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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 11.12/11.19.2014

GHOST STORY: LOCAL FILMMAKERS TRACE THE ROOTS OF AMISTAD REBELS IN NEW DOCUMENTARY 30


EVENTS 11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

11.21 – 8pm ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN PORNO Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

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12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


11.12/11.19.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 46

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} {COVER ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

“If you have any more bad news, you have to keep it to yourself at this time.” — Curtis Porter, of the mayor’s education task force, at a public meeting concerning the state of Pittsburgh Public Schools

[VIEWS]

Tom Corbett taught us just one 12 “Ifthing, it’s that you don’t have eight years to make a difference.” — Charlie Deitch in an open letter to Pa. Gov.-Elect Tom Wolf

[TASTE]

[MUSIC]

trying to emulate the big 21 “We’re horn sections of the ’70s.” — Jake Berntsen on his band Beauty Slap

ROCK • COUNTRY • POP • DANCE

{ADMINISTRATION}

[SCREEN]

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“Folks are gonna either love or hate the end — what if Cosmos aired on the Hallmark Channel?” — Al Hoff reviews Interstellar

ducks are also alluring, 34 “The awkward, fragile, and sad yet durable.” — Nadine Wasserman on Sebastian Errazuriz’s sculptures incorporating taxidermied birds

[LAST PAGE]

was probably the greatest sexual 55 “Itexperience I had in Pittsburgh and

it was with a fish.” — Radio host Lynn Cullen, on her liaison with a dolphin at the Pittsburgh Zoo and her new one-woman show

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 50 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 51 STUFF WE LIKE 53 TA S T E

STEEL CITY MEDIA

NOVEMBER 21

LEE ALVERSON

RUFF CREEK NOVEMBER 26 NO BAD JU JU NOVEMBER 22

SPECIAL THANKSGIVING EVE PERFORMANCE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE HOBBS SISTERS & KEVIN DALE

{PUBLISHER}

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

Pittsburgh’s Jeffrey Inman on NuVal which assigns a score to food items

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THE REGION’S

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

nutritional systems have 16 “Simplified a positive effect.” — University of

30

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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“IF EVERYTHING WAS GREAT WE WOULDN’T NEED A TASK FORCE.”

INCOMING RE: The latest iteration of Conflict Kitchen features take-out fare from Palestine (Nov. 5) “It is a shame that some good food will be tainted by the undercurrent of antiSemitism displayed by the planners.” — Web comment from “Jeff Pollock” “There is nothing anti-Semitic about Conflict Kitchen or the programs it presents. As it has done with every other nation whose food Conflict Kitchen presents, it also allows the residents of those nations to express their thoughts through printed material and via panel [discussions] held. If those opinions are sometimes critical of Israeli policies and U.S. policies toward Palestine, that does not make it anti-Semitic any more than I could have been termed anti-American for protesting the […] wars we wage. The cry of anti-Semitism is both commonly and over used by those who will not tolerate any criticism of Israeli policies by anyone (which Conflict Kitchen does not express itself), nor any recognition that Palestinians, like all human beings in all nations, deserve full human rights. In fact, the charge of anti-Semitism in this case cheapens the word and will eventually cause people to ignore such charges when, in fact, there are many other instances in which the charge can be and should be used, but Conflict Kitchen’s existence is not one of them.” — Web comment from “Mel Packer”

TRICK QUESTION

RE: An exhibit showcases classic album covers by a forgotten local artist (Oct. 29) “Great story. I hope this exhibit reminds people of Pittsburgh’s often overlooked talent like Mozelle Thompson. People also need to appreciate what J Malls has been doing to preserve Pittsburgh’s music legacy.” — Web comment from “TMC3500”

“Justin Bieber is going to need more than Steelers bible study to help himself.” — Nov. 10 tweet from Madalyn Zapletal (@MadalynZapletal)

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EAN SCHULTE didn’t know what to expect when she went to the first public meeting of Mayor Bill Peduto’s education task force on Oct. 21. The 20-member body comprised of city councilors, school directors, students, teachers and education advocates had been meeting behind closed doors since spring. The task force’s fourth meeting, which would be its final before meeting with the mayor later this month, invited the public to share its thoughts on public education. As president of the parent/ teacher organization at Minadeo, a preK to fifth-grade school in Squirrel Hill, Schulte was there to talk about increasing class sizes. As the evening wore on, however, she wasn’t sure the task force wanted to hear her concerns. “They were there to talk generally about education, and I had very specific concerns,” Schulte said a few weeks after

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

the meeting. “I’m very concerned about the state of our school.” While Schulte was eventually allowed to speak, others weren’t so lucky. The meeting’s facilitator, Curtis Porter, who works as Peduto’s chief education and

Can the mayor’s education task force make a difference in city schools by ignoring its problems? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} neighborhood-reinvestment officer, told attendees that the purpose of the meeting was to highlight positive news and talk about ways to market Pittsburgh Public Schools to suburban parents and those who have transferred their chil-

dren to charter and private schools. “If you have any more bad news, you have to keep it to yourself at this time,” Porter said after only a handful of the more than 30 residents had had a chance to speak. The audience wasn’t happy. A few got up and left. Others began talking amongst themselves. “I hope this group is more ambitious than promoting positive images of schools,” said district parent Arthur Kosowski. “If they’re interested in marketing, listening to parents’ concerns is important to make sure parents feel good about their decision to send their children to schools in the district,” Schulte says. “I think the task force needs to rethink their agenda.” Members of the audience weren’t the only ones who disagreed with the direction of the public meeting. Task-force


members also argued about whether they should listen to the public’s concerns, and questioned the purpose of the task force itself. “I think we really need to hear and address what some of their concerns are,” said city councilor and task-force member Theresa Kail-Smith. “Our charge is not to fix the underlying fundamental issues,” said task-force member Patrick Dowd, a former city councilor and school-board member who now leads the nonprofit Allies for Children. “There are a lot of things over which the city has no control.” Even as the public and task-force members grapple over what the commission’s purpose is, and before it even makes its first set of recommendations, Kail-Smith has proposed making the body permanent. But without a defined focus and a willingness to deal with all of the district’s issues, parents and residents worry the group will fail to make a difference.

agrees marketing is a worthy endeavor, she says it’s equally important to tackle some of the district’s issues. “Everyone’s eager to get the good message out, but if we’re failing to address the real issues and hesitant to hear the real concerns, then we’re not going to be successful,” Kail-Smith says. “Some things we’re never going to address, but some things we can improve. Acknowledgement is half the battle.” Public safety is one of the issues the task force plans to work on. One of its recommendations to the mayor will be to put up safety zones along pathways to and from schools. Kail-Smith would also like to see expanded afterschool programs. “I think we all realize we’re in this together; we need to figure this out together,” KailSmith says. “Everybody needs to put their egos aside to figure out what’s best for our students and the city.” Education advocate Annette Werner agrees that public safety is a good place for the task force to start. But she says the focus on marketing is misguided. “It seems like everyone just wants to be really nice and really positive, but if everything was great we wouldn’t need a task force,” Werner says. “This whole idea of marketing — the district pays marketing people. I don’t think the city needs to market the district.” Werner also attended the task force’s first public meeting and says she was disappointed the audience wasn’t given more time to speak. “I expected to hear a lot more from the public,” Werner says. “For the first 45 minutes, it was members of the committee talking amongst themselves. I was surprised that the meeting focused so little on public input.” “I can definitely see how that would’ve been frustrating for someone in the audience,” says Carey Harris, a member of the task force and executive director of education watchdog group A+ Schools. “I don’t think there were any bad intentions here, but I don’t think it was entirely clear to anybody what the purpose of the meeting was.” And the same confusion surrounding the meeting has enveloped the task force itself, Harris says. “The initial legislation that created this task force may have unnecessarily

“I DON’T THINK IT WAS ENTIRELY CLEAR TO ANYBODY WHAT THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING WAS.”

KAIL-SMITH first proposed forming a mayor’s education task force last October, after the district released a proposal calling for additional school closings. The closings were identified as a possible solution to avoiding a looming budget deficit in 2016. “The Pittsburgh Public Schools had been talking about closing additional schools, and in our [council] district we already have several closed school buildings,” Kail-Smith says. “I wanted to think about ways we could avoid school closures.” But after several newly elected schoolboard members took office in December 2013, the decision to close schools was reversed. From then on, the task force has had to develop a new mission. “I think we got the attention of the school district,” Kail-Smith says. “We continued to meet. One, because the legislation [creating the task force] already passed; and two, because there were other things we thought we could be addressing and ways we could work together. After we started meeting and talking, we realized there were definite areas where we had a shared interest.” One of those interests is to promote a positive image of the district in an effort to attract families to the city and increase enrollment. But while Kail-Smith

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CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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problems throughout the district, Werner worries the task force will remain unfocused and its members lose interest. “It’s very hard to have a successful city without a good education system,” Werner says. “I expected some acknowledgement of the problems. The first thing that needs to happen is an honest admission of the problems that are out there. The committee could talk about what the problems are and never run out of things to talk about.” Mayor Peduto, through spokesperson Tim McNulty, declined to comment on the task force until after he has met with task-force members. Porter, from the mayor’s office, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. The task force is still expected to submit its recommendations to the mayor by the end of the month. Kail-Smith said a vote on making the task force permanent could happen as early as Mon., Nov. 10, but the vote had not occurred as of press time. Schulte, the parent from Minadeo, says that when she hears one of the task force’s members say “they’re not sure why we even have [a task force], I question what they’re doing. But I do think the mayor’s office could have an impact on the state of education even if they can’t control schools. To people looking in, it shows we have a city that really cares about education.”

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constrained what was possible,” Harris says. “It was supposed to be about school closings and district finances, which are really issues for the school board to wrestle with, and they were not issues this group was well positioned to do anything about.” Harris says she hopes the task force will begin to home in on areas where the city and district can collaborate. In particular, the mayor’s office has always played an important role in early childhood education and the Pittsburgh Promise, a scholarship program for postsecondary education. “I think there is a genuine interest in the city and the district being more aligned and being more helpful to each other,” Harris says. “I think it’s terrific that the mayor’s office wants to do more for public schools. This is definitely a good, well-intended effort.” Werner has also identified ways the city can help the district. In 2006, the state shifted a portion of the wage tax from the district to the city. She says she’d like to see that money returned to the district and used to pay for salaries for school-board members. “There are ways the city can use its weight … and exert its influence behind the scenes,” Werner says. “I’d like to see the task force go out and visit the schools themselves. I’d like to see them go unannounced and see what’s going on.” But without first addressing the

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Sushi This endearing senior has so much going for him! Sushi exudes a spirit of gentleness and calmness. He will happily sit or give paw in hope of an affectionate pat on the head. This wonderful fellow would be most comfortable in a home with children over six. He probably would welcome a canine sibling.

TRICK QUESTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

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RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT?

City officials mum on policy change calling for third-party review of excessive-force complaints {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} WHEN THE CITY exonerated a Pittsburgh

police officer after he struck and arrested a PrideFest attendee this past June, the city’s top lawyer announced a significant shift in the way future excessive-force accusations will be investigated. “While [the Office of Municipal Investigations] exonerated the officer in the case, it also obtained an independent third-party use-of-force review by an outside agency that arrived at the same conclusion,” city solicitor Lourdes Sanchez-Ridge wrote in a Sept. 5 statement. “It will be city policy from this point forward to seek third-party analysis in all excessive-force investigations, just as we did in this case.” But in the months since that change in policy was announced, the city has refused to explain even the most basic elements of its decision to hire outsiders to review excessive-force cases. It’s a move that puzzles police experts and watchdogs, who say it’s an uncommon policy. “Experts can add value, but it’s interesting that the city would make what seems like a pretty significant policy shift and not discuss the reasons for it or how it’s going to work in every case,” says Brian Buchner, president of the National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement. “It certainly raises questions about their trust in the existing oversight structure of the police department.” It is not clear who will conduct these outside reviews in the future, how those reviewers will be selected, where the funding will come from, or how their conclusions will be weighed against those of OMI, the city’s internal investigative agency. The city would not grant interviews with those presumably involved with or affected by the change, including city solicitor Sanchez-Ridge, OMI head Deborah Walker

and acting police chief Cameron McLay. But police expert and University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris says there are two likely reasons for the new policy. There could be “lack of confidence in their own processes,” Harris says. Or “they think the public does not have confidence in their processes” and want to use outside experts to validate the conclusions the city reaches. “It can be a good thing, if the agency or entity being relied on is reliable and subject to certain kinds of standards accountable to the public,” Harris says. But “it’s hard to know just what role the city plans to have them play and how extensive that might be in any given case.” Tim McNulty, spokesperson for Mayor Bill Peduto, says the decision to hire outside agencies to review excessive-force cases doesn’t mean the city distrusts OMI, which is responsible for investigating misconduct by city employees, including police officers. “This is just the next step in making OMI a completely independent and trustworthy source for investigations,” McNulty says. Asked what would happen if an outside agency reached a different conclusion than OMI about whether a police officer used excessive force, McNulty said the case “would be reviewed by supervisors.” He did not elaborate. When the city cleared Souroth Chatterji, the officer involved in the PrideFest incident, city officials refused to name the outside agency because they were treating it “like a witness,” McNulty said at the time. On Oct. 22, the city denied a request under the state right-to-know law to provide a copy of its contract with the “outside agency” that reviewed the PrideFest incident, writing that “the City is not required

to create records which do not currently exist or maintain information in a form in which it does not currently exist.” But on Nov. 3, Pittsburgh City Council unanimously approved an agreement with Monaca-based CSI Corporate Security and Investigations, not to exceed $2,000, for “expert advice regarding appropriate police conduct.” As this issue went to press Nov. 10, the city provided a copy of an invoice from CSI as part of the original right-to-know request, which shows the firm billed $1,653 for services including video and document review and “analysis and preparation of reports” as part of a “Pittsburgh police review” of evidence from the “Pride Day Parade.” The law department, without further explanation, did not release CSI’s reports. CSI did not respond to a request to comment for this story, but according to its website, the company does everything from investigative research and surveillance to executive protection. Though its website does not appear to explicitly mention municipalities or law-enforcement agencies as clients, it says that the company’s founder and CEO, Louis Gentile, worked for the state police for 17 years and has expertise in “use of force.” McNulty would not say how CSI was selected or precisely how they were involved in the PrideFest investigation. City Councilor Daniel Lavelle, chair of the Committee on Public Safety Services, and council President Bruce Kraus did not return requests for comment. Pennsylvania ACLU legal director Vic Walczak says withholding key details won’t help assuage the public. “Unless they’re willing to explain a whole lot more about this group, the rela-

“I DON’T SEE ANY REASON TO KEEP THIS CONFIDENTIAL.”

tionship, the terms of the review, and then to discuss the results themselves, they’re not going to get much PR benefit,” he says. Lamb says he couldn’t recall other instances where the city paid an outside vendor to review an excessive-force case. He criticized the Peduto administration for its handling of the issue. “To me, when we’re spending public money, unless there’s some overriding interest to keep something confidential,” the information should be public, Lamb says. “I don’t see any reason to keep this confidential. “Saying the word ‘transparency’ and acting as a transparent organization are very different things.” Also at issue is the role of the Citizen Police Review Board, an entity that is supposed to provide independent findings and recommend discipline when allegations of police misconduct surface. “If you have a good, independent, thorough internal-affairs investigative system,” Walczak says, “then you really don’t need this. And in Pittsburgh, we’ve also got CPRB, which has been both underutilized and underappreciated.” The city often doesn’t wait until the CPRB has issued its findings before deciding whether to exonerate an officer or settle on specific disciplinary measures. CPRB executive director Beth Pittinger says it was initially “offensive to me that they would be looking for an outside investigation.” She’s since changed her mind. “I think right now the administration has the challenge to demonstrate it’s the best it can be when it comes to these kinds of reviews. They want to bolster their credibility.” Still, Pittinger is critical of the decision not to say more about who will be involved in the reviews. “That part of it is not an acceptable answer — it raises the whole specter of suspicion.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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UPCOMING WORKSHOP:

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Ian Smith, a solar energy consultant with Energy Independent Solutions will teach homeowners the basics of Solar PV (electric) systems. We will discuss how Solar PV works, the progress of the technology, as well as financial incentives available. Homeowners will have an opportunity to learn if their home is “solar-worthy” using aerial imagery tools. Bring a copy of your electric bill to get an idea of how much solar you need. Ian brings five years of solar industry experience to his presentation and is proud of his solar-powered house in Wilkinsburg.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15 • 10:00 - 11:30 AM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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An open letter to Pennsylvania Gov.-Elect Tom Wolf

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REPEAL DAY PARTY

This December, Labatt will pay homage to the Speakeasies of the roaring 20’s with a Repeal Day party. This party will deliver a modern day vision of what made those times and places so great. Speakeasy 2014 is a nod to the exclusivity, the people, the fashions, and the edginess of old Prohibition establishments but with a contemporary 21st century flair.

FREE SAMPLES OF LABATT PROHIBITION BOURBON BARREL AND APPLE HARVEST. 1916 Smallman St, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5th, 9PM - 1AM

THIS PARTY IS FOR THE FLAPPERS AND GANGSTERS. COME DRESSED IN YOUR BEST PROHIBITION ATTIRE! Must be 21+ with valid photo ID and a ticket is required.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Dear Gov.-Elect Wolf, I’ll be honest. When I first saw you onstage at Carnegie Mellon University in January, I wasn’t very impressed. Sure, it was tough to get noticed up there with seven other Democrats all licking their chops at the prospect of getting a oneon-one shot at Gov. Tom Corbett on Nov. 4. But, still, you seemed especially timid. In fact, I had you pegged to be one of the race’s first casualties. I knew you would last longer than Jo Ellen Litz or Max Myers, the minister from Mechanicsburg. But if I had to lay a wager, I had you going out before progressive poster-boy John Hanger. But then you grabbed your old Jeep and used some of the millions you made with your family’s kitchen-cabinet company to get on TV across the state and tell a great story. The rest was history. You became the first challenger to oust an incumbent since the state began allowing in c u mb ent s . B r eakin g decades-long traditions is not an easy thing to do, especially in Pennsylvania. Not only did you oust the incumbent — you did it with 55 percent of the vote. That’s a mandate from the people of this commonwealth who were not happy with Tom Corbett’s leadership. You told us that you could do better, and we believed you. But now comes the hard part: putting up. Unfortunately for you, we expect the change you promised, and we expect it yesterday. If Tom Corbett taught us just one thing, it’s that you don’t have eight years to make a difference. We have a lot of problems. Among them are a $1 billion budget shortfall, a pension system that is broken to the tune of tens of billions of dollars, and a school funding mess that has kept poor districts poor, sent less money to the classroom and forced districts to heap higher and higher tax rates on property owners. And those are just the initial priorities. We also need medical-marijuana laws to help sick Pennsylvanians; reform of the state liquor-store system; more regulation on the gas-drilling industry, including a severance tax; LGBT anti-discrimination laws; a true Medicaid expansion; stricter gun-control measures; and an end to divisive partisan legislation like making English the state’s official language or laws interfering in women’s health issues.

And these are just a few off the top of my head. You’re the guy tasked with fixing these issues, and while your election has me hopeful, I’m not entering your first term without trepidation. You became the frontrunner in this race in early 2014 and never relinquished that lead. Because of that, you ran a careful race in which what you didn’t say was as important as what you did say. That left us wondering how you’ll address certain issues, like your much-discussed tax plan. You said that until you got into office and looked at the numbers, you wouldn’t be sure who would see tax cuts and who would see increases. You sketched it out generally, but were very scant on details. I think a lot of that came from campaign strategy — why divulge more than you have to? We put a lot of faith in you on this issue and others, and now it’s incumbent upon you not to break that trust. Your biggest challenge will be working with a GOP-controlled legislature that has a history of being cantankerous at best and obstructionist at worst. Legislation important to Pennsylvanians languishes in committees because that party’s leadership doesn’t deem it worthy of debate. Working with the legislature will take compromise. And that gives me pause. While compromise is important, you must remember that what you’re giving up can be just as important as what you’re getting. Wins in areas of pension reform and education funding are vital to the state’s future, but so is the need for LGBT anti-discrimination laws, environmental protection, medical-marijuana legalization and a halt to the attacks on women’s health. Oftentimes political victories are won by giving up something that’s seen as less important or critical. I ask that when you’re making these deals that you do so carefully and thoughtfully. Finally, you are not a politician. You’ve embraced that fact, and it’s part of the reason that we embraced you. You are softspoken and mild-mannered, but when you get to Harrisburg we need you to speak loudly and fight for the things that you promised. The past four years were spent with a governor who didn’t listen to what we were saying And you know better than anyone what happened to him.

WE PUT A LOT OF FAITH IN YOU, AND NOW IT’S INCUMBENT UPON YOU NOT TO BREAK THAT TRUST.

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Announcing New Walk-In Hours At Health Center Associates–UPMC Monday through Friday, 7 to 9:30 a.m. and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to Noon Walk-in hours are available only at our Oakland location. During Walk-in Hours: No appointment is needed • Non-UPMC and UPMC patients are accepted • Patients are seen on a first-come, first-served basis • Conditions treated include colds and the flu, infections, sinus and ear pain, minor injuries, and more. • Recurrent or chronic problems, routine follow-ups, annual exams, and physicals will NOT be addressed during walk-in hours. For information, please call 412-623-8905. Health Center Associates–UPMC University Center, (in Oakland) Suite M059 120 Lytton Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

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Welcome to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 5 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week. Spend the holidays with your favorite craft beer.

Sweet Baby Jesus Chocolate Peanut Butter Porter is a complex, robust porter. It is jet black in color with a tan, rocky head, full body and creamy, luxurious mouthfeel. Its lightly sweet, malty flavor is accented by strong notes of chocolate, coffee and peanut butter.

A robust Porter made with chocolate malt. This malt Beverage is brewed with coffee beans with Natural Flavor added (Vanilla Extract), and we balance it with U.S. Golding Hops. Our award winning brew is sure to please! Open it!

An ale whose mysterious and unusual palate will swirl across your tongue & ask more than it answers. Brewed clandestinely & given a name whose meaning is never revealed. Why #9? Why indeed. A sort of dry, crisp, refreshing, not quite pale ale, #9 is really impossible to describe because there’s never been anything else quite like it. Malts: Pale, Crystal Hops: Apollo, Cascade

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


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NEARLY EVERY DISH AT CAFÉ DIYOR WAS HEAVILY SPRINKLED WITH DILL

HIGH SCORE {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Many people are trying to buy healthier foods. But, says Jeffrey Inman, a marketing professor and researcher at the University of Pittsburgh, anecdotal evidence suggests shoppers can be confused by nutritional labels. “Then I began hearing about these new programs where they would take all of the nutritional facts and information and roll them up into a single number, and there was just something ething intrinsically interesting about bout that.”

So Inman partnered with a Northeast grocery retailer to study the habits of 535,000 shoppers. For the next six months, the stores rolled out a singlenumber grading system called NuVal, which takes the nutritional information from 90,000 products and assigns a score between one and 100 (100 being the healthiest). The scores were then displayed on shelves under products in eight different categories — frozen pizza, tomato products, soup, salad dressing, yogurt, spaghetti sauce, granola bars and ice cream. Inman found that when given the single-number nutritional value, shoppers would make healthier choices and, according to the data, the healthiness of their purchases increased by 21 percent on average. But rolling these rating systems out on a large scale could prove challenging. Inman explains food retailers and manufacturers aren’t likely to pay for something that could affect their profitability. “If I’m in the business of making healthy products, I’m really into this system; but if I’m not, then I probably don’t want to see it.” “What this shows is that these simplified nutritional systems have a positive effect on the healthiness of a shopper’s basket, and that’s a good thing,” Inman adds. “There has been talk that NuVal might turn this into an app. But my fear is that the person who would buy this app is already health-conscious, and it likely wouldn’t reach the people who need it most.”

UZBEK PROMISE

U

ZBEK FOOD IS a recent addition to the local scene that has not yet achieved the cultural cachet of, say, Japanese cuisine in the 1980s or Thai in the ’90s. Combining elements of several cuisines, including Russian, Middle Eastern and East Asian, Uzbek cooking is simultaneously exotic and familiar, a fusion born of geography rather than self-conscious recombination. So we were pretty psyched to learn that a new Uzbek restaurant, Café Diyor, had opened Downtown on Smithfield Street, right by the bridge. Café Diyor has not so much transformed the interior of the former bar in which it’s located as attempted to cover every inch of it. Lavish velvet tapestries adorn the walls, patterned scrims are draped from the tin ceiling and even the booth seats have been covered with colorful fabric. The effect could be evocative of the Silk Road, perhaps, if the lighting were a little dimmer. The menu doesn’t reveal much about the dishes besides their ingredients, but phonemic affinities allowed us to guess at

CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

Manti lamb dumplings, lagman soup and samsa meat pastry

relationships between some of them and their derivations. For instance, a dish of salted and spiced cabbage, carrots and pickles, called chim-chi, seemed sure to have some resemblance to Korean kimchee; shashlik was another form of shish kebab; non, like Indian naan, was a kind of bread; and manti, steamed dumplings, adapted the Chinese dumpling tradition to the farm products of Uzbekistan, primarily mutton and lamb.

CAFÉ DIYOR 14 Smithfield St., Downtown. 412-471-1411 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. noon-11 p.m. PRICES: $6-18 LIQUOR: BYOB

Though barely mentioned on the menu, a unifying principle in Uzbek food preparation is dill. Almost without exception, every dish at Café Diyor was heavily sprinkled with this potent herb, to the point of obscuring differences. Chuchvara dumplings were much smaller than

the manti, more like Russian pelmeni. But it took careful tasting to distinguish them by anything but size and sauce. The key differences were that the manti, stuffed with distinct pieces of diced lamb, were dotted with tomato sauce, while the chuchvara, filled with plump little lumps of ground meat, were served with firm, sour cream-like yogurt. We’re a dumpling-loving people, but neither version captured our ardor. Tashkent salad was another story. Angelique in particular felt she could have eaten this, and this alone, for her entire meal and been satisfied. To be clear, it was not a vegetarian dish; little bits of diced beef tongue added substance and savor to a lively mix of peppery radishes and crispy fried onions, their pungency just tamed by cooking but not totally subdued into sweetness. The entire salad was coated in a white, creamy dressing whose subtle tang kept it perfectly in balance with the blend of other flavors. Lagman soup reeled us in with the promise of hand-spun noodles, and these


were good, with a slightly rustic variation in thickness and texture. It was devilishly difficult to manage them with a soup spoon, however, and the soup’s thin broth didn’t really deliver the promised “Asian spices.” Some bits of cubed lamb were tender, but others were tough. Chalagach, described as lamb ribs but actually four little chops, was well cooked and tastily rubbed with seasonings. It was the “seasoned potato,” actually super-salty French fries, that kept this plate from being an unqualified success. The same fries — promisingly dark, yet inexplicably limp — came with tabaka, a fried chicken leg described, in a rare nod to context, as being cooked according to a recipe from the small city of Yangiyul. We appreciated the namecheck, but we hope that the good people of Yangiyul are not doomed to chicken that is this salty, dried-out and tough.

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

BAR U

Portland Cocktail Week inspires Pittsburgh bartenders

Beef shashlik was also on the tough side, though not inedibly so, and not overcooked. Shashliks of veal liver and lulya — ground pork and veal — sounded intriguing, but were unavailable on the night we were there. A round of non bread was the final disappointment. Instead of the oil-glossed, sesame-studded crust and steaming, tender, airy interior that has had us swooning over this bread in the past, we received a flavorless basket of something that more resembled American-style Italian bread, unevenly heated through as though it had been hastily popped in the microwave. A couple dishes at Café Diyor — tashkent salad, chalagach — were excellent, and others had features, like the hand-spun noodles, that showed promise. It’s a promise the entire menu needs to live up to if Café Diyor is to help launch Uzbekistan’s beguiling cuisine into Pittsburgh’s mainstream.

Given that Pittsburgh has been called the “Portland of the East,” it’s no surprise that seven of Pittsburgh’s experienced bar professionals would feel at home attending Portland Cocktail Week last month. In its fifth year, PCW invites bartenders to hone their craft, network and share knowledge. Some 240 students are selected and pick a major, ranging from Advanced Bartending to Bar Ownership/Business. Festival passes are an alternative, allowing the audit of classes across majors. The week also has a bevy of social events, parties and competitions where bartenders can use — and drink — what they are learning. Alyssa McGrath, of Dish Osteria and Bar, speaks excitedly about the 12 Hour Bar, a competition where each team built a bar from the ground up. Teams had 12 hours to build, plan, compose a menu and open for business, a herculean creative feat. Their fellow PCW participants vote for a winner. In class, McGrath majored in Beyond the Bar, which focused on aspects of business planning, brand representation and preparing bartenders to apply their experience to a range of settings. She also took a seminar from one of her inspirations, David Kaplan, co-owner and designer of the famous New York cocktail haven Death & Co. McGrath hopes to bring the enthusiasm and emphasis on education to next year’s Pittsburgh Cocktail Week. “We’re a young event here, and I’d like to help however I can,” she says. Chris Matrozza, bartender at Grit and Grace and 1947 Tavern, came to the event with a mission. “I wanted to take my craft more seriously. It seems like anyone that I’ve respected in the industry has done these trips,” he says. Matrozza talked shop with bartenders from places as far-flung as Tel Aviv, volunteered and took a variety of classes. He says the experience gave him “a confidence to have my own vision. You meet everyone who is committed to doing this for a long time. It inspires me to keep doing the same.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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“I WANTED TO TAKE MY CRAFT MORE SERIOUSLY.”

Napoleon pastry

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-2242163. A casual-chic burger-andsandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beer-friendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t diner-cheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallopsthree-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF

Pino’s Contemporary Italian {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE

COCA CAFÉ. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171. This café is somehow hip but not pretentious. Variety predominates: The omelets alone include smoked salmon, wild mushroom, roasted vegetable, sun-dried tomato pesto and four-cheese. (Coca also caters to vegans, with options like scrambled tofu in place of eggs.) JF GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentine-barbecue eatery worth stopping at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Tin Front Café MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were

a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. This fine-dining restaurant offers the bold flavors and confident preparations of classic Portuguese cuisine — from thick, meaty Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage flambéed en route to the table. Entrees include steak in a red-wine sauce, chicken cooked with Portuguese peppers, pork with clams and, of course, fish. LE PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-243-4348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy CONTINUES ON PG. 20


Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

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Twisted Thistle {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The everchanging but compact menu reflects a hybrid style, combining cutting-edge techniques with traditional ingredients to create unique flavor and texture combinations. Salt erases distinctions — between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests humble and downhome, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Best of all, each meat has its own custom rub and is dry-smoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF

SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE

TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. 412-224-2579. In this intimate restaurant, the emphasis is on local, seasonal ingredients simply yet inventively prepared. Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brown-sugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique four-course dinner www. per pa just for you. LE pghcitym .co

FULL LIST ONLINE

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE

TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny familyrun storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and fried-rice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668. The Carson Street bar and nightclub offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and a knack for well-selected ingredients to the burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, corn-and-black-bean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE

TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers aboveaverage fare, reasonably priced. Alongside the contemporary American flavors are numerous Asian-inspired dishes, such as soup made from kabocha pumpkin. From po’boy oyster appetizers to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, each dish is carefully conceived and prepared. KE


LOCAL

“WE FEEL THAT WE CAN LET LOOSE, BE A LITTLE FREER AND HAVE MORE FUN ONSTAGE.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

BRINGING HEAT

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VELVET HEAT CD RELEASE. 8 p.m. Tue., Nov. 18. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com N E W S

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Velvet Heat (Jessica Zamiska and Arianna Powell) {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY KENNEDY}

Even in Pittsburgh’s rich jazz scene, Velvet Heat is a bit of anomaly. As twentysomething women, vocalist Jessica Zamiska and guitarist Arianna Powell represent a demographic you don’t always find in the older, male-dominated world of jazz clubs. As Powell puts it, “We’re bringing a very feminine element to the music scene.” Powell, who studied at Duquesne University under jazz guitarists like Joe Negri and Ken Karsh, became friends with Zamiska, a former musical-theater student, when the two were members of the Spin Bartini house band. Along with saxophonist Abby Gross, they began to play around town as a trio, making their debut at James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy. Gross eventually left to pursue other projects, and while Velvet Heat’s live shows feature a range of local musicians — often highlighting other female jazz musicians, including keyboardist Reni Monteverde, bassist Ava Lintz and drummer Janelle Burdell — it remains a duo, first and foremost. Musically, Powell says, “Jess and I are always on the same page. It’s nice to not worry about several other creative minds.” Over the last year, Velvet Heat has widened its audience, crossing over from small clubs to larger venues like the Rex Theater. “As the vocalist, [the difference] was immediately noticeable, because I was used to interacting with older people,” Zamiska says. “When we’re at a jazz club, we get a lot of requests for jazz standards that people aren’t used to hearing a young person sing. It makes them really happy.” On the other hand, Powell points out, the band’s cover of “All About That Bass” is a crowd-pleaser no matter who the audience is. On Tuesday, they’ll release their first EP, Circles, which was produced by renowned drummer James Johnson III. When he offered his help, Zamiska recalls, “We thought it was a joke. Like, ‘Really?’ Then he brought it up again and we realized he was serious.” With Circles, Velvet Heat aims to showcase its traditional jazz-club roots (all the instruments were recorded live), while nodding to more accessible, Top 40 influences. “I feel like we tried to stay true to ourselves,” Zamiska says. “We’re influenced by pop and R&B. We wanted it to sound like us, but also be something our peers would enjoy.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL WADE}

{BY SAMANTHA WARD}

A computer with horns: Beauty Slap

“W

ATCHING INTERVIEWS with

James Brown is probably one of the biggest inspirations of my life,” Jake Berntsen of Beauty Slap muses. “We’re going for funkier vibes. We’re trying to emulate the big horn sections of the ’70s.” It’s not surprising, given all the brass instruments in his group. But at the same time, it’s a strange reference for Berntsen to make — as a 20-year-old DJ who does his playing in front of a laptop. But this is what makes the group unique: Beauty Slap exudes a big-band brass sound that’s mixed and manipulated by the young Ableton guru into electronic dance music. The band has become known in Pittsburgh for introducing funk back to its college-age following by combining it with the dancestyle music that populates the charts. The group formed at Carnegie Mellon, where C Street Brass, a classically trained five-man group, was finishing up a residency. C Street features two trumpets, a trombone, bass trombone and French horn. The quintet got in touch with undergraduate student and DJ Jake Berntsen, a.k.a. Jakeisrain, via

connections in the university’s recording studio. Together, they released an EP, Wop de Wop, under the name Jakeisrain and C Street Brass, before rebranding as Beauty Slap. The other members, guitarist Paul Crocker and saxophonist Matt Powell-Palm, joined the group shortly after. There’s no drummer — the beats all come from Berntsen.

BEAUTY SLAP

WITH LIZA COLBY SOUND, MEMPHIS HILL 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10-12. 18 and over. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

The band, still in its youth, fluctuates as the players continue to grow musically. “We’re in that beautiful sort of nascency of the group that will continue to happen for a while, I think,” explains Powell-Palm. “It feels like we get something out of every rehearsal and get something out of every show that we straight up didn’t have when we walked on the stage.” Since the release of its EP, the group has added more rhythmic and harmonic

complexity and has become more dynamic onstage, incorporating bits of choreography, the brass section moving its horns in unison and Berntsen acting as a pseudoconductor of the group. “There’s just more going on,” Powell-Palm continues. “We’ve gotten way more comfortable with using the instruments that we have available, you know? Because when we first started doing it, we were just as surprised as everybody else to be hearing the guitar next to the brass section.” It’s easy to forget that the group is only six months old, and that despite its local popularity, Beauty Slap has not yet released a full-length album. The band has been recording in the sound studios at CMU with Berntsen mixing and mastering all of the tracks. It hasn’t set a release date, but Berntsen and Powell-Palm say the album will be released by early 2015. This album is crucial for the travelhungry band. Beauty Slap has performed at Brillobox, Altar Bar, Schenley Plaza, the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Cattivo, CMU’s campus — and many of these places two or three times. Now it’s focusing all of its CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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attention on the upcoming festival circuit and will play at South by Southwest this spring. Powell-Palm is confident about broadening the playing field: “Everything else we’ve already got. … We just need the tracks and we’ll see a nice exponential curve in our activity.” Despite the band’s youth, the members of Beauty Slap are by no means beginners in their trade. Berntsen was performing regularly under the guise of Jakeisrain before getting involved with Beauty Slap, and has had the opportunity to study under Grammy-winning composer Robert Aldrige as well as travel to Hans Zimmer’s Remote Control Productions in Los Angeles to study mixing and mastering with Alan Meyerson and Seth Waldmann. C Street is a well-respected quintet in local chambermusic circles and has played in a variety of chamber concert series, including in Corpus Christi, Texas; Baltimore; and the group’s own series at Carnegie Mellon. The members come from all over, and have held many positions as members of orchestras or brass collectives, or as teachers. For many classically trained musicians, the transition to dance music may have stood as a challenge, but C Street was already exhibiting some funkiness in its classical performances, the members memorizing the pieces and moving around on stage. “It’s really way out there and radical for a classical audience, but for this stuff it’s kind of on the conservative side,” trombone player Gabriel Colby explains. “We feel that we can let loose, be a little freer and have more fun onstage.” C Street is still performing regularly as a brass quintet, but the members feel as though Beauty Slap and their classical work have a symbiotic relationship that improves the group’s playing and overall performance. “It works well,” says promoter and DJ “Pandemic” Pete Spynda, an integral figure in the local brass-band revival. “What they add is a different dynamic on the Pittsburgh scene.” Beauty Slap is approaching a moment where the musicians have to decide if the project is their priority. When asked about potential conflicts, Powell-Palm and Berntsen at first seem unable to give an answer. “A really interesting moment for me was last year when C Street’s residency officially ended,” Berntsen says, “and we hadn’t even come up with the name Beauty Slap yet, and they stayed in Pittsburgh.” The group formed quickly because the musicians found something that they could all connect with in the music. The passion that they exude onstage is palpable. With more confidence, Berntsen says, “Everybody seems hesitant to walk away at the moment.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


{PHOTO COURTESY OF DERICK DAILY}

Other people’s records: DJ Shadow (left) and Cut Chemist

AFRIKA’S WAX {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT} WHEN DJ SHADOW and Cut Chemist arrive

in Pittsburgh on Nov. 14 for their show at Mr. Small’s, they will bring with them more than 30 years of turntable experience. Their set, however will reach back even further, and illuminate the very roots of hip hop. With 500 of Afrika Bambaataa’s records in tow, Shadow and Cut will pay homage to one of hip hop’s most influential icons. Both Cut Chemist (Lucas MacFadden) and DJ Shadow (Joshua Davis) have spent the past three decades establishing themselves as, arguably, hip hop’s most stalwart turntabalists. Cut Chemist’s early projects with Ozomatli and Jurassic 5 solidified him as one of the most creative in the business, and DJ Shadow’s debut studio album, Endtroducing, was included in Time magazine’s “All Time” 100 best albums. The two have worked together on numerous projects in the past, including 1999’s Brain Freeze, which originally attracted archivist Johan Kugelberg. It was Kugelberg who brokered a deal between Bambaataa and Cornell University, resulting in a majority of Bambaataa’s collection to be archived there; he then approached Shadow and Cut with an idea to create a set based on Bambaataa’s records. “We said yes,” MacFadden recalls with a chuckle, “as long as we got to tour with it. Because we really wanted to do it right. [After all,] there would be no Ozomatli or Jurassic 5 without Bambaataa. ” With Bambaataa’s blessing, Cut and Shadow spent

two-and-a-half weeks digging through a sampling of his 42,000 vinyl records, finally narrowing their search to 500, which they’ve taken on the road as the Renegades of Rhythm tour. The story of Afrika Bambaataa is multifaceted. Born as Kevin Donovan in 1957, he grew up in the Bronx with a mother who was entrenched in the civil-rights movement. In the ’70s, Bambaataa was a wellrespected and upwardly mobile member of one of New York’s most ruthless street gangs, the Black Spades. After a trip to Africa, however, his worldview changed, and he began to see music as a way to elevate exploited blacks. Upon his return to New York, Donovan changed his name to Afrika Bambaataa (Zulu for “affectionate leader”) and founded the Universal Zulu Nation, whose purpose was to unite rival street gangs and to promote peace and social welfare.

“THERE WOULD BE NO OZOMATLI OR JURASSIC 5 WITHOUT BAMBAATAA.”

DJ SHADOW AND CUT CHEMIST: RENEGADES OF RHYTHM TOUR WITH DJ SELECTA

8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 14. Mr. Small’s Theater, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The social element of Bambaataa’s legacy was not lost on Cut and Shadow, and they were both adamant about including that part of his story into their set — and, according to Davis, those witnessing the live set understand that it’s not just the aural element that the two DJs are projecting. “I think what the crowds are realizing is that there was a lot of thought put into CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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Wed Nov 12

Wed Nov 26

Thu Dec 18

Dec 26 & 27

Sun Dec 28

Wed Dec 31

Soulful gritty funk

21+

Holiday get together with friends & family

21+

Brooklyn power funk army

21+

Pittsburgh’s favorite rock band!

21+

Progressive rock and dance music

17+

Grateful Dead inspired jam

21+

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Fri Nov 14

YO MAMA’S BIG FAT BOOTY BAND Sat Nov 15

MATUTO

with MACHETE KISUMONTAO

Sun Nov 16

DAVINA & THE VAGABONDS Mon Nov 17

OPEN STAGE with SGD Tue Nov 18

SPACE EXCHANGE Fri Nov 21

TIGER MAPLE STRING BAND

this, a lot of dreaming put into it,” Davis says. “I’ve always considered Bambaataa a dreamer. He’s somebody that was in a situation being in the Bronx in the ’70s, which is unlike most places that anyone has ever been to, and he always dreamt for a way out, not necessarily for himself, but for anyone that felt undue pain and harsh situations.” “What Bambaataa taught us,” adds MacFadden, “still holds a lot of weight in how we carry our lives.” Music became the primary means by which to implement Bambaataa’s Zulu Nation’s agenda, and soon Afrika Bambaataa’s work stretched beyond the streets of the Bronx and began to invigorate the fledgling hip-hop genre. He was one of the first to use the Rowland 808 drum machine, revolutionary for its time, and was also one of the first DJs to make his reputation based on the depth of his record collection. Now, as Bambaataa serves as a visiting scholar at Cornell University, his reputation is based on the depth of his knowledge. With so much culture and history vested in both the man and his collection, anyone would feel the weight of having to choose a slim minority to tell his story. “We had to pull things that were relevant to the history of hip hop,” MacFadden explains. “If we wanted to cover the variety of genres that he was playing, and weren’t really familiar with what we saw, we just had to go on instinct and how the covers looked — if the cover was taped up and marked up, then, yeah, we’re going to pull that.” It could be argued that all the roads of hip hop lead back to Afrika Bambaataa, be it breakdancing, graffiti, rap, EDM, trance or turntablism. And, with the Renegades of Rhythm tour receiving high accolades, it would seem that those roads pass through Cut Chemist and DJ Shadow as well. After all, it was the popularity of Cut and Shadow in the early ’90s that brought about a renewed interest in Bambaataa’s early work. But although their careers drove younger listeners to hip hop’s pedigree, they’re reluctant to accept such an honor. “I don’t consider myself a factor in that movement at all,” admits Davis. “I think I was just a fan and a bystander and a proponent of what was happening.” Regardless of who might be responsible for upholding the genre, the point for Cut and Shadow is to maintain the legacy of Afrika Bambaataa, not only by playing his records but also by maintaining his philosophy. “The last record in the set,” Davis point out, “has the line ‘pass the information, extend the knowledge.’ And that is what our mission statement would be, pass the information that Bambaataa gave us and extend the knowledge to another generation.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

LOFI DELPHI VICTOR (SELF-RELEASED) LOFIDELPHI.BANDCAMP.COM

Piano pop meets the upbeat indie rock of a decade or so ago on this sweet first release from the band of local scene vets. Sensible comparisons would include bands like Rainer Maria and Mates of State; Becki Gallagher’s spot-on vocals anchor six beautiful, melodic tunes on which guitar, keys and bass all take start turns from time to time. Great first effort! (To be released at a joint CD-release show with Paddy the Wanderer; see details below.)

PADDY THE WANDERER THE MASTERY OF SPACE (SELF-RELEASED)

PADDYTHEWANDERER.BANDCAMP.COM

This four-track release splits between three dirty, swampy blues tracks and one song that’s got a spacey, uplifting feel. For the most part, Paddy’s first release will appeal to fans of White Stripes-style stuff; that third track, “Worldwide,” though, shows the band’s versatility (and a nod to Galaxie 500 and similar jangly psych-pop artists). Nice work. PADDY THE WANDERER/LOFI DELPHI DUAL RELEASE SHOW with CITY STEPS. 9 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. Howlers Coyote Café, Bloomfield.

JESSE MADER BREATH BY BREATH (A-SIDE ENTERTAINMENT) WWW.JESSEMADER.COM

Mader comes out swinging with a blazing-fast flow on this full-length’s opening track, “Pop Pop Pop.” He then alternates between hard raps and party-rockers, and sometimes combines the two, over a span of over an hour. With assists from local notables like vocalist Tarra Layne, battle-rapper Real Deal and R&B singer Ambition, Mader presents a solid, cohesive effort, telling stories of urban life in a way that’s gritty but still hopeful. Expect more big things from Mader and his live band, The Urban Rock Project. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


CRITICS’ PICKS

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! TICKETS AT WWW.JERGELS.COM 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

Natural Child [INDIE ROCK] + THU., NOV. 13

Last year, Wreck Loose burst onto the local scene with its debut EP full of piano-driven melodic pop music. After a year of playing plenty of shows both locally and elsewhere, the band returns tonight to Brillobox with a new 7-inch single, “Feed Me” (backed with “Only You”). With classic AM-radio-style songwriting (think Elton John and Jackson Browne) and the chops to back it up, the band is worth checking out live; Josh Verbanets and The Commonheart play tonight as well. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[COUNTRY] + FRI., NOV. 14

It’s called Handel’s Occasional Oratorio not because it’s only performed every now and again — though that’s true — but because the German-turned-British composer put it together for a special occasion: England was preparing for invasion by Charles Edward Stuart

+

Natural Child has been pouring out laid-back Southern rock since 2009, when bassist Wes Taylor and drummer Zack Martin of The Turbo Fruits teamed up with guitarist Seth Murray. The trio added Benny Divine and Luke Schneider in 2013 and shows off new sounds in 2014’s Dancin’ With Wolves. But don’t worry if you’re not feeling that album: The group plans another release by the end of the year. Natural Child plays The Smiling Moose tonight with Act of Pardon. Samantha Ward 10 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $8-10. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

WED DEC 17

[INDIE POP] + WED., NOV. 19

[CLASSICAL] + SAT., NOV. 15

N E W S

[SOUTHERN ROCK] + TUE., NOV. 18

THU NOV 20

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK GRANT}

After 2011’s Walk of Shame full-length, Nikki we didn’t hear Lane much from budding country starlet Nikki Lane for a bit — disappointing given the Nashville songwriter’s natural talent and swagger. Little did we know she was hard at work on this year’s All or Nothin’, the Dan Auerbachproduced LP that’s been her ticket to mainstream notoriety (including a live slot on Conan). Tonight, she makes her Pittsburgh debut at the Hard Rock Café, touring with Jamestown Revival and Hollowood. AM 9:30 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $13-15. 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

and the Scots. No such event has occasioned the Bach Choir of Pittsburgh’s performance of it tonight (and tomorrow) — at least not that we know of. It’s just a lesser-known Handel work that artistic director Thomas Douglas wanted to bring to a Pittsburgh audience. AM 8 p.m. Also 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, 116 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. $9.95-30. All ages. 412-241-4044 or www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org

UPCOMING SHOWS

724.799.8333

Caroline Smith exudes that particular ’80s flavor of girl power you may not have known you’ve been missing. The young pop star comfortably merges R&B and neo-soul with her indie-rock roots. Her third and most recent album, Half About Being a Woman, is all about self-acceptance and her growth from girl into — you guessed it — a woman. You can see her tonight at Club Café with A.G. Levine and Circles and Squares. SW 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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WE KNOW BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 13 BRILLOBOX. Wreck Loose, Josh Verbanets, Clinton Clegg & the Commonheart. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CATTIVO. Bear Hands, FENCES. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Grant-Lee Phillips, Howe Gelb. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Grid. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LEVELS. Mike Medved Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Shaggy. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PITTSBURGH WINERY. David Childers. Strip District. 412-566-1000. SMILING MOOSE. Gates The Venetia Fair, Fiveunder. South Side. 412-431-4668. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Ashwall & the Keepers. North Side.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

SAT 15 ALTAR BAR. Beauty Slap, Liza Colby Sound, Memphis Hill. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. O.G.W.S. North Side. 412-323-2924. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. The Rat Pack: Together Again Show. 877-987-6487. CATTIVO. The Turbosonics, Slim Forsythe, Steve Adams, Mother’s Little Helpers, Elkhound, more. The Beatles vs. the Rolling Stones. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express, John

Murry (Early) The Inseams, Grasping At Straws (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Waiting For Ray. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Darryl & Pete. 724-265-1181. HAMBONE’S. DRU, (AKA Andrew the impaled), Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, The Raging Vaginas. Comedy musical night hosted by Krish Mohan. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Unwise Urge (Rush tribute). Station Square. 412-481-7625. JAMES SIMON SCULPTURE STUDIO. Tattletale Saints. Uptown. 412 434 5629. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. 412-655-3553. MOONDOG’S. Chris Duarte. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

MP 3 MONDAY

FRI 14 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Bastard Bearded Irishmen, The Red Western, Coastal Remedy. North Side. 412-321-1834. ALTAR BAR. The Birthday Massacre, New Years Day. Strip District. 412-263-2877. AMERICAN ITALIAN CLUB. The Casanova Band. 724-417-4078. CATTIVO. Nevada Color, My Friday Slacks, William Forrest, Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Jubilee Riots, Enter The Haggis, Adam Ezra Group (Early) Hard Money, The Love Letters, Colonel Eagleburger’s Highstepping Goodtimes Band (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Jamestown Revival, Nikki Lane, Hollowood. Station Square. 412-481-7625. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Jeff Jimerson & Airbourne. Greensburg. ROCK ROOM. Urns, Cavern, Dead River. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. RUM RUNNERS SALOON. Walk of Shame. Ross. 412-847-3300. SMILING MOOSE. Cerebral Collapse, Brazilian Wax, Fantasy Crime, Weapons of Choice. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

HEATHER KROPF {PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLEY DRU}

GUITARS

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Heather Kropf, from the new Pittsburgh Songwriters Circle compilation, released this Fri., Nov. 14, with a show at The Roots Cellar, at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts (6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside). Preview the comp by streaming or downloading Kropf’s “This Is How the Time Goes” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


150+ Flavor Tasting Bar! MR. SMALLS THEATER. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt Augustana, River City Extension, & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. Colony House. Millvale. 412-969-0260. 866-468-3401. LINDEN GROVE. DJ Bugger. PALACE THEATRE. Ace Frehley. Oldies Dance. Castle Shannon. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PITTSBURGH WINERY. BRILLOBOX. LAZERCRUNK Cello Fury w/ Evan Gibb. feat. Distal, Cutups & Keeb$. Strip District. 412-566-1000. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Smokin’ DRUM BAR. DJ Nugget. Section. 412-487-6259. North Side. 412-231-7777. SNPJ LODGE. Daniels & LATITUDE 360. Totally 80s. McClain. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SONNY’S TAVERN. The Plums. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist STEEL CITY STEAKHOUSE. w/ Selecta. Millvale. E-Z Action. Monroeville. 866-468-3401. SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE THE NEW AMSTERDAM. BAR & GRILLE. Walk of Shame. Noetic. Lawrenceville. Beechview. 412-344-8700. 412-682-6414. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, Matuto, Machete DJ Rojo. Downtown. Kisumontao. Lawrenceville. 412-874-4582. 412-682-0177. PERRYTOWNE WIGLE WHISKEY DRAFT HOUSE. BARREL HOUSE. Pittsburgh Nightly Standard. . w w w DJ Company. North Side. paper pghcitym Top 40. McCandless. .co 412-367-9610. BRILLOBOX. Balloon REGINA ELENA Ride Fantasy, Wedding CLUB. DJ Ron Hopkinson. Dress, Sleep Experiments. Sharpsburg. 412-781-0229. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. CLUB CAFE. Robyn South Side. 412-431-2825. Hitchcock. South Side. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night 412-431-4950. w/ DJ Connor. South Side. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 412-381-1330. Perhaps, Sup, Muscles?, RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Erik Pitluga, Fantasy Crime. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. South Side. 412-720-5647. THE SHOP. King Buffalo, Lost Realms. Bloomfield. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: 412-951-0622. Chalga Party. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. RANGOS BALLROOM DIESEL. DJ CK. UNIVERSITY CENTER. Dale South Side. 412-431-8800. Earnhardt Jr. Jr. Oakland. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. STAGE AE. Black Veil Brides, North Side. 412-231-7777. Falling In Reverse, Set It Off, LINDEN GROVE. DJ Tim. Drama Club. North Side. Top 40. Castle Shannon. 412-229-5483. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. Old Lines, Soothsayer, Hindsight. AFROHEAT! A Dance Party Bloomfield. Celebration of Afrobeat Music. SMILING MOOSE. Natural Child. Lawrenceville. 412- 904-2279. South Side. 412-431-4668. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. ALTAR BAR. Manowar. 412-481-7227. Strip District. 412-263-2877. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel CLUB CAFE. Caroline Smith, City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Circles & Squares. South Side. Oakland. 412-874-4582. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Blackbird Revue, Hamartia, BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Sky Steele, Morgan Erina, Vox Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. Lumina. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. North Side. 412-323-2924. REX THEATER. Four Year Strong, Transit, Such Gold. South Side. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ SMI. 412-381-6811. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SMILING MOOSE. The Ataris, SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day Teenage Kicks. South Side. chill. House music. aDesusParty. 412-431-4668. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 16

SAT 15

MON 17

TUE 18

WED 19

TUE 18

WED 19

DJS

BLUES

THU 13 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Angry Johnny. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

SAT 15

PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST

e-Cigarette Super Store

KOLLAR CLUB. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Side. 412-431-2002. NIED’S HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Johnny Smooth. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

7206 McKnight Road

412-358-0200

near Ross Park Mall

CoolVapes.com

TUE 18 NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Sweaty Betty. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

JAZZ THU 13 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. The Boilermaker Jazz Band Thursday Jazz w/ Paul Cosentino. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

FRI 14

ANDYS. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 15 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. Kenny Blake Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. LITTLE E’S. The Jenny Wilson Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 16 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

FRI 14

MON 17

MOONDOG’S. Shot O’ Soul. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

EARLY WARNINGS

Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. David Budway, Jeff Grubbs, Thomas Wendt. Oakland. 412-621-6566.

TUE 18

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

412.326.5964

4504 BUTLER STREET

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15th 11AM-3PM Organically Social’s first Pittsburgh Juice Fest isa new, unique event that will join local juice companies, juice lovers, foodies and wellness professionals this November in the North Hills. Your vote along with guest judges will determine the best juices in town!

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

WE’LL CUT YOU.

PURE ATHLETEX SPORTSPLEX

119 NEELY SCHOOL RD. WEXFORD, PA 15090 TO PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE:

GETORGANICALLYSOCIAL. COM/JUICEFEST

We buy all day-every day LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

CLUB CAFE. Velvet Heat. South Side. 412-431-4950. SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. Richie Cole w/ Ron Wilson, Mark Perna & Vince Taglieri. Lawrenceville. 412-874-7379.

Riff Raff

WED 19 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414.

ACOUSTIC THU 13 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

{FRI., JAN. 23}

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Zig Daniels. North Side. 412-323-2924. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181.

Lotus

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {SAT., MARCH 21}

SAT 15

Blackberry Smoke

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall

WED 19 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

GRILLE. Christian Beck Band. Ross. 412-364-8166.

CLASSICAL FRI 14 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PNC POPS. Sci-Fi Spectacular hosted by George Takei. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 15 WEST MIFFLIN MIDDLE SCHOOL. The Otets Paissii Performing Ensemble. Followed by a Vecherinka dance party at 9:00 p.m. 412-461-6188.

REGGAE BUY • SELL • TRADE FRI 14 GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm

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CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 15

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. The Occasional Oratorio. East www. per pa Liberty Presbyterian pghcitym .co Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PNC POPS. Sci-Fi Spectacular hosted by George Takei. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

COUNTRY FRI 14 NIED’S HOTEL. The Maverns w/ Slim Forsythe. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com

SAT 15

NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

Riff Raff

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

FRI 14

WORLD

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

{TUE., DEC. 09}

SUN 16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ORGAN STUDENTS. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PNC POPS. Sci-Fi Spectacular hosted by George Takei. Heinz Hall,

Downtown. 412-392-4900. WARREN DAVIDSON & LUKE MAYERNIK. Violin & organ. Old St. Luke’s, Scott. 412-851-9212. THE WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg.

OTHER MUSIC THU 13 CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. River City Brass. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CAVO. Carlton Leeper, Lito Corpuz Victoria Brady, Patrick Whitehead. Strip District. 412-610-1384.

FRI 14 LEVELS. Lyndsey Smith. North Side. 412-231-7777. PARK HOUSE. Neon Swing X-perience. North Side. 412-224-2273. THE ROOTS CELLAR. PGH Songwriters CD Release. Shadyside. WOLFIE’S PIZZA HEARTH. The Shameless Hex.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

Nov 12 -18 WEDNESDAY 12 Yann Tiersen

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Werks vs Zoogma MR. SMALLS THEATRE MIllvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Walter Wadsworth. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 7:40p.m.

THURSDAY 13 Gates

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:15p.m.

Bear Hands

The Birthday Massacre

412-821-4447. With special guest Truth & Rites. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Thursday Jazz with Paul Cosentino

Comedian Dwayne Gill

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. Free show. 8p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Nov. 15.

FRIDAY 14

SATURDAY 15 153

The Intergalactic Nemesis: Target Earth A Live Action Graphic Novel

Smart Blonde

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Dec. 21.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Rat Pack Together Again

Sci-Fi Spectacular

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Nov. 16.

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m. The Pride of Pittsburgh II CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Shaggy Downtown. Tickets: MR. SMALLS THEATRE MIllvale. consolenergycenter.com. 7p.m.

R.J. Palacio: 365 Days of Wonder

Shaggy

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghlectures.org or 412-622-8866. 2p.m.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 MR. SMALLS THEATER

SUNDAY 16 164 Contemporary Choreographers

GEORGE R. WHITE DANCE COMPLEX Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com or 412-392-8000. Through Nov. 23.

MONDAY 17 175

Literary Evening with Andrew Roberts CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghlectures.org or 412-622-8866. 7:30p.m.

Black Veil Brides STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

TUESDAY 18 186 Natural Child

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:15p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Over the River, Through the Woods! WATERPROOF FOOTWEAR

DANSKO WOMENS

MERRELL MENS

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com DANSKO WOMENS

MERRELL MENS

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SPACE IS THE PLACE

“WHAT I HAD LEARNED THROUGH THE DOCUMENTARY RECORD IN THE U.S. WAS CONSTANTLY TESTED.”

{BY AL HOFF} In the near future, things are a mess on Earth, but the discovery of a wormhole might lead to a solution. So, in Interstellar, an astronaut-turned-farmer (Matthew McConaughey) leaves his family behind to lead a small NASA team to the other side of the wormhole to look for potentially habitable planets. Things, predictably, go awry in deep space — and also back on Earth (which, by the way, is not on the same timeline as the astronauts, because relativity).

Suited up: Matthew McConaughey

CP APPROVED

Christopher Nolan’s thriller is certainly ambitious: a jumble of astrophysics, family melodrama, 2001: A Space Odyssey homage and a meditation on being human. It has some strong components: good performances (McConaughey tries out a new lachrymose setting, with good sniffly results), a decent mystery (what is out there?) and some whiz-bang special effects. But it’s also overstuffed, and dialogue seems to veer between clunky scientific exposition and trite blather about the power of love (can it survive a blackhole?). Folks are gonna either love or hate the end — what if Cosmos aired on the Hallmark Channel? — depending, well, on whether you think love can survive a blackhole. But for all its flaws, Interstellar is pretty entertaining — like Nolan’s Inception, it’s some head-scratching, popcorn-munching fun — so off to space we go! In IMAX, at select theaters AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Catch atch

From Deep ep p,

local filmmaker ker Brett Kashmere’s new ew “mix-tape” film essay say about professional onal basketball, street treet basketball, race, media, hip hop, branding and more. Screens as part of the Three Ri Rivers ers Film Festival, and will be followed by a pick-up basketball game in the library’s gym, so wear your best kicks. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16. Carnegie Library, 419 Library St., Braddock. Free

Some of the Sierra Leoneans Marcus Rediker’s film crew met making Ghosts of Amistad.

GHOST HUNTING {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

H

ISTORIAN Marcus Rediker usually

does his research in archives, and presents his findings in scholarly (if accessible) hardbacks like 2008’s The Slave Ship. But after publishing 2012’s The Amistad Rebellion, Rediker felt there was more to the story than could be found on paper — and that there were other ways to communicate what he’d learned. Where Steven Spielberg’s film Amistad recounted the legendary 1839 slave-ship reco rebellion and its aftermath from the rebe perspective of the rebels’ American per defenders, Rediker told it from the capdefe tured Africans’ point of view. Likewise ture with Ghosts of Amistad: In the Footsteps the Rebels, the documentary the Univerof th sity of Pittsburgh professor has made with famed local filmmaker Tony Buba. The fam hour-long film chronicles Rediker’s search hou for traces of the rebels and their rebellion in their homeland, present-day Sierra Leone. It has its U.S. premiere Nov. 15 during the Three Rivers Film Festival. The film was shot over two weeks in

May 2013, most of it in remote dirt-road villages. The crew included: two Western experts on Sierra Leone, Conrad Tuchscherer and Philip Misevich; two cameramen, Pittsburgh-based John Rice and Freetownbased Idriss Kpange; and the group’s indispensable, Freetown-based translator and cultural go-between, Taziff Koroma.

GHOSTS OF AMISTAD 4:15 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15, at Regent Square Q&A with filmmakers follows. www.3rff.com

Rediker, the film’s producer, conducted interviews with village chiefs and other authorities. “The knowledge of slavery times was extremely uneven,” he says. But he collected some intriguing stories about the Amistad rebels both before their capture and after their return, as free men. Besides experiencing the landscape and tribal cultures firsthand, Rediker was interested to learn how well his original, paper-

based research would hold up. “What I had learned through the documentary record in the U.S. was constantly tested [in Africa],” he says. However, he was relieved that the emphasis his book placed on the significance to the rebellion of the Poro Society — a secret society for male leaders — was seconded by contemporary Sierra Leoneans. There’s also an exciting discovery about the long-untraceable location of the notorious slaving post called Lomboko. And along the way, the film portrays a seldomseen side of West Africa, one not wracked by poverty or disease (although the region was more recently hit by the Ebola virus). Buba, the film’s director, and his longtime editor, Tom Dubensky, shaped 25 hours of original footage into a package suitable for screenings in college classrooms, at festivals and, hopefully, on public television. Rediker recently accompanied the film to showings in Europe, including one at a French history festival. Upcoming dates include the Sonoma International Film Festival. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


FILM CAPSULES CP

CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

THREE RIVERS FILM FESTIVAL FILM KITCHEN. The series’ Three Rivers Film Festival edition honors filmmaker Emmett Frisbee, a longtime linchpin on the local underground scene. Two new films screen. One is “Rumor Rides Again,” a 20-minute comedy based on a true story: the (false) rumor that vocalist Jimmy Sapienza and his jump-blues band, Five Guys Named Moe, are the new house combo on the The Howard Stern Show. The music-filled film stars Sapienza, his family, his band, Frisbee himself and local notables including Phat Man Dee. Also premiering is “Metamorphosis,” a 16 mm color short that’s a portrait in motion of the late Betty Hollingsworth, a children’s entertainer and clown. Film Kitchen, curated by Matthew Day, also includes several older Frisbee shorts, including: “Chin Up” and “El Dorado,” two of his comedic collaborations with the loquacious D.J. Huber; the manipulated-video work “A Man Has Lascivious Thoughts While Walking His Dogs”; and “Maculate Conception,” whose visuals are cartoon drawings and whose soundtrack is a humorous stream-ofconsciousness essay on male privilege. The evening also includes a set by Sapienza and Five Guys Named Moe. 8 p.m. Thu., N ov. 13. Regent Square (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

STRAY DOGS. For 90 minutes, acclaimed filmmaker Tsai Ming-Liang offers a realistic portrait of a dispossessed man and his two children in a Taiwanese city; the man works a dehumanizing job as a human billboard for expensive apartments. By contrast, the film’s final 45 minutes are a half-surreal psychodrama about those three’s relationship with a woman who works in a giant supermarket. Tsai is known for his remarkably long takes, minimalist camera movement and scant dialogue. But if Stray Dogs demands a good deal of patience it also rewards it, with haunting imagery, intriguing motifs (food is everywhere in this film) and wrenchingly strange scenarios. Tsai portrays a society both populous and lonely, where the poor are invisible though in plain sight (and where it is nearly always raining). Stray Dogs suggests both a parable on contemporary Taiwan and a more personal story about living people who haunt others, and themselves, like ghosts. In Mandarin, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Fri., N ov. 14 (Harris) and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 19 (Melwood) (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

MEN OF THE CLOTH. While it’s likely few of us can ever afford a bespoke suit, we should still be sad that the world is running out of master tailors. Constructing a suit the old-fashioned way — personally fitted and converted to patterns, employing quality yardage and hand-sewn — is both an art and a skill that takes years to achieve. And so it’s no surprise that the tailors that filmmaker Vicki Vasilpoulos profiles in her documentary are all eligible for retirement, though still working. Tailoring was a trade developed in Italy, so naturally these three are all Italian or ItalianAmerican. One runs a shop in Manhattan (after

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Phat Man Dee is featured in Emmett Frisbee’s “Rumor Rides Again,” at Film Kitchen, Nov. 13. working years at Brooks Brothers), while another has a shop near Philadelphia and is mentoring a young man. Back in Italy, we meet a master tailor who helps run the internationally known suit-maker Brioni. In an age when most clothes are made by factory machines, with human assistance, the exquisite handicraft these men do is an anomaly. They began as children, and devoted a lifetime to learning a trade. Their tools Men of are old-fashioned — scissors, the Cloth chalk, hand needles, metal steam irons — and they work in cramped spaces seemingly untouched by time. But time is taking the last of these craftsmen, and there’s no certainty the trade will be picked up by younger generations. Anyone interested in clothing, art or craft will enjoy this profile of these gifted men, but be prepared to be melancholy afterward. The director is scheduled to attend. In English and Italian, with subtitles. 3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15 (Harris) and 4:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16 (Melwood). (Al Hoff)

story is propelled by each new clue she finds while trying to solve her grandmother’s suicide attempts and eventual death. In the process, Baumane takes the viewer down several wormholes, including commentary on women’s socialization and history lessons on mass starvation caused by Soviet policies. The histories of the young woman’s family and friends peel away layer by layer, as she investigates her own mental illness and its connection to her grandmother. The animation is playful, and even more so is the narrator’s voice, changing character by character. Ultimately, Rocks in My Pockets offers a hopeful account of everyday human struggles. 4 p.m. Sat., N ov. 15, and 7:30 p.m. Thu., N ov. 20. Melwood (Ashley Murray)

STRANGE LITTLE CAT. In Ramon Zurcher’s unassuming but intriguing film, a mother (Jenny Schily) preps food in the small kitchen of her Berlin apartment, where the majority of this film takes place. Her youngest daughter (Mia Kasalo) screams in sync with the howling blender. Their dog barks at the (rather ordinary, despite the film’s title) purring cat. The room feels claustrophobic with only a few people inside of it, and as the film advances, more and more family members gather in the apartment for this evening’s meal. One has to wonder whether the mother’s calm demeanor is destined to crack. The buzz of a hand-controlled toy helicopter. The clicking noise of pieces being dropped into a game of Connect 4 at the kitchen table. A bottle spinning in a pot on the stove. The dog barking at the doorbell — wait, they’re going to squeeze even more people into this kitchen? Every sound is like an additional family member, fighting to find a place to sit. Nothing particularly extraordinary happens in the film, but it’s not what has been done or said that makes it worth watching. The entertainment comes simply from trying to guess what is going through the mother’s head, especially during the few times the noises stop and the room is still, even for just a moment. In German, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15, and 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21. Regent Square (Lisa Cunningham)

NEW THIS WEEK BAD TURN WORSE. When two of this film’s characters start talking about Jim Thompson pulp novels in the first reel, it’s a good bet that events will go badly. Also: when the opening scene is a robbery. And indeed, Simon and Zeke Hawkin’s indie drama tracks three teenage friends (two boys and a girl) in rural Texas as they try to make up for one crime by committing another. CONTINUES ON PG. 32

‘‘BRILLIANT ON SO MANY LEVELS.’’ BETSY SHARKEY,

‘‘SENSATIONAL!

IN MY POCKETS. This animated CP ROCKS Latvian film from Signe Baumane follows the life of a young woman during the Soviet era. The

NOT QUITE LIKE ANYTHING YOU’VE SEEN AT THE MOVIES.” STEVEN J. SNYDER,

‘‘MICHAEL KEATON SOARS.’’ LOU LUMENICK,

Magical Universe (2014)

11/12 @ 7:30pm A great new documentary, with the filmmaker present. Art raffle as well!

-Why - - - - Don’t - - - - - - You - - - - -Play - - - - in- - -Hell? -----------------

(2014) 11/13 @ 7:30pm, 11/14 @ 10:00pm, 11/15 @ 7:00pm, 11/16 @ 7:00pm, 11/18 @ 7:30pm An amateur film production crew and a yakuza boss try to make a movie during a decade-long battle between two crime lords.

-Bad- - - -Turn - - - - -Worse -----------------------------(2014) 11/14 @ 7:30pm, 11/15 @ 9:45pm, 11/16 @ 4:00pm, 11/17 @ 7:30pm. A stylish and emotional new crime thriller.

-Rocky - - - - - -Horror - - - - - - - Picture - - - - - - - - Show -----------------11/15 @ Midnight

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CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES C L A S S I F I E D S

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

the news), Nov. 14-17 and Nov. 19-20. Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese’s 1976 drama about America’s dark underbelly), Nov. 14-19. Raging Bull (1980 bio-pic about boxer Jake LaMotta), Nov. 14-18. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com.

The crime aspect of the story treads familiar ground, but the film does function better as a smallscale character study of young people who process the wide open spaces of Texas as stifling rather than liberating. That destructive malaise and some nice cinematography help give this neo-noir some verve. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 14; 9:45 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15; 4 p.m. Sun., N ov. 16; and 7:30 p.m. Mon., N ov. 17. Hollywood (AH) BEYOND THE LIGHTS. Rising hip-hop star Noni (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is trapped in a blinged-out prison of cheap celebrity, housed there by her hyperaggressive stage mom (Minnie Driver). Then, some melodramatic circumstances put Noni in the arms (literally) of a sensitive Los Angeles policeman, Kaz (Nate Parker). And surprise: With Kaz, Noni can let her weave down, and just be herself — somebody who would rather croon Nina Simone songs than show up at another awards show in a metal thong. Look, you’ve seen this film a thousand times before, but if you like these backstage romances, you could do worse. Gina Prince-Bythewood’s film is tripping over a lot of tropes, but it’s also consciously trying to be positive about self-determination, the presentation of women in media and what extra challenges people of color face in the public sphere. (Kaz is angling to go into politics.) Needless to say, the leads are easy on the eyes, and the good musical numbers balance out the (intentionally) horrifying ones. Starts Fri., Nov. 14. (AH) DUMB AND DUMBER TO. The Farrelly brothers direct this third iteration of the D&D franchise. This time out, it’s all about finding a long-lost daughter. Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels reprise their roles. Starts Fri., Nov. 14. PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH AND SUPERMARKETS. Florian Habicht’s new profile of the U.K. band is interwoven with more dream-like segments featuring … uh … “common people” (folks

GREMLINS. The little furry guys sure are cute, but when the rules get broken, hordes of misbehaving gremlins get loose, unleashing mayhem on a small town. Joe Dante directs this 1984 comedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 12. AMC Loews. $5 MY PEOPLE FILM SERIES. This week of the film series exploring the experiences of gay men and women of color offers a program of recent short films, including: “Hector: Lost Souls With Switchblades,” about a gender-bending loner harassed at a bar by hooligans adopting a 1950s-gang look, and “Barrio Boy,” a secret-love story of sorts set in a Brooklyn barbershop, between the Latino barber and an Irish stranger. 7:30 p.m. Tue., N ov. 18. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5. www.kelly-strayhorn.org

Beyond the Lights recruited off the streets of Sheffield). Starts Wed., Nov. 19. Hollywood ROSEWATER. TV host Jon Stewart makes his directorial debut with this docudrama about journalist Maziar Bahari (Gael Garcia Bernal), who was detained and tortured in an Iranian prison. Starts Fri., Nov. 14.

CP

WHIPLASH. Andrew (Miles Teller) is a first-year student at a prestigious New York City music college — he’s a jazz drummer — when he’s chosen for the school band by the autocratic professor Fletcher (J.K. Simmons). Thus begins Andrew’s extremely physical and emotionally devastating trial

by fire, as he strives to survive Fletcher’s explosive anger and head games, while also meeting his impossible performance standards. Writer-director Damien Chazelle’s intense drama is a virtual two-hander, featuring a pair of great performances: Watching Teller flail on the drum kit will exhaust you, while Simmons is on fire as the abusive teacher. Though ostensibly about art, Whiplash is reminiscent of a sports film, complete with scenes of grueling physicality, close-ups of bloody injuries and an exploration of the succeed-at-any-cost mentality. (Fletcher espouses the oft-cited coach mantra of “I push athletes to the breaking point because only then do they perform at their best.”) It’s a battle of wits that ends up in a disturbing place, though I found the film’s final twisted scenes as exhilarating as any action thriller. Starts Fri., Nov. 14. Manor (AH) WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL? Your enjoyment of Shion Sono’s new mash-up of comedy, gangster film and martial-arts actioner may depend on your patience. There’s a pretty epic payoff, but Sono takes well over an hour to set up all the components. Key players include: a slapdash amateur film crew who go by the moniker “Fuck Bombers” and adore old Bruce Lee movies; two groups of battling yakusa, one of whom has adopted the old-school look of kimonos; a 98-pound weakling fake-dating a gangster’s wild-child daughter; a toothpaste commercial sung by a perky young girl; and the God of Film. It all comes to a head when the two gangs go to war, and both sides agree to let the Bombers film the action. For fans of filmmaking, martial-arts movies and silly humor, this is some amusing, albeit very bloody, stuff. Brush up on your tracking shot and your swordplay, people. In Japanese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 13; 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 14; 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15; 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 18. Hollywood (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Introduction to French Cinema: A Prophet (2009 crime drama about a French-Algerian youth who rises to power in prison), Nov. 12. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir’s 1939 class critique wrapped in a comedy of manners), Nov. 12-13. The 400 Blows (Francois Truffaut’s 1959 tale of a troubled youth, another French New Wave classic), Nov. 12-13. Breathless (Jean-Luc Godard’s 1960 French New Wave classic about a thief and his American girlfriend), Nov. 13. Robert De N iro Series: Jackie Brown (Quentin Tarantino’s 1997 blaxploitation homage), Nov. 14-16 and Nov. 18-20. Wag the Dog (1997 political comedy about spinning

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HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE. A young boy (Daniel Radcliffe) learns he’s a wizard and heads off to Hogwarts School. Chris Columbus’ 2001 film is the start of an epic magical journey. 7:30 p.m. Wed., N ov. 19. AMC Loews. $5

Whiplash

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ONCE UPON THE TIME IN THE WEST. Sergio Leone’s epic 1968 Western set in the famed Monument Valley begins enigmatically, as three dubious-looking hombres hang around a railroad station. Water drips, a fly buzzes, an eyelid twitches … time hangs in the air until the sense of foreboding is answered by a hail of gunfire from a mysterious, harmonica-toting stranger. Henry Fonda, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards, Charles Bronson and Utah’s Monument Valley star in this uncompromising revenge drama, marked by the director’s idiosyncratic pacing and framing; bursts of shocking violence; and Ennio Morricone’s unusual score. This film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series, which offers patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@ yahoo.com. (AH) ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org


& P I T T S B U R G H F I L M M A K E R S P R E S E N T:

YK(UU\HS

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UPCOMING Highlights:

With Author Jeremy Schahill

This is Spinal Tap

Dirty Wars

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Actress

Spirited Away

Tonight! 9:00pm

Thursday Nov 13, 4:15pm

Thursday Nov. 13, 7:00pm

Waterworks Cinemas

Melwood Screening Room

Regent Square Theater

Friday. Nov. 14, 7:00pm Regent Square Theater

Saturday Nov. 15, 1:30pm Regent Square Theater

With Director Vicki Vasilopoulos

Men of the Cloth Saturday Nov. 15, 3:00pm Harris Theater

Zero Motivation

From Deep - FREE

Red Army

Escobar: Paradise Lost

Saturday Nov. 15, 9:00pm

Sunday Nov. 16 2:00pm

Sunday Nov. 16, 4:45pm

Monday Nov. 17, 7:30pm

Melwood Screening Room

Carnegie Library, Braddock

Harris Theater

Regent Square Theater

*VTWSL[LZJOLK\SLHUKHK]HUJL[PJRL[ZH[9--JVT N E W S

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[DANCE]

NOTHING ELSE REALLY MATCHES ITS SIMPLE GENIUS

FLOWN AWAY

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Shana Simmons Dance performs PASSENGER 8 p.m., Fri., Nov. 14, and 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15. National Aviary, 700 Arch St., North Side. $15-35. passenger.brownpapertickets.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHANA SIMMONS}

Jessica Marino of Shana Simmons Dance

Once they were the most populous bird in North America, accounting for a quarter of all birds. But in less than half a century, starting in the late 1800s, unabated commercial and sport hunting and habitat destruction reduced the passenger pigeon’s numbers from billions to none. Their extinction inspires Passenger, a new program by fledgling company Shana Simmons Dance, staged Nov. 14 and 15 at the National Aviary. The 40-minute modern-dance work, choreographed by Shana Simmons with original music by Ian Green, is part of Project Passenger Pigeon, a nationwide initiative founded by Chicago native Joel Greenberg. Passenger is part of the Pittsburgh chapter of the organization’s local programming (lecture, movie, art exhibit) surrounding the centennial of the death of Martha, the last known passenger pigeon. Martha died in 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens. “It is about extinction,” says Simmons. “The piece takes you on a journey of this morphing between bird and human.” Simmons, a 2003 Point Park graduate, has a master’s degree in choreography from London’s Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. She has performed with dance companies in New York, London and Pittsburgh. Passenger will take place in the atrium of the Aviary. (Seating is limited.) Its three sections begin with its five dancers displaying birdlike behavior. As the work progresses, comparisons between avian and human behavior will illustrate our natural link to other species. Simmons hopes to have audience members contemplating how humans have affected the environment, and thus the survival of birds and other species. The production also features a live performance by opera singer Anna Singer, who will perform Rachmaninoff’s “Vocalize.” Following the main performance, the “free-fly zone” areas of the Aviary will be opened for another 30 minutes for audience members to tour the facility and observe its birds. There will also be impromptu mini-performances by the dancers, who will move about those spaces. “The underlying goal is to promote awareness in one area,” says Simmons. “That will hopefully lead to a discussion about extinction in a broader sense.”

PLA YE R

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

PIA

NO {PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

A

S A VISUAL antic, the falling piano

never gets old. What started with Charlie Chaplin and then Laurel and Hardy has proliferated in cartoons. The beauty of the gag is the instrument itself, a rarified and expensive object, which comes to ruin at the expense of some rascal, deviant or numbskull. Often, the piano meets its own end while crushing an adversary or unsuspecting victim below. In the Hall of Architecture at the Carnegie Museum of Art, a piano hangs suspended by a rope as part of the exhibition Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again. Curated by Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design, the exhibition is the first solo exhibition for Errazuriz, an internationally recognized Chilean-born, New York-based artist and designer. “The Piano” is one of the best things in the show. Viewing it, you understand the joke immediately, but once you walk beneath it you feel the enormity of that tenuous boundary between life and death.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

“The Piano” by Sebastian Errazuriz

While “The Piano” sets a tone for the rest of the exhibition, nothing else really matches its simple genius. Yes, the rest of Errazuriz’s work is beautifully crafted and clever, but in the end it comes off a little too slick, and meticulous to a fault. There is nothing else quite as impulsive or unruly as that dangling piano.

SEBASTIAN ERRAZURIZ: LOOK AGAIN continues through Jan. 12. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

The only other pieces that come close in straightforward camp are “Duck Lamp” and “Duck Fan.” Both pieces use taxidermied birds that are, in fact, geese. The choice of the word “duck” by the artist was deliberate because of the way it sounds. But it also seems that the word has associations with cartoon characters such as Donald and Daffy (who, incidentally, have

a dueling piano scene in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, a film whose main human character, Eddie Valiant, hates “toons” because one of them killed his brother by dropping a piano on him). But the duck pieces are more than just comic. They are also alluring, awkward, fragile, and sad yet durable. In the gallery guide, Errazuriz explains that his idea for the lamp was “so morbid and yet so beautiful … naïve and … real ... it’s so wrong but it’s so right.” Just like “The Piano,” the ducks are a simple expression of the brevity of life. Simplicity is also the key to “Personal Registration of Time Passing,” a group of found watches that have had their hour and minute hands removed as a reminder that life is fleeting. Errazuriz’s acute awareness of death has no doubt influenced his prolific output, but ultimately there is too much included in this show. As a result, some of the smaller and more poignant pieces get lost. For example, “La Moneda Fire Screen (prototype)” turns a functional piece into a memorial


and testament to the events that took place during the 1973 coup d’état in Chile. But its subtle message is lost amongst various snow globes, salt-and-pepper shakers and fly-swatters with more obvious political messages. And yet a whole wall is taken up with “Occupy Chairs” that feel disingenuous, as they were sold to wealthy collectors at the Armory Show Art Fair in New York at a high price with the illusion that the messages they contain are somehow a type of “Trojan Horse” that infiltrates the homes of the 1 percent.

Other works that are more interesting are just not accessible. It is impossible, for instance, to get a real sense of the “Narcissus Desk” because you can look at it only from a distance and can’t gaze down into its mirrored top. The same goes for “Time Lapse,” a stripped-down Norton motorcycle in which, because of the way it is positioned in the gallery, you can’t really see the colorful and delicate bird encased in its gas tank. At least the gallery supplies iPads that show the things you can’t see, like the playful and innovative “Explosion,” and the “Porcupine” cabinets in motion. But perhaps most intriguing of all is the wall of sketches that gives viewers access to Errazuriz’s unconventional thought processes. While they are not entirely abstract, they bring to mind the “automatic” drawing process that New York School artists like Robert Motherwell and Jackson Pollock learned from the Chilean painter Roberto Matta. Matta explained: “The New Yorkers became aware of these things through contact with us [the Surrealists in exile], although, as in a Chaplin movie, we had arrived utterly lost.” And so we are back to Chaplin, who at the end of the 1914 film “His Musical Career” makes the best of things by playing the piano as it sinks into the lake.

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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November 15 – December 21, 2014

FLOOR SHOW

Bill Miller’s “My Mother the War”

“Duck Lamp” by Sebastian Errazuriz

[ART REVIEW]

TA S T E

Bill Miller’s works, now on view at Gallerie Chiz, are evocative, moving and sustainable, fine art painstakingly unearthed from mundane materials. In an aesthetic recalling styles ranging from pointillism to Dr. Seuss, Miller constructs exclusively using vintage linoleum, cut and shaped but otherwise unaltered, adding dimension to his wall-mounted pieces both literally and figuratively. In art, it’s a novel medium, but in 20thcentury American architecture, linoleum was ubiquitously underfoot. Its past imbues its present with history and nostalgia. The Pittsburgh-based Miller coaxes linoleum into landscape, still life and portrait. Clusters of small works like “Grace,” “Inca” and “Yorick” — a trio of skulls — are bright and dynamic. “Macho Libre,” a face in a devilhued luchador mask surrounded by festively blooming flowers, is clever and comical. The large-scale “Eye of the World” is truly epic — sprawling, intricate and amazing, a vivid interpretation of a planet and its people delicately rendered. Outdoor scenes feature rolling hills, boats floating atop lakes, bristly pines and blades of grass. Abundant forests are magical and mystical and so lushly rendered that you can smell the earth. The busy-ness of the environmental pieces is offset by the wealth of emotion and staggering depth of the portraits. “My Mother the War” is generous in its gravity, a Madonna brimming with dignity. Her strength is as palpable as her pain, and communicated with brilliant clarity. The aged, craggy sailor in “My Home Is the Sea,” landlocked and housebound in his living room, sits stagnant in a chair; the image of his hale and hearty youth rests in a picture frame behind him. It’s beautiful, powerful and heartbreaking. “Three Sisters” is as electrically charged, with one woman offering solace to a distraught other, the third glimpsing the viewer at the moment of intrusion. This Chiz show, Fly On In … Take Off Your Shoes … Have a Seat, also includes works by Michael Beswick and Ron Nigro. In Beswick’s sculptural furniture pieces, form follows function in practical and stirring grace. Chairs are composed of roughly hewn wood and polished steel, merging the organic and manufactured with elegance, and discarded metal is repurposed into small tables as lovely as they are useful. Nigro’s sculptural models envision aircraft both replicated and imaginary, construction in wire with sinuous strength.

A MUSIC-FILLED PORTRAIT FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE MORINI STRAD

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

FLY ON IN … TAKE OFF YOUR SHOES … HAVE A SEAT continues through Nov. 22. Gallerie Chiz, 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com +

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MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER EATER PRESENTS...

DEATH BY CHOCOLATE A comedy/farce by Paul Freed

NOVEMBER 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m. Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

McKEESPORT

(412) 673-1100 For Reservations www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VINCENT NOE}

Madrid Vinarski and Jay Garcia with “Trekkie Monster”

[PLAY REVIEWS]

PUPPET MASTERS {BY ALAN W. PETRUCELLI} IF MR. ROGERS had grown up on Avenue Q, there could still be beautiful days for a neighbor … provided the neighbors were racist, homeless, gay, unemployed, abusive, penniless and addicted to porn. Avenue Q can be thought of as an adultsized Monsters, Inc., a puppet show for grown-ups (with puppet buggery!), two hours of sheer funny fodder for those with filthy mouths and filthier minds. A new University of Pittsburgh Stages production is exceedingly well-done, sharply directed and boasts a flawless cast. Within minutes the “people of fur” (as director Bria Walker dubs them in the program) become real. This is easy, even when confronted repeatedly by the cast who have arms shoved up the puppets’ rears.

theme is symbolized by child star Gary Coleman (played by Daria Sullivan), who had to sue his parents over his fortune. Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx shared a Tony for the show’s music and lyrics, work at which Lloyd Webber and Sondheim would cringe … then wish they had thought of such genius. Gianni Downs has done a superb job at using the small space for an incredibly functioning set. A handful of performers (and remember, these are Pitt students, some of them making their Stages debut) become their characters, and remind us that Broadway will embrace them one day. It’s rude to name the Best of the Best, but if Mr. Rogers can have a favorite sweater, I can name a favorite actor. Tim Kaniecki is a senior chemistry and theater-arts double-major at Pitt, proof that he has chemistry as he brings his closeted character to life. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

AVENUE Q continues through Sun., Nov. 23. Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning (basement), 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

TOUCHING {BY TED HOOVER} AFTER LAST week’s election, I needed a

The musical opened on Broadway in 2003, and though TV and stage shows have crossed more boundaries, Avenue Q is still solid. Jeff Whitty’s book won the Tony; its warped plot of coming-of-age is so wellwritten, as we all continue looking for purpose in life. After all, life isn’t always easy, and probably always will be politically incorrect. Though funnier a decade ago, this

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

good cry. So it’s kismet that Little Lake Theatre would be presenting The Miracle Worker — William Gibson’s warhorse about Helen Keller and her teacher, Anne Sullivan. This show which never fails to tear me up. An attack of scarlet fever before her second birthday left Keller deaf and blind. Over the next several years, her parents


indulged every whim, and by 7 she was an id-fueled hellion. Sullivan was hired by the Kellers to reach the Helen “trapped” inside her silent darkness. Both teacher and pupil were creatures of intense willfulness, and their battle makes up the bulk of the evening. When the literal and figurative floodgates open for Helen in the play’s legendary climax … well, you-know-who is usually bawling in his seat. The most amazing aspect of Gibson’s play is that he had the guts to write it. Guts, or sheer stupidity. What playwright would ever be brave enough to create a piece of theater in which the lead character has no language and no direct means of connecting with the audience, and is a brimming pot of undisciplined fury … oh, and by the way, who needs to be played adolescent child?

THE MIRACLE WORKER continues through Nov. 22. Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

It’s a role beyond the range of most seasoned actors, so that Little Lake found 9-year-old Madeline Dalesio is its own miracle. She’s got the force and passion in spades, but what I particularly enjoyed were her small reactions when Helen isn’t the focal point of the scene; reading her face you get a glimpse into the remote world where Helen lives and where Dalesio has set up residence. Abigail Lis-Perlis is a ferocious Anne, pursed relentlessly by a tragic past and confronting an impossible future; Lis-Perlis has no trouble showing us the emotional cost of such a life. Jena Oberg’s direction is focused on the high-stakes drama and titanic personalities; Bill Crean, Stacey Rosleck and Jeff Johnston play additional — and additionally — strong-willed Kellers. Though a bit more subtlety and a considerably less-cluttered game plan would help, this is a quite effective production … I cried at the end, and not just because of Mitch McConnell.

for a good 40 years. But there was Nilsson’s music playing, and the look of Lindsay Mayer’s design of Shakespeare’s Arden Forest brought the 1971 movie/ album to mind. Besides the aesthetic link, The Point had its hero banished into its own (“Pointless”) forest, just like Duke Senior, et al., of AYLI. Oh, yes, and in the days since Nilsson was inspired by an acid trip to write his tale, the Downtown school has acquired a nickname: The Point. I was having my own flashback, admiring the multi-print flower childthemed costumes of designer Michael Montgomery (I still have some of those crocheted vests in my attic) for the forest scenes. His court dress for the ladies is spectacular, though the men’s are an underwhelming mix of 20th-century formals and Elizabethan ruffs. It’s tempting to extend that description to the performances, though not entirely fair. Director John Amplas has changed several key characters to women, thus ramping up the opportunities for the young actresses to shine. Torée Alexandre delivers vocally and physically as the new Mme. Jacques, but belies the character’s claim of melancholy with a smile more cheer- than wistful. In several roles, including an unwilling singer, Katherine Rogers projects a wry charm. But of course the star turn is Jennifer Arfsten’s as Rosalind (a truly unlikeable heroine, if looked at dispassionately), both coquette and bully. No mere princess sidekick, Hannah Morris’ Celia is a wellrounded character with a sense of humor. Among the rustics, Angela D’Occhio giggles a lot of personality into Audrey’s few lines of dialogue. Dominique Brock makes a lively heartbreaker as Phoebe.

- DAILY NEWS

“AS ENCHANTING AS A FIRST SNOW” - SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER

THAT LITTLE LAKE FOUND 9-YEAR-OLD MADELINE DALESIO IS ITS OWN MIRACLE.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

LIKABLE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} UNTIL WALKING onto the set of Point Park University Conservatory Theatre Co.’s production of As You Like It, I hadn’t thought about Harry Nilsson’s The Point

- BOSTON HERALD

AS YOU LIKE IT continues through Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Mike Nicosia is dashing as the hero, Tal Kroser villainous as his brother, and Perris Drew channels Darth Vader as the evil ruler. The design team has outdone itself, notably Jessi Sedon-Essad for video. Mayer’s whimsical set suggests trees with clumps of hanging wine bottles, reminiscent of too much Boone’s Farm Apple that accompanied the music back in the day when flamboyance mattered more than taste. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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OPENS TUESDAY! November 18-23

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Benedum Center Box Office at Theater square trustarts.org • 412-456-4800 Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

PNC BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA-PITTSBURGH IS A PRESENTATION OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AND BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA.

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VERDI’S SHAKESPEAREAN MASTERPIECE

[STAGE]

AFTERLIVES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design.

Ed Dixon’s L’Hotel premieres at Pittsburgh Public Theater. {PHOTO COURTESY OF DANNY GHITIS}

FINAL WEEKEND! Tickets $12+

“ [OTELLO] drew the viewer into the spell that only opera, with its marriage of aural and visual elements, can create” - Music in Cincinnati

NOVEMBER 14 & 16 ǦŠ“Š‰š’Š“™Š— ǦŽˆŠ™˜ȖȜȝ†“‰š• ǦȟȜȝǂȟȠȡǂȡȡȡȡ Ǧ•Ž™™˜‡š—Œ”•Š—†ǀ”—Œ

BUY TICKETS NOW .

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! “Œ‘Ž˜™Š™˜•—”Šˆ™Š‰†‡”›Š™Š˜™†ŒŠǀ

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This week brings to town two theatrical world premieres offering radically different takes on vintage celebrities: L’Hotel, at Pittsburgh Public Theater, and Smart Blonde, at City Theatre. L’Hotel playwright Ed Dixon is a veteran Broadway performer and widely staged playwright with Pittsburgh connections. Ted Pappas, the Public’s artistic director, suggested that he write about the famous residents of Paris’ Père Lachaise cemetery. Dixon decided to ensconce Victor Hugo, Sarah Bernhardt, Isadora Duncan, Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison and Italian composer Gioachino Rossini — plus one overmatched waiter — in a faded grand hotel, together for eternity. It is, of course, a comedy. “This is not a literary work to discover the true nature of Sarah Bernhardt,” says Dixon, who even acknowledges, “I picked Rossini because he’s funny-looking.” Pappas directs, and Pittsburgh favorite Sam Tsoutsouvas plays Hugo. But while L’Hotel is packed with one-liners, it has thoughtful undertones about “what I consider to be the really important aspects of being an artist,” says Dixon — questions about the nature of fame, and what makes an artistic legacy last. “I do think in the end it really does wrestle with some really existential questions,” he adds. In Smart Blonde, meanwhile, veteran playwright Willy Holtzman takes an historically grounded look at the legacy of actress Judy Holliday. At mid-century, Holliday was a big star: a woman with a genius-level IQ best known for playing dumb blondes, like her breakout role as Billie Dawn in Born Yesterday (both on Broadway and on screen). Her career was hobbled in the 1950s, after a Senate subcommittee called her to testify about alleged “subversive” activities. Holtzman (a Holliday biographer) says Holliday’s testimony transcript “was structured like a little three-act play.” Smart Blonde was commissioned by City, where Holtzman had a 2010 hit with The Morini Strad. The new play depicts Holliday in 1964 (a year before her death), in rehearsal for a record album. Holliday pauses between songs to tell her story, with her pianist and third actor assuming roles from Holliday’s mother to Marilyn Monroe. Peter Flynn directs a cast including Andréa Burns as Holliday. “For me it’s the story of a woman who had to struggle against her time, and finally acted heroically,” says Holtzman.

Season Sponsor

L’HOTEL runs Nov. 13-Dec. 14. (Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown; $15.75-56; www.ppt.org) SMART BLONDE runs Nov. 15-21. (City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side; $15-56; www.citytheatrecompany.org)


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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.1311.20.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

Looking for the

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Perfect Location

for Your Holiday Party?

NOV. 14

Contemporary Choreographers

+ THU., NOV. 13 {ART} “The future” plus “the environment” typically inspires thoughts of dystopia. But Eco Art PGH solicited local college students for visual interpretations of a future Pittsburgh that’s more sustainable — economically, environmentally or otherwise. Artist Ziggy Sawdust, the office of state Sen. Jim Ferlo and PGH Green Innovators organized the contest, which includes cash prizes. Tonight’s event, at Pittsburgh Opera headquarters, includes DJs and live music, light refreshments and complimentary adult beverages. Proceeds benefit PGH Green Innovators and the Larimer Green team. Bill O’Driscoll 7-10 p.m. 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. $15-20. 412-621-3006 or www.pghgreeninnovators.org

7-10 p.m. Exhibit continues through Dec. 31. 2216 Penn Ave. (second floor), Strip District. Free. www.sethclark.com

{CABARET} Forgo makeup; local performers Anna Elder and Rebecca Covert will make you blush naturally with their show Indecent Divas, “a cabaret with sass and questionable class.” Decorum aside, the pair present an hour-and-a-half of comedy with blues, modern pop and show tunes sung with a three-piece band, plus an encore titled “Pure Filth.” This week’s four performances at Off The Wall Theater begin {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{ART}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

Seth Clark is one of Pittsburgh’s higher-profile young artists, known for striking collages that evoke collapsing buildings. Though widely exhibited, he’s trying a new business model. Through his Studio Direct program, Clark invited eight patrons to each pre-purchase a work, which he had a year to complete; the funds supported his studio practice. The finished works are part of Studio Direct, a collection of Clark’s newest works. The opening reception at The Union Hall is tonight. BO

NOV. 14 Pride of Pittsburgh II

tonight, with “special guest diva” Brian Edward, of Burgh Vivant. Danielle Fox 8 p.m. Continues 8 p.m. nightly through Sun., Nov. 16. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $10-20 (encore is additional $5). 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

+ FRI., NOV. 14 {SPORT} Since becoming a boxing promoter last year, Mike Tyson has shown that he loves Pittsburgh fighters and producing shows in the Steel City. After a sold-out


sp otlight

Isla Hansen and Tucker Marder are interested in science and technology, but no PowerPoints for them, please. The two Carnegie Mellon University graduate art students have matched scientists with area artists for Encountering the Unseen, which they describe as “artist-actualized lectures on contemporary topics in microbiology.” The free Nov. 14 event grew from both their puppetry work and their interest in new developments in microbiology. In particular, they were intrigued by the “gut-brain axis,” or how intestinal fauna are understood to affect people’s emotions and mental health in ways formerly attributed to psychology. Hansen and Marder are among the seven artists, performers and puppeteers who’ll join a small brass band to illuminate talks like “The Human Microbiome & The Gut-Brain Axis,” by Chatham University microbiology professor Sherie L. Edenborn, and one about tree-root microbes’s impact on climate change, by UC Berkeley doctoral candidate Evan Starr. Hansen promises “a lot of scaled-up bodily functions”; Marder says he and Hansen, for instance, will supplement a talk on predatory bacteria in ophthalmic microbiology with “a 6-foot-diameter eyeball, a giant puppet on a pole.” Phipps Conservatory’s Botany Lecture Hall surely hasn’t seen anything like it. “The main goal,” says Marder, “is to figure out if spectacle and humor can create meaning.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 14. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. Limited seating; RSVP at “Encountering the Unseen” Facebook event page.

televised event here in August, Tyson returns with Pride of Pittsburgh II. While the event is headlined by undefeated Monessen welterweight Sammy Vasquez Jr., the mustsee fight is between local pugs Monty Meza-Clay (pictured), of Rankin — ranked 15th by the World Boxing Council — and “Lighting” Rod Salka, of Bunola. The two Mon Valley lightweights battle for the vacant WBC/Central American Boxing Federation title tonight at Consol Energy Center. Charlie Deitch 7 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $42-250. www.consolenergycenter.com

{MUSIC}

George Takei takes the helm at Heinz Hall for a Sci-Fi Spectacular. Star Trek’s original Mr. Sulu and conductor Jack Everly lead the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra through scores from classic science-fiction television and movies, including 2001: A Space Odyssey, Star Trek and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Since his days aboard the USS Enterprise, Takei has become famous for his voice talents and social-media wit, and has guest-narrated similar concerts nationally. Other guests include vocalist Kristen Plumley and the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. DF 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

broadcast, but featuring a backdrop of more than 1,250 comic-book-style panels projected on a screen. Actors Rachel Landon, Brock England and Christopher Lee Gibson perform at the Byham Theater to a live score, with original sound effects from Kelly Matthews. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust event includes a post-show book-signing. DF 8 p.m. 101 Sixth Ave., Downtown. $14-45. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

the 20 musicians, actors, acrobats, puppeteers and dancers following a pre-show festival Eastern European crafts, snacks and face-painting. DF 7:30 p.m. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. $15-28. 412-9683040 or www.thehillman.org

NOV. 13 Studio Direct

+ SUN., NOV. 16 {FOOD} Sixty vendors let you sample the flavors of the season at the Third Annual Farm to Table Harvest Tasting. Today’s event has a new location — Pittsburgh Public Market and Wigle Whiskey, both in the Strip — and showcases food purveyors, chefs and area farmers. If you’re looking to try new artisanal cheeses and breads, locally raised meats, sauces, jams, craft beers and more, this is probably the place to be. BO 3-7 p.m. 2401 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10-35. 412-657-3028 or www.farmtotablepa.com

{DANCE} A strong and varied line-up of contributors highlights the annual Contemporary Choreographers show from Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. Choreographers collaborating with the school’s student performers include: Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell; internationally known performer and choreographer Luke Murphy; North Carolinabased David Morse; and Ronin Koresh, of Philadelphia’s critically acclaimed Koresh Dance Company. Tonight is the first of eight performances over two weekends at

Art by Seth Clark Downtown’s George R. White Performance Studio. BO 8 p.m. Performances continue through Nov. 23. 201 Wood St., Downtown. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ SAT., NOV. 15 {CIRCUS} Blending classical music and

comedy, contemporary circus Cirk La Putyka brings its Slapstick Sonata show from the Czech Republic to the Hillman Center for Performing Arts. One part slapstick comedy, one part Mozart, the show is set in a dark warehouse, where the graveyard-shift laborers reveal themselves as boisterous performers. The Hillman Performing Arts Series presents

{DRAG} Dare we call it “venerable”? At 22 years, the Miss TriState All-Star Pageant is certainly Pittsburgh’s longestrunning drag contest (but doesn’t look a day over 20). As organized by Kierra Darshell, it’s back at the Cabaret at Theater Square. Queens will compete in the evening-gown and talent categories to succeed last year’s winner, Kourtney Brown. The evening includes a cash bar and food service. BO 7:30 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-30. www.kierradarshell.com

NOV. 13 Indecent Divas

{STAGE} Comic books meet theater in the Pittsburgh premiere of live-action graphic novel The Intergalactic Nemesis: Target Earth. Written by Chad Nichols and Jason Neulander, the comedic touring show is a science-fiction adventure set in the 1930s and performed like an old-school live radio

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The Economist hailed as “Britain’s finest military historian,” comes to Carnegie Music Hall tonight to discuss Napoleon Bonaparte at the Monday Night Lectures. Robert has visited 53 of Bonaparte’s 60 battle sites, and pored over 33,000 of his surviving letters. He’s worked his findings into Napoleon: A Life, the first biography to include the lengthy correspondence. Roberts also wrote the bestselling World War II history The Storm of War, and is a frequent broadcastnews commentator on England’s royal family. DF 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

+ THU., NOV. 20 {WORDS} Poetic, political and wise, fiction writer NoViolet Bulawayo paints the complexities of her home county, Zimbabwe, in a glaring light. Author of Hitting Budapest, Snapshots, and We Need New Names, the latter a critically acclaimed novel about displacement and immigration, Bulawayo aimsto “write stories that don’t normally get told,” she has said. Bulawayo, 32, has won the Caine Prize for African Writing, the Hemingway Foundation/ PEN Award and, now, the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Brown Literary Award. Tonight, she visits Frick Fine Arts Auditorium as part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. DF 8:30 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. www.writing.pitt.edu

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THEATER AIDA. Presented by Undercroft Opera, Giuseppe Verdi’s classical opera. Campbell Memorial Chapel. Sat., Nov. 15, 7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. AS YOU LIKE IT. Shakespeare’s pastoral comedy, directed by John Amplas. Preview Nov. 6, 8 p.m. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. AVENUE Q. The politically incorrect Tony-winning musical which upends children’s television. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. BYE BYE BIRDIE. Thu., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 15, 2 & 7 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-316-5361. DEATH BY CHOCOLATE. Members of the newly renovated Meadowbrook Health Resort are dropping like flies. The clues point to a sinister box of chocolates, and the suspects

include all the outlandish characters working for the resort. Opens Nov. 7. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. ELF’ED. Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner Theater about one of Santa’s new elves who ends up receiving his last rights. Opens Nov. 8. Sat., Nov. 15, 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 5, 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 19, 7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. EVITA. Presented by Stage 62 through special arrangement w/ the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412 429-6262. THE FANTASTICKS. The world’s longest running musical. About a boy, a girl, two fathers & a wall. Sat., Nov. 15, 7 p.m., Sun., Nov. 16, 2:30 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22, 7 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 2:30 p.m.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

The Legacy Theatre, Allison Park. THE MIRACLE WORKER. The story of Helen Keller & 412-635-8080. her teacher, Anne Sullivan. GODSPELL. Presented by Thu-Sat and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Calvin Church Youth Group. Nov. 16. Little Lake Theatre, Benefits Calvin Youth Group Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. Mission Project. Fri, Sat, MURDER FOR TWO. 1 actor 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 22, investigates the crime, the 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 21. other plays all of the suspects & Calvin Presbyterian they both play the piano. Church, Zelienople. Wed-Sat, 7:30 p.m. 724-452-7560 ext. 17. and Sat, 2 p.m. THE INTERGALACTIC Thru Jan. 18. NEMESIS. A mash-up Cabaret at Theater of the epic adventure . w Square, Downtown. ww per comic book & a 1930s a p ty ci h pg 412-325-6769. era radio broadcast .com OTELLO. Verdi’s performed live on opera based on stage. Fri., Nov. 14, 8 p.m. Shakespeare’s play. Fri., Byham Theater, Downtown. Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., 412-456-6666. Nov. 16, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, LYNN CULLEN’S WILD RIDE. Downtown. 412-456-6666. An evening w/ Pittsburgh THE RAT PACK: TOGETHER broadcaster Lynn Cullen. AGAIN. The best of the Stories from her 40-year career Rat Pack songs, comedy & in radio and television. Doors sketches feat. Tony Sands as 5pm. Show 6:30pm. Benefits Sinatra, Johnny Petillo as Martin Planned Parenthood of Western & Geno Monroe as Davis. Sat., Pennsylvania. 6:30 p.m. Cabaret Nov. 15, 8 p.m. Carnegie Library at Theater Square, Downtown. Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-258-9540. 877-987-6487. SMART BLOND. Born Yesterday star Judy Holliday lays down a series of tracks about her rise to fame amidst the politics of the 1950s. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 21. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. TWELFTH NIGHT OR WHAT YOU WILL. Presented by Steel City Shakespeare Center. Multiple locations. Thru Nov. 15. Email steelcityshakespeare@gmail.com forinformation. WHITE CHRISTMAS. The stage adaptation of Irving Berlin’s classic film. Opening Nov. 18, 7:30pm. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 21, 8 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 20. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. WRITER’S BLOCK. Writer Conrad Baker, has hit a dry spell & is sent off to a cabin for a weekend to write. The peace is interrupted as the little cabin fills with people - the hippie daughter of hippie parents, the camouflage-wearing, rifle-toting husband & wife who see conspiracies behind every tree. Conrad’s jealous wife; & his anxious editor. Presented by R-ACT Theatre Productions & written by R-ACT member Larry Spinnenweber. Doors at 6pm. Show at 7pm. Fri., Nov. 14, 7 p.m. The Avenue Theater. 724-775-6844.

Legacy Sampler Available now at Better Beer Retailers.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

VISUALART THURSDAY NOV 13/10PM

SCENE STAGE THE WORLD, SEMI SUPER VILLAINS, THE FILTHY LOWDOWN THURSDAY NOV 20/10PM

AMRCNDREAMING Mixed media by Andy Beck, from Rebuilt Connections, at the Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown

NEW THIS WEEK BAR MARCO. Studio Direct. New Work by Seth Clark. Opening reception Nov. 13, 7-10pm. Strip District. 412-471-1900. BE GALLERIES. Stranger Than Fiction. Work by Brody Burroughs. Opening reception Nov. 15, 1-4pm. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Selections of The Michael Berger Foundation’s Private Collection. Painting & prints from the 200 piece collection. Opening reception Nov. 15, 5-8pm. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Moving Targets. A multidisciplinary exhibition by artists Ann Rosenthal & Steffi Domike w/ Ruth FaumanFichman commemorating the 2014 centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon & linking it to Jewish diaspora. Duquesne Library Gallery. Calling before visiting suggested. Opening reception Nov. 11. 5-7pm. Uptown. 412-396-6130.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. The Landscape Architecture of Legacy of Dan Kiley. Organized by The Cultural Landscape Foundation & featuring specially commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Downtown. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM.

Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISAN. Simeon Larivonovoff. Russian Orthodox “Old Believers” icon painter keeping a family tradition unbroken since 1392. Food provided by Jon Beck and drinks from Red Star Kombucha. Will hang through Nov. Garfield. 412-661-0503. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Rebuilt Connections. Multi-media pieces w/ photography, found objects, thread & painting techniques that capture a unique Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858.

BUNKERPROJECTS. Follow Through. Site specific instillation by Meg Prall. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. New Art by Tom & Carol Norulak. Fine art prints, handmade silks & jewelry. Open during campus hours at the Boyce Campus Art Gallery. Monroeville. 724-327-1327. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Once upon a time. Pittsburgh. Paintings by Fritz Keck. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Nocturne Moonrain: A Solo Exhibition by Lisa Marie Jakab. Oil paintings. Nocturne Moonrain. A solo exhibition of oil paintings by Lisa Marie Jakab. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DELANIE’S COFFEE. DOUBLE MIRROR EXHIBIT 4. Ft. local visual and performing artists. South Side. 412-927-4030. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection.

THURSDAY DEC 4/10PM

COMFORT TECH, CHARM & CHAIN, TANDY $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

Over 600 Beer choices to mix & match Eight rotating Seasonal Tap handles. Vienna all beef & Smith's natural casing Dogs New expanded menu including Subs & Salads Free Lunch Delivery Monday - Friday till 3pm. 201 Shiloh Street Mt. Washington www.packsanddogs.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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Tony Sands Productions presents . . .

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

COMEDY THU 13

A MUST-SEE SHOW!

Rat Pack Together Again

A thrilling night of great music and song. Experience Frank, Dean, and Sammy — the Rat Pack — performed with a wonderful mix of song, comedy, sketches, and brilliant musical arrangement. A sensory experience you don’t want to miss - the music that inspired and thrilled an entire generation! Rat Pack Together Again brings these characters to life and make them vibrant. For more information, visit www.ratpacktogetheragain.com

SATURDAY Nov-15-8-pm Carnegie Homestead Hall 510 East 10th Ave Munhall PA For tickets: call-877-987-6487 or go online to www.librarymusichall.com

COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

life of an audience volunteer. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 14 - SAT 15

DWAYNE GILL. Nov. 14-15, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 15

HOTEL NOWHERE. Long-form improv troupe Hotel Nowhere w/ opening set by CHAD. BYOB 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN KNIGHT, AUGGIE COOK, RAY ZAWODNI. 7 p.m. Langeloth Community Center. 412-920-5653. TOM DADDARIO, www. per a p TERRY JONES, pghcitym .co ROBERT CIVEDANES. 6 p.m. Monessen Elks MAGICIAN#773. 412-920-5653. COMEDIAN EXTREME WARP ZONE & CHANGE MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. MACHINE. A night of longform Amazing strolling magic & improv. BYOB. 8 p.m. Arcade comedy. Fun for the whole Comedy Theater, Downtown. family feat. Caesars Palace 412-339-0608. award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. COMEDY SAUCE. Up-and412-231-1112. coming comedians w/guests. MISS GAYLE BARREN, Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. BILL BENDEN, DAVID KAYE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Dress For Success Laugh Til Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. It Helps Funny Fundraiser. 412-682-9603. 6:30 p.m. The George Washington UNPLANNED COMEDY’S Hotel, Washington. 412-920-5653. JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru YOUR LIFE: THE MUSICAL. An Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. improvised musical based on the 412-681-4318.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 14

MON 17

TUE 18 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 19 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOHNNY DAM. 8:30 p.m. Peter B’s. 724-353-2677. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities,

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Magic of Everyday. By Mary Hamilton. By appt. only. Shadyside. 412-241-1528. THE FRAME GALLERY CARNEGIE MELLON. Power Loom. Kevin Brophy & Adam Milner explore the dynamics of the self & the social, power struggles, & gender/ body politics. Squirrel Hill. 412-268-2000. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Bountiful. A group exhibition all about food. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In. Take Off Your Shoes. Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Wild Abandon. New Paintings by Jason Woolslare. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP.

cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment.

A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art,& committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MEXICO LINDO MERCADO Y GALERIA DE ARTESANIAS. Blood + Bones. Work by Mexican folk-art masters, remembering soldiers & civilians killed in U.S. wars in the Middle East and Mexican drug wars, plus ofrendas, honoring Nelson Mandela, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Maya Angelou, Lou Reed, more. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9984. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. The Perception of Value. Work by Dee Briggs. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Work by Susan Constanse, Jean McClung,

O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome

John Morris & Patrick Schmidt. Garfield. 412-969-7689. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. The Album Art of Mozelle Thompson. A retrospective of album cover art by Mozelle Thompson. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. SLIMETIME. A 90s themed art show. Ft. work by Lizzee Solomon, Jordan Patton, Brian Gonnella, Christina Lee, Phyllis Kim, Jes LaVecchia, Maggie Negrete, Siena Baldi, Jess Paul, Megan Shalonis, Steph Neary, Andy Scott, Mike Madsen, Tim Currence, Mark Toneff. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Meta/ Morphoses. New work by Brian Lang & Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. Strip District. 412-261-7003. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

(planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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FREE TO PUBLIC

THE FUTURE OF

MEDICAL CANNABIS IN PENNSYLVANIA

TUESDAY, NOV. 18 AT 5PM LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILL 2106 PENN AVE. IN THE STRIP DISTRICT

A Q+A with Senator Daylin Leach Prime sponsor of Pennsylvania’s bi-partisan medical cannabis bill, which passed the Senate 43-7 this year

COME LEARN MORE! REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED PRESENTED BY:

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the

surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays,

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comictanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: The Overnighters, Three Rivers Film Festival at the Harris Theater, Downtown CRITIC: Fred Heckler, 72, a plastic surgeon from the North Side WHEN: Fri.,

Nov. 07

I’m feeling a little introspective. It’s the strangest thing. As I watched [this documentary about migrant oilworkers in North Dakota], I said, “Oh, yeah. This is a documentary.” But, then, “Wait a minute, maybe they’re acting? How did they get a script like this?” I think it’s interesting that these two different viewpoints kept going back and forth because it was very realistic, very true to life and certainly had lessons in it, but the ending had me say again: “Was this fiction or not?” None of this audience is subjected to the day-to-day problems they were having. So, it’s a little hard to visualize it, but I think it stretches existence down to some pretty basic elements, and I’m surprised by the ending. That’s what made me think almost I was watching fiction. It reminds me of the things you see in Grapes of Wrath, in a sense. It was certainly worth seeing. BY DANIELLE FOX

WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY FRI 14 - SAT 15 BOULEVARD GALLERY’S ANNUAL HOLIDAY EVENT. Pottery, jewelry, sculptures, cards, photography, watercolor, oils, & acrylics. Fri, Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 29 Boulevard Gallery, Verona. 412-828-1031.

SAT 15 THE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade crafts by local artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

MON 17 - WED 19 THE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade crafts by local artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

DANCE THU 13

. B.L.K.~N~W.H.T. Solo & a guided meditation through the fluidity of gender & race. Duet performances by

choreographers Jasmine Hearn and jhon r. stronks. 7:30 & 8:30 p.m. BUNKERprojects, Garfield. (412) 440-8422.

SAT 15 - SUN 16 PRAKRITI : MAATRIKAA, MRITTIKAA. An ode to Devi & nature through dance & storytelling. Presented by Nandanik Dance Troupe. 7 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 16, 4 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

WED 19 WHIRLING DERVISHES OF RUMI. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FUNDRAISERS THU 13 CHEFS CREATE FOR AUTISM SPEAKS. 6 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-367-4571. KEEP HEALTHY. Kidney Screening from the National Kidney Foundation. 11 a.m.2 p.m. YMCA Homewood/ Brushton, Homewood. 412-261-4115 x12. NATIONAL PHILANTHROPY DAY. Registration, exhibition viewing, dinner reception, & awards ceremony. 5 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-694-4250.

FRI 14 POLAMALU’S POLYNESIAN LUAU. Polynesian fire dance show, Polynesian-inspired food, pig roast, cocktails & items. Benefits The Troy & Theodora Polamalu Foundation Fund & The Harry Panos Fund for Veterans. 7 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 412-956-0611.

SAT 15 MAKE-A-WISH BENEFIT CONCERT. Duquesne’s Music Therapy Student Association is hosting a benefit concert for Make-a-Wish at the Mary Pappert School of Music. 7 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 585-217-7430. YOGA PAARTY. A multidisciplinary celebration of Yoga, benefiting Pittsburgh Action Against Rape. www.yogapaarty.com 2-5 p.m. AlphaLab, South Side.

SUN 16 13TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Proceeds benefit BCHS. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Bishop Canevin High School, Crafton. 412-922-7400 x24. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. LUNCH, VENDORS & FASHION SHOW. Benefits Dress for Success. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Peter’s Place Restaurant, Bridgeville. 412-221-5000.

MON 17 FALL SOCIAL 2014: A BENEFIT FOR GLOBAL SOLUTIONS PITTSBURGH. Cocktails, live music, food, more. 6:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. NO MENU MONDAY. Dan Lamb, will serve Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry-inspired creations. Benefiting the Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry. 5-11 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900.

TUE 18 WILKINSBURG GIVES THANKS BREAKFAST. Speaker Jim Cunningham, WQED Artistic Director & Morning Show host. Lifelong Wilkinsburg resident & volunteer, Mr. James B. Richard, will be honored for contributions to the Chamber of Commerce & the Wilkinsburg community. Benefiting Wilkinsburgh Community Ministry. 8 a.m. Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, Edgewood. 412-727-7855.

POLITICS THU 13 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to


LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

WED 19 PITTSBURGH SOCIALIST FORUM. An evening w/ Steve Brouwer, author of Revolutionary Doctors: How Venezuela and Cuba are Changing the World’s Conception of Health Care. Wed., Nov. 19, 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-303-2310.

LITERARY THU 13

SAT 15 365 DAYS OF WONDER W/ R.J. PALACIO. New York Times bestselling author & graphics designer, R.J. Palacion will speak about the adventures of her children’s book, Wonder. 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-622-8866. IMAGE TO WORD W/ AUTHOR SHERRIE FLICK. Writer’s workshop. Novice & experienced writers welcome. Create short stories & poems. Group discussion & one-on-one guidance. Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m. Thru Feb. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. TESS BARRY, DANIELA MOSCHELLA, BERNADETTE ULSAMER & LAURIN BRANDY WOLF. Poetry reading presented by Versify. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

3 POEMS BY .. POETRY DISCUSSION GROUP. Discussing Naomi Shihab Nye. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FOUR BOOTS-ONE JOURNEY BOOK TALK. A couple’s adventure on the John Muir Trail through three national parks. 1-2 p.m. Whitehall Public Library. 412-882-6622. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent BOOK SIGNING W/ graduates looking for additional AARON SKIRBOLL. Local feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. author signing “The ThiefTaker Hangings”. 12-2 p.m. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. 412-741-3838. SAMUEL HAZO POETRY READING. Reading & discussion of his newest COMICS DECODED poetry collection, BOOK CLUB. Third “And the Time Is: Mon of every month, Poems, 1958-2013. 6:30-7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Mount Carnegie Library, Lebanon Public . w w Oakland. 412-622-3151. w Library. 412-531-1912. aper p ty ci h g p SPANISH .com CONVERSATION CLUB. JAPANESE Second and Fourth Thu CONVERSATION of every month, 6-7 p.m. CLUB. First and Third Carnegie Library, Oakland. Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. 412-622-3151. Carnegie Library, Oakland. STEVEN REISS BOOK 412-622-3151. SIGNING. Booking signing PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL of “Frank Lloyd Wright’s PHILOSOPHY READING Pope-Leighey House”. GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fallingwater. East End Book Exchange, 724-329-8501. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

SUN 16

MON 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 18

FRI 14

LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIANE NORMAN, DIANE KERR. MadFridays Reading Series. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. PITTSBURGH POETS ROCK THE APOLLO. Ft. local poets Scott Silsbe & Angele Ellis Reception & book signing. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Apollo Memorial Library. 724-478-4214.

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THU 13 - WED 19 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 7 p.m. Penn Hills High School, Penn Hills. 412-456-6666.

1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fastpaced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination. Pittsburgh

OUTSIDE FRI 14 - SAT 15

SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

SOCKS FOR SENIORS

Help older folks stay warm this winter by getting involved with Socks for Seniors. Now though Dec. 24, the organization — which collects and distributes socks to people in nursing homes and shelters across the country — is seeking individuals and groups of volunteers to organize sock drives. Visit www.socksforseniors.com for more information.

TUE 18

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 19 BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

International Children’s Theater. 7 p.m. Seneca Valley Intermediate School, Harmony. 412-456-6666.

OTHER STUFF

WED 19

SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fastpaced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination.

THU 13 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BEAVER VALLEY ARTISTS MEETING. Guest artist: Gail

Beem. 7 p.m. Merrick Art Gallery, New Brighton. 724-846-1130. CANDLELIGHT OPEN HOUSE. Recreating the ambience of an 18th century evening w/ games, candlelight strolls, beer tasting & items for sale. At the Tavern. 4-8 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-836-1515. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First CONTINUES ON PG. 48

$2 Tuesdays 1/2 Price Rooms on Wednesday Happy Hour 5-7PM 1/2 Off All Drinks & Half Price Appetizers 5 Star Kitchen Open Late!! Complimentary Limo Service

SAT 15 ALBUM ART W/ J MALLS. Work w/ artist J Malls to assemble, laser cut, & paint your own unique album covers! 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SUPER SCIENCE SATURDAY: EXPEDITION DAY. Join Carnegie scientists as they talk about their travels near & far. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SUN 16

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Marshall Goldberg reviews his new book, “The New Colossus”, a historical fiction mystery about well-known people in the Pittsburgh area. 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

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SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fastpaced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination. Presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

PITTSBURGH 3100 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-281-3110

TUE 18

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MISTER ROGERS’ SWEATER DRIVE KICK OFF. Feat. a special appearance by Mr. McFeely. 11 a.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME LECTURES: MUSIC 101. Sarah Clendenning, Violin: “Like Mother Like Daughter.” 12:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA EDUCATORS FOR AWARENESS, COMPASSION & EMPATHY (WE-PEACE) MEETING. Second Thu of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 13 Shambhala Meditation Center, Highland Park. 412-345-1759.

FRI 14 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE ART & SCIENCE OF GLASS. Explore exhibits, participate in hands-on scientific & artistic demonstrations & experience the Science Center in an adults-only atmosphere. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE FEATURE. A creature painting & a creature movie. Fri, 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197.

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[VISUAL ART]

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, DC MOORE GALLERY AND THE CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

Art by Duane Michals

Duane Michals has said that he tries to photograph the things about a person that are not visible. Born in McKeesport in 1932, he made a splash in the art world by distancing himself from traditional photographic subjects and methods, creating narratives — some straightforward, some surreal — through sequential photos and handwritten messages. The Carnegie Museum of Art’s new retrospective, Storyteller:

The Photographs of Duane Michals, opened this month. On Sunday, hear the storyteller himself as he discusses his fascinating body of work. Artist talk: 1-2:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16. Exhibit continues through Feb. 16. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING. Take a first look inside one of Warhol’s unopened boxes w/ museum archivists. 7 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

FRI 14 - SAT 15

WEIHNACHTSMARKT. Juried regional vendors present a marketplace in the tradition of Germany’s famed Christmas markets. Nov. 14-15 Harmony Museum, Harmony. 888-821-4822.

FRI 14 - SUN 16 WORKSHOPS IN AFRICAN BRAZILIAN FOLK ARTS/CAPOEIRA. See www.negogato.org for schedule. Nov. 14-16 Steel Dragon Kung Fu Studio, Lawrenceville. 845-687-9001. 2014 PITTSBURGH PET EXPO. Vendors, family-friendly entertainment & learn about animal organizations & pet products. 5-9 p.m., Sat., Nov. 15, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 16, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-310-7781.

SAT 15 BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi. com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. FALL TEA. Sample delicious fare & learn about the popularity & social role tea played in early America. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x215. FLEA MARKET SATURDAY. Held by South Side Presbyterian Church. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. KOREAN II. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 31 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. SATURDAY SILVER SCREEN FILM CLUB. Showing of Blended, starring Adam Sandler


and Drew Barrymore. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLAPSTICK SONATA. Presented by Prague’s Cirk La Putyka. Acrobatics, dance, puppetry & live music. Eastern European crafts, snacks & face painting before the show. 7:30 p.m. Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3040. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STEEL CITY SAMPLER: A RUSTBELT CULINARY. Food tour feat. visits a renovated church hall, a modernized mill bar, & other revamped treasures. 10 a.m. Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 15 - SUN 16 8TH ANNUAL KEEPERS OF THE FLAME AWARDS. The culture makers of Pittsburgh’s African & African American heritage will be recognized for their contributions in art, social justice, education & leadership. The honorees of 2014 are Chico Butler, Dr. and Mrs. Johnson, Helen Baynes, Joyce Meggerson-Moore, Poogie Bell, William ‘Oba’ Wells. 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 16, 3:30 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. 412-452-3847. AMERICAN GIRL FASHION SHOW. Hosted by the Junior League of Pittsburgh. A presentation of historical & contemporary fashions. Refreshments, prizes. 11 a.m., 2:30 & 6 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 16, 1 & 4 p.m. Pittsburgh Field Club, Fox Chapel. 412-488-9270. EVENING & CRITIQUE FOR ARTISTS W/ DUANE MICHALS & RICHARD KELLY. Nov. 15: viewing of Storyteller: the photographs of Duane Michals, dinner, & conversation. Nov. 16: conversation & review of participants’ work w/ photographer Richard Kelly. 5:30-9 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 16, 2:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

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help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 2014 FARM TO TABLE 412-622-3151. HARVEST TASTING. Over SAHAJA MEDITATION. 60 vendors will be carrying Dimple meditation techniques, & sampling artisinal cheeses which will improve your & breads, locally raised meats, physical, emotional, psychological, locally harvested fruits & social, and spiritual health vegetables, sauces, jams, Mon, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru baked goods, craft beers, Jan. 5 Mount Lebanon Public ciders, cocktails,& wines. Library, Mt. Lebanon. Multiple locations: 412-531-1912. Pittsburgh Public SCOTTISH COUNTRY Market & Wigle DANCING. Lessons Whiskey. 3-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m., social . 888-718-4253. dancing follows. www per a p ty ci AMNESTY No partner needed. pgh m o .c INTERNATIONAL Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Weekly letter writing event. Church, Mt. Washington. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, 412-683-5670. Oakland. 412-683-3727. SPELLING BEE WITH ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Second and Third Sun of every Lava Lounge, South Side. month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-431-5282. Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARTIST TALK: DUANE MICHALS. Photographer HOT METAL BLUES. Blues from McKeesport reflects dancing. Lessons: 8-9pm. on his work. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Dancing: 9 pm-12am. Tue, Museum of Art, Oakland. 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 23 Peter’s Pub, 412-622-3131. Oakland. 412-681-7465. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third INCLUSION IN THE and First Sun of every month, WORKPLACE: EMPLOYMENT 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, SUPPORT FOR INDIVIDUALS Beechview. 412-437-8676. WITH DISABILITIES. Keynote CHINESE II. First and Third speaker Jeremy Shapira. Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Fostering an inclusive Carnegie Library, Oakland. workforces to help individuals 412-622-3151. w/ special needs & disabilities. THE DIRTIEST SHOW IN 6-8 p.m. The Children’s Institute, TOWN. Sex-positive, BodySquirrel Hill. 412-325-0039. positive fine art & performances. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE 21+ only. 7 p.m.-2 a.m. YOU GO: WHITE CHRISTMAS. Trundle Manor, Swissvale. Program by critic Christopher 412-916-5544. Rawson. Trust Arts Education PFLAG GREENSBURG. Center, Downtown. Support, education & advocacy LIVING & LEARNING: for the LGBTQ community, TOOLS IN THE CAREGIVER family & friends. Third Sun of TOOLBOX. Registration required. every month, 2 p.m. Trinity 7 p.m. Temple David, Monroeville. United Church of Christ, 412-372-1200. Greensburg. 412-518-1515. MY PEOPLE: SHORT FILMS SUNDAY ART & FOOD NIGHT. Presenting two shorts: MARKET. Local artists & foodies. Hector: Lost Souls with Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 Switchblades & Barrio Boy. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 7:30pm mixer, 8pm show. 412-969-7197. 7:30 p.m. The Alloy Studios, TEA CLASS & TASTING. Friendship. 412-363-4321. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea CAREER DEVELOPMENT samples & European cookies CENTER CAREER FAIR W/ will be served. Reservations MACY’S. Bring multiple copies required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru of a resume. Research & apply for Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, available positions beforehand. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. Professional dress. Registration required. 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Career Development Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-586-3728. MORNING SPANISH DETROIT STYLE URBAN LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. 412-531-1912. ENGLISH CONVERSATION ROBOTO MONTHLY (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto Lebanon Public Library, board of directors to find out Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. what’s happening at the space & PITTSBURGH REGIONAL AMATEUR PING PONG CHAMPIONSHIP. Nov. 15-16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Home Economics Building, South Park. 412-849-4220.

SUN 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 18

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

5TH ANNUAL SING-OFF HIGHMARK PITTSBURGH FIRST NIGHT. Student must submit 1 rendition of a Motown classic & 1 song of their choosing. Entry forms & guidelines on the Highmark First Night Pittsburgh 2015 website. Deadline midnight Nov. 21. GREENSBURG CIVIC THEATRE. Auditions for Perfect Wedding. Nov. 22. Seeking men & women ages 18-50. Reserve a spot at gctheatre.org/auditions.html. Walk-ins also accepted. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a’capella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. SPLIT STAGE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Hair, Nov. 16-17. Prepare 2 32 bar cuts in contrasting styles. There will be a mandatory “movement call”. Email splitstage@ gmail.com for an appointment. Newlonsburg Presbyterian Church. 724-327-0061.

AUDITIONS 12 PEERS THEATER. Auditions 2015 season. Prepare two contrasting contemporary monologues no longer than 2 minutes in length. To schedule an audition time please email Sara Fisher at sfisher@12peerstheater.org. Fri., Nov. 14, 7-10 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 15, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-496-2194.

SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. Thru Jan. 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-in-thecultural-district/

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I’m a pretty quiet Midwestern woman currently wracked by a guilty Catholic conscience. My last boyfriend and I were in an open, long-distance relationship. We were together for a year-and-a-half, and things were great fun. I met his other partners and I got to have some fun playtime back in my own city. Then I finished grad school and wanted to talk about moving to his city. He simply refused to have that conversation, and we broke up. It hurt but we resolved to stay friends, and we are still close. A year later, he was diagnosed with cancer. I went to visit him at his request and cuddled him at night as he was wracked by chemo nausea and fatigue. Mostly I just spooned him and fetched him tea. That same weekend, I met his new, much younger girlfriend (19 to his 28). She is sweet and caring, but she was clearly uncomfortable with my visit, and I belatedly realized that either they aren’t doing the open thing or they haven’t talked much about it. I suddenly felt a little jealous and a lot like an emotional intruder. Not everyone understands the sort of relationship he and I had, but I’m lost on how to be a good friend/former girlfriend to him now. Am I jeopardizing his romantic life by staying his friend? Is it possible for us to stay close without making his current girlfriend jealous? Did I just help him cheat?

We have never been directly ASKED, nor have we told. On the one hand, I want others to know that workable long-term nonmonogamy isn’t just a pipe dream, but on the other, the details of my personal life are nobody’s business. Am I crazy to feel guilt for not being openly poly? NONMONOGAMOUS, UTTERLY NORMAL, YET APPREHENSIVE

Not everyone who’s poly can be out, NUNYA, just as not everyone who’s gay, bi, trans, kinky or poz can be out. But the only way to dispel myths about poly people and poly relationships — poly people are all burners, poly relationships don’t work out for the long term, all nonmonogamous relationships ultimately fail — is for poly people to come out when and where they can. So if you’re in a position to be out, NUNYA, you should come out.

AN OPPOSITE-SEX COUPLE THAT WANTS TO HAVE A THREE-WAY IS GONNA HAVE TO MAKE AN EFFORT.

ACCIDENTAL HOME WRECKER

Good on you for going to see your ex-boyfriend, AHW. It was absolutely the right thing to do. If you and your ex are close enough to spoon during a health crisis, AHW, you’re close enough to ask him a direct question or two about his current relationship. Is it open or closed? If it’s open, are we talking open in practice or open in theory? If it’s the latter, you may be the first “non-primary” partner — or the first ex-primary partner — with whom this girl has ever had to interact. Meaning: She may have been more comfortable with You, the Idea, than she was with You, the Person. Another question to ask your ex: Will your being around screw up his current relationship? Your ex may still want you around even if the answer is yes. Right now the support of his old friends may be more valuable to him than this new girlfriend. So don’t disappear on your ex because you have a hunch his new girlfriend might be jealous, AHW. Talk to him, let him make his own choices and be there for him. I consider myself one of the lucky ones: happily married for decades, with a longterm girlfriend. GF is at this point part of the family, and while it hasn’t always been an easy arrangement to sort out, it has worked for over a decade. Recently, I’ve been talking with other nonmonogamous folk and find myself wondering whether I have any responsibility to publicly admit details about my multi-partner lifestyle.

I am a straight female who has been in a relationship for the last decade. We are highschool sweethearts who lost our virginity to each other. We are now engaged, but for the last few years, we have been having a recurring issue. He wants a three-way desperately. He thinks about it all the time, and it seems to come up in almost every conversation we have. I feel that this goes beyond just a fantasy. We used to have a great sex life, but now I feel as if I have to beg for it. He wants this to happen NOW. I think it should just happen naturally if it is going to happen. I think it is a deeper feeling that he missed out because we got together so young. I have repeatedly told him I am fine with taking a break so he can go get some other ass before we get married, but he will not listen. I am completely satisfied. We are both happy and love each other. I just constantly have guilt about being the reason he can’t have what he wants. Is there anything I can do? Please help. NOT ENOUGH FOR HIM

When a person says she wants something sexual to happen “naturally,” NEFH, what she means is “spontaneously.” Three-ways don’t happen that way. An opposite-sex couple that wants to have a three-way is gonna have to make an effort, NEFH. You’ll have to take out personal ads, go to swingers clubs, and approach trusted friends or exes and carefully broach the subject. (A gay couple that wants to have a three-way? They just have to leave the house. Pretty much.) So your fiancé is right: This won’t happen if you don’t make it happen. But your fiancé is also being a douche. If he’s so obsessed with three-ways that he’s not interested in twoways (with you) anymore, then he’s consciously or subconsciously sabotaging your relationship. Offer him a deal: So long as he makes the two-ways happen, you’ll help make the three-ways happen. On the Lovecast, Dan and Janet Yassen from RAINN talk about recovering from rape: www. savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.12-11.19

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Sex is like pizza,” said comedian Mel Brooks. “Even when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good.” That’s a generalization, of course. I’m sure you can think of times in your past when mediocre pizza and mediocre sex were just plain mediocre. But work with me on the overarching principle, Scorpio: Some of the finer things in life just can’t be spoiled. They are always at least moderately pleasurable and interesting and lucky — and usually more than just moderately so. According to my reading of the astrological omens, your immediate future will be filled to the brim with these finer things.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ancient people knew about Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn because all of those planets are visible to the naked eye. From the second millennium B.C. until the late 20th century, only three additional planets were found: Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. (Pluto was later reclassified as a dwarf planet, however.) Then in 1992, astronomers began to locate planets orbiting other stars. On one spectacular day in February 2014, NASA announced it had identified 715 new planets. I foresee a similar uptick for you in the next seven months, Sagittarius. Your rate of discoveries is about to zoom.

They are fundamental to being human. So the challenge is not to eliminate them — that’s not possible — but rather to harness them. If you hope to keep them from dragging you down, you must work hard to channel them into activities that enhance your life. How are you doing on this score, Aries? Are you chronically dependent on drugs, gambling, sugar or chaotic relationships? Or are you, instead, hooked on the courage you summon when you face your fears and the willpower you invoke as you free yourself from your limitations? Now is an excellent time to upgrade your addictive and obsessive tendencies.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

When Evan Lattimer’s 92-year-old father died in 2007, she inherited his large collection of odd relics. It included a cigar smoked by W.C. Fields, Greta Garbo’s driver’s license, Abraham Lincoln’s shaving mirror, a bearskin coat owned by Gen. George Custer and Napoleon Bonaparte’s penis. Many items turned out to be quite valuable to collectors. One eager bidder offered to buy the famous genitalia for $100,000. I suspect that in the coming months, you will experience events that have some resemblances to this story. For example, the legacy you receive may not be what you expected, but could turn out to be more useful than you imagined.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s your assignment: Get more organized and purposeful about having fun. Think harder about what makes you feel good, and plan more aggressively to bring those feel-good experiences into your life. In offering these prescriptions, I’m not advocating irresponsible hedonism. Not at all. In my view, you will become a better servant of those you care about by boosting your commitment to pleasure. You will carry out your duties with more aplomb and effectiveness. Raising your joy quotient is actually a formula for becoming a better human being.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The Appalachian Mountains span 1,500 miles from Newfoundland to Alabama. They are the seventh longest range in the world. And yet they have shrunk over the eons. Their average height is 3,000 feet, but when they were young they were probably twice that high. What happened? There has been constant erosion caused by rivers, glaciers, wind, tree roots, lichens and oxidation. Rain and condensation have also played a role because when water freezes, it expands, creating a wedging force. I propose that we make what has happened to the Appalachians a symbol of what’s possible for you in the next eight months, Pisces. Through steady, small actions, you can significantly grind down a mountainous obstacle.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): We all have addictive and obsessive tendencies.

Our planet’s most abundant mineral is called bridgmanite. It’s an amalgam of iron, magnesium, silicon and oxygen. Until recently, no one had actually seen it because it lies so deep underground it can’t be reached by digging tools. Scientists have only known about it from studying how earthquake waves moved through it. That changed in the last few years, when two mineralogists found bridgmanite in an ancient meteorite. They were able to analyze the nuances of this basic mineral for the first time. I predict a comparable development for you, Taurus. In the coming months, you will become more familiar with a core part of you that has always been a mystery. The revelations may occur with the help of an influence that resembles a meteorite.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): For much of its history, the United States claimed ownership of the ocean within three miles of its coasts. That changed in 1988, when the federal government declared that hereafter it would have sovereignty over the ocean as far as 12 miles from land. With that action, American territory increased dramatically. I invite you to consider a comparable expansion in the coming months, Leo. Seize more space. Seek further privileges. Ask for a bigger piece of everything.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Poland’s most renowned ghost-hunter is frustrated. Having invested a fortune in spectral detection equipment, Piotr Shalkevitz finds that there are fewer and fewer spooks to investigate as the years go by. I’m not qualified to speak about whether the whole world is experiencing a decline in the ghost population. But I’m confident that this is exactly what is happening for you Virgos. Recently, the haunted elements of your life have begun to dissipate. And in the next eight months,

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“To improve is to change, so to be perfect is to have changed often.” Winston Churchill said that, and now I’m passing it along to you — with one caveat. I don’t expect you to be perfect, and never will. To shoot for perfection is risky. It may set up unrealistic expectations that lead to bad mental hygiene. It tempts you to avoid messy experiences, some of which might be essential to your growth. So I will offer a revised version of Churchill’s maxim for your use: If you want to improve, you must change. If you want to keep improving, you must change often. And the coming months will be prime time for you to keep improving and improving and improving. What’s the bravest thing you ever did? What will be the next brave thing you do? Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I can’t remember the last time you’ve had as much artistic freedom as you have now. It’s as if life has given you a slew of wild cards and X-factors to play with. You don’t have to answer to the past as much as you usually do. You are less beholden to the demands of duty and the constraints of karma. Here’s the best perk: You have been authorized by both the higher powers and lower powers of the cosmos to fall in love. With whom? With what? Everyone! Everything!

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

get your yoga on!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some conspiracy theorists are paranoid that aliens or government agencies use radio waves to try to control their minds. They wear tin-foil hats to protect themselves from the evil transmissions. But a recent study shows that this protective head gear has an effect that’s opposite to what it’s supposed to. In fact, it actually amplifies the intensity of radio frequencies, making it even more likely that mind-control signals would work their dastardly magic. This problem probably does not apply to you, but I suspect you are suffering from a comparable glitch. An approach you’re pursuing or an attitude you’re cultivating is having an impact contrary to what you imagine. Now is an excellent time to make adjustments.

I expect that you will be freed from most, maybe all, of the ghosts and pesky demons that attached themselves to you once upon a time.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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MASSAGE

Xin Sui Bodyworks

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA., 15213, on November 18, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for Service Contracts at various schools for: • Elevators and Vertical Transportation Mechanical Prime • HVAC Water Treatment Plumbing Prime • Fire Extinguishers and Fire Hoses General Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 27, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

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*Stuff We Like

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

Great Allegheny Passage: Mon River Tour

Asian 888 Massage

Still looking to eke out a few more bike rides before winter sets in? Begin at Point State Park, cross the Mon on the Hot Metal Bridge and continue upriver past the Waterfront and on toward Duquesne. Great views of nature and industry, including the still-active Edgar Thomson Steel Works.

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

Gobble Gobble Burger at BRGR {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Antonio Brown

Everyone raves this time of year about a certain Thanksgiving-themed burrito about town, but BRGR’s Thanksgiving meal-on-a-bun is top-notch, especially with its pickled green beans.

In the past, the Steelers have let a number of quality receivers leave, but they decided to stick with Brown. It was the right choice: He leads the NFL in catches and yards, and is third in touchdowns.

Serial

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

Pittsburgh Bridges The best prop for even the most amateur of photographers.

This experiment in long-form podcasting from This American Life’s Sarah Koenig chronicles the case against teenage Adnan Syed for strangling his ex-girlfriend ... 15 years ago. With a new episode every Thursday, there’s still plenty of time to catch up and join the debate about whether the evidence shows Syed was wrongfully convicted. www.serialpodcast.org

“A Tale of Three Cities”

Carbon Shock author Mark Schapiro’s article in the Oct. 27 The Nation notes that much of Pittsburgh’s greening has come through outsourcing our industry — and our pollution — to places like Guangzhou, China. He argues for counting the greenhouse gases produced in the making of our consumer goods on our ledger, not on those of the developing countries where they’re manufactured. www.thenation.com

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JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment R

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Suboxone

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

Immediate Appointments Available

Acute Partial Program Individual and Group Counseling

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

Pregnant?

South Side Outpatient

We can treat you!

For more information, call 24 hours

2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922

1-888-694-9996

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com

MONROEVILLE, PA www.myjadewellness.com

Help is Available!

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com 54

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.12/11.19.2014

Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412-380-0100

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Recovery Without Judgement™


{ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

WILD RIDE

Lynn Cullen on her life, career and new one-woman show {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} AFTER 35 YEARS working in Pittsburgh media, Lynn Cullen has a ton of behind-the-scenes stories to tell — from television-news outtakes to the time she met a sexually inappropriate dolphin while on assignment at the Pittsburgh Zoo. (Yes, you just read that correctly.) On Nov. 17, Cullen will share her experiences during her one-woman show Lynn Cullen’s Wild Ride, at the Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret. The show will benefit Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. Cullen says she’ll be sharing stories from her days as a TV and radio reporter and talk-show host for WTAE, WAMO and public television. Cullen hosts a daily talk show for City Paper at www.pghcitypaper.com. She sat down with CP to chat about her life and upcoming performance, but not before sternly warning us not to “give the show away!”

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO THIS CAREER? I was not necessarily attracted to this career. I always felt it just happened. I did not major in journalism. I, myself, did not think I would go into television, and it was not my idea to go into radio. I’ve felt like my entire life has been an out-of-body experience.

a nightmare, a monochromatic right-wing horror show. The [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette] is hardly big enough to wrap fish in anymore, and that’s a liberal newspaper that couldn’t seem to endorse Tom Wolf for governor. There are some really good reporters in this town, but old media — TV, radio, newspapers — are like me in my 20s. They’re grasping, they’re being sort of driven by huge forces beyond their control. They’re being swept downstream, and I don’t think anybody quite understands where that will end. WHAT STORIES DO YOU PLAN TO SHARE IN YOUR SHOW? I’m going to show some clips from my TV career at WTAE because in my TV career here, I had a hell of a lot of fun and did things that you would not see anywhere in television news now. DO YOU PLAN TO SHARE THE STORY ABOUT THE DOLPHIN? I’d think there’d be a riot if I didn’t. It was probably the greatest sexual experience I had in Pittsburgh and it was with a fish. I know it’s technically a mammal, but “fish” is funnier. It almost makes me weep, that poor

“I’VE FELT LIKE MY ENTIRE LIFE HAS BEEN AN OUT-OF-BODY EXPERIENCE.” animal. I’ve just never gotten his loneliness and neediness out of my WELL THEN HOW DID YOU GET HERE? I’ve always been amazed at people who know what they want to do, head. I weep for the life he led. who have ambition and passion. I had none of that. I was a very bewildered and lost soul well into my 20s. I did not get a degree from college WHY DID YOU CHOOSE PLANNED PARENTHOOD AS THE until I was 26. I first went to college […] because that was what you were BENEFITING ORGANIZATION? supposed to do. The ’60s and the Vietnam War began and I was swept I support their mission with all my heart. They are under constant assault from all the yahoo state legislatures that have been taken over by Reup in all of that. Because I was an idiot, my guru was the LSD guru publicans. The thing I can’t comprehend is how women in this Timothy Leary. I had personally heard him speak at Northwestcountry supposedly have the right to end a pregnancy if they so ern University. He sat cross-legged on the stage as he talked. I L L FU choose, and yet in so many states, they can’t access that right. heard him say, “Turn on, tune in, drop out.” This was genius to IEW INTERV me. So I did drop out of school, […] and then I got it in my head ONLINwE. at ww aper YOU’VE BEEN HAVING A HEALTH ISSUE. DO YOU WANT to go to San Francisco because I guess that’s where things p pghcitym TO TALK ABOUT THAT? were happening. My parents, desperate to stop me, managed .co I am totally freaked out. I’m about 78 percent of my normal ento do so. That’s where my story takes a turn. They lucked out ergy level right now. I’m having a very rough recovery from an and somehow got me to a situation where I was sort of able to emergency surgery. I mean, the show will go on even if I have to be grab onto a branch in this raging river that was carrying me to who wheeled out in a hospital bed. I’m hoping that I’m like a racehorse and knows where. when the gate opens, I’ll come bounding out. A M U RRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE PITTSBURGH MEDIA LANDSCAPE NOW? I think it’s pretty horrific. I think TV news, even at the network level, has dumbed down to a point where my heart goes out to them for having Lynn Cullen’s Wild Ride 6:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 17. Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret, to work in it. There are so many bright, capable people who are in that 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $50-250 (limited tickets remaining at job. I think radio is obviously beyond a vast wasteland. It’s a moonscape, www.tinyurl.com/ovjdtn) N E W S

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OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FOR VIEWING!

FEATURING

POKER NIGHT IN AMERICA CASH GAME NOV 13-14 IN THE BANQUET ROOM

PLAY WITH

THE PROS

NOVEMBER 14 (1A) & 15 (1B) MAIN EVENT

PHIL HELLMUTH

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY. PENDING PGCB APPROVAL.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

November 12, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 46

November 12, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 46