian relatives were even tougher. “Oh, you’re not having a vegan wedding, are you?” they griped. Her mom said, “You don’t have to eat [meat], but why can’t I have it?” Others joked about sneaking meat into the reception. But Kreigel stood firm. “It’s a challenge, and of course I’m very competitive,” she says. “I want to win them over.” With help from a chef who’s game, she just might.

“EVEN IF THE PLACE DOESN’T ADVERTISE AS VEGAN-FRIENDLY, JUST ASKING THEM WAS MORE PRODUCTIVE THAN WE THOUGHT.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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big day

from vision to expression

Celebrate your wedding or rehearsal dinner with style and a special mix of the best cuisines in Pittsburgh.

• LIGHTING: up-lighting, chandeliers, bistro lighting and specialty lighting

Choose from Casbah, Mad Mex®, Eleven, Soba, Kaya® and Umi menu offerings, combine selections from several big Burrito restaurants, or create your own menu.

• DECORATIVE FABRIC: swagging, backdrops, draping and tent decor.

bigburrito.com

412-606-8563

G R AY P H O E N I X . C O M

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Only 15 miles from Downtown Pittsburgh, Old Economy Village’s beautiful nineteenthcentury formal gardens offer a couple a unique and beautiful wedding experience.

724.266.4500, ext. 120

www.oldeconomyvillage.org

“Make Event Dreams into Dream Events” Travis Hunt and Stephen Simpson

Accredited Wedding Consultant

SHOPPING AROUND

For same-sex couples, not all wedding vendors are created equal {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

412-436-0337 DivineCelebrations-Events.com

THE FIRST TIME Travis Hunt and Stephen Simpson planned their wedding, they settled on having the celebration in Maryland, the closest state at the time that allowed same-sex marriage. But a federal judge’s decision last May to strike down Pennsylvania’s ban threw an unexpected wrench into the couple’s plans. “When it became legal [in Pennsylvania], we just canceled everything,” says Hunt, noting that the couple and many family members live in Pennsylvania. They began planning their upcoming May wedding essentially from scratch, finding new venues and vendors closer to their home just east of the city. Though Hunt, 32, and Simpson, 42, were excited at the opportunity to become legally married in their home state, they planned their wedding to ensure that vendors wouldn’t be surprised to find a gay couple. Because even as same-sex marriage gains traction in the courts of law and public opinion, most Pennsylvanians who don’t live in Allegheny or Philadelphia counties still don’t enjoy protection from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

“The whole process is just coming out of the closet every single time,” Hunt says of the conversations he’s had with vendors. He explains that on first contact, he hopes to leave a voicemail explaining what they’re looking for, and that they’re a gay couple. That way “if they don’t get back to us […] we just move on to the next name on the list. “The good thing about living in Pittsburgh is that it’s actually a pretty gayfriendly city.” Many in the local wedding industry say the vast majority of businesses are happy to work for same-sex couples. Still, “there are some vendors who just don’t want to deal with it,” says Erin Calvimontes, a wedding planner and owner of Divine Celebrations who helped plan Hunt and Simpson’s wedding. Her website lists her as a “Certified Gay Wedding Specialist,” a certification that came through an online course designed to promote tolerance in the wedding-planning process. Calvimontes says she vets the businesses she works with “so [couples] don’t have to come out of the closet every time they talk to a vendor.”

“THE GOOD THING ABOUT LIVING IN PITTSBURGH IS THAT IT’S ACTUALLY A PRETTY GAYFRIENDLY CITY.”

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She also produced and coordinated two installments of the “Celebrate Marriage Equality Wedding Showcase,” an event held at the Heinz History Center designed to give same-sex couples a friendly environment to meet vendors excited to serve the LGBT community. Maura Minteer, director of the events department at Heinz, explains that she was interested in hosting the showcase two weeks after the marriage ban was struck down to “get the word out quickly that we were embracing the change in the law.” But she isn’t convinced they’ll need to do it again. “In a way it’s saying, ‘You guys are still different,’ where I would almost rather say, ‘We embrace all; here’s the show.’” Marriage equality is finding its way into more traditional venues, too. Randy Bush, senior pastor for East Liberty Presbyterian Church, says that one-third of the church’s marriages next year will be for same-sex couples. He adds that church membership grew 9 percent last year — something he attributes to the church’s inclusive stance on LGBT issues. “When I’ve done these services, it’s interesting to me and gratifying that the people who are witnessing this are adjusting their own internal vocabulary around weddings,” Bush says. Asked why he thought so many samesex couples were electing to get married in his church, Bush says it’s been a long time coming. “Frankly, it’s just catching up on the backlog.” AZ I MME R M A N@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

Same-Sex Marriages in Antiquity “According to the historian John Boswell, there were ‘many same-sex couples in the Roman world who lived together permanently, forming unions neither more nor less exclusive than those of the heterosexual couples around them.’ … Homosexual weddings seem to have increased during the first and second centuries, but were outlawed in 342 [CE].” — A HISTORY OF THE WIFE (2001), BY MARILYN YALOM

TYING YOUR OWN KNOT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

For couples who want to skip a formal marriage ceremony, usually their first thought is to just get a marriage license, go to city hall and get married by a judge, magistrate or mayor. But in Pennsylvania, getting married doesn’t even have to be that formal. Pennsylvania is one of the few states that offers couples the option of a self-uniting marriage license. The custom is rooted in the Quaker faith and is actually part of a formal wedding ceremony. According to the book Quakerism: A Religion Meaningful for Today’s World, the couple walks into the ceremony together and later rises and states their vows to each other. At the conclusion of the event, all of the witnesses sign the marriage certificate. Because Pennsylvania has a large Quaker population, the license is available in most counties. But you don’t have to be a Quaker to take advantage of the service; the state American Civil Liberties Union took care of that in 2007. An Allegheny County couple had been denied the self-uniting license because they told the Register of Wills that they weren’t part of the Quaker faith. With the help of the ACLU, the couple sued, and the court ruled that the license cannot be denied to anyone. According to the Allegheny County marriage-license bureau, the cost of the license is $80, the same as a standard marriage license. All you have to do is tell the clerk that you’re applying for a self-uniting license, sign it in front of two witnesses, and send it back in for filing. Turns out you can get married and avoid all the wedding-day drama, like dancing with your inappropriately handsy Uncle Joe.

COUPLES CAN WED THROUGH A SELF-UNITING MARRIAGE LICENSE

A twist to wedding parties & events 8FEEJOH3FDFQUJPOTt3FIFBSTBM3FDFQUJPOTt&OHBHFNFOU1BSUJFT #BDIFMPS#BDIFMPSFUUF1BSUJFTt#SJEBM4IPXFST

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

G-Free Options While many standard bakeries now offer gluten-free options, there’s always the potential for cross-contamination. Gluuteny, in Squirrel Hill, is totally gluten- and dairy-free, and offers a variety of wedding cakes, including some vegan options. Worth noting: Since its desserts tend to be heavier than average, it’s best to feed guests with multiple small cakes rather than the tiered variety. 412-521-4890 or www.gluuteny.com

OR ®

UI4USFFUt1JUUTCVSHI 1" 412.255.0525

www.olive-twist.com CP WEDDING ISSUE 2015

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Wedding bell rhythm ’n’ blues: Mark Matteo and Sabrina de Matteo of No Bad JuJu

INSTRUMENTS OF YOUR LOVE

Conveniently located on Banksville Road, The Boiler Room can accommodate 50 to 275 guests for a variety of occasions.

412.613.6494 1070 Banksville Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15216

WHEN YOU THINK “wedding band,” certain

characteristics come to mind. It’s probably got a pretty standard repertoire (“Celebration,” “Electric Slide”), and likely is just a wedding band — an outfit that aims to please brides and grooms, but might not be pursuing any musical interests of its own. Then there’s No Bad JuJu. The longtime local soul-rock band is well known on the club circuit, and last year released its latest album, No Covers, a collection of original music penned by vocalists Mark Matteo and Sabrina de Matteo. But the group is also a weddingand-event staple. Matteo estimates the eight-piece band plays about 15 weddings a year, in addition to corporate events and club shows. It’s an unconventional setup, but it’s one that suits him just fine.

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

“Some musicians might say, ‘I’d rather work at [a food-service job] than play in a wedding band,’ and that’s fine,” Matteo says. “But for me, this is perfect: I get to play music and do what I love full time.” No Bad JuJu operates on something of a hybrid model. While the band writes, records and releases its own music (and plays originals at club dates, or on request at hired gigs), it also plays a substantial list of covers — though sometimes played a little differently. “If, say, we do a Katy Perry song, we’re twisting that,” Matteo says. “We’re putting horns in it; one of the songs we go into a kind of ska feel.” Matteo says that a No Bad JuJu wedding set isn’t for just anyone; those seeking the standard set list, or who want to dictate every song, might be better suited with

Marriages per 1,000 population

In 2008, the rate of marriages per 1,000 population was 7.1 — down from 10.9 in 1972. — STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE U.S.

someone else. “There still is a traditional weddingformat list, which we don’t do,” he adds. “’Shout,’ ‘Play That Funky Music,’ ‘Brick House,’ ‘You Shook Me All Night Long’ — all that stuff you hear wedding DJs do, bands do too. “All those songs, we do none of. I’ve actually turned down weddings because people ask, ‘Do you do “Oh What a Night?” I’m sorry, but that’s not really 耄thing. We’ll keep them dancing, we’ll play all music they know, but the majority of people who contact us about a wedding have heard about us through the grapevine, or seen us live before.” For those folks, No Bad JuJu is in demand. Some will even request No Bad JuJu originals for their big day. Matteo knows, though, that ultimately you want to be only so different when you’re playing as a wedding band. “I almost shy away from [playing originals] at a wedding,” Matteo says. “Because we’re not there for us. We’re there for them. The majority of people at a wedding aren’t gonna dance unless they know the song.” A M U L K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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O P U S

3

A R T I S T S

THE SILK ROAD ENSEMBLE WITH YO-YO MA

Making their Heinz Hall debut, the world renowned Silk Road Ensemble with cellist Yo-Yo Ma bring together performers and composers from more than 20 countries for a thrilling performance experience. Join the Silk Road Ensemble as they celebrate 15 years of performances.

FEBRUARY 25, 2015 • HEINZ HALL

PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG 412.392.4900

THIS CONCERT DOES NOT FEATURE THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.

CP WEDDING ISSUE 2015

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Outside-theBox Venues Pittsburgh Botanic Garden The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, interestingly built on restored mine land, offers six different wedding venues to accommodate parties of all sizes, including a dogwood meadow, a lotus garden and a restored 1870s barn. 799 Pinkerton Run Road, Oakdale. 412-444-4464 or www.pittsburghbotanicgarden.org

West Overton Village The 1800s-era rye-whiskey distillery and surrounding buildings make up the village, which is on the National Register of Historic Places — and boasts of being the birthplace of Henry Clay Frick. Wedding venues include the Big Brick Barn and the Distillery Room. 109 West Overton Road, Scottdale. 724-887-7910 or www.westovertonvillage.org

Pennsylvania State Parks Small rental fees and nature’s decorations are the advantages to having your big day in a state park. Parks in Western Pennsylvania include Tharp Knob Overlook, in Ohiopyle; the fountain at Point State Park; Hell’s Hollow, in McConnell’s Mills; and Fire Tower No. 9, in Cook Forest State Park. 888-PA-PARKS or www.dcnr.state.pa.us

The Studio on Fifth Yes, the historic studio where Mister Roger’s Neighborhood was filmed is now available for you and your betrothed to say “I do.” A big plus: You won’t need to fret over good lighting and sound. 4802 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-622-1395 or www.wqed.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE TENNEY}

Kristen Blocka’s barn wedding

GETTIN’ HITCHED

More couples heading to the farm for a unique wedding experience {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} WHEN IT RAINED on her wedding day, Kristen Blocka and her fiancé, Brian, of Pittsburgh, had to move their outdoor celebration at Fadeaway Farm in Sarver, Pa., into the horse stables. “All of my friends were standing along the stables where the horses were,” says Blocka. “It was kind of impromptu, but it was beautiful.” A love of autumn and beer, rather than an interest in agriculture, drove the Blockas to a farm wedding. The Oktoberfest-themednuptials were casual and “cozy” — mums, pumpkins, hay bales, mulled wine and a big bonfire finale. Her new father-in-law wore overalls. “That whole combination just worked

for us,” Blocka says. In today’s world, though, if you want milk, you drive to the store; you don’t go see a cow. Yet, in the wedding industry, brides and grooms are busting down big, wooden, red-barn doors demanding to return to American roots and exchange their vows on an old-fashioned farm. “Couples are realizing there’s more variety out there, and that they don’t have to have a formal wedding,” says Simone Hill, assistant editor at TheKnot. com, a wedding-resource website that puts the average cost of a wedding at $30,000. Yet, as one look at Pinterest illustrates, modern farm weddings don’t necessarily mean pitchforks and hay bales.

“I THINK IT’S MORE ABOUT THE IDEA OF CREATING A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE.”

“One client brought four chandeliers into a barn. [She wanted] that juxtaposition of glamour with a barn rustic setting,” says Shayne Souleret, owner of Soiree by Souleret, a Pittsburgh weddingplanning company. Last year, five of the 19 weddings Souleret planned were barn weddings. This year, it’s 11 out of 23. Three of them are on functioning farms, while the others are solely used as wedding venues. “I’m more shabby-chic,” says Carey Huleihel, of Squirrel Hill, who got married on Lingrow Farm, in Leechburg. While the ceremony was outside, the reception took place in a restored 1850s barn. Lingrow provided the tables and chairs, as well as an exclusive caterer that used some food grown on the farm, but all the decorating was up to Huleihel. “We did a lot of lace and burlap.” The affair cost $25,000. “I think it’s more about the idea of creating a unique experience than it is about [doing] something simpler, [because] sometimes it’s no less expensive,” says Beth Montemurro, associate professor of sociology at Penn State Abington, who writes on the subject of wedding trends. She says social media has driven the trend as well; weddings are no longer the private affairs they were a generation ago. “Not only does it have to be memorable for your guests, but something that you will be proud to post and that would impress people.” Souleret says there’s a cost-savings misconception, and that she warns couples that if the barn hasn’t been renovated, they may be renting a lot— right down to kitchen equipment. “It really depends on the barn you choose.” A M URRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Tracy Mahood models a wedding dress available at Style Exchange Boutique.

SOMETHING OLD

Buying a wedding dress doesn’t have to break the budget {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} “SOMETHING OLDE, something new /

Something borrowed, something blue / A sixpence in your shoe,” goes the traditional English wedding rhyme purported to bring luck to a bride on her special day. Usually the “old” here relates to family heirlooms. But a new trend has “something old” coming from an unlikely source: secondhand wedding dresses. As wedding costs skyrocket, brides are more frequently turning to stores and sample sales that offer dresses at lower prices.

STYLE EXCHANGE BOUTIQUE 4211 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Brookline. 412-881-1171 or www.styleexchangeboutique.com

“This is kind of a new trend, but it is a strong trend, especially in Pittsburgh,” says Dana Mazzarini, the owner of Style Exchange Boutique. “The old idea of reusing wedding dresses in the past was frowned upon. But it’s a sign of the times that it’s become more popular, especially for independent women on a budget.” Style Exchange Boutique is an upscale

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consignment store that, among other things, carries secondhand wedding dresses. Open for nearly two years, Mazzarini hadn’t planned on offering wedding gowns until clients started clamoring for them. If a bride can find a dress she loves at a budget price, Mazzarini explains, she’s more willing to buy a used gown. She adds that buying used has other benefits: “They can find a unique dress that maybe they weren’t able to obtain otherwise on their budget. It leaves them more money to spend in other areas so that they can get the wedding of their dreams.” Mazzarini says brides who are still skeptical about purchasing a secondhand wedding gown may be surprised by what they find at consignment stories. One client came in to shop for other items, but ended up leaving with a gown for her destination wedding in Mexico. “She really didn’t have anything in mind for the special day,” says Mazzarini. “But the minute she put it on, it was the exact look she was going for for her beach wedding.” Finding a dress at a secondhand store might require more effort than simply going to a larger chain store, which often


offers more selection in designs and sizes. But finding a dress at a consignment store can still give a bride her “wow moment.” Though Style Exchange only recently started selling wedding dresses, Mazzarini anticipates having anywhere from 10 to 20 dresses at a time. Dresses range from $100 for a less formal dress to $1,300 for a more traditional gown. “You can find so many hidden treasures in little boutiques and especially secondhand consignment stores,” Mazzarini says. And there are other options for brides looking to purchase a dress for less. This Magic Moment Wedding Sale offers sample dresses from local boutiques at much reduced prices.

THIS MAGIC MOMENT WEDDING SALE 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Sun., March 15. Greensburg Ramada, 100 Ramada Inn Drive, Greensburg. www.thismagicmomentweddingsale.com

“When a boutique buys a line of dresses, they have to buy every dress in the line,” says Mashel Rathmell, co-owner of This Magic Moment. “Sometimes they don’t sell because maybe the style isn’t as popular here. So they bring them to us.” Dresses at the This Magic Moment sale aren’t secondhand. They’re sample gowns that have often been tried on in stores. Rathmell says brides can expect to find $2,000 dresses and purchase them for as little as $500. “We really believe in people not living their lives in debt,” Rathmell says. “We often hear stories of people who regret spending so much on their dress. This frees them.” R NUTTA LL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

Three Essential Rules for the Cookie Table: Bakers No store-bought cookies •••

Make your fanciest cookie

THE BRIDE WORE GREEN {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Evites instead of invitations. Napkins made from recycled paper. Locally sourced cuisine. It’s now easier than ever to have a green wedding. And thanks to a growing trend called upcycling, brides and bridesmaids can even extend sustainability to the dresses they wear. “You usually spend a lot of money to wear this dress for only one day,” says Rebekah Joy, a local seamstress. “The main idea of upcycling is to take a garment that would probably not be worn again, remake it and give it new value.” Environmentally or budgetconscious brides and bridesmaids can incorporate upcycling into a wedding in two ways. Either they can choose to craft a new dress from a secondhand garment or, after the wedding, they can take their store-bought dress and have it transformed into a less-formal garment, instead of throwing it away or letting it hang unused in the back of the closet. “The trend means decreasing the amount of garments that end up in a landfill,” says Joy. “It gives a garment a second chance to be useful and beautiful.” Upcycling can also apply to altering an older garment. For a wedding, a bride might update her mother or grandmother’s old wedding dress. Brides without a family heirloom but who are still hoping to upcycle can scour local consignment shops. Even though Joy specializes in upcycling bridesmaid dresses after the wedding, she says it’s become more popular for brides to wear an upcycled dress on their big day. “It’s becoming more popular for brides to upcycle their mother’s gown,” says Joy. “They can even just take a part of it and incorporate it into their gown.”

“IT GIVES A GARMENT A SECOND CHANCE TO BE USEFUL AND BEAUTIFUL.”

say yes.

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Silencio

PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. 412-566-1000. Over 21 show. Tickets: showclix.com. 9p.m.

Trophies Reunion Show SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Pierce The Veil & Sleeping With Sirens The World Tour STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

The Vagina Monologues

BRILLOBOX Bloomfield. 412-392-4900. $10 at the door. 7:30p.m.

ABBA the Concert Tribute BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SUNDAY 15 158

Doors open at 8p.m.

Jukebox the Ghost

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 12 125

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SATURDAY 14 147 Jukebox the Ghost Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Aesop Rock with Rob Sonic ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 13 136

with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

Comedian Dusty Slay (As Seen on FOX) LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555.

Jackie Evancho

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. Through Feb. 14.

Zoso - The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony. org. 8p.m.

Snocore Tour 2015 Featuring Flyleaf ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

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Rumpke Mountain Boys with Shelf Life String Band

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Casablanca with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Free show. 9p.m.

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GONE GIRL {BY AL HOFF}

SOME BAD GUYS ARE GIANT UPRIGHT LIZARDS IN LEATHER MOTORCYCLE JACKETS

Still Alice, co-directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland, charts the unstoppable decline of Alice Howland (Julianne Moore), a well-regarded professor of linguistics, after she received a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s. She vows to fight, but what defines her — career, facility with language, independence, intimate family relationships — begins to fall away. There is a supportive family: a husband (Alec Baldwin), two prickly daughters (Kate Bosworth, Kristen Stewart) — but their lives go forward, while Alice’s goes backward.

CP APPROVED

Losing one’s self: Julianne Moore

The filmmakers have created an intimate portrait of the devastation wrought by dementia, and they relate it in an almost lyrical fashion: Time jumps are muted, and scenes are everyday moments turned wonky rather than grand dramatics. It’s free of the manipulative tearjerker moments we expect from diseaseof-the-week films, yet no less devastating. The work has a certain genteelness, as if these well-heeled Upper West Siders would never behave badly under stress, that risks making the tragedy feel idealized. But, Still Alice is Moore’s showcase and worth seeing for that alone. (Moore has been nominated for an Academy Award for the role.) Even portraying the catatonic Alice, Moore is never less than captivating, and throughout, she keeps the “still” in Alice: fiercely strong and heartbreakingly vulnerable. Starts Fri., Feb. 13. AMC Loews and Manor AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

There are many problems with the space saga

Jupiter Ascending (see right), but not with this gorgeous outfit for a Jupiter wedding. Consider hosting your nuptials on another, more fashionable planet.

A PLACE IN

SPACE

{BY AL HOFF}

Y

EAH, THE space opera Jupiter As-

cending, written and directed by Andy and Lana Wachowski (The Matrix), is a hot mess, but it’s not all bad. In the moribund realm of big-budget franchise pics and remakes, Jupiter is an original story and straining with ambition. It’s got a lot of visual panache, and its trappings — sets, costumes, aliens — are groovy to look at. And its awfulness — which commendably runs unchecked from start to finish — is of that rarer quality: bad, but entertainingly so. Years ago, Movieline magazine ran a column celebrating “Bad Movies We Love,” heralding those special films that were bloated, self-serious, miscast with big stars and delivered howlingly bad dialogue and buckets of unintentional camp. Let Jupiter now ascend to that celebrated pantheon. Try not to laugh: A Russian toiletcleaner named Jupiter (Mila Kunis) has her DNA sniffed out by a wolf-man “splice” named Caine (Channing Tatum, with pointy ears), and learns that she

Wolfmen are from Jupiter, women are from Earth: Channing Tatum and Mila Kunis try love.

is space royalty and owns Earth, if she can keep her nasty space relatives from tricking her out of it. Plus, Chicago and a crappy part of Jupiter (the planet) get destroyed, and space battles, and zap-zap raygun fights, and a to-die-for wedding. And bees. But beneath the loopiness, it’s ho-hum: a Dynasty-level family drama and a plucky girl hero who needs constant rescuing by a wolf-man.

JUPITER ASCENDING DIRECTED BY: Andy and Lana Wachowski STARRING: Channing Tatum, Mila Kunis, Eddie Redmayne In 3-D, in select theaters

The film is oddly padded — every scene on Earth and the flatline romance — but also feels truncated from, say, a 12-hour version. I appreciate that the Wachowskis are world-building here, plus setting up a mythology and laying the groundwork for sequels, but a lot is left unexplained, even with the film’s fre-

quent, and clunky, data dumps. (Here’s an example of some head-scratching background: “Bees are genetically designed to respond to royalty.”) Many characters are part animal, but for reasons that are never very clear. Some bad guys are giant upright lizards in leather motorcycle jackets, and Caine’s lupine-ness is restricted to having once ripped out the neck of some royalty, which sounds pretty human-like, too. Then, there’s that awesome scene where a spaceship is in trouble, and a quick edit shows that an elephant is flying the craft. Get a human on deck, for Pluto’s sake! But I can’t deny that Jupiter wasn’t mostly entertaining, particularly if you’ve got a penchant for deliriously off-track bad movies. Soak up Academy Award-nominated Eddie Redmayne’s bizarre vocal stylings; marvel at Caine’s glowing “gravity boots” (really, rollerdisco skates made for air); and savor dialogue like “Does any part of you want to bite me?” A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK BRAHMIN BULLS. In Mahesh Pailoor’s new dramedy, an estranged father (Roshan Seth) and son (Sendhil Ramamurthy) reconnect in Los Angeles. Somewhere between dad’s overbearing nature and the son’s immaturity are enough shared experiences for the two to bond, as well as jumpstart their respective stalled lives. Nothing surprising here, but this is a pleasant-enough, low-key film that also features small roles for Michael Lerner and Mary Steenburgen. 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 13, and 5 and 9 p.m. Sat., Feb. 14. Parkway, McKees Rocks (Al Hoff) 50 SHADES OF GREY. The wildly popular S&M-tinged romance novel gets a big-screen adaptation. Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson star; Sam Taylor-Johnson directs. Starts Fri., Feb. 13. GIRLHOOD. It’s infuriating that films about girls growing up are rare, and that great ones that don’t pander, or fall back on tropes, are rarer still. But this year we have Céline Sciamma’s new film, about Marieme (Karidja Touré), a teenager living in the boring concrete suburbs of Paris who kicks her childhood to the curb after hooking up with a group of fun, confident, Listen Up Philip tough and mildly delinquent girls. Marieme — rechristened “Vic” for “Victory” — blossoms in their company: gaining an identity, learning new survival skills and reveling in the sweetness of intense girl-bonding. (There is no substitute for four girls, giddy on youth and new stolen dresses, singing along to Rihanna’s “Diamond,” and these four young actresses about broke my heart.) Adolescence is also a mess, and things go wrong for Vic, too; she’s not immune to bad decisions. But Sciamma knows that good and bad, fun and boredom, confidence and wariness all matter, and she lets Vic’s time of self-discovery unfold with an easy naturalism. In French, with subtitles. 10 p.m. Fri., Feb. 13; 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 14; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Feb. 16; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 18. Hollywood (AH)

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Girlhood from the popular comic book. Colin Firth stars. Starts Fri., Feb, 13. LISTEN UP PHILIP. In Alex Ross Perry’s new dark comedy, Philip (Jason Schwartzmann), a self-absorbed New York City-based novelist, has an eventful few months: He loses a girlfriend (Elisabeth Moss), but gains a mentor in Ike Zimmerman (Jonathan Pryce), a once-successful novelist now living on fumes in the country. Zimmerman invites Philip to stay at his rural home, and schools him on being even more self-absorbed. There are some wry observations on the nature of writing and writers (the end credits feature an amusing selection of cover art from Zimmerman’s many novels), and those who don’t mind the navel-gazing whinging from Philip might appreciate the dissection of various “famous writer” tropes. Starts Fri., Feb. 13, through Thu., Feb. 19. Rowhouse (AH)

the Regent Square Theater through Thu., Feb., 12, before moving to the Harris Theater on Fri., Feb. 13. The documentary shorts play at Melwood Screening Room, Fri., Feb. 13, through Sun., Feb. 15. ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Our 2014 Favorites: Guardians of the Galaxy (a goofball, a tree and a raccoon save outer space in this action comedy), Feb. 11. Ida (period drama set in 1960s Poland about a young nun and her family’s secret past), Feb. 11-12. The Grand Budapest Hotel (a star-studded ensemble checks into Wes Anderson’s period hotel), Feb. 11-12. Snowpiercer (dystopian thriller about class struggle — all aboard a speeding train), Feb. 12. Romantic Classics: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (the

1961 Audrey Hepburn classic), Feb. 13-19. Harold and Maude (off-beat 1971 comedy about the romance between a teen and a senior), Feb. 13-19. His Girl Friday (wisecracking 1940 newspaper comedy), 5 p.m. Sat., Feb. 14. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT. In this 1934 romantic comedy from Frank Capra, a news reporter (Clark Gable) pursues a runaway rich girl (Claudette Colbert) through Depression-era America. Times grow so lean that the mismatched pair are forced to chastely share a motel room (separated by a hanging blanket, or “the Wall of Jericho”), but

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REPERTORY OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORTS. Still time to catch up on the short films nominated for Academy Awards. The animated and live-action programs continue at

Omnimax®

KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE. Matthew Vaughan’s super-secret-spy caper is adapted

Birdman (2014) - 2/11 @ 7:30pm - Michael Keaton’s

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GLATZER & WASH WESTMORELAND

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM Lebanon STARTS FRIDAY, Mount CARMIKE GALLERIA 6 FEBRUARY 13 (412) 531-5551 Delmont CARMIKE WYNNSONG 12 (724) 468-3553

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------Grand Budapest Hotel stunning performance as a washed up actor has Oscar potential.

Hits (2014) - 2/12 @ 8:00pm - A small town in upstate New York plays host to its inhabitants’ delusions of grandeur. Written and directed by David Cross. Pay what you like at this one-day-only screening!

(2014) - 2/13 @ 7:30pm, 2/14 @ 4:00pm & 9:30pm, 2/15 @ 7:00pm, 2/17 @ 7:30pm, 2/19 @ 7:30pm - Wes Anderson directs a star studded cast in a film that has received multiple Oscar nominations.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------Three Stooges Fest Girlhood

(2014) - 2/13 @ 7:30pm, 2/14 @ 7:00pm, 2/16 @ 7:30pm, 2/18 @ 7:30pm - Powerfully acted and smartly scripted, Girlhood offers a fresh perspective on the power of friendship. Directed by Céline Sciamma. 2/15 @ 3:00pm - Classic 3 Stooges films and guest speaker Richard Sanner!

Film sponsored locally by:

WWW.STILLALICEFILM.COM N E W S

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

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Brahmin Bulls you won’t surprised to learn the pair transcend their differences. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 11 (AMC Loews) and 10:30 a.m. Sun., Feb. 15 (Hollywood) HITS. A new dark comedy from David Cross takes place in a small New York town, where people are consumed by the desire for attention. There’s the town ranter (Matt Walsh, from Veep), who has made a high art of being annoying at city-council meetings; his daughter hopes to get picked for The Voice; and, over in Brooklyn, a web-based collective is gearing up to fight for “freedom,” while squabbling about hummus. Not surprisingly, most in this mix discover that social media is just the ticket they need, but results aren’t always what they desired. The jabs are pretty low-hanging fruit, and a bit overripe in 2015 (are sex tapes even a thing anymore?), but Cross lands a few funny bits and ropes in some high-profile pals like Michael Cera and Amy Sedaris for small roles. 8 p.m. Thu., Feb. 12. Hollywood. Pay-what-you-like. (AH)

MARCUS GARVEY: LOOK FOR ME IN THE WHIRLWIND. This 2001 documentary from Stanley Nelson examines the influential life of Jamaican immigrant Marcus Garvey, who developed black nationalism and back-to-Africa movements in the 1910s and ’20s. 6 p.m. Sat., Feb. 14. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Suggested donation: $2. www.sembenefilmfestival.org BEFORE SUNRISE. While traveling in Europe, an American (Ethan Hawke) meets a French woman (Julie Delpy), and the two spend the night wandering around Vienna talking. Richard Linklater directs this offbeat 1995 romance. 7 p.m. Sat. Feb. 14. Parkway

THREE STOOGES FEST. This celebration of the Three Stooges features a screening of classic short

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

KISS ME DEADLY. Adapted from Mickey Spillane’s popular novel, this 1955 film opens with a bang. On a dark rainy highway, tough-guy detective Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker) almost runs over a beautiful and incoherent blonde — wearing only a raincoat. Soon Hammer is clashing with gangsters and rogue scientists, all in pursuit of a mysterious glowing box. Director Robert Aldrich easily adapts the free-floating post-war paranoia typical of noir features into a terrifying real-world tale about man’s inability to manage what has been wrought by the nuclear age. 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 15. Regent Sqaure (AH)

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RED HOOK SUMMER. Spike Lee’s 2012 drama follows a 13-year-old Georgia boy who spends the summer in Brooklyn with his grandfather, a fiery preacher. 6 p.m. Fri., Feb. 13. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Suggested donation: $2. www.sembenefilmfestival.org

THE GODFATHER PART 3. The multi-generational Corleone organized-crime saga comes to an end in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1990 drama. Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) tries to go legit, but up-andcoming gangsters aren’t so accommodating. 3 p.m. Sun., Feb. 15. Parkway

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films (“Men in Black,” “A Plumbing We Will Go” and “Brideless Groom,” among others). Rich Sanner, founder of the Restless Knights 3 Stooges Fan Club, will introduce the films. 3 p.m. Sun., Feb. 15. Hollywood

HITS THE FOURTH WORLD. Mark Volker’s 2011 documentary examines the plight of one in six people on the planet — those who live in dreadful slums worldwide. Screens as part of Duquesne University’s Human Rights Film Festival. 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 18. College Hall (Room 105), 600 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-6415 or www.duq.edu. Free ROMAN HOLIDAY. A sheltered princess runs away from her handlers in Rome and finds amore with an American newspaperman. Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck star in William Wyler’s 1953 lightly comic romance. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 18. AMC Loews. $5


[DANCE]

WAYWARD MINDS

“THIS WAS A REQUIREMENT, NOT A CHOICE.”

There are journeys in life, and then there are journeys of being. Jil Stifel and Ben Sota’s new work, WaywardLand, explores the idea that we’re on a journey in our human evolution. The 55-muinute abstract work combines circus, dance and physical theater, says Sota, 34, artistic director of the Zany Umbrella Circus. WaywardLand, part of The New Hazlett Theater’s Community Supported Art Performance Series, follows several “conversational threads.” One is the idea that we now live at a junction between the analog age and the digital age, and that a similar transition is happening inside our DNA, as we move from predominantly primal selves to the evolved beings of a digital and technological era. That idea of transformation is manifested in the work, with Sota, dancer/ choreographer Stifel and dancers Taylor Knight and Anna Thompson appearing at times as minotaurs, by donning bull’s-head masks created by artist Blaine Siegel. Stifel, 36, is a former dancer with Attack Theatre. In a solo in WaywardLand, she says, she plays with the idea of her DNA being on a percentage meter, moving between 100 percent human and 100 percent minotaur, and to points in between. The trick, she says, is portraying both beings proportionately in her dancing. This idea of someone’s DNA shifting between human and animal comes and goes throughout the nonlinear work, says Stifel. Another big theme, says Stifel, is our yearning as humans to constantly explore new places, and the perils we run into doing so. Set to music by David Bernabo, the work explores its themes by using what Sota describes as slow-moving, alternative takes on familiar circus acts. Acts include: stiltwalking; tightrope-walking without a wire; a trapeze act, used as a metaphor; and a duet by Stifel and Sota on a German wheel, an apparatus consisting of two large rings joined by a set of parallel bars, which performers stand inside to roll around a space. While the themes explored in the work might sound a bit heady, Sota says he and Stifel have a sense of humor about WaywardLand, and that the work contains plenty of whimsical moments and circus-like spectacle to go with its somewhat esoteric motivations. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JIL STIFEL AND BEN SOTA present WAYWARDLAND 8 p.m. Thu., Feb. 12. $20-25. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square, North Side. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org N E W S

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A scene from WaywardLand {PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE JAROCK}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{ PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH SPANAGEL}

Pittsburgh’s Rothschild Doyno Architects designed the Sant Lespwa Center of Hope in Hinche, Haiti.

A BUILDING THAT SERVES [ARCHITECTURE]

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

E

ACH JANUARY, architecture enthusiasts eagerly await announcement of the National Awards from the American Institute of Architects. There are 11 Honor Awards this year, and they trend toward high-dollar institutional buildings for education and research, with a boutique distillery added for good measure. The designs are invariably sleek and uncompromising, portrayed in dramatic and flattering photos. The pictures, of course, are part of the problem. Whether as Alberti’s art or Vitruvius’ delight, visual enjoyment has been an intrinsic part of the appreciation of architecture since ancient times. But there should be more to the profession than the looks of buildings. To be truly successful, architecture can and must build and serve communities. Such values drive the existence of the Sant Lespwa Center of Hope in Hinche, Haiti, by Pittsburgh’s Rothschild Doyno Architects. The project recently won a National Honor Award from the

AIA, which no Pittsburgh firm has done since 1999. The client for the Sant Lespwa Center of Hope is World Vision, an international relief agency for which Rothschild Doyno had done a distribution center in Sewickley. After the devastation of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, which left hundreds of thousands

“WE WOULD FIRST GO THERE AND SPEND SOME TIME IN THE COMMUNITIES.” homeless, World Vision approached several firms to sketch designs for a community center outside of Hinche, a city of 50,000. While other firms dutifully submitted drawings, Rothschild Doyno instead proposed a process, “Not to make assumptions from afar,” says principal Mike Gwin. “Instead we would first go there and spend some time in the communities.”

The process has served the firm and its clients well in residential projects and community centers throughout Western Pennsylvania and beyond for more than 20 years. “It’s part of our DNA,” says Dan Rothschild. Here, it won them the commission. Gwin began by traveling to Haiti and meeting with all varieties of constituents, “spending time with elders and doing activities with children,” he says. Local subsistence farmers and building tradespeople were part of the dialogue. By numbers, it is a 5,000-square-foot community center that has classrooms, community rooms, administrative spaces and job-training facilities, with an adjacent soccer field. Throughout, it exhibits the wisdom of architects who respond rather than dictate. It is carefully sited and shaped to capture prevailing breezes, while resisting hurricane-force winds. Following local practice, it provides shade from direct sun while admitting usable daylight. Area builders guided use of traditional CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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A BUILDING THAT SERVES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

IRA GLASS & MONICA BILL BARNES CO

THREE ACTS, TWO DANCERS, ONE RADIO HOST

It’s It tsm magic. agic.

– Santa Barbara Independent

WATCH: TrustArts.org/ThreeActs SAT, FEB 28 TH 2015 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER TrustArts.org/dance • 412.456.6666

“Little freedoms” can liberate us in an unfree world. For the Tree to Drop By Lissa Brennan Directed by Alan Stanford

February 19-28 World Premiere Limited run. Limited seating.

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

materials and techniques, such as a riverstone foundation, and woven palm for parts of the enclosure. Meanwhile, the architects took traditional local concrete construction and updated it with better seismic performance and durability. The construction process also became a job-training program for 100 people to learn marketable trades that are in significant demand in post-earthquake Haiti. Equally admirably, the building is truly sustainable. “It is adjacent to a dirt road with no utilities,” explains Rothschild. “This was a requirement, not a choice.” Since trucking water in would have been cost-prohibitive, the building instead gathers rainwater from carefully shaped roofs and stores it in a cistern, whose capacity of 9,000 gallons constitutes a year’s supply. It has its own septic system to treat wastewater. Likewise, the building generates its own electricity — for lights, water pumps and computers — from rooftop photovoltaics, which are also self-sufficient. A Pittsburgh skyscraper might boast of using less energy from fossil fuels than its neighbors, but the Sant Lespwa Center of Hope is a true net-zero energy building. All of its architectural elements contribute to a building that is functional and handsome in a strangely familiar way. For all of its ethical and environmental virtues, the Center of Hope also photographs well. Its angular footprint, canted roofs and didactically exposed structure evoke some timeless Modern architecture of the 1930s, when practitioners such as LeCorbusier and Alvar Aalto believed the regional wisdom of vernacular architecture could bolster the artistic integrity and suitability of their work. In the 1970s, preservationist and historian James Marston Fitch argued that vernacular builders could teach architects lessons about ecological conscientiousness. Only now, however, could such a structure be a net-zero energy building with lights and computers. Only now could it draw so substantively from its users and constituents with such a gentle touch. Now is also the time for the AIA to recognize such achievements as the fundamental substance of architects’ work. Says Rothschild, “Architects don’t just design buildings, we design communities.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

CORRECTION The first of two plays in PICT’s Downtown Series located at Peirce Studio | Trust Arts Education Center | 805 Liberty Avenue

PICTTheatre.org/Tree | 412.561.6000 | Discount CP5OFF* *Some restrictions apply

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

In the Jan. 28 CP, the article “Going Big,” about Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, incorrectly stated that the Pittsburgh Musicians’ Union struck against PBT in 2005. In fact, the PBT decided to no longer use live music at its performances, and the union considered this a lockout. (Live music was later restored at selected performances.) CP regrets the error.

[ART REVIEW]

POWER FIGURES {BY DAVID BERGER}

One of Vanessa German’s “power figures”

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

Concept Art Gallery’s exhibit Vanessa German: The Ordinary Sacred is an adventure in sight. The exhibition consists of eight sculptures known as “power figures” and a large collection of Black Madonnas created in a variety of materials — some painted, others assembled in an exciting way with glitter, rhinestones and found objects. The power figures consist of dolls that the self-taught Pittsburgh artist has plastered over and fashioned with gauze and glue, then given African-American features. German stated that she wants viewers to see the faces “elementally,” without racist stereotypes like the “tar baby.” The figures are draped with a plethora of ordinary discovered objects attached and juxtaposed in ingenious ways. German often works on her front porch, in Homewood, and these sculptures are the product of sacred experiences of imagination. The work also expresses her feelings about injustice, worthlessness and the fear of violence in the black community. The message includes a reckoning with the promises and lies of American culture. The Madonnas were inspired by a mother-and-child quilt German’s late mother created. They intercede for our needs, whether for black girls contemplating suicide, the healing return of joy, the victims and witnesses of gun violence, or just because you (as one title says) “woke up like dis.” It is a “holy” discourse, despite the daily disrespect, slanders, poor jobs and historical lynchings. The work has a Byzantine beauty. The sculptures contain beads, shells, ceramic figurines, keys, mirrors, old ads and labels, coins, buttons, glass eyeballs, rifle shells, radio tubes, rusty nails, bottle caps, etc. The objects sometimes seem to cascade from crevices in torsos. German refuses to waste materials, painting on old envelopes, bills, books, wine bottles and even a skateboard. The paintings, though stylized, have a spiritual grace. The large eyes are trusting and the haloed figures seem to float in space. The artist has manipulated body parts and articulated designs and color so as to maintain interest. The sculptures, with their variety of imagery, also suggest a kind of folk medicine. German, whose work is exhibited nationally, is also known locally for her New Art House project and other activism. In Ordinary Sacred, her lesson seems to be: “You make yourself and your art but you are also responsible for your neighborhood and the innocent children around you.” In other words, black lives matter. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE ORDINARY SACRED continues through Feb. 28. Concept Art Gallery, 1031 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. 412-242-9200 or www.conceptgallery.com


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February 13 - February 22 Dialogue and Reception Following Opening Night Performance. Thursday - Saturday 7:30PM Saturday & Sunday Matinees at 3PM (No Matinee on February 22)

Falk School Auditorium University of Pittsburgh 4060 Allequippa Street (Oakland) Pittsburgh, Pa 15261

Tickets: $15, $20 For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records or Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com For more information visit newhorizontheater.org

Fascinating and dramatically compelling, this eloquent play depicts the supposed meeting of two of the most important men of modern times: Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Differing in their philosophies, but alike in their mutual respect, the two men debate their varying approaches to the same grave social problems, both prepared to die for their beliefs. This production is funded in part by grants from Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh Program, a partnership of The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowments, Allegheny Regional Asset District, Chris Moore Communications, Inc., The Heinz Endowments, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts/Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

ONE MAN + THREE STEWARDESSES = ENDLESS LAUGHS!

Laura Lee Brautigam and Drew Palajsa in Prussia: 1866, at the REP

[PLAY REVIEWS]

WILL TO CHORTLE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

Tony Award® Winner

NOW - April 26 By -!2##!-/,%44)sTranslated by "%6%2,%9#2/33&2!.#)3%6!.3sDirected by VAN KAPLAN

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

PRUSSIA: 1866 is definitely for grown-ups only. I refer not to the bit of full-frontal nudity and sexual byplay in locally based playwright Gab Cody’s new comedy, but to the wealth of philosophical, political and literary ideas mixed with a French-style farce. The REP’s lively production, spritely directed by Kim Martin, is worth a second, even third visit to absorb and enjoy such intelligent humor.

PRUSSIA: 1866 continues through Feb. 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

The premise posits a young, Byronesque Friedrich Nietzsche in an early-pondering mode regarding aesthetics, ethics, morality, etc. — while shtupping his elderly mentor’s young wife. Yes, Nietzsche (“Fritz” in the play) really did live in Prussia in 1866, when he was 22, the playwright assures us. While I would bet that at least some of the dialogue is truly Nietzschean (it’s been a while since I slogged through Thus Spake Zarathustra), the rest is delightfully heady fiction. The fast-paced plot matters far less than the distinctively zany characters delivering crisp dialogue in preposterous situations. The cast hasn’t any weak spots. Drew Palajsa portrays a puppy-ish Fritz whose appetites for sex, poetry and philosophy war with each other yet remain

unsated. As his paramour Mariska, Laura Lee Brautigam draws on native ingenuity, physical agility and the attitude of a “great beauty” of the era. As both playwright and actor, Cody echoes The Importance of Being Earnest in shaping Mariska’s relationship with Rosemary (Cody), the pipe-smoking women’srights champion who’s employed as an assistant to Heinrich Von Klamp. The pomposity of that military hero, cuckolded husband and popular writer is well captured by Philip Winters. In smaller but key roles, Sam Turich (also fight director) brings elegant confusion to “the American delegate,” and Mary Rawson conjures the image of the flagship of a marauding armada as — let’s not spoil the surprise. The production is gorgeous. The clever doors punctuate the multi-leveled and beautifully furnished set designed by Stephanie Mayer-Staley. Cathleen CrockerPerry’s costumes not only look good but also define their characters. (Note Rosemary’s culottes and Mariska’s perfect period look, especially the hair.) Given my definition of perfect escapism — “well-dressed, well-spoken people misbehaving” — Prussia: 1866 is not to be missed. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

WAR STORY {BY TED HOOVER} WHEN PITTSBURGHER Sam Hazo writes anything, it’s important we all listen up. Stepping away from his comfort zone — poetry — the venerable man of letters has written the play Tell It to the Marines,


directed by Rich Keitel and featuring a cast of local heavyweights. The complete title is Tell It to the Marines: A Play for the Time at Hand. But that’s a bit of a misnomer. Not only is it set in 2007, it’s ruthlessly focused on 2007 issues, specifically the Iraq war. We’re eavesdropping on the Killeen family. Leo, the father, is a Marine veteran and his sons have seen combat in Iraq: Andy is home, suffering from PTSD, while Steve is finishing his last tour. And it wouldn’t be theater if there weren’t bad news ahead. The play chronicles Leo and his wife, Edna, as they re-examine long-held beliefs. Think of Tell It to the Marines as the antiAmerican Sniper. Where that film doesn’t bother too much with the war’s origins or context, Hazo has a lot to say about both. I salute not only Hazo’s passion, but his anger as well. The Iraq war was not inevitable and not just, and Hazo’s aim to hold accountable the political leaders who drove us into war is nothing less than patriotism at its finest. I do wonder, though, whether the kind of play he’s written — almost kitchen-sink realism — is the right vehicle. The characters are really mouthpieces for the writer, and sometimes feel more like points of view than people. And often, for reasons

of exposition, one character ends up telling another information known to both. I think there’s an interesting idea here for a theatrical piece (perhaps a full-length monologue of the father’s emotional journey), but right now Hazo hasn’t quite cracked it.

TELL IT TO THE MARINES continues through Sun., Feb. 15. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5-25. 412-621-4253 or www.soldiersandsailorshall.org

There can be no doubt, however, he’ll never see this play done better than in this strong, lucid production directed with enormous intelligence by Keitel. Across the board, the cast does amazing work animating this script; Jeff Howell, Maura Minteer, Justin Fortunato, Daina M. Griffith, David Crawford and Tal Kroser are just about everything a hopeful playwright (and audience) could wish for. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

POP LIFE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THERE ARE some worthy observations in

12 Peers Theater’s premiere production of Existence and the Single Girl. But the laughs are hard to come by in this frenetic but lumpy comedy. Matt Henderson’s instincts as one of Pittsburgh’s best comic actors don’t support him as well when he switches to playwright mode. The title, of course, refers to Sex and the Single Girl, the culture-changing how-to manual that made Helen Gurley Brown famous in 1962, and provided the modus operandi when she took over as editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, in 1965. Half a century later, Cosmo still thrives on a diet of selling sex in a world very much changed from pre-Pill days. The alternative universe conjured by Cosmo combines with the over-sexualization of adolescent divas to drive Single’s plot. The story starts with 12-year-old Ashley confused by life. Her helicopter parents certainly didn’t encourage any growing up, but that doesn’t jibe with the premise that a Cosmo/Britney Spears trajectory is the way to happiness. OK, it’s supposed to be a farce. The characters are cartoons so one-dimensional that their interactions are like leaves rustling. None is particularly sympathetic, but Diana Ifft’s portrayal of a multi-tasking psychologist makes

her fascinating in the snake sense; the shrink might be even more repellent than a snake. Alyssa LaVaccca nicely slithers from pre-teen angst to unwilling stardom, with occasional snatches at normality. Valentina Benrexi survives in the thankless role of doting Mommy, and Ross Kobelak hits all the discordant notes of the self-contradictory Blaine.

EXISTENCE AND THE SINGLE GIRL continues through Feb. 21. 12 Peers Theater at the Maker Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $17. 412-496-2194 or www.12peerstheater.org

The basic bedroom set, designed by director Todd Betker and 12 Peers’ founding artistic director Vince Ventura, seems to be more suited to a 4- to 6-yearold girl. Perhaps the Disney Princesses and Barbie dolls symbolize the earlier and earlier sexualization of American girls by pop culture. But why isn’t this reflected in the dialogue? There are occasional chuckles in Single, augmented by good beats in the original music by IMD2music. But as a whole, it doesn’t flow. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

presents

Distant Feel is a rebrand of empathy.

a new body of work in sculpture, photography, and video.

Watch Pittsburgh's Gulf Tower beacon February 11–13. The museum will be using it as a photography mood ring for the city!

Carnegie Museum of Art Forum Gallery February 14 –May 18, 2015

tower.cmoa.org

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

FEB. 12 Dog in the Manger

+ THU., FEB. 12 {STAGE}

{STAGE} With a secret love affair, drug abuse, peer pressure and a religious backdrop, drama reigns in Robert Morris University’s production of Hartmere and Intrabartolo’s Bare. The rock musical focuses on two gay teenagers and their struggles at a Catholic boarding school. Despite recent advances in marriage equality, the musical is as relevant now as when it premiered, in 2004. The cult hit’s Pittsburgh-premiere rgh-premiere production has four more performances

after tonight’s. ZM 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Feb. 15. Massey Hall, 6001 University Blvd., Moon. $10. 412-397-5454 or www.rmu.edu/theatre

Jeff Stetson’s play The Meeting imagines a 1965 meeting, in Harlem, between {STAGE} Martin Luther King Jr. and A classic of Spain’s golden Malcolm X. The critically age of theater, Lope de acclaimed 1987 one-act, Vega’s 1618 romantic depicting the two men comedy Dog in the debating their philosophies, has Manger gets a sexy new been staged internationally. translation by University of “You feel as if you’ve watched Pittsburgh Stages. ges. The play a kind of human-scale countess follows haughty count wrestling with angels,” wrote Diana, who rejects her many the San Francisco Examiner suitors and falls for her about one production. handsome young yo Houston-based director or Eileen secretary, J. Morris returns turns to Teodoro, Pittsburgh to guide himself a new staging ing actually in for New } love with w Horizon {CRAFTS s st o h Diana’s Diana Theater, Museum ntine. ’s n re d y Vale e Chil maid. starring event, th gram My Snark cutting, nd-over The play p Michael In a 21-a d MAKEnight pro airs putting your t cu rs aff st. Laserheme is directed direc Green, after-hou g skills to the te phrase; holiday-t re a ts h by Dennis Den as King, MAKEnig ring and stitchin vorite pillow-talk ody lase Schebetta, your fa Schebett and Art of your b h e it crafting, p w a rt sh a e th n he ow whose film fil Terry, as a woode lded chocolates in ake a Cupid’s b c li o ;m My Date With W Malcolm. create m w a voodoo doll food and alcoho t se h d g s; e part Adam debuted debut The first d more. Li ges will be serv n a ; w o and arr c bevera ing event. att the 2013 Three Th performance, ce, -alcoholi aft and non dalous cr 0-9:30 p.m. Rivers Film Festival. Rive ers Festiv at Pitt’s Falk n k a sc is at th 6:3 The p play opens School Auditorium, ditorium m, s McKee ide. Zacchiau n’s Way, North S tonight.. ZM M 8 p.m. is tonight. Bill re d il 8 or 5 0 10 Ch -5 2 2 12-3 Continues through Feb. 22. O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. p Show $12-17. 4 ittsburgh Randall Charity Rand dall Theatre, continues through hroug gh Feb. 22. www.p kids.org Oakland. 4301 Forbes A Ave., Oakland 4060 Allequippa uippa St., S Oakland. $12-25. $12 25 412 412-624-7529 6 or $15-20. 412-431-0773 2-431-0773 0773 or www.play.pitt.edu www.newhorizontheater.org horizontheater.org

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+ THU., FEB. 1


FreeEvent Art by Casey Li Brander

What’s left to say about guns? Perennial Second Amendment debates are so easily caricatured as “for” and “against.” But if you want fresh takes, and swatches of gray area, consider new SPACE gallery exhibit Unloaded. Organized by Carnegie Mellon University art professor Susanne Slavick, the group show opening Fri., Feb. 13, explores the historical and social issues surrounding the availability, use and impact of guns in our culture. The 19 artists comprise a national roster including such Pittsburgh artists as Slavick and Vanessa German, and contributors based in China and Germany. Mel Chin’s “Cross for the Unforgiven” is a Maltese cross fashioned from eight AK-47s. Nina Berman’s photography series “Homeland” captures military-weapons displays, SWAT-team training and more from around the country. Renee Stout’s “Baby’s First Gun” is a deceptively sweet keepsake. And Casey Li Brander’s self-portrait “Destiny Fulfilled” (pictured) combines pop iconography — singing group Destiny’s Child; shotguns — in a way that defies stereotypes. Noting that nothing in Unloaded is truly pro-gun, Slavick acknowledges the risk of preaching to the converted. But she says these piquant artworks might re-sensitize viewers, or perhaps inspire activism. She hopes one point comes through with a bang: “The data point to guns as a major public-health crisis,” she says. “That is something that people can’t in a knee-jerk way oppose.” Bill O’Driscoll 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 26. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

+ FRI., FEB. 13 {ART} Nine locally based artists pushing the boundaries of contemporary art all have new solo shows at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. One of them, Scott Andrew’s multimedia installation “Phase Shift,” takes the “cloaking technology” from Star Trek Next Generation as a metaphor. Katie Ford offers mixed-media sculptural works that play with sounds within the gallery itself. And Oreen Cohen augments her installation “Nearly Captured” with a one-night-only performance. Other artists include Vlad Basarub, Terry Boyd with Kara Skylling, Joy Christiansen Erb, Joseph Lupo, Katie Murken and Hisham Youssef. The exhibits, all curated by the PCA’s Adam Welch, open with a reception tonight. BO 5:30-9 p.m. Exhibits continue through May 3. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

{STAGE}

slot. BO 8 and 10 p.m. Shows continues through Sun., Feb. 15. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-15. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

+ SAT., FEB. 14

FEB. 13 Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Art by Joy Christiansen Erb

{ART} Starting Feb. 11, you might have noticed the Gulf Tower changing colors unusually. That’s a tie-in to new Carnegie Museum of Art exhibition Antoine Catala: Distant Feel. The French-born, New York-based artist is using the Downtown landmark’s peak as a six-story mood ring, one that turns green when Pittsburgh’s Instagram images are trending happy, red for sad. At Carnegie proper, Catala’s first solo U.S. museum exhibition includes new sculpture, photography and video exploring how images in the digital age provoke emotion. The Forum Gallery exhibit opens today. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95 (free for kids under 3). 412622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

{COMEDY}

{OUTDOORS} It’s cold feet and warm hearts today at some public ice rinks. The county’s North Park and South Park and the city’s Schenley Park all offer two-for-one ice-skating for Valentine’s. The county special runs all day, though free Valentine leis are while-

“The city’s only nonprofit theater dedicated wholly to comedy,” Arcade Comedy Theater, is doing pretty well. The Downtown venue marks its second anniversary with six shows over three days, from improv and standup to an appearance by Rick Sebak. It starts tonight with an early set by short-form improv troupe Player One, sketch group Spinster Comedy, and musicians Brad & Zoob. Magician/comedian Lee Terbosic headlines the late show. On Saturday, Sebak is featured at the early improv-and-storytelling show, and standup competition Comic Wars holds the late

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724-935-1280 and 412-8331499 or www.alleghenycounty. us/parks). Schenley: 7-10 p.m. ($4; 412-422-6523 or www. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks). Skate rental not included.

supplies-last, and the photo booth is open 1-9 p.m. In the evening only, Schenley’s venerable Valentines on Ice event includes free roses and chocolates for the first 300 couples, a keepsake photo, free salsa lessons indoors, and more. BO North and South parks: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. ($3-5;

{STAGE} Bunker Projects is an experimental gallery with a live-in artist residency program. With site-specific installations, the Bloomfield gallery hosts open-studio hours and aims to actively engage with the community. Tonight, for Valentine’s Day, Bunker hosts Night of Erotica 2, a series of performanceart pieces, literary readings and more by nine local artists. It also features Arielle Seligson and Sarah LaPonte’s Hug Deli, a concession stand of sorts offering romantic gestures, from different types of hugs and kisses to handshakes. ZM 8 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5-10 suggested donation. 412-440-8422 or www.bunkerprojects.org

FEB. 18 Tiempo Libre

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Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.’s annual Festival in Black and White teams white playwrights with black directors, and vice versa, for entertaining and sometimes provocative evenings of new one-act plays. This year, the fest ups the ante with “Multicultural Edition,” including local artists from even more varied cultural backgrounds. Program A premieres this afternoon, with Alexis Payne’s crime drama “The Code,” John Reoli’s “Sublet: A Futuristic Real Estate Comedy,” Michael A. Jones’ “Family Matters” and Matt Henderson’s crowdfunding comedy “The Roar of the Crowd.” Program B, with four different plays, debuts tonight. BO 3 p.m. (Program A) and 8 p.m. (Program B). Programs continue in repertory through Feb. 28. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. www.pghplaywrights.com

+ WED., FEB. 18 {MUSIC} Three-time Grammynominated Cuban timba group Tiempo Libre brings its Latin fusion to the Byham Theater tonight. A high-energy combination of jazz and Cuban music, Miami-based Tiempo Libre is known for its joyous concerts. It’s unsurprising to find people dancing in the aisles and singing along at their concerts, which are often described as “music parties.” Featuring music from their past two albums, My Secret Radio and Bach in Havana, the concert will reflect their lives studying classical music in Cuba and starting from scratch in a foreign culture. ZM 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $30-45. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE) romantic comedy of class & desire. THE MEETING. Eileen J. Morris’ play about the supposed meeting Sun, 2 p.m. and Tue-Sat, 8 p.m. of Malcolm X & Martin Luther Thru Feb. 22. Stephen Foster Following Alice’s adventures King, Jr. Presented by New Memorial, Oakland. 412-624-7529. through Wonderland. Evening Horizon Theater, Inc. Thu, Fri EXISTENCE & THE SINGLE performances led by child cast and Sat, Sun. Thru Feb. 22. Falk GIRL. A play about a young & matinees led by adult cast. School, University of Pittsburgh, girl & her search for the meaning Matinees included an additional Oakland. 412-431-0773. of life. By Matt Henderson tea party. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. THE MIKADO. Gilbert & Sullivan’s & presented by 12 Peers Theater. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 1. comic opera presented by the Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 21. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. Pittsburgh Savoyards. The Maker Theater, 724-773-9896. Thu-Sun. Thru Feb. 15. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. ARTS FACULTY EXHIBIT. Andrew Carnegie Free LEND ME A TENOR. Selected sculptures, jewelry, Library Music Hall, Ken Ludwig’s popular drawings & paintings by Carnegie. 412-276-3456. comedy. Presented www. per Professors Andrew Heisey, MOTOWN THE pa by the Valley Players. pghcitym Kathleen Rearick, Dr. Don .co MUSICAL. The story Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Simson & Ron Jesiolowski. of Motown founder Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Opening reception Feb. 16, 6 p.m. Berry Gordy’s journey from Feb. 22. Ligonier Theater. Feb. 16-March 20. Waynesburg featherweight boxer to the 724-532-1240. University. 724-852-3274. heavyweight music mogul who A LINCOLN PORTRAIT. This AUDITION FOR MURDER. A launched the careers of Diana Ross, orchestral score incorporates film director is holding auditions Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson some of Lincoln’s oratory read for extras in an upcoming film & & more. Thru Dec. 3, 8 p.m. Heinz over Aaron Copland’s music. audience members are recruited Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. Feat. the Allegheny Brass Band to read for roles. The director MY FAIR LADY. A musical & narrator Congressman Tim is trying keep the dueling stars about Eliza Doolittle & her teacher Murphy. Dessert reception. from killing each other before Henry Higgins, as she transforms Mon., Feb. 16, 7 p.m. Andrew someone ends up dead. Sun., from a Cockney flower girl to the Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Feb. 15, 2 p.m. Crowne Plaza fairest lady of them all. Performed Carnegie. 412-276-3456. Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-344-2069. w/ a live orchestra. Wed, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 p.m. and Thu., Feb. 19, [KIDSTUFF] 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 21. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. PERFECT WEDDING. A farce about a stag party, wedding day & the time in between. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 15, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA. A musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Tue, Wed, 7:30 p.m., Thu., Feb. 19, 1 & 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Thu., Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 1. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PRUSSIA 1866. A farcical examination of Nietzsche & his proto-feminist friends, written by Pittsburgh playwright Gab Cody. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. TELL IT TO THE MARINES. Set in 2007, this play is a story about the effect of the war in Iraq on one family: a 30-year retired Marine veteran, his two sons, also Marines, his wife & his twin brother, also a Marine veteran & currently a {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER} Catholic priest. Fri-Sun, 7 p.m. Thru 15. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial This Saturday, the Frick Art & Historical Center celebrates Valentine’s Day with Feb. Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253. the latest installment of its monthly series, geared toward children THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES. ages 4-8. Explore the paintings and tapestries of the museum’s permanent Eve Ensler’s landmark play. All collection for depictions of loving families and friends, and then create your own proceeds benefit Pittsburgh Action Against Rape. Thu., masterpiece in the form of a handmade Valentine. 11-11:45 a.m. Sat., Feb. 14. Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. Brillobox, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

THEATER ALICE IN WONDERLAND.

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AUDITION FOR MURDER. A film director is holding auditions for extras in an upcoming film & audience members are recruited to read for roles. The director is trying keep the dueling stars from killing each other before someone ends up dead. Sat., Feb. 14, 7 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 28, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. A CHASTE MAID IN CHEAPSIDE. Centered on the marriage of Moll Yellowhammer to her intended husband, Sir Walter Whorehound, a play of romantic intrigues & betrayals. Produced by the Duquesne University Red Masquers. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 14. Peter Mills Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), Uptown. 412-396-6429. DO NOT DISTURB. 6 comedic 1-acts all taking place in the same hotel suite. Presented by R-ACT Theatre Productions. Feb. 13-15, 7 p.m. The Avenue Theater. 724-775-6844. DOG IN THE MANGER. A new translation of Lope de Vega’s

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 38-year-old woman. My husband of 18 years is 22 years my senior. I credit my husband for giving me a good life and helping me pursue goals. But he’s a typeA professional, and that has played out in the bedroom. He has always been disinterested in my pleasure. When our kids were little, I did not want sex as often as he did. I suggested that he masturbate in the shower if he wanted a quickie. His answer: A married man “should not have to pleasure himself.” If I ask for oral, he tells me to “clean it really, really well,” then he’ll “think about doing that.” This makes me feel disgusting. I have tried to spice up our sex life. For years, it has been missionary position or doggy style. It can feel pretty “rapey” a lot of the time, as he typically comes at me rounding third base and it’s over in five minutes. A few months ago, I told a friend that I had never received “enthusiastic oral.” She said it made sense that my husband didn’t enjoy doing it because it was a “domination thing” that mostly submissive men enjoy. I started visiting online domination forums, and my new “online friends” would love to orally service me. Two of these “sub males” want me to “own” them. I have spoken to each on the phone and exchanged hundreds of emails. This is the happiest I have been in my life, and I want to act on these desires. My husband is my only concern. He is my best friend, and I don’t want to lose that. I feel like I can’t even tell him about the online stuff. How do I deal with this?

orgasm during sex is being on top and rocking back and forth on him in a similar manner. I’ve never climaxed during oral or hand stimulation, or in any other position. My husband has been very understanding (he even finds the way I masturbate “hot”), but I want to be able to do more. I’m also concerned about this being bad for me in the long run, like how the “death grip” is for guys. How can I teach myself to masturbate correctly? I’m currently abstaining from masturbating for a week to become more sensitive and then trying to get off only with my hands while on my back. I’ve been reading online and hearing conflicting suggestions. Some say to take a month off of sex, too? I’m terrified of never being able to get off the conventional way.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

CAN’T REALLY USE DIRECTION

Forgive the mixed messages I’m about to send you, although they won’t be nearly as mixed as what I just sent DOMME. I’ve advised guys with Death Grip Syndrome — a.k.a. Traumatic Masturbatory Syndrome — to keep masturbating but to use a lighter touch and a lot of lube. (Not all of these guys are clenching their dicks too hard; some are rubbing up against pillows like you or — my personal favorite — sliding their dicks between mattresses and box springs.) But here’s the difficult part: If they can’t come with the lighter touch and more lube, they don’t get to come. No reverting to a tightly clenched fist (or a pillow) after 20 minutes of “trying.” Allow the pressure and frustration to build long enough, and a dick will adapt. But they may have to keep at it for months, plural, not a month, singular. Go ahead and have sex but, again — no death grip, no pillow. If you want to get off in other ways, masturbate regularly — constantly — but without the pillow. If you don’t come, you don’t come. Focus on the pleasure you are able to achieve, and give it at least three months. It’s a good sign that you aren’t entirely dependent on a pillow — you can get off with/on your partner. Most people with TMS aren’t so lucky. And it’s less awkward to grind on your partner pillow-style when you want to come than it is for a guy to shift from penis-in-vagina sex (PIV) to penis-in-between-mattressand-box-spring sex (PIBMABS). That said, some people with DGS/TMS simply aren’t able to retrain their junk. But you don’t have to live without orgasms, or view yourself as damaged. After giving your junk a chance to adapt, you may have to accept that this is how you get off, and let go of the shame. Enjoy the fingering, enjoy the oral and enjoy the fucking, and when you want to get off, maneuver your husband into a position that works and shamelessly grind away.

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

YOU MAY HAVE TO ACCEPT THAT THIS IS HOW YOU GET OFF, AND LET GO OF THE SHAME.

DON’T OFFEND MY MAN EVER

On the one hand … a man who demands “rapey” sex on his schedule for 18 years, makes his wife feel bad about her genitals and isn’t open to trying new things is begging to be cheated on. On the other hand … you say your rapey, pussy-disparaging, sex-shaming husband is your best friend (baffling!) and you don’t want to lose him (equally baffling!). And a guy with his retrograde attitudes about sex, gender roles and “wifely duties” would divorce you if he found out you cheated on him. So you probably shouldn’t take this into real life. But on the other other hand … your husband sounds like the type of guy who would regard your secret online life as cheating — the emails, the phone calls, the lurking on domination websites — and divorce you just the same if he found out. So you might as well fuck those subs, because if you get caught — and you probably will — you’ll be in the same trouble whether or not you got enthusiastic oral. I’m a 25-year-old woman who can only get off lying facedown and rubbing my clit against a pillow. The orgasms are great, but it limits the ways I can get off with my husband. The only way I can

On the Lovecast, hear how rich girls slutshame poor girls on college campuses: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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COMEDY THU 12 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

THU 12 - SUN 15 BRAHMAN/I. A one hijra comedy show. In this play set as a stand-up comedy routine, the title character explores history, mythology, gender.. & high school. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 22 Temple of Comedy, Garfield. 412-362-1713. BRENT ERNST. Feb. 12-13, 8 p.m., Sat., Feb. 14, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 15, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 13 LISA DAPPRICH & CHUCK KRIEGER. 8:30 p.m. 565 LIVE, Bellevue. 412-522-7556. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 DUSTY SLAY. 8 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 14, 7 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 14 DAVID KAYE. 7 p.m. Lower Burrell Moose Lodge 53. 724-335-4131. JOHN KNIGHT, ANDY BENINGO, RAY ZAWODNI. Saint Ursula Catholic School Valentine Fundraiser 6:30 p.m. St. Ursula School, Allison Park. 412-920-5653. MIKE EAGAN, LIONEL HAMILTON, KAREN FAY. 6:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. 724-379-7100. MIKE WYSOCKI. 8:30 p.m. North Hills Pittsburgh Moose Lodge #46, Glenshaw. 412-952-7215. WOLFIE’S STAND-UP SHOWCASE FEAT. MIKE WYSOCKI. 8 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322.

SUN 15 FIVE MINUTES OF FAME OPEN MIC. 9 p.m. Gus’s Cafe, Lawrenceville. 412-290-9652.

MON 16 COMEDY SAUCE. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TFM IMPROV COMEDY. Full throttle improv every Monday night starring our resident house teams. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

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of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Photo Section. Exhibit celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Pittsburgh Photo Section. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Attention. Rising Star! Works on paper by Charity Baker & Dorothy Forman. Jewerly by Masha Archer. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Quintessence. 5th anniversary show feat. Mark Ryden, Scott Hove, Joe Sorren, Jeremy Fish, Glenn Barr, Audrey Kawasaki, Camille Rose Garcia, James Jean, Sam Flores, John Puglisi, more. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Headliners. New paintings, mixed media

TUE 17 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 18 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Hosted by John Dick Winters. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru April 29 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-904-1744. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

works, glass & ceramics. Feat. Christine Aaron, Eileen Braun, Claire Cotts, Jamie Harris, Ben Johnson, Micheal Madigan, Susan Morosky & Scott Turri. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Armin Hoffman: Farbe/Color. Celebrating our Armin Hofmann exhibition of silkscreens &emerging talent from CMU School of Design 2014 Seniors. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. 12x12 Rewind. An introduction to a new group of artists living & working in Pittsburgh. Curated by Craig Freeman & Ron Copeland. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. 3d@mgg. A exhibition of artists working

AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of

in three dimensional media. Shadyside. 412-441-7258. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Winter Blues. A multi-media juried art exhibit, feat. regional artists. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Behind The Murals: Histories and Other Stories. Exploring the historic, social & artistic influences impacting each stage of the creation of Maxo Vanka’s murals in St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church. Presented by The Society to Preserve the Millvale Murals of MaxoVanka. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN STATE NEW KENSINGTON. Photo Jazz. Photo exhibit by Ronald Jones, Kenan Foley & Nelson Harrison. Call or email tms57@psu.edu to RSVP. New Kensington. 724-334-6056. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos on Glass. Lantern slides: 1880 to 1920, handpainted, sometimes with a single hair to color a small line. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. Nice But Mean. Paintings & woodblocks by Miss Dingo. Miss Dingo: Nice, But Mean Exhibition. A solo exhibtion. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 15: Projects by Christopher Meerdo & Matthew Conboy. Feat. work by Christopher Meerdo showcasing work from his projects Iceland & Cataphote & Matthew Conboy, presenting

Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

work from his project “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear”. Both artists will give a brief gallery talk describing the scope & inspiration of their work. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Sideways Museum. A collection of works by Pittsburgh-based artists exploring folk & visionary art traditions. Viewable 24 hrs. a day w/ periodic alterations. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. UNJURIED. Pittsburgh Society of Artists 50th Anniversary show. Closing reception/ People’s Choice Awards Feb. 27, 6-7:30 p.m. Uninjured. Exhibition of PSA members’ work. Laurie Arnold McMillan will be conducting The Eckphrastic Tradition: Writing to Art – A Workshop of Creative Encounter on Feb. 21. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. West Hills Art League Exhibition. A sampling of the wide array of West Hills Art League members’ artistic styles ranging from traditional watercolors & oil paintings to acrylics, pastels, clay, paper, & more. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith

shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. Colorful orchids curated in collaboration w/ the Orchid Society of Western Pennsylvania& displayed throughout our glasshouse. Skillfully trained tropical bonsai in the permanent collection. Feat. silk artist, Jamie Kirkell. indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. Journey to one of the lushest landscapes on the planet as Phipps showcases some of Africa’s most unique plants, animals & cultures. Opening gala April 23. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and


Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CHARLIE MONROE BURLESQUE SHOW. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 14 TOTALLY HEART-LESQUE” BURLESQUE & VARIETY SHOW. Feat. Kat De Lac, Cherie Blondell, Vivi Noir & Macabre Noir. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668.

FUNDRAISERS POLITICS

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THU 12

THU 12

I HEART HAITI: THE SPIRIT OF ERZULE. Erzule-themed pieces for sale, a special Valentine’s cocktail & Haitian music. 7-11 p.m. Haiti Friends, Point Breeze. 412-361-4884. VALENTINES CABARET NIGHT. Feat. Rebecca Covert & Anna Elder of Indecent Diva. 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

ON THE SPOT HAPPY HOUR. On the Spot is a campaign that provides menstrual supplies to local schools for girls who find themselves w/o supplies. Admission fee or donation of new supplies. Baked goods & On the Spot cocktail. 6-8 p.m. Hough’s, Greenfield. 412-586-5944.

GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

FRI 13

FREEDOM UNDER FIRE: CHALLENGING THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX. A fundraiser for the Dallas 6, prison whistleblowers being prosecuted for speaking out against torture in prisons. Speakers: Pam Africa & Shandre Delaney Performing: Devyn Swain, 1Hood & Dos Noun. 7:30-10 p.m. The New Bohemian, North Side. 716-238-4089.

HAVE A HEART FOR ANIMALS VALENTINE PARTY. Party w/ live music, art show, food, drinks, kids activities & vendors. Bring a food, toy or supplies donation for the animals. 6 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539.

SAT 14

MOONLITE MIXOLOGY: VALENTINE’S DAY FLOWERS, SPARKLES, & FLOATS. A full participation mixology class that will teach the basics of home bartending & develop comfortability w/ mixology tools, home-made RED LIGHT DISTRICT SOIRÉE. ingredients & classic techniques Feat. playboy playmate including stirring, flaming Margaret Wood, CMT’s citrus peels & custom Josh Varnado, Sandy infusions. 1-3 p.m. Wholey, DJs, auctions, Moonlite Cafe, more. Benefits the Brookline. . w w w Red Light Fund & 412-506-0420. r citypape h g p the American Heart SATURDAY SIPPER: .com Association. 7 p.m. VALENTINES BUBBLES. Uptown Rooftop Lounge, A mini-wine class involving Uptown. 412-916-1936. tasting & discussing four sparkling wines in an hour w/ wine expert Mike Gonze. COMMUNITY CLOTHING 6-8 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, COLLECTION. Pittsburgh Public Lawrenceville. 412-391-1709. Market w/ the Give a Thread Campaign hosts a two day donation event. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, FOCUS ON RENEWAL Strip District. 412-624-1065. AFRICAN AMERICAN CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS. Visual art, plus musical, dance & BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO variety acts by regional African American performing artists. 1 p.m. PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, Father Ryan Arts Center, McKees pack ‘em or database ‘em! Rocks. 412-771-3052. Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. A CONCERT FOR DOUG. An event to raise funds for Quail, who BEAUTY & THE BEAST. A full needs a liver transplant due to length Pittsburgh Ballet Theater non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Live music interpretation of the classic fairy w/ Knob Road, Shannon & the tale. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m., Sat, Sun, Merger & Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers 2 p.m. and Thu., Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. along w/ comedian Shane Dolan. Thru Feb. 15 Benedum Center, Spaghetti dinner. Proceeds will Downtown. 412-456-6666. be used to defray Quail’s medical expenses. 2-6 p.m. American Legion 940. 724-561-5616. B2BB I LOVE YOU TO DEATH. Anti-Valentines Day Burlesque/ Drag show feat. Charlee Monroe, HELPING WOMEN HELPS Boom Boom Bridgette, Corvida THE WORLD: THE FINE ART Bluex, Pushing Daisys, Emma OF LEGOTIATION. Guest Gee Kelly, Malcum Tent & Harmonie Cynn. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, speaker & Executive Director of

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At the photographer’s cue, the bride, groom and the rest of the gang jump as high as they can. Laughs ensue for years when looking back on the goofy faces and contorted positions made during that exuberant split second.

FRI 13

LITERARY THU 12 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WHAT’S NEW IN FEDERAL TAX CREDITS. Ready to file, but confused about the many tax credits for personal taxation? Mr. Price will review recent changes & updates to the federal tax credits. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

FRI 13

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNIE PERRI COLE AND KRIS RADDER PHOTOGRAPHY}

Wedding Party Jump Photos

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

MAKENIGHT: MY SNARKY VALENTINE. 21+ night: make molded chocolate body parts, woodcut hearts, voodoo dolls, more. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Cake Toppers from Ready Go Pittsburgher Nadia Marks Wojcik creates custom paper creations for the cake — brides, grooms, even pets. www.etsy.com/shop/ReadyGo

Bride Mural This trompe l’oeil work, from Judy Penzer, is near the corner of Penn Avenue and South Graham Street, in Garfield.

Hitchburgh A new website designed to link local artisanal vendors to those planning weddings. Sign up to learn about upcoming events. www.hitchburgh.com

JILL KHOURY & CHRISTINA DEKA. MadFridays Reading Series is a Carlow University sponsored reading series featuring work by members of the Madwomen in the Attic community workshop group. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WETV}

THU 12

*Stuff We

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TRAVIS NEELY PHOTOGRAPHY}

HOLIDAY

PROGRESS CMU, Ayana Ledford discusses the value of women who speak up & advocate on their own behalf. Learn how to negotiate for what you want & strategize win-win solutions that benefit all parties. Benefits Bethlehem Haven Women’s Shelter of Pittsburgh. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-391-1348 x222.

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

Bridezillas

Tin Hearts from Worker Bird It’s a solid keepsake Valentine of wood and tin, cut and assembled by Pittsburgh crafter Kim Fox. Available at Wildcard, in Lawrenceville. www.workerbird.com

Reality-TV Nuptials Over-the-top shows like Bridezillas, My Big Fat Redneck Wedding, Millionaire Matchmaker, Four Weddings and so on can help you feel good about not getting married.

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W Y E P A N D T H E P I T T S B U R G H C U LT U R A L T R U S T P R E S E N T

Winner of three 2015 GRAMMY® Awards for The River and the Thread

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 7:30 PM • BYHAM THEATER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PITTSBURGH POETS ROCK THE APOLLO. Local poets Renee Alberts & Robert Walicki. Reception & book signing. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Apollo Memorial Library. (724) 478-4214.

SAT 14 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 16 COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 17 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

Schenley Park Ice Rink. Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 28 Schenley Park, Oakland. 703-597-6905. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. VALENTINE’S ARTKIDS PROGRAM. Come look for examples of loving friends & family in paintings & tapestries & create a special valentine for someone you love. 11-11:45 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-342-4075.

ONE LIGHT, MANY VIEWS. Experience the simple interplay between light and darkness in the camera obscura that creates the visual image. FINE Artist in Residence, Brandt Wild, explores concepts of light & darkness; literal & figurative points of view & collaborative relationships. Feb. 14-28, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 16 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials and processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarianturned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 16 - TUE 17

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

CAMERA TAKE APART. Delve deep inside old cameras to find the parts that make them work. Find springs, lenses, buttons, capacitors, LEDs, motors & more. How can these be reused in new creations? Feb. 16-17, 12-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 12 - WED 18 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. Interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Thru March 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 YO, VIKINGS! The mini-saga of 10-year-old Emma Katz & her quest for real adventure presented by Stage 62. Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 15 Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262.

SAT 14 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LEARN TO ICE SKATE. Teaching basic skating fundamentals of balance, edge control & stopping. Classes for all ranges of expertise. All ages.

EVENT:

Unblurred gallery crawl, Friendship/ Bloomfield/Garfield CRITIC: Jono Matusky, 25, a product manager from Lawrenceville

SAT 14 - WED 18

WED 18

KIDSTUFF

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

TUE 17 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE TUE 17 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 18 ALLEGHENY SPORT, TRAVEL AND OUTDOOR SHOW. Expo of hunting, fishing, camping, boating & off-roading. Feb. 18-19, 3-9 p.m., Fri., Feb. 20, 12-9 p.m., Sat., Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-373-7300. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 12 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m.

WHEN: Fri.,

Feb. 06

Every first Friday of the month there’s a gallery crawl all along Penn Avenue, and I actually found out about it through the girl who organizes all these events. I started here at [Mr. Roboto Project] and I plan on hitting up the other galleries afterward and just work[ing] my way through. This show [at Roboto] is Fun-A-Day, so everybody does one thing a day for the month of January and then combines it at the end. A lot of these people aren’t “artists,” they’re just regular people looking for something fun to do in January and then show it off. I’m very impressed; I think last year they had 25 people, and this year there’s almost 50. It’s just really impressive just seeing a wide variety of people with different backgrounds pulling artistic talent out. It’s pretty cool to see the innate artistic talent in everyday people, who aren’t necessarily artists. The quality of the show is fantastic.

Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CULTURE CLUB: IMAGE TO WORD – A PUBLIC READING. Using Duane Michals’s photographs for inspiration, a group of emerging writers share short stories & poems written during a six-session course w/ writer Sherrie Flick. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LAST APE STANDING. Scientists are piecing together the story of humanity’s origins & casting light

RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. A SIMPLE TRUTH: LOVE’S PRESENCE IN OUR RELATIONSHIPS W/ GAIL LUDWIG. Presentation & Q & A w/ Gail Ludwig. Presented by OMA Center for the Body, Mind & Spirit. 6:15 p.m. La Dorita, Sharpsburg. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

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AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CUPID’S COCKTAIL CLASS. Cocktail demonstrations, hors d’oeuvres, tarot readings, more. 6:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. B Y Z AC C H IAU S MC K E E Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GET HIP HAPPY HOUR RECORD FAIR & SWAP MEET. 5-7 p.m. on the animal we are today. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. Pizza, cupcakes & a guided 412-682-0320. tour of how we came to be. HOW TO LIVE LIGHTLY & Presented by the American BE BLESSED BY LESS. A Humanist Association. 5:30 p.m. seminar on spiritual wisdom Carnegie Mellon University, w/ guest speaker & author Oakland. 412-242-7117. Susan Vogt. Cardinals’ Great MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting Hall. 7:30-9:30 a.m. Bishop night. Second Thu of every Canevin High School, Crafton. month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh 412-401-0555. Center for Creative Reuse, SCREENING OF RED HOOK Homewood. 412-473-0100. SUMMER. A Spike Lee film. OLIVE OIL TASTING. Culinary 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Institute of America alum & Homewood. 412-204-7291. executive chef Deb Mortillaro UNLIKELY ENTREPRENEUR: will guide students through THE INTERSECTION OF the ins & outs of the olive. LIFE EXPERIENCES, 6-8 p.m. Dreadnought FOOD, AND A Wines, Lawrenceville. DRIVE TO SUCCEED. 412-391-1709. Regina Koetters, OPEN STUDIO: Founder/CEO of Marty’s www. per a p REUSEMOBILE Market, LLC will be pghcitym o .c MATCHING GIFT speaking about her CHALLENGE PARTY. experience as a officer in Open Studio with magic, the navy & her transition to prizes & cake. 18+, paybeing a business owner. 8-9:30 a.m. what-you-wish event, potluck Chatham University, Shadyside. (vegetarian preferred so everyone 412-365-1253. can partake)& BYOB. Basic crafting supplies provided. 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for MONSTER JAM. Feb. 13-15, 7 p.m. Creative Reuse, Homewood. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, 412-642-1800. education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. month, 7 p.m. Covenant www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, Presbyterian Church, Butler. 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. 412-518-1515.

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CAPT. THOMAS ESPY ROOM TOUR. The Capt. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved and most intact GAR post in the United States. Sat, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. FRENCH FOR BEGINNERS. French for Beginners is an introduction for those who are new to French or consider themselves a little bit rusty. Second Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. and Fourth Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. Thru May 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GETTING CONNECTED: JOB SEARCHING ONLINE. This class will help you set up a plan for your online job search, introduce you to major job searching websites & provide you w/ insight into the online application process. Registration required. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MARCUS GARVEY: LOOK FOR ME IN THE WHIRLWIND. Screening & refreshments. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-204-7291. PITTSBURGH AREA JITTERBUG CLUB VALENTINE’S DAY DANCE. Dance & bring a dessert to share. 8 p.m. Sygan SNPJ, Bridgeville. 412-551-0830. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SLOVAK DOCUMENTARY FILM FEST. In the Shadow of Time, a 45-minute documentary describing the life of Emil Svec, who was imprisoned by the Communists for 18 years. When, in 1959, he managed to flee across the Iron curtain to freedom in Austria in a crop duster plane, he never expected to return. But three years later, he was abducted by Communist spies dispatched from Prague. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. A workshop presented by SCORE Pittsburgh. Second Sat of every month, 8 a.m. Thru Feb. 14 PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 ext. 130. CONTINUES ON PG. 62

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[LIT] SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VALENTINE’S DAY CLASSES. Paint classes for kids & couples. 12, 4 & 7:30 p.m. Paint Monkey, Cranberry. 724-900-0150. VALENTINE’S TEA ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE. Dances from Charles II to Jane Austen’s day. All dances taught. Beginner’s session at 12:45pm. 1-3:30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-535-2078. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 CINEBRUNCH FEAT. SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE. Brunch & a screening of Sleepless in Seattle. Feb. 14-15, 11 a.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322.

SUN 15

STRYKER ORTHOPAEDICS ANNOUNCES BILLION DOLLAR HIP IMPLANT SETTLEMENT On November 3, 2014, Stryker agreed to pay more than $1 billion to settle thousands of injury claims related to its Rejuvenate and ABGII modular hip implants. Under this settlement, most patients who undergo revision surgery will receive at least $300,000 in compensation. Whether to participate in this settlement, or pursue your legal rights in the court system, is a decision that should be made only after consultation with an experienced attorney. Meshbesher & Spence attorneys have been Court-appointed leaders in the Stryker hip litigation since its inception, and will provide a free in-home consultation to discuss your legal options, including this settlement. There are important deadlines approaching. Failure to meet these deadlines could adversely affect your legal rights. Please call or email us today to discuss your case.

Main Office: 1616 Park Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 339-9121 (866) 765-5027 www.meshbesher.com

Attorneys: Anthony Nemo Genevieve Zimmerman Andrew Davick Jason Johnston Ashleigh Raso

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

“On our mountain only boys were born, and some of them turned into girls around age 11,” writes Jennifer Clement in her novel Prayers for the Stolen, a portrait of a rural Mexico where mothers must protect their daughters from drug lords. Clement also wrote the leading Jean-Michel Basquiat biography, Widow Basquiat, two other novels and several books of poetry. Clement, a member of Mexico’s prestigious Sistema Nacional de Creadores, visits Pitt’s Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 19. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Arabic for Beginners gives an introduction to the language & culture of Saudi Arabia. to improve health, center Second Sun of every month, emotions, manifest goals, master 2-3 p.m. and Third Sun of every energy, & become a healing month, 2-3 p.m. Thru April 19 force through. Presented by Carnegie Library, Oakland. Dana Micucci,healer & author 412-622-3151. of The Third Muse. 10:30 a.m.BOARD GAME NIGHT. 2:30 p.m. Unity Center of Third and First Sun of every Pittsburgh, Bloomfield. month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, MILITARY MINIATURES DAY. Beechview. 412-437-8676. Display of military miniatures, CASABLANCA W/ THE hand-painted toy soldiers & PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY war-gaming dioramas ORCHESTRA. Screening feat. the 18th & 19th of the film w/ Max century armies of North Steiner’s OscarAmerica & Europe. nominated score 12 p.m. Woodville played live by the Plantation, Bridgeville. www. per a p Pittsburgh Symphony 412-221-0348. pghcitym o .c Orchestra. 8 p.m. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Heinz Hall, Downtown. Support, education 412-392-4900. & advocacy for the LGBTQ CHINESE II. Chinese II is geared community, family & friends. toward those who already have Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. a basic understanding of the Trinity United Church of Christ, language and are interested Greensburg. 412-518-1515. in increasing oral and written PITTSBURGH REPTILE proficiency, as well as enhancing SHOW & SALE. Buy, sell, their understanding of Chinese trade, & learn about reptiles. culture. First Sun of every month, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 22, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Third Sun of 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Harmar House. every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. 724-516-0441. Thru April 19 Carnegie Library, RADICAL TRIVIA. Trivia game Oakland. 412-622-3151. hosted by DJ Jared Evans. Come EMBODYING THE WISDOM alone or bring a team. Sun, OF THE HEART. Learn to 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. harness the power of the heart 412-828-6322.

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STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. www.steelcityrollderby.org 5 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

MON 16 ASSEMBLE BANTAM NIGHT. Cocktails,local food trucks, hands-on science experiments involving distilling & more. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-432-9127. A BLIZZARD OF GREAT READS. Play book bingo & talk about great reads! 12:15-1:15 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The


Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SINGLE MINGLE. Beers, snacks & love. Presented by eatPGH 7-10 p.m. The Brew Gentlemen Beer Co., Braddock. 724-622-7777. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 17 NO TIME TO THINK: FROM MINDLESSNESS TO MINDFULNESS. Lenten Breakfast w/ speaker Anne Kertz Kernion. 7-9 p.m. Kearns Spirituality Center, Allison Park. 412-635-5401. PITTSBURGH MOOD PROUD. Pittsburgh Mood Disorder Support Group is a peer sponsored group and is LGBTQIA friendly. Get focused about mental health topics & make new friends. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 24 Crazy Mocha Baum, Friendship. 412-465-0381. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 18 AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. Lessons offered to beginners. Wed, 12-2:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. ALLEGHENY SPORT, TRAVEL & OUTDOORS SHOW. Feb. 18-22 Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA. Hosted by Christopher Rawson, this program allows patrons to gain insight on each production. Light refreshments. Register online. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6070. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

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THE RIDE OF YOUR LIFE: BICYCLING FROM WEIRTON, WV, TO WASHINGTON, DC, W/ BILL KUTZER & DOUG ETTINGER. Doug & Bill will talk about their experience doing the 350- mile-trip. Tips for those interested in biking in their footsteps — from pre-planning & resources to accommodation recommendations, support groups, directions, & local day trips to get you in shape. Q &A. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS THE CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for The Little Princess. Open to all interested persons age 5-Adult. Children 5-12 10am. Age 13 to Adult 11am. Sat., Feb. 14, 10 & 11 a.m. Carnegie Performing Arts Center, Carnegie. 412-279-8887.

BALL FURNACE VOLUME 5, ISSUE 1. Call for poems w/ the theme of mistakes, as well asoriginal poetry outside of this theme. No more than 3 poems per poet that may not exceed three pages in length individually. For more guidelines, see the website. Deadline Mar. 20, 12pm. BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. 412-721-0943. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

BATTLE OF THE BOOKS Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s team trivia contest, Battle of the Books, is a chance for students grades 6 through 12 to show off their literary knowledge. Volunteers are needed to welcome teams and administer score sheets, as well as help with other aspects of the contest, which takes place Feb. 24, March 3 and March 10. Email volunteers@carnegielibrary.org for information.

DEMAKUS. Auditions for “Wine in the Wilderness”. Bring a headshot & resume. Sat., Feb. 14, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. PearlArts Studios, Point Breeze. 724-396-9538. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for an original murder mystery Moonshine & Murder, Feb. 20-21. Seeking 4 women & 4 men. Cold readings from the script, no preparation needed. Email ractproductions@ gmail.com or call for information. The Avenue Theater. 724-775-6844.

SUBMISSIONS THE AUGUST WILSON EDUCATION PROJECT 11TH PLAY COMPETITION. Inviting high school students to write plays & monologues about their communities & submit them for competition.

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original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH KNIT & CROCHET FESTIVAL DESIGN CONTEST. Calling all fiber designers to submit their creative original designs. Due by Feb. 28. For guidelines see the website. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com THE WRITERS’ PRESS POETRY CHAPBOOK COMPETITION. Open to new & emerging writers. No theme restrictions. Prizes include publication w/ Createspace & online distribution w/ Amazon & Barnes & Noble.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My 15-year-old son has been watching sadistic porn — and ONLY sadistic porn — for a couple of years. He also tells us (husband and me) that, though he’s not had sex (which he defines as penetration), he’s had oral sex, handjobs, etc., and that he didn’t “flash on” violent images at those times. But he says he thinks about this type of porn all the time — all day, every day — and fantasizes about doing sadistic things to the girls he dates. This all came out as we started having conversations about respect and dating! I proceeded to freak the hell out (though not around him). As the mom and as a woman, I’m upset. I want information, but it makes me sick to read about sexual violence. Particularly when I know there’s an unwilling partner involved, as my son hints he prefers — gang rapes are an example. Though we try to be open and talk about relationships, sex, real-world stuff, this caught me completely off guard. My husband doesn’t believe there’s much reason to worry (yet?), because to us, his friends and family and girlfriends (as far as I know), he’s a very different type of person. He’s involved in school sports and his grades are good. He has friends. There have been zero instances of violence from day care into high school. He has an extremely close relationship with his older brother. There’s nothing I’ve seen that would have made me believe he was even capable of thinking about this stuff. I don’t know if this is a huge red flag or if I’m making this a bigger deal than I should. I’m just terrified he’s going to harm someone. I’m also shamefully awkward around him now. I hate that my view of him has changed. Are there signs — more signs — that I need to watch for? Is he already a danger to himself or others? Where did we drop the ball?

of people who enjoy violent (or violent-looking) porn are into healthy BDSM. Going just by the numbers, this is (by far) the most likely outcome.” What do we know about people who develop into psychopathic sex killers — or some other sort of sex offender — and what should you watch for? “We don’t know much,” says Cantor. “Politicians will spend enormous sums on punishment but barely anything on research to prevent sex crimes in the first place. What is very clear, however, is that psychopathic sex killers are psychopathic: They have a callous disregard for the well-being of others and often have a long history of conduct problems, generally apparent much before age 15. A history of good peer friendships, healthy family relationships, and a typical social and dating life all argue against PANICKED’s son being a danger to others.” So it’s unlikely that your son is the next Ted Bundy, PANICKED. The likelier scenario is this: Your son is really, really kinky. Some sons are. Here’s one thing your kinky teenager needs to know: One day, he’ll be able to explore his kinks with consenting adult partners — there are kinky women out there who enjoy bondage, erotic pain, consensual group sex (a.k.a. “gang rapes”), pretending to be “unwilling partners,” etc. — but for now, he’ll have to stick to vanilla sex, which he enjoys, as his kinks aren’t something he can spring on a high school girlfriend. His kinks aren’t something he can spring on any woman, ever. The stuff he’s interested in can be explored only after a mutual interest is established, each and every item on the menu is carefully negotiated, and consent is obtained and sustained. “It would help to find this boy some role models,” says Cantor. At 15, your son is too young to find kinky role models in the usual places — munches, classes, play parties — but he can find role models right now in books written about safe, sane, consensual kink by safe, sane, consensual kinksters. A few suggested titles: The Ultimate Guide to Kink: BDSM, Role Play, and the Erotic Edge, a collection of essays edited by Tristan Taormino; Playing Well with Others: Your Field Guide to Discovering, Exploring, and Navigating the Kink, Leather and BDSM Communities, by Lee Harrington and Mollena Williams; SM 101: A Realistic Introduction, by Jay Wiseman; and The Loving Dominant, by John Warren and Libby Warren. “Healthy members of BDSM/kink communities are essentially the opposite of psychopaths,” says Cantor. “Although they are sexually aroused by violent (or violent-looking) images, they are very highly attuned to the feelings of their partners and very much want to take extreme care never to hurt them. Their arousal includes the idea that what they’re doing is providing pleasure, even though it might not look pleasurable to vanilla folks.” Follow Dr. James Cantor on Twitter @JamesCantorPhD.

“IT’S UNLIKELY THAT YOUR SON IS THE NEXT TED BUNDY. THE LIKELIER SCENARIO IS THIS: YOUR SON IS REALLY, REALLY KINKY.”

PARENT ABSOLUTELY NEEDS INFORMATION CONCERNING KID’S EROTIC DEVELOPMENT

“Full props to PANICKED for not freaking out in front of her son, and for having always kept the door open for these conversations,” says Dr. James Cantor. “I don’t think she’s dropped the ball: Fate just suddenly dropped her into a whole new game.” Before we get to Cantor’s advice for you, PANICKED, here’s why you should listen to him: He is one of the top experts in the world on atypical sexualities and has worked with thousands of sexual offenders — and thousands of perfectly healthy kinksters. He is a clinical psychologist, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, and the editor-in-chief of Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment. He knows what he’s talking about. Now let’s listen to Dr. Cantor … “The chances of there being something serious to worry about here are very small,” says Cantor. “It is true that psychopathic sex killers have violent sexual fantasies, but it doesn’t work the other way around: Having violent sexual fantasies doesn’t mean anyone is likely developing into a psychopathic sex killer. The great majority

On the Lovecast, how to comport yourself at a kinky play party: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

02.11-02.18

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): How many desires do you have? Take a rough inventory. Identify the experiences you continually seek in your quest to feel relief and pleasure and salvation and love and a sense of meaning. You can also include fantasies that go unfulfilled and dreams that may or may not come true in the future. As you survey this lively array, don’t censor yourself or feel any guilt. Simply give yourself over to a sumptuous meditation on all the longings that fuel your journey. This is your prescription for the coming week. In ways you may not yet be able to imagine, it is the medicine you need most.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The German word Nachkussen refers to the kind of kiss that compensates for all the kissing that has not been happening, all the kissing that has been omitted or lost. If it has been too long since you’ve kissed anyone, you need Nachkussen. If your lover hasn’t kissed you lately with the focused verve you long for, you need Nachkussen. If you yourself have been neglecting to employ your full artistry and passion as you bestow your kisses, you need Nachkussen. From what I can tell, Pisces, this Valentine season is a full-on Nachkussen holiday for you. Now please go get what you haven’t been getting.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I hope you have someone in your life to whom you can send the following love note, and if you don’t, I trust you will locate that someone no later than Aug. 1: “I love you more than anyone loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also, I love you in a way that no one loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also, I love you in a way that I love no one else, and never have loved anyone else, and never will love anyone else.” (This passage is borrowed from author Jonathan Safran Foer’s book Everything Is Illuminated.)

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “We assume that others show their love in the same way that we do,” writes psychologist Amy Przeworski, “and if they don’t follow that equation, we worry that the love is not there.” I think you’re on track to overcome this fundamental problem, Taurus. Your struggles with intimacy have made you wise enough to surrender your expectations about how others should show you their love. You’re almost ready to let them give you their affection and demonstrate their care for you in ways that come natural to them. In fact, maybe you’re ready RIGHT NOW.

bodies. Whisper funny secrets into each other’s ears or wrestle like good-natured drunks on the living-room floor. Howl like coyotes. Caw like crows. Purr like cheetahs. Sing boisterous songs and recite feral poetry to each other. Murmur this riff, adapted from Pablo Neruda: “Our love was born in the wind, in the night, in the earth. That’s why the clay and the flower, the mud and the roots know our names.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Is there any sense in which your closest alliance is a gift to the world? Does your relationship inspire anyone? Do the two of you serve as activators and energizers, igniting fires in the imaginations of those whose lives you touch? If not, find out why. And if you are tapping into those potentials, it’s time to raise your impact to the next level. Together, the two of you now have extra power to synergize your collaboration in such a way that it sends out ripples of benevolence everywhere you go.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The poet Rainer Marie Rilke said that people misunderstand the role of love. “They have made it into play and pleasure because they think that play and pleasure are more blissful than work,” he wrote. “But there is nothing happier than work. And love, precisely because it is the supreme happiness, can be nothing other than work.” I’m sharing this perspective with you for two reasons, Virgo. First, of all the signs in the zodiac, you’re most likely to thrive on his approach. Second, you’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when this capacity of yours is at a peak. Here’s how Rilke finished his thought: “Lovers should act as if they had a great work to accomplish.”

I’d like to bestow a blessing on you and your closest ally. My hope is that it will help you reduce the restlessness that on occasion undermines the dynamism of your relationship. Here’s the benediction, inspired by a Robert Bly poem: As you sit or walk or lie next to each other, you share a mood of glad acceptance. You aren’t itchy or fidgeting, wondering if there’s something better to be or do. You don’t wish you were talking about a different subject or feeling a different emotion or living in a different world. You are content to be exactly who you are, exactly where you are.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Want to infuse your romantic interludes with wilder moods now and then? Want to cultivate a kind of intimacy that taps deeper into your animal intelligence? If so, try acting out each other’s dreams or drawing magic symbols on each other’s

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Love and intimacy come in many forms. There are at least a billion different ways for you to be attracted to another person, and a trillion different ways to structure your relationship. Maybe your unique bond involves having sex, or maybe it doesn’t. Maybe it’s romantic or friendly or holy, or all three of those things. Do the two of you have something important to create together, or is your connection more about fueling each other’s

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Anaïs Nin wrote the following passage in her novel A Spy in the House of Love: “As other girls prayed for handsomeness in a lover, or for wealth, or for power, or for poetry, she had prayed fervently: Let him be kind.” I recommend that approach for you right now, Capricorn. A quest for tender, compassionate attention doesn’t always have to be at the top of your list of needs, but I think it should be for now. You will derive a surprisingly potent alchemical boost from basking in kindness. It will catalyze a breakthrough that can’t be unleashed in any other way. Ask for it! Proposed experiment: Carry out an act of love that’s unique in your history. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on! new year. new you. classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

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In the TV science-fiction show Doctor Who, the title character lives in a time machine that is also a spaceship. It’s called a Tardis. From the outside, it appears to be barely bigger than a phone booth. But once you venture inside, you find it’s

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

talents? Your task is to respect and revere the idiosyncratic ways you fit together, not force yourselves to conform to a prototype. To celebrate the Valentine season, I invite you and your closest ally to play around with these fun ideas.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): About 2,600 years ago, the Greek poet Sappho wrote the following declaration: “You make me hot.” In the next 10 days, I’d love for you to feel motivated to say or think that on a regular basis. In fact, I predict that you will. The astrological omens suggest you’re in a phase when you are both more likely to be made hot and more likely to encounter phenomena that make you hot. Here are some other fragments from Sappho that might come in handy when you need to express your torrid feelings: 1. “This randy madness I joyfully proclaim.” 2. “Eros makes me shiver again. … Snake-sly, invincible.” 3. “Desire has shaken my mind as wind in the mountain forests roars through trees.” (Translations by Guy Davenport.)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

a spacious chateau with numerous rooms, including a greenhouse, library, observatory, swimming pool and karaoke bar. This is an excellent metaphor for you, Scorpio. Anyone who wants your love or friendship must realize how much you resemble a Tardis. If they don’t understand that you’re far bigger on the inside than you seem on the outside, it’s unlikely the two of you can have a productive relationship. This Valentine season, as a public service, make sure that everyone you’re seriously involved with knows this fact.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 3, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for: • Pgh. Obama 6-12 Restroom Renovations, Asbestos, General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Elec. Primes • Pgh. Fulton Pre K-5 New Elevator, General, Plumbing, HVAC and Elec. Primes • Various Pgh. School Locations Paving Projects, General Prime • Pgh. Online Academy ADA Restroom, General, Plumbing and Elec. Primes • Pgh. Allegheny K-5 Coal Hole Repair and Boiler Room Modifications, General Prime • Pgh. Allderdice H. S. Stairwell Renovations, Asbestos and General Primes • Pgh. Lincoln K-5 and Spring Hill K-5 Flooring Replacement, Asbestos and General Primes • Pgh. Banksville Pre K-5 and Minadeo Pre K-5 Flooring Replacement, Asbestos, General and Plumbing Primes • Pgh. Dilworth Pre K-5 Fire Alarm and PA Sound Systems, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Perry H. S. Pool and Auditorium Lighting, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Schiller 6-8 Elec. Distribution and PA Sound System, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Schiller 6-8 Classroom Ceiling Fans, Elec. Prime

• Clayton Academy PA Sound System, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Phillips K-5 Classroom Ceiling Fans, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Weil Pre K-5 Classroom Ceiling Fans, Elec. Prime • Pgh. Banksville K-5 Replace Walk-In Cooler, HVAC and Elec. Primes • Pgh. Greenfield K-8 HVAC for Computer Classroom, HVAC and General Primes • Pgh. Linden K-5 HVAC for Main Office, HVAC Prime • Pgh. Brashear H. S. Exterior Canopy, General Prime • Pgh. Brashear H. S. Toilet Room Renovations, General and Plumbing Primes • Pgh. Brashear H. S. / South Hills 6-8 HVAC System Upgrades, HVAC Prime • Pgh. Grandview K-5 Classroom Ventilation, HVAC Prime • Greenway Phase 3 Concrete and Asphalt Paving Work, General Prime • Various Pgh. School Locations Cycle Painting, Multiple Bid Packages, General Primes • Pgh. Online Academy Computer Rooms AC, HVAC and Elec. Primes • Pgh. Carmalt Pre K-8 Replace Unit Ventilator, General, HVAC and Elec. Primes

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 26 and February 2, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. N E W S

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LET’S GET TOGETHER

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

ACROSS 1. Roth’s replacement in Van Halen 6. Maid’s nightmare 9. Outcome of any of the Bills’ Super Bowl appearances 13. Writer Calvino 14. Latin 101 verb 16. Stake that might get you jacked up? 17. Festival whose first headliner was Jane’s Addiction 19. “Democracy is the road to socialism” writer 20. Put down 21. One taking a lot of drugs, perhaps? 23. Maker of Mauvelous and Unmellow Yellow colors 26. Dog-breeding grp. 27. “Edge of Tomorrow” craft 28. Slick stuff 29. Making no sense 32. Like a strong drink 34. Protective cup location 35. Hairy mountain beast 36. Lout 38. “This can’t be good” 42. Actress Grossman of “American Horror Story” 44. Big name in watches

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

45. Sealed, as a deal 50. Make a mistake 51. Altar in the sky 52. Judge who heard arguments from Shapiro 53. Kigali resident 55. Chocolatefilled cookie 57. One collecting thoughts on the record 58. Cote d’___ 59. Getting it on, or a hint to this puzzle’s theme 64. Boring way to learn 65. Quick drink 66. Some Facebook clicks 67. Change for a five 68. Temperamental one with bad face piercings, maybe 69. Approving words

DOWN 1. Queen’s home 2. The Hawks, on an ESPN chyron 3. Miss 4. “Luck Be ___” 5. Demarcate, as a V.I.P. section 6. Assorted 7. NFL analyst Aikman 8. “Only You” synthpop band 9. Doner kebab meat 10. Streaking 11. Shoot from high above 12. Rabbit, e.g.

but quick 40. Fried seedpod 41. “Get him on the ___!” 43. Serving upside 44. Covered in sequins 45. Classic sports car 46. Sprint competitor 47. Base gesture? 48. Hitchcock classic that takes place in San Francisco 49. Country singer Jake ___ 54. “Swear to God!” 56. War god 57. 2% alternative 60. Stun 61. Approvals 62. #22 in a series 63. #19 in a series

15. Guitar effect played with the mouth 18. Org. that’s against abusive debt collection 22. Healthy berry 23. Snug and comfortable like a cashmere jumper 24. Confirmation, e.g. 25. Returned to earth 26. The world’s largest one has a circumference of 4’ 4” 30. Classic pizza order 31. Show room? 33. Ticket number? 36. Some BDSM participants 37. “Just saying here,” briefly 39. Got out of here

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

G E T T E X H E S P E L E L L A D O B I R L E T A L T E X A M E T H A S H Y T I P S E C H O E K E D M E N S

O W A X R L I P S P E Z T A A W S R A I D N N A G E I N W A B R I L E

A C A I

G E I S H T A E P S E K E Y M H I E L F E T S

E D D I S E E D B A I N G O T S S T A H L

C U R L

O N E A L A L R G E O D T O N L E E I O L I L

M I N N I E

A T O D D S

R O A D S O D A

S R T A U S C


MASSAGE

Downtown $40/hour Open 24 hours

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Xin Sui Bodyworks

Under

New

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530

412-335-6111

1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

412-595-8077

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

TA S T E

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

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420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Asian 888 Massage

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

N E W S

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

724-519-2950

MASSAGE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

TIGER SPA

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

Aming’s Massage Therapy

STAR

FULL BODY MASSAGE

4126 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

Management

MASSAGE

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JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

WE SPECIALIZE IN

IN WEXFORD, PA

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pregnant? We can treat you!

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

NEW LOCATION OFF OF PERRY HIGHWAY

NOW OPEN & ACCEPTING HIGHMARK

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Recovery Without Judgement™

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency • Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

GRAND RE-OPENING! Specializing in Roor, Hisi, Pulse, Pyrology, Hitman, Medicali, Sky

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes, Glass And Vapes Best Service, Selection and Prices in Town!

NO WAIT LIST

20% off Glass with this Ad

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361

MONROEVILLE, PA

Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

JANDSGLASS

J&S Glass

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com 70

R

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Suboxone

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

Immediate Appointments Available

Acute Partial Program Individual and Group Counseling

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.11/02.18.2015

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient 306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

South Side Outpatient 2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922 For more information, call 24 hours

1-888-694-9996

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com


Photos of “love locks” on Downtown Pittsburgh’s “three sister” bridges: the Rachel Carson, the Andy Warhol and the Roberto Clemente. These tokens of expression have been a fixture on city bridges for the past several years. {BY LISA CUNNINGHAM} N E W S

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TWICE AS NICE

Buy one service, get a second new service for 50% off. *This fab offer ends on February 28th, 2015. Some restricitons may apply, see center for details.

europeanwax waxcenter.com

PITTSBURGH - FORBES AVENUE 412 586 4571

PITTSBURGH - WALNUT STREET 412 683 2124

5854 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217

5505 Walnut Street Pittsburgh, PA 15232

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

February 11, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 6

February 11, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 6