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INFORMATION OVERLOAD: PUBLIC RECORD IS A WELCOME ADDITION TO THE PITTSBURGH BIENNIAL 44


EVENTS 10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.7 – 5pm M . E . :THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

11.21 – 8pm ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN PORNO Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

The Barr Brothers

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS, MILTON FINE CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

11.12 – 8pm Warhol theater | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students | visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes the Montreal-based folk quartet, The Barr Brothers, on a tour supporting their latest release on Secret City Records. Known for their eclectic orchestrations, the new record features a wide range of instrumentation with varied special guest contributions including members of Arcade Fire and Bassekou Kouyate’s band. Since the band’s recent emergence and debut release in 2011, they have headlined the Montreal Jazz Fest and have shared stages with an impressive array of artists from Emmylou Harris to Spiritualized.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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What is Job Perks? Job Perks is Port Authority’s tax-savings program that benefits not only your employees, but your company’s bottom line as well. Here’s how: • Employees benefit because the money used to purchase the pass is exempt from federal taxes. • Employers also benefit by saving on its FICA & FUTA payroll taxes. How does Job Perks work? 1. Employer signs Job Perks agreement to enroll company in the program. 2. Employees must select either a One Zone or Two Zone monthly pass. 3. Monthly passes are mailed directly to the workplace. 4. Cost of the pass is payroll deducted from the employee. 5. Invoices are mailed each month based on the number of passes requested. How does my company enroll? Contact Megan Anthony in Port Authority’s Marketing Department at 412.566.5312 or manthony@portauthority.org.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014


“TOM CORBETT IS MAKING HISTORY ON NOVEMBER 4, ONE WAY OR ANOTHER.”

INCOMING RE: Tea-party Congressman Keith Rothfus is seeking a second term, so how come nobody seems to care? (Oct. 15) “‘You have to be customer-servicefocused.’ Running for a second term and [Keith Rothfus] still doesn’t understand we are citizens, not customers. He is duplicitous and simplistic enough to pander to an electorate he thinks does not know the difference between civic obligations and bargain hunting.” — Web comment from Larry Conley

MONSTER UPSET?

“‘I’m a get-off-your-ass-and-work kind of person.’ And Democrats aren’t? Jeez, the electorate gets dumber and dumber all the time. They’ll buy any line of BS fed to them.” — Web comment from “ClueBusDriver”

RE: Jason Baldinger’s new poetry collection travels the country (Oct. 15) “As a teacher, I respect and honor the intricate word webs woven by our best poets. Jason is one of these masters of the craft. Where Leonard Cohen (one of my favorites) plays with [the] reader’s perception, Jason presents his landscapes and observations in an almost photographic sweep of images. You may have to read and re-read to gauge his emotion of the moment, but you’ll be rewarded once you connect with his both weary and energetic sense of being. His travels have sharpened his vision. The … mundane takes on some majesty here, no easy task. Buy this little volume, brew some coffee or tea and go on a little journey for an hour or two. It’s a worthy ride.” — Web comment from “David Stash”

RE: Daryl Metcalfe really doesn’t like immigrants (Oct. 16, online only) “I love this guy.” — Web Comment from “Bob”

“Drive an hour to a pumpkin patch for Facebook pictures? They got a box of ’em down the grocery store. Hop in there.” – Oct. 19 tweet from

“Pittsburgh Dad”

{ILLUSTRATION BY RHONDA LIBBEY}

I

N THE SUMMER of 2005, Ed Rendell was

in real trouble. His job-approval ratings were low and only four out of 10 voters thought he deserved a second term as governor. G. Terry Madonna, the well-known Franklin & Marshall pollster, wrote on his blog at the time: “The approaching 2006 election cycle may break the iron grip incumbents now have on public office.” For most of the next year, talk focused on whether the streak of Pennsylvania incumbent governors winning re-election — going back to 1968 — would be broken. Many pundits thought Rendell, who was going to face popular Republican and for-

(@PittsburghDad)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

mer Steelers wide receiver Lynn Swann, could be the first. While most people talk about the streak of incumbent governors, there was even more at stake: Republicans and Democrats have traded the governor’s

Tom Wolf has Tom Corbett and the GOP’s gubernatorial legacy on the run {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} office every eight years since 1951. But Rendell spent much of that year using the governor’s office to his advantage,

changing his image and improving his once-dismal 42-percent approval ratings. By the end of the November general election, Rendell had trounced Swann with 60 percent of the vote. “Rendell started off his governorship with pretty low approval ratings, so did [Republican] Tom Ridge for that matter, but they were able to fix them,” Madonna tells City Paper now. “This year is a much different situation. Tom Corbett has never been able to recover from the budget cuts he made in his first year. “Tom Corbett is making history on November 4, one way or another. He’ll either have to win re-election by overcoming the CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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largest poll deficit in history two weeks before the election, or he’ll be the first candidate to lose the governor’s office for his party since the 1950s.” The foretelling of Corbett’s potential demise has been in the cards for some time. In August 2013, Madonna’s Franklin & Marshall poll showed that just 17 percent of respondents thought Corbett was doing a good job and just 20 percent thought he should be re-elected. It was during Corbett’s first budget that voters got a sense of his priorities. He cut $1 billion from education when he refused to use state money to replace expiring federal stimulus dollars — which accounted for half of the $1 billion lost — despite replacing lost stimulus dollars in other areas, like corrections. Corbett has put roughly $1.5 billion into education since then, but most of that went into pensions, leaving basic education — the money sent to classrooms — below the levels they were when he arrived, according to the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center. But it wasn’t education cuts alone that cost Corbett credibility with voters, Madonna says. There were several key policy

reforms that Corbett didn’t get done — pension reform, charter-school reform and liquor-store privatization, for example — that cost him. “He cut school funding and taxpayers in the majority of the state’s 500 school districts saw property-tax hikes and layoffs and program cuts in their schools,” Madonna says. “Then, he failed to deliver on other parts of his agenda. “What makes it worse for him is that he couldn’t get these things done and his own party has controlled the legislature. He hasn’t been able to effectively communicate with them and that has led to a lot of disarray.” Corbett has also had his problems when it comes to social issues. Earlier this year, he may have made a bit of headway when he decided not to appeal a federal court’s ruling legalizing same-sex marriage or a state court’s decision striking down the voter-ID law he had pushed for and signed in 2012. However, the consensus seems to be that Corbett more or less gave up on those issues rather than actually changing his mind. He also got some favorable headlines on medical-marijuana legalization when,

“THE STATE GOP IS NOT IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

in an effort to hold off a planned sit-in by for Republicans generally, but that wave parents of children with debilitating epi- hasn’t seemed to help the governor and lepsy that could be helped by medical can- I think that’s a pretty significant indicanabis, he said he supported a limited pilot tor of the future,” Madonna says. “I think program at some in-state hospitals. How- the state is no longer purple and is now ever, that program was never established, trending light blue [toward Democrats]. and last week a senate-passed medical- And if the Republicans lose control of this marijuana bill died in a house committee. seat, I think all bets are off, possibly for a And then there’s the governor’s track decade or so. record on women’s health. Corbett not “Democrats have taken the state during only signed and supported a law that the last six presidential elections, the state placed onerous, “medically unnecessary” has a Democratic Attorney General for the restrictions on health centers that perfirst time, and all three state row offices form abortions, but also supported are in Democratic hands.” other legislation like one that GOP political strategist Bill required any woman who deGreen seems to agree. Corbett, cided to have an abortion to “The state GOP is not in Wolf on the go through a mandatory ulvery good shape,” Green told Issues trasound. That led to the govCity Paper this past summer. ernor’s statement that women “Ten years ago, you had a bench PAGE 12 who didn’t want to watch could of politicians that included Mike just “close their eyes.” Fisher, Tom Ridge, Rick Santorum, Jim Roddey, Melissa Hart, the Ories Those policies and many others led Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania to do [former state Rep. Jane Orie and her sisa weekly countdown of the “Top 10 reasons ter Judge Joan Orie Melvin], and that’s a why Pennsylvania women can’t afford four list I can develop without putting much thought into it. more years of Tom Corbett.” “But that’s all gone now. It looks like Madonna says Corbett’s re-election struggles come at a time when Democratic we’re about to break an almost 70-year traPresident Barack Obama is also seeing dition of eight years with a Republican and sagging approval ratings. Ordinarily, that eight years with a Democrat as governor. would be a time for Republicans to make And if that happens, it’s because Corbett up ground, not lose it. If the state’s “eight- wasn’t able to do the things he said he was year rule” were going to be broken, this going to do with a Republican-controlled legislature, and that will show that he wouldn’t ordinarily seem like the year. “This should be a pretty good year wasn’t an effective commander.”

{BY MATT BORS}

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In the second of a three-part lecture series, PHLF Historical Collections Director Albert M. Tannler, gives an illustrated presentation on the period in Western architecture known as the “Middle Ages” or the medieval period, which lasted approximately from the 5th through the 15th centuries (400 A.D. through the 1400s). The era comprised a period of architectural design that evolved from the Byzantine through the Romanesque to the Gothic. By the 17th century, when what would become the United States was being colonized, the prevailing European architectural language was Greco-Roman Classicism, reborn during the 16th century Renaissance. The United States, thus, had no indigenous medieval architecture.

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25 • 10-11:30 AM Demonstration Workshop: Using Reclaimed Steel Scraps in Design

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CANDIDATE

TOM CORBETT

BIOGRAPHY

Raised in Shaler, Corbett was a school teacher before attending law school. Spent 10 years as state attorney general (as a Tom Ridge appointee from 1995-97, then elected in 2004 and 2008). Defeated former Allegheny County Chief Executive Dan Onorato for the governor’s office in 2010.

A native of York, Wolf made his living in his family’s kitchen-cabinet-making business before selling, re-buying and bailing out the failing company in 2010. A long-time contributor to political candidates, this is Wolf’s first run at elected office, although he previously served as Gov. Ed Rendell’s revenue secretary.

ECONOMY

Does not support a minimum-wage increase. Has offered tax breaks to corporations, including a $1.7 billion tax break to Shell for a proposed ethane cracker plant in Beaver County. Corbett touts the creation of 184,000 private-sector jobs in his first term; however, Factcheck.org has called those numbers exaggerated.

Wants to cut income taxes on the middle class and provide propertytax relief. Tax breaks would go to individuals making less than $70,000$90,000 (doubled for married couples). Those in the range would not see an increase while those above would. Would enact a 5 percent severance tax on Marcellus Shale drillers.

SOCIAL ISSUES

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Against same-sex marriage (likened it to sibling marriage) but did not appeal court’s legalization decision; supports LGBT anti-discrimination legislation. Endorsed by the NRA and signed stand-your-ground law. Pro-life platform on full display in first term; signed numerous laws limiting legal abortions and also supported mandatory ultrasounds, infamously saying women could “close their eyes” if they didn’t want to see.

Staunchly pro-choice. Supports universal background checks for gun purchases as well as lost-and-stolengun ordinances and favors a ban on assault weapons; was endorsed by Ceasefire Pa. Supports same-sex marriage and laws to prohibit LGBT discrimination. Supports medical marijuana, the decriminalization of pot possession and supports a study of legalization. Backs a moratorium on the death penalty.

EDUCATION

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THE TWO TOMS

Gubernatorial candidates Tom Corbett and Tom Wolf share a first name but have little else in common. Corbett is a Republican and seasoned politician who drifted even further to the right as governor. Wolf, the Democrat, is a progressive on most issues facing the Commonwealth.

Cut $1 billion in state education in his first budget instead of replacing federal stimulus dollars with state funds. Has claimed an overall first-term increase in education funding of $1.5 billion; however, $1 billion of that went to fund pensions and not classroom programs.

Says he would replace the $1 billion cut from the state’s education budget by Corbett in 2010. State would fund 50 percent of education costs, allowing for lower property taxes. Would develop a fair funding formula for all school districts and would reform the state’s charter schools.

Despite trailing Wolf in the polls for the entire campaign, Corbett still has his share of supporters. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has campaigned here and the Republican Governor’s Association has sunk almost $6 million into the campaign. He’s also won the support of the Laborers’ District Council of Western Pennsylvania and the Boilermakers Local 154, which represents energy-sector workers.

Wolf remains his own largest financial backer, kicking off his campaign with $10 million of his own money. York businessman Thomas Grumbacher has given Wolf more than $2 million. He’s also received the backing of most labor unions since his primary win, including AFSCME, SEIU and the American Federation of Teachers, which have each given more than $500,000.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS

Volunteer.

A political neophyte, Erin McClelland cut her teeth in the health-care industry, founding a substance-abuse rehab operation in Blawnox.

Before getting elected to the 12th District, Republican Rothfus was a corporate attorney. The father of six narrowly beat incumbent Mark Critz in 2012.

Is in favor of higher capital-gains and income taxes on the wealthy. “Middle-class wages have stagnated,” she says. “The upper 1 percent are far richer than they’ve ever been. […] That’s just not fair to the middle class.”

Rothfus has pledged not to raise taxes. In a recent debate, he advocated supply-side economic policies, including reducing the corporate tax rate from 35 percent, which he says “puts us at a significant disadvantage in the global marketplace.”

McClelland says she generally doesn’t approve of federal regulations on gun owners, but would support efforts to conduct background checks. She says she wants to eradicate abortion, but not make it illegal, and is also a sharp critic on Rothfus’ VAWA vote, saying the bill provides important resources for women and LGBT people.

Received the NRA’s endorsement and an “A” rating, meaning he’s a “solidly pro-gun candidate.” That doesn’t differentiate him much from McClelland, but there are differences on abortion and women’s rights: Rothfus is pro-life and voted against the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

McClelland isn’t a climate-change denier, but has also criticized the president on energy, calling proposed caps on coal emissions “arbitrary.” Instead, she supports tax incentives to reduce emissions, instead of required reduction benchmarks.

Rothfus echoes the rallying cry that Obama is waging a “war on coal” that will put America at a disadvantage versus countries like China, and raise utility bills. He doesn’t believe climate change is human-caused, and has criticized the EPA for treating carbon dioxide as a pollutant.

Though McClelland has the backing of a slew of Democratic politicians and unions — including the AFL-CIO — she hasn’t been able to translate that into strong campaign contributions. At press time, she had raised $335,000, dwarfed by Rothfus’ $2 million.

Unlike 2012, when Rothfus was in the fight of his life against Critz, conservative SuperPACs such as the Club for Growth aren’t pouring money into his campaign. Instead, Rothfus is playing largely off Obama’s unpopularity.


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★ STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 20 ★

THE NEW NORTH

This race pits incumbent Adam Ravenstahl against Republican Tom Fodi, although Fodi is a former Democrat and identifies as a Libertarian. The candidates have found common ground on several issues: Both are pro-life, and both support medical marijuana and same-sex marriage. But in a district encompassing parts of the city’s northern neighborhoods and Lawrenceville, plus the suburbs of Avalon and Bellevue and portions of Ross Township, there is a varied swath of constituents to appeal to.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

BIOGRAPHY

This gal is a highly energetic, playful pup who can’t wait for her next adventure! Aster is very friendly and thrives on the attention. This wonderful girl would be a perfect fit for an active family with children over eight. She also would prefer to be the only dog in the household.

Two-term incumbent Ravenstahl, of Spring Hill, says elected office is in his “family’s blood.” But he’s often been criticized for ties to his brother, former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. During his tenure, he says, Republican inaction in Harrisburg has been frustrating, but he’s focused his efforts on constituent services locally.

EDUCATION

Aster

A self-professed man of “many hats,” Fodi, of Bellevue, is an inactive officer in the U.S. Air Force, a minister at Emmanuel Christian Church and a business owner. His nonprofit, Liberty in Bellevue, is a communityadvocacy organization championing greater transparency and accountability in government.

Fodi isn’t as concerned with increasing funding for education as with looking more closely at how money is being spent. He says he would reconfigure the formula to ensure districts are receiving funding based on their needs, instead of being allocated the same amount year after year.

A strong ally of the teachers union, Ravenstahl aims to reduce class sizes and prevent teacher layoffs by increasing funding for education. One way he would increase funding is by closing the “Delaware loophole” that allows some businesses to avoid paying taxes.

LIQUOR SALES

Photo by Linda Mitzel Photography.

ADAM RAVENSTAHL

According to Fodi, Pennsylvania is one of only two states that control liquor sales. Calling it a “wasted expense,” Fodi says liquor sales are “not something the state should be involved in.” He says privatizing liquor sales would bring much-needed revenue to the state.

While Ravenstahl doesn’t support privatizing liquor sales, he says he’d like to see a more modernized system that appeals to consumers. He says studies have shown privatization would “increase underage drinking” and could lead to the “proliferation of liquor stores on every corner.”

GUN CONTROL

WEEK

TOM FODI

With an endorsement from Firearm Owners Against Crime, Fodi is a “proud gun owner” and holds a conceal-carry permit. As a constitutionalist, he has vowed to uphold Second Amendment rights.

Ravenstahl supports a “common sense” approach to gun control. He recently voted to defeat a state measure that would have prevented local governments from passing their own ordinances to regulate firearms and ammunition.

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS

CANDIDATE

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Besides the firearms group, he’s been endorsed by the pro-life group LIFEPAC. His cash on hand as of June was just shy of $2,000, which included $500 from Jim Roddey, the head of the county GOP. Fodi is also endorsed by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Ravenstahl has received endorsements from labor unions and education organizations, and his fundraising efforts reflect that. He’s also been endorsed by several fellow Democratic representatives. As of June, he’s raised close to $20,000, more than half of which came from the steamfitters union.


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Pittsburgh’s 1st IMPORT and craft Beer Distributor and still the best!

HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE and the

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL

OCT. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, AND NOV. 1

Open: 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays.

If we don’t stock it, u! we’ll order it for you!

LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE

Admission Only $ $12 to Each Attraction or $ $17 for Both

412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com

18 Pack 16 oz. cans

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com

$17.49

412.682.4396 like us on Facebook!

AN

stock, With over 550 Beerswinrong? how could you go

+ Tax

@MellingerBeer

See website for $3 OFF Coupon

FREE PA R K I N G!

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) North Versailles, PA 15137 1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart • Group rates & private campfire sites available • Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

Survive our

Halloween Night

vampire!

All you can bowl $15 Costume Contests for Hottest, Scariest & most original. Crazy Games and Contests for prizes $1 off Pumpkin Beers

The greatest laser tag challenge of all time!

g Oct 13th. Games startin s October 13- 31. $7 per person, run

win a prize If you are the last one to survive you *Call (412)828-1100 to schedule your challenge.

KIDS HALLOWEEN PARTY SATURDAY, NOV. 1 - $10 Costume Party 2 hours of bowling 1 game of laser Tag 1 slice of Pizza 1 Small Drink Trick or treating Costume Party Balloon Artist

2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com

are we so different?

FINAL WEEKEND See the exhibition that examines the complex issues of race and racism in the US through the lenses of science and society.

you’ll never see race the same way again.

A project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

Presented by

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

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S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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“Selfie fever” has begun to sully the sacred Islamic pilgrimages to Mecca, according to scholars who complained to Arab News in September. What for centuries has been a hallowed journey intended to renew the spirit of Islam (that all Muslims are called upon to experience at least once) has come, for some in the so-called Facebook era, to resemble a trip to Disneyland, with visitors to the Sacred Mosque texting friends the “evidence” of their piety. (Another scholar complained in a New York Times opinion piece in October that Mecca is often experienced more as a tour packaged by marketers and centered on Mecca’s upscale shopping malls rather than religious structures.)

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Just in time for California’s new law requiring explicit consent for students’ sexual activities is the free iPhone/Google app Good2Go, which developer Lee Ann Allman promises will simplify the consent process (and even document it). As described in a September Slate.com report, Good2Go requires the initiator to send the prospective partner to at least four smartphone screens, wait for a text message, provide phone numbers (unless he/she is a multiple-user with an “account”) and choose accurately one’s sobriety level — all before “the mood” evaporates (ending the app’s usefulness). It took the tech-savvy Slate writer four minutes to navigate the process — and she was still unclear which sexual activities had been consented to, because those specifics aren’t referenced. (The app has since been pulled from the market.)

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New York Giants tight end Larry Donnell manages his own fantasy-league team by

“drafting” NFL players for virtual competitions based on their real-life statistics of the previous weekend. Donnell lamented to New Jersey’s The Record in October that he had benched virtual “Larry Donnell” on his fantasy team the week before because he thought his other tight end (“Vernon Davis”) would do better. In reality, real Donnell had a career-high game, with his three touchdowns leading the real Giants to a 45-14 victory. However, Donnell’s fantasy team lost badly because virtual Larry Donnell (and his weekend statistical bonanza) was on Donnell’s bench.

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In August, the Tampa Bay Times reported a dispute in Dunedin, Fla., between 12-yearold lemonade-stand operator T.J. Guerrero and the adult neighbor (Doug Wilkey) trying to close him down as an unlicensed entrepreneur, despite T.J.’s business plan for assisting his favorite animal shelter. Of course, T.J. was quickly inundated with donations, media praise and more lemonade sales. Wilkey, however, is under investigation by the city after a tipster revealed that Wilkey himself might operate a home-based financial-services business not properly licensed.

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Roger Weber, running for a Minnesota House seat in November, is now being sued by a neighbor over a property-line dispute near Nashwauk. Rather than working with an arbitrator or mediator, or letting the legal process run its course, Weber in 2013 took a chain saw and sliced completely in half the large, two-car garage that Weber says sat half on his property and half on the neighbor’s.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

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Sensitive in Vermont: (1) Lianne and Brian Kowiak of Waterbury, Vt., complained to Ben & Jerry’s in September that the name of its new ice-cream flavor, “Hazed & Confused,” was “shock[ing]” and “upset[ting]” and should be changed immediately. Though most customers recognize the name as a play on the 1993 cult movie Dazed & Confused, the Kowiaks insist that they never be reminded that their 19-year-old son died in a college hazing incident. (2) In Winooski, Vt., in August, local eatery Sneakers Bistro earned public advertising space by beautifying one of the city’s flower beds, and managers used it for the quixotic ad, “Yield for Sneakers Bacon.” After one woman complained that the sign disrespected those who do not consume pork, Sneakers took it down.

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Medical Marvels: (1) In October, workers at a clinic in Honda, Colombia, reported helping a 22-year-old woman who came in several days earlier with vegetation growing from her vagina. She said her mother had told her that inserting a potato (now sprouting) was effective contraception. (2) An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Bishkek Hospital in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, in September with severe stomach pains, which doctors discovered was due to her long-standing habit of chewing both discarded hair and her own. Doctors removed a hairball that weighed 8.8 pounds (and a Yahoo News report had a photo).

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Prosecutors in Killeen, Texas, are seeking the death penalty for Marvin Guy, who

in May shot one SWAT officer to death and wounded three as they conducted an unannounced (“no-knock”) drug raid on his home at 5:30 a.m. — leading Guy to believe hoodlums were breaking in and thus provoking him to grab his gun and start firing. (The tip given to police was bogus; no drugs were found.) However, in December, 90 miles away in another Texas county, mistaken SWAT-raid victim Henry Magee also killed an officer under similar circumstances (except that Magee actually had some marijuana), but was cleared in the shooting by a grand jury’s acceptance of self-defense. Guy is black; Magee is white.

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Harmonic Convergence of Perversions: (1) Palm Beach County, Fla., sheriff’s deputies searching the home of child-pornography suspect Douglas Wescott, 55, stumbled upon about 50 dead cats stored in four freezers. Wescott’s computers were seized, along with another 30 to 35 live cats.

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Least Competent Criminals: (1) In October, a man unnamed in news reports snatched a bottle of wine from the shelf of a Sainsbury’s supermarket in East Grinstead, England, and dashed for the door. However, he ran into a shelving unit and knocked himself unconscious. (2) Walter Morrison, 20, a United Parcel Service baggage agent at Phoenix’s Sky Harbor airport, apparently intended only to swipe random parcels, but inadvertently came upon, in one package, a diamond (later found to be worth about $160,000). Police charging him in September said he traded the diamond to a friend for a gram of marijuana (around $20, retail).


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST CAR DEALER IN PITTSBURGH! Scion, Toyota, Mazda, Chevrolet, Honda, Lexus, Maserati, Bentley, and Cadillac make the cars, but...

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Thanks everyone for voting us one of the best!

Love Love, Jamie, John, Lisa, Sean, Aubrianne, Matt, Ruth, Conan Your Friends at The F’ing Allegheny Wine Mixer ! 5326 Butler St., Upper Lawrenceville 412-252-2337

DECEMBER 5-28, 2014 BENEDUM UM CE C CENTER EN NT TER ER

TICKETS CALL: 412.456.6666 6.6666 VISIT: PBT.ORG G Groups of 8+ call: 412.454.9101

Artist: Alexandre Silva Photo: Lois Greenfield

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

The Mexican Underground would like to thank you for voting us one of the best Mexican restaurants.


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THANK YOU

FOR VOTING US BEST COCKTAIL LIST 2108 E CARSON STREET

SOUTH SIDE

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

ORGANIC SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO

BEST PIZZA!

THANK YOU

Squirrel Hill

FULL SERVICE BAR NOW OPEN 2128 Murray Ave.

521-9864 521-2053

FOR VOTING US ONE OF THE BEST DAY SPAS IN PITTSBURGH

Hair Services • Miami-style Nail Bar • Skin Care Massage • Sauna • Body Treatments Yoga Studio • Wellness Coaching • Bridal Parties Able to accommodate large groups 5112 BUTLER ST LAWRENCEVILLE 412.781.1262 SPAPGH.COM 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

Mt. Lebanon

713A Washington Rd.

344-9467 344-9468

Thankk you Pittsburgh tt b and the readers of City Paper for voting us “Best Seafood.”

_

FULL SERVICE SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO

ACACIACOCKTAILS.COM

MONTEREYBAYFISHGROTTO.COM

VOTED BEST PIZZA IN PITTSBURGH FOR OVER 37 YEARS PASTAS • PIZZA • HOAGIES PARTY TRAYS & MORE SUN-THUR 11:00 AM - 1:00 AM & FRI-SAT 11:00 AM - 2:00 AM

We FedEx Pizzas anywhere in the U.S.

www.mineospizza.com


Thai Me Up

NA KA MA

You’re bound to like it

Dine In Take Out Catering Party Trays Available Hours: Monday - Friday 11:00 am – 9:30 pm Saturday Noon – 9:30 pm

412-488-8893 or 412-488-7170 118 S. 23 St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 www.thaimeuppittsburgh.com

Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar

Simply the Best... Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar for 11 consecutive years

Visit Our New Location: WEXFORD PLAZA 10636 Perry Highway 724-638-SAKE(5149)

Visit Our Award Winning Location:

DAVE & ANDY’S

SOUTH SIDE 1611 East Carson Street 412-381-6000

H O M E M AD E ICE HOMEMADE I C E CRE C RE A AM M

Thank You for voting us

Best Frozen Treat!

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: Nakama FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: Nakamasushi

eatatnakama.com

207 ATWOOD ST • OAKLAND • 412-681-9906 N E W S

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TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Thank you for voting for us.

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us Best Indian Restaurant in Pittsburgh

Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine 7795 McKnight Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com

THANK YOU!

PITTSBURGH for voting us your best furniture store!! 2014 2011 2012 2013 Four Years in a Row!

bighamtavern.com

FACEBOOK PAGE Neverending Ink Tattoos

wrecklooseband.com

SAVINGS COUPON

$

50 OFF

ANY FURNITURE OR MATTRESS PURCHASE At any Levin Furniture or Levin Mattress Location

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

One per household. Good thru 10-31-2014. Excludes clearance, accessories, Tempur-Pedic, Serta and promo Sealy mattresses


Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

BYOB TUES.-THURS. 11am - 10pm FRI.-SAT. 11am - 11pm SUN.-MON. - closed

THANK YOU

China Palace Shadyside

FOR VOTING US BEST ITALIAN & BEST BYOB!

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

ß

3801 Butler St • Lawenceville

Featuring cuisine in the style of

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES! Delivery Hours 11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

412-622-0111 www.piccolo-forno.com

Follow us:

@piccoloforno

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE chinapalace-shadyside.com

@piccolofornopgh

Thank You For Voting Us...

Best Bakery & Best Desserts N E W S

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Thank You! for voting our B*tches Ball as City Paper’s Best of Pittsburgh’s

BEST LOCAL FUNDRAISER!

B*tches B*tches Ball Ball 2015! Hope to see you at

HE

D LP U S CELEBRATE WORL

AY D Y SPA

www.animalrescue.org Facebook: facebook.com/AnimalRescueLg Twitter:

@AnimalRescueLg #ARLSavesLives

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

Stay

tune

d!


DE

SI

the

ON

EACH TACO FILLING IS CUSTOM-COMBINED WITH SALSAS, SAUCES, SLAWS AND GARNISHES

QUINCE DAYS {BY AL HOFF} Fall has much to recommend it food-wise, but I’m always excited about the arrival of quince. Martha Stewart calls it “fall’s forgotten fruit,” but it needn’t be. Quince looks like a pear-apple hybrid — especially when ripe and pale yellow — but it’s actually a member of the rose family. (In fact, the fruit gives off a lovely flowery smell, even just hanging out in a bowl.) The apple-like fruit, which is rock-hard and super sour, appears challenging, but lends itself to several easy preparations. Preserves: Rich in pectin, choppedup quince (skin, core, seeds and all) combined with water and sugar turn quickly and easily into preserves, while also turning a gorgeous pink-orange color. (Pro tip: Put core and seeds portions in a spice bag while cooking for easy removal when done.) Advanced cooks can go for membrillo, traditional Spanish quince paste, often served with cheese. Desserts: Treat chopped quince like equally sour rhubarb. It makes a fine pleasing tart addition to sweet breakfast cakes or combination fruit tarts. Stews and tangines: Combines well with beef, lamb and pork. Khoresh beh is slow-cooked meat stew, made lively with quince, prunes and Middle Eastern spices, and as simple to make as any pot roast. The biggest challenge may be finding quince. It does turn up in some supermarkets and farmers’ markets, though often for only a short time. But the bushes grow abundantly around here, so foraging is definitely an option. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

In olden times es in Ireland and nd Scotland, ’twas was the fall roott vegetable e rutabaga thatt was carved into o a hideous face e and placed on the doorstep to ward d off evil spirits. The recent global ascent of the pumpkin has put rutabagas out of spiritual work, but you can still eat them. Chopped small and added to soups and stews, even kids think they’re just weird potatoes.

TIME FOR TACOS {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

L

IKE THE enchanting sirena — mermaid — of legend, Sirena Taco Joint and Bar lured us to the shoals of suburban McMurray with its song of tacos. OK, maybe that’s the song we wanted to hear, but it sure sounded good: Take some classic Mexi-Cali combos, add some trans-national twists (bulgogi, jerk chicken), and the humble, hand-held taco — already one of the world’s most glorious and versatile street foods — becomes a palette for recombining world cuisines, one tortilla at a time. Sirena’s location in far-flung McMurray didn’t faze us in the least. Not only have we grown accustomed to finding culinary sophistication even pretty deep in the suburbs, but we’ve also eaten at a couple of pretty great restaurants within a stone’s throw of Sirena. With local diners accustomed to excellence, it seemed reasonable to expect that standards would be high. The decor did its part to keep those expectations afloat. Its location off an interior “Main Street” inside a strip mall (complete with faux Victorian lampposts) rang hollow to those of us accustomed to authentic

A selection of tacos: barbequed shrimp, “Pittsburgh taco” and beer-battered cod

city streets, but Sirena’s own space was as hip as any urban cantina, with bold, turquoise-and-coral colored walls and a wittily executed undersea theme including pendant lights made from dried blowfish.

SIRENA TACO JOINT AND BAR 3909 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-0329 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Starters, soups and tacos $5-12; salads and taco combo platters $12-24 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED It came as a shock, then, to discover that there was nothing authentic about our first order: margaritas, of course. Sirena’s are available in a surprising panoply of fruit flavors, including blueberry. We ordered the classic lime, but its syrupy sweetness belied any contact with actual citrus fruit and masked the flavor of whatever tequila may have been involved. Cocktails aren’t made

in the kitchen, and food isn’t prepared at the bar, but still … it gave us pause. The chips and salsa weren’t reassuring. Actually, the chips were perfectly good, crunchy and well-salted, but the salsa had little character beyond that of puréed tomato, watery-tasting and lacking in herbal or spice notes. The side of guacamole was a better match for the chips, its citrus-laced flavor revealing that the kitchen, at least, knows how to deploy a lime, and crumbled cotija cheese sprinkled on top adding an extra bit of salty, creamy goodness. We note, however, that the list of ingredients, including poblano pepper, tomatillo, pico de gallo and watercress, led us to expect a guacamole that was chunky and complex, but most of those things served as mere garnishes parsimoniously laid on top. Crispy pork belly didn’t live up to its name. The thick cubes of succulent meat and rich fat were deep brown on top, but crispy? Not so much. But the chorizo salt on the plate added savory zing to each bite, while mango-smoked jalapeño chutney very effectively balanced sweetness, CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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TIME FOR TACOS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

smokiness and spice. Empanadas, filled with reasonably tasty pork, were made with bland pastry, and the additional filling of roasted corn didn’t add much flavor. They came with a black-bean salsa that was inexplicably sweet and a one-note, faintly bitter ancho-chili sauce. At last, it was time for tacos. While Sirena isn’t trying to compete with the new crop of excellent taquerias (and at $8-12 a pair, it shouldn’t), its tacos share their crucial qualities: tasty meat, complementary and sometimes inventive condiments, and tortillas that bring something to the table in terms of texture and taste. In the jerkchicken taco, juicy chunks of poultry, mildly spiced, took main stage, while mango chutney, pickled jalapeños, pico de gallo and crema contributed sweetness, spice and richness, respectively. The Pittsburgh taco could have been a mere stunt, but well-seasoned fries and sriracha-ranch slaw combined well with respectable strips of grilled steak. Fritos did not make the chicken-enchilada tacos especially enchilada-like, but were another fun touch that worked.

Chips and salsa

We also liked the crispy-oyster taco. The shellfish were big and wore crunchy coats of breading, but their distinctive ocean-floor flavor wasn’t obscured by the other fillings: a creamy, tangy slaw, a healthy slather of beer mustard, and the cilantro and lime that kept things at least faintly Mexican. Note that we have yet to repeat an ingredient, and that might be the most impressive thing about Sirena. It could have taken a mix-and-match approach to garnishing its 24 very distinct tacos, from traditional carne asada to fried mac-andcheese, but instead each filling is customcombined with salsas, sauces, slaws and other garnishes that complement it best. And while this might have been a recipe for hit-and-miss results, muddled flavors or ill-conceived combos, we didn’t taste any of that in our sampling of fully one-third of the choices. While Sirena’s execution of some basic Mexican items was rocky, the siren song of its nontraditional tacos rang true. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

WINE PIONEER Noted vintner Gary Eberle hits town A wine novice could be forgiven for finding Gary Eberle a little intimidating. The Pittsburgh native (and former Penn State defensive tackle) is a pioneer: He was the first winemaker in the United States to produce 100 percent syrah, a wine made with dark-skinned grapes originally from the Rhone Valley. However, speaking with Eberle, of Eberle Winery in Paso Robles, Calif., is more like conversation with a jovial, patient uncle.

“I WANT TO GO UP TO MY WINERY AND TALK TO PEOPLE.” Eberle discovered his passion for wine while doing graduate work at Louisiana State University. “I decided I wanted to be an alcoholic and not a geneticist,” he quips; he pursued a doctorate in enology at University of California, Davis. He left school to work in the wine industry in 1973, and a few years later planted California’s first syrah vineyard. His passion never faltered. “Every day was a 15-hour work day and I loved it, I’m not complaining. … Today, I’m here seven days a week,” he says proudly. “People say, ‘What do you want to do?’ and I say, ‘I want to go up to my winery and talk to people.’” Eberle is an enthusiastic advocate for wine education. When he’s not making wine, he’s teaching people about it: He gives classes around the country and is excited by Americans’ growing wine independence. On Mon., Oct. 27, he’ll give a California-wine class at Dreadnought Wines here ($35; reservations required at 412-391-1709). And Tue., Oct. 28, he’ll be guest vintner at the Terrace Room Dinner Series at the Omni William Penn Hotel, with food pairings by chef Luke DeBisschop ($99; reservations at 412-553-5235). Eberle values sommeliers, considering them some of the trade’s best advocates — but he’s adamant that knowledge of wine is accessible to everyone. “Every American knows what their favorite beer is, what their favorite hard drink is [or] where they can get the best hamburger,” he says. “It’s just a bottle of wine. If you like it, it’s good. If you don’t like it, it’s not good.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


Thank You City Paper readers for voting us

Best Sunday Brunch in Pittsburgh!

Muer.com | 100 West Station Square Drive | 412.261.1717

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

EERS B T F A R C 40 N TAP! O NS

BRGR. 5997 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE

CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212

BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412-323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-thanaverage fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-and-bleucheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE

doublewidegrill.com

3

$

COORS LIght cans

Halloween Bash Friday, October 31st 7pm-2am

End of season blow out!!! Live DJ! Best costume contest! prizes! The COORS LIght Girls!

1155 Washington Pike Bridgeville

FOOTBALL

IS HERE! NFL SUNDAY

Ticket & College Games

¢.35 Wings Mon

thru

FRI

$ 2 DRINKS FRI-SAT

10PM-MIDNIGHT

open daily for lunch and dinner

2328 223 328 EE. CCarson arson SSt. t

412-914-8013 • WWW.RUMFISHPGH.COM GREAT SOUTHERN SHOPPING CENTER

412.481.0852

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

SOUTHSIDE

Diamond Market {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE

CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-anddumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a standout Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard Chinese-American menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House cachet of Pamela’s, but the

battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and hand-crafted cocktails. LE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF

Naya {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF

JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers well-prepared Italian-American cuisine and a welcoming atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-todate: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky marinara, fluffily

NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE


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Union Pig and Chicken {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700. This cozy Downtown spot offers a menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti than to pub grub. More than 30 beers are on tap, as well. KE

partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancycasual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE

TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, SALVATORE’S PIZZA . w w w train stations and HOUSE. 612 Penn aper p ty ci h g p family kitchens. From Ave., Wilkinsburg. .com salads containing 412-247-4848. A burdock root and rice neighborhood pizza place balls to cabbage pancakes and and more, Salvatore’s offers stir-fried noodles, this diner-style something even rarer than good venue lets casual eaters expand pizza: fast food of the finest beyond sushi. KE quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. menu has dozens of dishes in 220 N. Highland Ave., East a score of categories. Shellfish Liberty. 412-363-7675. This are prominently featured, and lively family-style BBQ venue worth trying. K hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty pork shoulder and chicken) Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. are “dry” (with sauces at table), Casual elegance is the byword and the sides are well-prepared at this neighborhood venue, classics: mac-and-cheese, baked where the fare is inspired by beans, collard greens and Northern California cuisine, coleslaw. Prices are higher than with seasonal ingredients a roadside stand, but the quality combined into New American is top-notch. KE and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from URBAN TAP. 1209 E. Carson ultra-traditional offerings like St., South Side. 412-586-7499. crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant Though it’s wallpapered in giant updates like duck with orangeTVs, the menu here is mostly apricot balsamic glaze. LF devoid of sports-bar clichés. TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Instead, there is duck-confit poutine, mac-and-cheese with Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. smoked Gouda, a burger topped Yogi Berra groused about the with pork belly and even aged restaurant nobody went to — rib-eye steak. With top-notch because it was always too service and excellent food, Urban crowded. Taste of India is the Tap elevates tavern dining. KE opposite: Everyone goes there

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onsite artist face-painting sugar skulls for guests

$250 Cash & Prizes Best Costume/Sexiest Costume plus numerous other Prizes and Giveaways For Costumes (Prizes Awarded at 12:30AM)

Monster Drink Specials $4 Devil’s Cut & Jacob’s Ghost Cocktails • $4 Tequila Punch Shots $5 Espolon Margaritas • $4 Victory Hop Devil Drafts

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Award Winning Thai Cuisine

We at Nicky’s Thai Kitchen want to

THANK Y U!

For voting us best Thai Restaurant 2011, 2012, 2013 and now 2014. Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisine to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out. Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day.

——— NORTHSIDE ———

——— DOWNTOWN ———

856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B.

903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014


LOCAL

“I DON’T REALLY FEEL COMFORTABLE BEING A TEACHER.”

BEAT

{BY ZACH BRENDZA}

THE OLD AND THE NEW

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

REMAINDERS/BARONS SPLIT RELEASE SHOW with TEDDY DUCHAMP’S ARMY reunion show, WORLD’S SCARIEST POLICE CHASES. 9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 24. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com N E W S

+

COOL AND

UNCALCULATED {BY MARGARET WELSH}

C

ASS MCCOMBS thinks we should all

Remainders, releasing a split with Barons this Friday {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN MACHAROLA}

Friday night at Howlers will mark an arrival, a reunion and a departure for the bands taking the stage at the Bloomfield bar. “It’s gonna be a party. Old school, new school, all at the same time,” says Dan DeLucia, guitarist in local melodic hardcore outfit Remainders. “It’s like a big family reunion almost.” While Remainders and Barons (which features members of Voices in the Wire, American Armada and Grand Piano) will be releasing a split, Pittsburgh punk legends Teddy DuChamp’s Army will reunite and World’s Scariest Police Chases will play its last Pittsburgh show. “It’s definitely a very intertwined community with the crew of dudes that are involved,” says Barons guitarist Mike Rock. “It’s gonna be a night of old friends playing music together, you know?” Rock, like several others, will be playing two sets, and is right in the thick of that community. He started Teddy DuChamp’s Army in the late ’90s and his brother, Dan Rock, is one of the vocalists in World’s Scariest Police Chases, which DeLucia is also in. Remainders and Barons played their first show together in June, and started planning the split 7-inch soon after. “With this band now, and I think Remainders is in a pretty similar situation … it’s just like, ‘Let’s just play music for fun and whatever happens, happens,’” says Rock. “We’re just gonna do it on our own terms.” Friday’s show was originally booked as a release show for Barons’ 7-inch. But with the records in early and Rock not wanting to wait, they played a release show last month. Both of the brothers Rock are heading to The FEST in Gainesville, Fla., and wanted to play a show together before that. With Pittsburgh placed in between major scenes, DeLucia thinks both bands take influence from across the country. “It’s not really Midwest, it’s not really East Coast. It doesn’t really fit into either of those big scenes,” says DeLucia. “I feel like we’re trying to meld that together, and both bands are going in a little different direction but both staying in that same genre.”

be reading more poetry. “The poetry section in any bookstore is always the most neglected,” he says. This is probably sage advice coming from a man who is both well acquainted with classic texts — some of his more obvious references are taken from the “Song of Solomon” and Baudelaire — and a poet in his own right. But if you’re wondering where to start, you’re on your own. “I find it hard to recommend things, because everyone has their own education, their own trip,” he says. “I don’t really feel comfortable being a teacher … telling people how to think and live.” This sort of demurring is typical, though less a matter of modesty than the product of a clear sense of self. While he is hardly an interview-dodging recluse, nearly every profile of McCombs describes the singer-songwriter as some variation of “cagey,” with a reticence to discuss the meaning behind his songs, or to follow certain ingrained conversational expectations; for instance, he allows for sometimes awkwardly long pauses and rarely uses verbal filler. As a result, it’s tempting to mythologize McCombs as some sort of riddle-speaking, Dylan-esque representation of the Old Weird America. McCombs, for his part, is barely aware of this stock music-journalism characterization. “I don’t read my clips, but I do talk to people, like now. Right now,” he

Following “Sean”: Cass McCombs

says, with a light laugh. “But to hear that is at least somewhat bizarre because I feel like I’m being pretty straight up.” In other words, what some seem to interpret as slightly craggy antagonism is just thoughtfulness. “Perhaps in this world of deception and lies, people are just naturally suspicious of everybody, you know?” he muses. “I think I am. I have my moments of, you know, flashbacks, acid paranoia” McCombs’ dry sense of humor — along

CASS MCCOMBS WITH MEAT PUPPETS

8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

with a general weirdo-country-psych-rock sensibility — makes him a fitting tour-mate for the Meat Puppets, with whom he recorded a split 7-inch, to be released later this month. (McCombs contributed two new tracks, while the Puppets covered “Cathy’s Clown” and “(Hey Baby) Que Paso.”) McCombs dislikes the word “fan.” (“It just sounds … demeaning? As if [it’s] a follower, some kind of sheep and not an autonomous, enlightened individual.”) But he counts the Meat Puppets, and Curt Kirkwood’s guitar playing in particular, as influences: “Coming from the West, that was a huge part of our musical education,” he recalls. “The SST music, the Meat Puppets and Minutemen, it just crossCONTINUES ON PG. 34

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COOL AND UNCALCULATED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

references so many different styles.” A Californian by birth, now living in New York, McCombs has rarely stayed in one place for very long, which gives him the romantic air of a traveling troubadour. He’s extremely prolific, having released seven records over the last decade — most recently last year’s strange and sprawling 22-track double record, Big Wheel and Others. It’s is an unwieldy collection of songs, jumping from country-rock trucker anthems and spooky, low-key murder ballads, to (in one case) an odd Karate-esque indie-jazz interlude. Sometimes the songs are funny and sometimes they’re wrenching, and sometimes they’re wrenching until you realize you’ve missed the joke. Big Wheel and Others is loosely tied together with clips from Ralph Arlyck’s 1970 documentary short “Sean,” a collection of interviews with the 4-year-old son of San Francisco hippies. These can be a bit unsettling (in the first clip, Sean talks gleefully about smoking pot), though they’re not necessarily meant to be. “We wanted to give [Big Wheel] the expanse that you’re allowed on a double record,” says McCombs, “not just making it a conveyer belt of songs, but breaking it up with sound clips, like a Wu Tang record.” The interviews, McCombs felt, matched the tone of songs, but there was more to it than that. “Sean is attempting to explain what he sees as the world, and a lot of what he says is hilarious and a lot of what he says is mundane because he’s repeating what he hears adults say,” he says. “I think all of us do that. A lot of what we think we’re thinking is just what someone else told us to think. And I think that’s a fact. I don’t think you can really avoid that.” Not everything on Big Wheel works and, on the whole, it’s not as consistently successful or cohesive as earlier efforts like Humor Risk and Wit’s End (which were released just seven months apart). But few modern songwriters seem to approach songwriting with less calculation — it’s easy to imagine that songs are spilling effortlessly out of McCombs at all times. Surely, one speculates, McCombs must possess an unusually strong sense of freedom, artistic and otherwise. “No,” McCombs says with a laugh. “I don’t feel free. I don’t. I mean, I try not to even think about my feelings on that level, whether or not I’m free or imprisoned by whatever … mostly the songs I write … they don’t always necessarily come from a personal place. I don’t need to express myself, completely. I gave up trying to do that. It’s a useless desire. And it’s kind of a delusional fantasy to expect that every song is a complete encapsulation of your entire spirit, you know?” MWE L SH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

NEW RELEASES

THE FEEL-GOOD REVOLUTION HOME (SELF-RELEASED)

New 10-track full-length from the guy-girl duo named, presumably, for a Bright Eyes song. Sweet stuff — Cody Kraski and Claire Secen trade off vocals, then much of the time create beautiful harmonies between the two of them. Some of the content is happy, some sad, but most of the album feels so squeaky-clean, it’s often tough to break through to the emotion. But catchy songs well-performed. — ANDY MULKERIN

RED ROOM EFFECT FRAME OF MIND (SELF-RELEASED)

Impressive sounds on a debut EP from a local three-piece. With some straight-up rock tunes, some funky blues, some illadvised rapping (reminiscent of Anthony Keidis) and recurrent grunge overtones, Red Room Effect is diverse in its influences, but perhaps a little too diverse, in that we can’t find the band’s center. That having been said, a few of the tunes here are top-notch; “Raindrops” could have been a ’90s radio hit no problem. Talented guys, maybe just looking to find their voice as a unit. — ANDY MULKERIN

RED ROOM EFFECT EP RELEASE. 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10-12. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz LUKE-O LACOSTE BOSS (SELF-RELEASED)

Luke-O, from Fayette County, has been rapping with the Moola Gang Cash Cows since 2007. His new pop-culture-meetsmafioso-rap mixtape (available at DatPiff. com) is packed with swag, rock ’n’ roll samples and movie snippets. The cover art showcases Luke-O (whose last name is actually Lucostic) as a baby in his Lacoste onesie, a product of a family business which sells the apparel. Despite a lack of local attention, Luke-O was recently featured on AllHipHop.com; his original sound will keep your attention and catchy melodies will keep your head bobbing. — MICHAEL CRANDLE


LOSING THE LABEL {BY ANDY MULKERIN} NEON HITCH grew up in a circus family in England, became a singer in her early 20s, and once lived with Amy Winehouse. She spent four years signed to Warner Brothers, and despite having two songs that hit No. 1 on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart, she never had a full album released by the label. She left Warner this year, and recently started an Indiegogo campaign to fund her forthcoming album. She talked to City Paper via phone two days after the campaign began, at the start of her Yard Sale Tour, which brings her to the Delta Foundation’s “Nightmare on Hellsworth” event this weekend.

SO, 48 HOURS INTO YOUR INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN, YOU’RE AT OVER $16,000 RAISED. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE PROJECT SO FAR — IS IT MEETING YOUR EXPECTATIONS? Yeah! It’s really inspiring to take my freedom back and have the support of my fans. I think people want to see me do well, and I think my fans are happy that I’m doing this independently — it’s liberating!

Having a yard sale: Neon Hitch

very passionate, and work very hard, so they basically are my label. This label I’m building, We Are Neon, is the fans. I’m raising money to hire the fans to do what people from a label would normally do. But my fans would do it more passionately.

“I’M RAISING MONEY TO HIRE FANS TO DO WHAT A LABEL WOULD NORMALLY DO.”

WHAT LED TO YOU PART WAYS WITH THE LABEL? I wanted to put an album out; I’m always making music, so the album wasn’t coming out, and by the time I was like, “OK, let’s do this,” I’d made another album. I’m always creating; I don’t want to be creating and [have] it going to waste.

NIGHTMARE ON HELLSWORTH

FEATURING NEON HITCH, STEVE GRAND, ERIKA JAYNE 7 p.m. Fri., Oct 24. Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $25. 18 and over. www.deltafoundation.us/tickets

THE FORTHCOMING ALBUM IS ALREADY DONE, RIGHT? Yeah — it’s all new music, it’s not old stuff, but yeah. Eluetheromaniac. I’ll be performing songs from it on the tour, and people will get to see what it’s all about. THE INDIEGOGO ISN’T JUST TO FUND THE ALBUM; YOU WANT TO CREATE A “FAN LABEL.” WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? My fans are incredibly talented, and

WILL THE FANS BE MAKING BUSINESS DECISIONS, OR DOES THAT ALL COME DOWN TO YOU? This is my project, and I’m the ideas person and the decision-maker. But I have organizers; we don’t want it to all be a random mess. It’s basically like I’m the head of the label, then I have people below me to organize. HOW DOES THE “YARD SALE” CONCEPT PLAY INTO ALL THIS? I was like, “What’s the best way to get rid of the old emotional baggage? Have a yard sale!” It’s emotional cleansing, and it’s a great concept for the tour, because I’m bringing actual yard-sale items — like, costumes I’ve worn — and that’ll be part of the stage props, an actual yard sale. And people can bring their own stuff and sell it at a physical yard sale, so kids can make their own money to pay for the ticket. It’s a really cool concept: It’s interactive! DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHEN THE NEW ALBUM WILL COME OUT? I have a date in my head which I’m sure my fans can figure out — they know my numbers. But I’m not announcing an actual date right now. AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS

PitchBlak Brass Band

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

[BRASS BAND] + SAT., OCT. 25

[TRIBUTE] + SAT., OCT. 25

“Brass band” can mean a lot of things, from a traditional outfit playing marches to a raucous gypsy-music group or a New Orleans-style jazz combo. In the case of PitchBlak Brass Band, it’s something different still: The Brooklyn-based 10-piece ensemble has as much in common with contemporary hip hop as with any older idiom. (One apt comparison parison might be Chicago’s Hypnotic Brass rass Ensemble.) The band comes to Cattivo vo o tonight; openers include horn-infused n-infused locals Beauty Slap and a Pandemic andemic DJ set. (The band will also so play a set Saturday afternoon on at the Children’s Museum.) Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 146 6 44th St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. 0. 412687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz ttivo.biz

As we near Halloween, plenty of local musicians are jumping at the chance to dress up as another band. But Muscle of Love is making it happen on a much more regular basis. The group of scene vets — representing bands stretching way back, Science Fiction including The Ultimatics and Scien Idols — got together earlier this yyear to ended up jam on Alice Cooper songs, and e band forming a full-time tribute. The b headlines tonight at the Smiling Smili Moose. AM M 10 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $5-6. 412-431-4668 or 412-431www.smiling-moose.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., OCT. 25

Tickets at www.jergels.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

Pittsburgh native and d Kalob Griffin Band drummer er Eric Lawry is always thrilled to return to his hometown. The Philadelphia-based foursome is making a pilgrimage to Pittsburgh tonight to o headline Mr. Small’s and bring some of itss Americana rock ’n’ roll oll energy. KGB members rs create a wild, improvised sed atmosphere in the room oom when they’re on stage. ge. So have a drink or two wo and make some noise e at their show: After all, they cite “folk-lovin’, whiskeyskeyfueled, outlaw stories” s” as the inspiration for their lyricism and spirit. rit. Samantha Ward 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. lvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 1-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[INDIE FOLK] + SUN SUN., OCT. 26

Former Hot Water Mu Music guitarist Chuck Ragan was raise raised in Tennessee before discovering punk disc Louisiana. To launch his rock in Louisiana solo career in 2005, Ragan conceptualized conceptualiz the Revival Tour, an acoustic event ac that allowed allow a group of bluegrass, alt-country alt-count and punk-rock punk-roc musicians to Chuck Ragan collaborate collabora and tour {PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA JOHNSON} together. togethe He recently released release his fourth studio album, Till Midnight, and Midn is touring and tou writing writin an original score for a new video game to be released by rele Molasses Molas Flood. His tour to of the East Coast stops C in tonight at ton Club Café. SW 7 p.m p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. Side 412-431-4950 412 or www.club cafelive.com ca


412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

THE

DO

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

BLUE

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 23 ALTAR BAR. Kina Grannis. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Brother Short Band. North Side. 412-322-1850. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Judy Collins. 412-368-5225. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Immortal Bird, Fisthammer, Greywalker, Night Vapor. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. STAGE AE. The Glitch Mob, The M Machine, Chrome Sparks. North Side. 412-229-5483. STEEL CACTUS. Walk of Shame. Shadyside. 412-709-6444. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Trace Bundy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 24 ALTAR BAR. Totally Bitchin’ 80’s Halloween feat. The Legwarmers. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Dirty Fingers. Station Square. 412-232-3101.

The Heights, Mike B. Lawrenceville. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Justin 412-681-4318. Beck Piano Party. North Side. HARD ROCK CAFE. Airiel Down. 412-323-2924. Station Square. 412-481-7625. CAFE 304. Jeremy Casella, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Wafarring Brothers. Downtown. World’s Scariest Police Chases, 412-726-4217. Remainders, BARONS, Teddy CATTIVO. The CATtivo Duchamp’s Army. Bloomfield. HOWLoween Bash. Muscle of Love 412-682-0320. as Alice Cooper, The Neverweres KOPPER KETTLE. Kings Ransom. as James Gang, Bloated Sluts as Washington. 724-225-5221. Siouxsie & the Banshees, LATITUDE 360. Digital Jackals of Botswanna Getdown. North Fayette. as The Cramps, The 412-693-5555. CHEATS as Devo, MOONDOG’S. G13, Thunder Vest as . w w w Shakedown. Blawnox. The Cars, Brazillian aper p ty ci h g p 412-828-2040. Wax as The Wipers, .com MR. SMALLS THEATER. more. Lawrenceville. Brimstone Coven, Cruces, 412-687-2157. The Black Six, Starve, Patton. CLUB CAFE. Umphrey’s Millvale. 866-468-3401. McGee, Dopapod Los RAMADA INN HOTEL Straitjackets feat. Deke Dickerson, & CONFERENCE CENTER. The B-Sides. South Side. Lovebettie. Greensburg. 412-431-4950. SPACE. Brooke Annibale, GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Dead Shani Banerjee. Downtown. Congregation, Mausoleum, 412-325-7723. Pissgrave, Wrought Iron Garfield. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Scarlet 412-361-2262. & the Harlots. Lawrenceville. GOOD TIME BAR. Lenny 412-682-0177. Smith & The Ramblers. Millvale. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The 412-821-9968. Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. HAMBONE’S. Still Not Sober, 724-494-1578.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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SAT 25

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHAEL KATSUR}

PALERMO STONE

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Palermo Stone, who recently released a full-length, The 2nd Coming. Stream or download

“Milk and Honey” for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

BUCKHEAD SALOON. Dirty Fingers. Station Square. 412-232-3101. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Jeff Grable. North Side. 412-323-2924. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Carnegie Mellon Chamber Music. Oakland. 412-268-2000. CLUB CAFE. Cass McCombs, Meat Puppets. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FRANKIE I’S. Waiting for Ray. Washington. 724-743-3636. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Jeffrey Lewis & The Jrams, Midge Crickett, Scott Fry. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JUGO SLAV CLUB. Brother Short Band. Bethel Park. 412-835-9928. NORTHGATE CHURCH. Joy Ike, Peace Ike, Mark Williams, Slow Machete. Ross. PALACE THEATRE. Ian Anderson. The Best of Jethro Tull. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Clinton Clegg’s The Commonheart. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. 3 Car Garage. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Twisted Fate. Greensburg.

Wednesday 22nd - Malibu promo - 3 fLavors from 10-12 Thursday 23rd - karoake FInals - Smirnoff promo 3 fLavors Friday 24th - Pin-ups and Pirates costume party Moonshine spirits promo for 10-12

Saturday 25th - costume party Jim Beam Fire promo at 10PM and Nitemare on Carson barcrawl starts at 1pm

Tuesday 28th - Pumpkins and Pounders Carve paint whatever you like to our pumpkins and enjoy one of our many craft brews in 16oz cans. Three Olives Apple promo at 10pm

Wednesday 29th - Halloween Trivia JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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An Evening of Music live music, great wine

PITTSBURGH WINERY

LIVE IN THE CELLAR Oct. 24 Silencio Oct. 25 Clinton Clegg presents The Commonheart + guests Lone Wolf Club & Joanna Lowe Oct. 28 Hannah Aldridge w/ Kayla Schureman 7PM Oct. 30 The Mulligan Brothers Oct. 31 Gene the Werewolf Nov. 1 Velvet Heat CD Release Nov. 7 Jasmine Tate and Friends Nov. 8 Tania Grubbs and TRAVLIN’ Nov. 13 David Childers Nov. 15 Grape Stomp Noon-3pm Nov. 15 Cello Fury Nov. 21 These Lions CD Release Nov. 26 The Routines Nov. 29 Women’s Center & Shelter Benefit w/Neids Hotel Band Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

2815 PENN AVENUE, PITTSBURGH PA 15222

4504 BUTLER STREET

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

RIVERTOWNE BREWING COMPANY. Fungus. ROCK ROOM. No Brainer, Die Choking, Last. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. STAGE AE. Kalob Griffin Band, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. North Side. 412-229-5483. SUB ALPINE CLUB. Valhalla, Deliverance. 412-823-6661. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cosby Sweater. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 26 OCTOBER 24: 8PM

Jacob Jeffries w/Heidi Jacobs Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Boz Scaggs. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Chuck Ragan. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Joycut. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 27 ALTAR BAR. The Sounds of Liberty (TSOL), The Briefs, The Cheats. Strip District. 412-263-2877. GOOSKI’S. J Fernandez. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Destroyer of Light, Island of Giants, Drätun Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Streets of Laredo. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 28 ALTAR BAR. You Me At Six. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. The Toasters, The Skunk 11, The Slobberknockers. South Side. 412-431-4950.

HARD ROCK CAFE. Alexz Johnson, Jared & The Mill, Patrick Droney. Station Square. 412-481-7625. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Tobacco Road. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Pentagram, Radio Moscow, Bang, Kings Destroy. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Orchestra Of Spheres. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ John Bagnato Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 29 ALTAR BAR. Big Wreck, Spike Merlot, Shadow of the Flag. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Chris Smither. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Loveless, The Big Bad, Under a Nightmare, Children of October. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Adrian Belew Power Trio. South Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 23 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. 412-969-0260. LINDEN GROVE. DJ Bugger. Castle Shannon.

412.326.5964

WE’LL CUT YOU. 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

TUE 28 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

WED 29 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 28 REX THEATER. TWIZTID. South Side. 412-381-6811.

BLUES FRI 24 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad ft. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. SHELBY’S STATION. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville.

FULL LIST ONLINE

www. per pa pghcitym .co

SAT 25

JIMMY Z’S PLACE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bellevue. 412-766-3110. MOONDOG’S. Vince Adwada, Jimmy Adler, Craig King. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Witchdoctors. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

FRI 24

WED 29

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Da Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Sweaty Betty. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SAT 25

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

CATTIVO. Pitchblak Brass Band, Beauty Slap, Pandemic. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-657-2279. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

SUN 26 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles Sin Night w/ DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-323-2924.

JAZZ THU 23 ANDYS. Maria Becoates-Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

FRI 24 ANDYS. Trudy Holler. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 25 ANDYS. Kathy Conner. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Cécile McLorin Salvant North Side. 412-322-1773. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.


EARLY WARNINGS

SUN 26 PALACE THEATRE. Kenny Rogers. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARINA ABADJIEFF/CAMI}

MON 27

Antibalas

{THU., NOV. 20}

Bob Dylan and His Band Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown {MON., DEC. 15}

The 1975 {WED., FEB. 04}

Antibalas and Zap Mama Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown

SUN 26

WED 29

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WORLD

WED 29

SAT 25

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414.

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH. The St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble.

SUN 26

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Graham Denmon. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Russian Balalaika Orchestra of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3116. HAMBONE’S. Geńa, Preach Freedom, Elie Kihonia. Int’l Open Stage. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 24

REGGAE

ACOUSTIC THU 23

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Roy Book Binder. Harmony. 724-452-0539.

SAT 25 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAVERN IN THE WALL. James Hovan. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

SUN 26 SAND HILL BERRIES. Brad Yoder. 724-547-4760.

TUE 28 PITTSBURGH WINERY. Hannah Aldridge w/ Kayla Schureman. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SATURDAY, OCT. 25, 2014 9 P.M.

CLASSICAL FRI 24 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Divine Travel feat. Lorna McGhee Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WITH: AARON KLEIBER · SHAUN BLACKHAM · T-ROBE

SAT 25 EXPLORING THE PIANO: CHARLES VALENTINE ALKAN 200TH ANNIVERSARY. Eric Dzugan, piano, Mendelsshohn Choir under Betsy Burleigh, James Gorton, Rise Kostilnik, Renate Sakins, David Sogg. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-422-1630. JOSE RAMOS SANTANA. Music in a Great Space. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

COMEDY NIGHT TICKETS DOORS OPEN AT 8 P.M. SHOW AT 9 P.M.

PURCHASE TICKETS AT 7SPRINGS.COM OR CALL 1.888.71.TICKETS

FRI 24 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY THU 23

CHERRY RHODES, ORGANIST. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. PITTSBURGH CONCERT CHORALE FESTIVAL OF CHOIRS. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Divine Travel feat. Lorna McGhee Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 25 HARVEY WILNER’S. Dallas Marks. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. ZAMBONI SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Ironhorse. New Kensington.

TA S T E

BOOK YOUR PACKAGE - CALL 866.437.1300

The beer that invented Light beer.

TUE 28 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside. HAIG MARDIROSIAN. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-4951.

OTHER MUSIC

Steel Towne Inn

THU 23 THE ROOTS CELLAR. Long Time Courting. Shadyside.

DURING PITTSBURGH FOOTBALL GAMES

FRI 24 THE ALLOY STUDIOS. Anqwenique Wingfield & Joe Sheehan. Groove Aesthetic: Winds of the Sahel. Friendship. 412-363-4321. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Silencio. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL SPECIAL

SAT 25 HEINZ CHAPEL. A Memorial Concert for Dr. Robert Sutherland. Feat. Steven Anisko, Robert Blevins, Douglas Himes. Oakland. 412-624-4157.

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CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

M U S I C

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LITE BOTTLES 2.25 MILLER

$

LITE 16oz DRAFTS 2.75 MILLER

$

NORTH STAR

WED 29

ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. 724-265-1181.

+

INCLUDES ONE NIGHT OF LODGING · BREAKFAST ONE COMEDY SHOW TICKET PER PERSON TWO DRINK TICKETS PER PERSON

777 WATERWHEEL DRIVE · SEVEN SPRINGS, PA 15622 866.437.1300 · 7SPRINGS.COM

SUNDAY FOOTBALL SPECIAL

F O L LO W @ M 2 T H I R D N E W S

COMEDY NIGHT PACKAGE

SUN 26

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

MON 27

NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, The Mavens, The Beagle Brothers. Patsy Paloosa. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

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# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H E V E N T S

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

October 22 - 28 WEDNESDAY 22

412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 23

The Smokers Club Tour ft. Method Man & Redman

Huntress SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Lettuce MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Rocco Deluca CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

New Found Glory ALTAR BAR Strip District.

Club Lounge, SOUTH SIDE Tickets: lindypromo.com. 5p.m.

SUNDAY 26

An Evening with Boz Scaggs “The Memphis Tour”

Kina Grannis

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Glitch Mob STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25 SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT

All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

The Sleeping Beauty BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pbt.org. Through Oct. 26.

The Wizard of Oz

FRIDAY 24

Umphrey’s McGee STAGE AE North Side.

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Seven Springs Comedy Night

Judy Collins CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

MAINSTAGE THEATER Midland. 724-576-4644x2. Tickets: lppacenter.org. Through Nov. 2.

Comedian Shawn Banks & more. Tickets: 7springs.com. LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 7p.m. & 9:30p.m. Through Oct. 25.

SATURDAY 25 Seven Springs Comedy Night

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. 866-437-1300. With T-Robe, Shaun Blackham

9p.m.

Kalob Griffin Band MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Nightmare on Carson Street - Pittsburgh's Largest Halloween Party Registration begins at Diesel

MONDAY 27 TSOL / The Briefs

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 28 Alexz Johnson / Jared & the Mill

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

FALL SALE NOW – SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26 SCOTT GREEN: New Balance Factory Representative 10AM-5PM WATERFRONT Friday, Oct. 24 WEXFORD Saturday, Oct. 25 40

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

$

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

REDEEMABLE TOWARDS ANY REGULAR PRICED NEW BALANCE, ARAVON, DUNHAM OR COBB HILL PURCHASE

VALID THRU OCT. 31, 2014 Minimum purchase $100. Limit to one certificate per customer. Certificate must be presented at time of purchase. Can not be combined with other offers and discounts. Some exclusions may apply. MAILRNB

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


PRIDE AND PREJUDICE

BILL MURRAY OFFERS HIS PATENTED BRAND OF LOOSELY FUNNY WHILE DOING BANAL THINGS

{BY AL HOFF} Can you combine the following downbeat aspects of 1984 Britain — the bleak days of the miners’ strike, the darkening clouds of AIDS and pervasive homophobia — into a feel-good film sure to make audiences cheerfully blubber and tap their toes to a forgotten Bronski Beat song? Logic says no, but Pride says yes!

Jessica Gunning and Dominic West take a twirl.

CP APPROVED

Matthew Warchus’ ensemble comedy (with just a splash of drama) is another in the canon of snuggly, inspired-by-real-events British films about plucky working-class people, portrayed with much crowd-pleasing brio by popular actors. Here, a group of gay-rights activists from London raise funds for a struggling coal town in Wales (true story!), and along the way, friendships are forged, prejudices are dispelled and one lucky lad gets a comingout story all his own. Actors among the “pits and perverts” (actual U.K. tabloid sobriquet for the unlikely alliance) include: Paddy Considine, Imelda Staunton and Bill Nighy for the pits, and Ben Schnetzer, George McKay and Dominic West for the pervs. It’s all as predictable, cliché-filled and bombastically heartwarming as you’d expect, but in these fractured cultural times, it’s nice to spend a couple hours with disparate people coming together for once, even if it happened three decades ago and reeks of movie magic. And seriously, anybody who doesn’t burst into happiness when the bemulleted West wins over the grumpy miners by breaking into the best-worst disco dance down at the union hall just isn’t human. Manor AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

They warned you that the Ouija board wasn’t a toy, that goofing off with one could summon unholy forces from beyond the veil. See for yourself when Stiles White’s economically named horror thriller Ouija opens Fri., Oct. 24.

DUST BUDDIES {BY AL HOFF}

N

Division of labor: Bill Murray and Jaeden Lieberher tackle some yard work.

EWLY SI NGLE mom Maggie

(Melissa McCarthy) works long hours and needs somebody to keep an eye on her son Oliver after school. Turns out her cranky neighbor Vincent (Bill Murray) could use the cash, and a bargain is struck. Vincent is the worst possible caregiver, which turns out to be for the very best in this quirky comedy. Of course. St. Vincent, from writer and director Theodore Melfi, making his feature debut, isn’t about plot. It simply sets up a shaggy-dog framework so its star can just be his patented brand of loosely funny in scene after scene of doing banal things. Murray dances to classic rock. Eats sardines. Withdraws money from bank. Drives. I’d have happily watched that for 90 minutes, and even Melfi seems to get it: There’s a lengthy scene that is just Murray singing along to Bob Dylan and badly watering a plant. But Hollywood needs a hook, and here it’s Oliver (Jaeden Lieberher), the

naïve kid who needs to be schooled in debauchery by Vincent, which has the reverse effect of allowing the old curmudgeon to drop his guard and care about somebody. On their shared journey, they hit the racetrack, a dive bar and a tree or two. That’s all good.

ST. VINCENT STARRING: Bill Murray, Jaeden Lieberher, Melissa McCarthy, Naomi Watts DIRECTED: by Theodore Melfi Starts Fri., Oct. 24

Less good is that, beside the killjoy mom, the other female character is a hackneyed whore-with-a-heart-of-gold, played by poor Naomi Watts, struggling to convey hard-bitten Russian stripper realness. (Men: If your unimaginative script offers only mother and hooker roles for women, then you should throw at least one out.) Another genuinely funny performer, Chris O’Dowd, gets the most fun he can

out of what is essentially a straight-man role, as a priest and teacher at Oliver’s Catholic school; his reaction to Oliver’s mom’s over-share about her fallopian tubes is some delightful mugging. But throughout the delicately balanced buddy comedy of Vincent and Oliver, Melfi can’t stop beating us over the head with the not-so-surprising reveal that cranky old Vincent is a nice guy after all. From the give-away title and the detailed definition of what a saint is from Oliver’s teacher to the final reel’s clunky enumeration of the same points all over again, Melfi’s lack of faith in the viewers’ ability to discern the obvious winds up smothering what could have been a far more winning feature. But, you’re coming to see Murray, and this is a film clearly constructed for his bittersweet, off-kilter comic gifts, so you won’t be totally disappointed. Think of St. Vincent as a perfect bite of sweet-buttart candy that is unfortunately covered in waxy “chocolate-y coating” instead of creamy chocolate. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

Poltergeist

-Blackenstein ---------------------------------------Project - - - - - 22- - -Premeire -------------------------------Pgh- - -48- -Hour- - - - Horror - - - - - -Film- - - Project ---------------------The- - -Other- - - - Side- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Matango: - - - - - - -Attack - - - - - of- - the- - - Mushroom - - - - - - - - -People -------------Rocky - - - - -Horror - - - - -Picture - - - - - -Show -----------------------

NEW

(1982) - 10/22 @ 7:30pm - Tobe Hooper directs this Spielberg written classic! (1973) - 10/23 @ 7:30pm - Blacksploitation horror!

DEAR WHITE PEOPLE. Writer-director Justin Simien makes a splashy debut with this buzzed-about ensemble comedy that’s a provocative and entertaining mash-up of satire, campus comedy and truth-telling about race in contemporary America. Set on a prestigious, and mostly white, campus, the film takes its title from one student’s radio show, a biting primer for white people interacting with blacks. (“My hair is not a petting zoo.”) The radio show and the broader discussions it prompts run throughout the film, covering issues such as personal representation (blacks who act white, whites who act black, gays who aren’t black enough, blacks who act too black), as well as cultural tropes (rap, Tyler Perry, fear of Obama). That’s a lot to cover in a film that on its surface is about a party that goes very wrong, but Simien’s not done tossing hot potatoes in the air: sexuality, father-son conflicts, media complicity, racial privilege and, perhaps most critically, our successes and failures to collectively talk about all these things in our not-really-post-racial society. Simien steers it all to a resolution that manages to find a sweet spot between hopeful, cynical and, yeah, still angry. (Be sure to catch the credits.) But don’t let all this fancy big-issues-talk keep you away: This film is also very funny. Starts Fri., Oct. 24. AMC Loews (Al Hoff)

CP

(2014) - 10/24 @ 7:00pm A new documentary that follows two combat wounded veterans on a mission to find hope.

- 10/24 @ 6:00pm - Join us as we watch the films, vote on favs, and give out awards.

(2014) - 10/26 @ 1:00pm, 4:00pm & 7:00pm Premiere weekend of locally filmed zombie flick with a twist.

(1963) - 10/28 @ 7:30pm - Classic Japanese hallucinogenic horror film. Food by Wild Purveyors, drinks by Full Pint Brewing. Doors open at 6:30pm. Midnight

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

- 10/24 @ Midnight, 10/25 @

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

JOHN WICK. Keanu Reeves stars as a former hitman who comes out of retirement to tracks down some folks who harmed him, in this action thriller from David Leitch and Chad Stahelski. Starts Fri., Oct. 24.

Dear White People and courage. In hindsight, too, are lessons about America’s trouble disentangling from military ventures that don’t quite turn out right — timely reflection as we “leave” Iraq and Afghanistan. In English, and some Vietnamese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 24. Harris (AH) MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN. In Jason Reitman’s ensemble drama, high school kids and their parents generally make a mess of their lives using social media. None of it will come as a surprise to anybody living in the year 2014: Teenage boys consume epic amounts of online porn; teenage girls pose for provocative photos; adults use the Internet to easily coordinate extramarital hook-ups; some parents FREAK OUT about the Internet; a high school guidance counselor doesn’t know what IRL means (LOL); and texting is the new talking. One subplot does suggest that social media can be useful, especially for more sensitive teens with interests beyond football, but you will ROTFL with its melodramatic outcome. The film’s primary achievement: a zippier way of putting text bubbles and Internet searches on screen. (AH)

REPERTORY

John Wick LAST DAYS IN VIETNAM. It’s no secret that the U.S. departed hastily and awkwardly from Vietnam in the spring of 1975, but Rory Kennedy’s documentary fills in plenty of fascinating and troubling detail about the final hours before Saigon’s fall. Through contemporary first-person interviews and extensive archival footage, those on the ground — American military and diplomatic personnel, as well as South Vietnamese military and civilians — tell their stories. Most relate the scramble to evacuate remaining Americans along with as many South Vietnamese as possible, in operations both sanctioned and otherwise, and in methods orderly and dangerously haphazard. Much like the war itself, muses one former military man, a humanitarian evacuation of imperiled South Vietnamese was wellintentioned, but there was no clear strategy, and the result was a chaotic mess. The failure is heartbreaking, but amidst the harrowing disaster are these tales of ingenuity, humanity

CP

Real People. Real Stories. Really Good Films.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Zombie Week: Planet Terror (Robert Rodriguez’s 2007 homage to grindhouse horror), Oct. 22. Army of Darkness (Sam Raimi’s 1992 wrap-up of the Evil Dead trilogy, set in the Middle Ages), Oct. 22. ParaNorman (spooky animated 2012 comedy about a boy who can talk to the dead), Oct. 22- 23. White Zombie (1932 voodoo classic starring Bela Lugosi), Oct. 23 and Oct. 31. Shaun of the Dead (2004 U.K. comedy mixing romance, laughs and zombies), Oct. 23. Row House of Horrors: Cabin in The Woods (twisty scary fun from Joss Whedon), Oct. 24-26 and Oct. 28-30. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (original 1974 version), Oct. 24-26 and Oct. 30. Hostel (2005’s reason to avoid Eastern Europe), Oct. 24-26 and Oct. 29-30. Nosferatu (F.W. Murnau’s creepy Draculainspired 1922 silent film), Oct. 24, Oct. 26 and Oct. 30-31. House on Haunted Hill (1959 Vincent Price classic), Oct. 24- 27 and Oct. 31. Vampyr (Carl Dreyer’s atmospheric 1932 vampire film), Oct. 24, Oct. 27 and Oct. 31. The Last Man on Earth (1964 film in which Vincent Price is the last man alive), Oct. 25-28 and Oct. 31. Carnival of Souls (1962 slow-burner set at the Great Salt Lake), Oct. 25, Oct. 27-29 and Oct. 31. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. REEL ABILITIES. The second annual film festival


Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $8. 412-364-2794 or www.ucowpa.org THE TINGLER. In William Castle’s classic thriller, a scientist (Vincent Price) discovers that fear isn’t just a feeling — it’s an insect-like creature that lives in the spine. When danger is present, this “tingler” can be controlled by screaming. Unless one were a deaf-mute, which, naturally, a major character is. Also featuring several drug-induced hallucination scenes and a literal splash of color in this otherwise blackand-white film. The 1959 film closes out a month-long series of horror comedies. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 26. Regent Square (AH) CP Approved

VISION COMES FROM WITHIN

“A POWERFUL MOVIE ABOUT FOOTBALL AND PERSEVERANCE. THE WHOLE FAMILY WILL ENJOY!”

MATANGO: ATTACK OF THE MUSHROOM PEOPLE. It’s a fungus-among-us nightmare, as shipwrecked survivors on a mysterious island turn into mushrooms. This 1963 horror film is directed by Ishiro Honda, who knows a thing or two about mutations; he also directed Godzilla. Mushroom snacks — if you dare — provided by Wild Purveyors, and beer from Full Pint Brewing. Dubbed in English. 7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.) Tue., Oct. 28. Hollywood

Last Days In Vietnam showcasing films about the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities. The opening film, Jenni Gold’s recent documentary CinemAbility (7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22) looks at how Hollywood has portrayed people with different abilities, from silent films to today’s popular X-Men franchise. On Sun., Oct. 26, Pitt’s Human Engineering Lab at Bakery Square hosts a screening of the Taiwanese bio-pic Touch of the Light, about a blind pianist (1 p.m., Penn Avenue, East Liberty). Later on Sunday, it’s Come As You Are, a Belgian film about three disabled young men seeking to lose their virginity (7:30 p.m.). The closing feature is Stand Clear of the Closing Door (7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 30), in which a 13-year-old boy with autism escapes into the labyrinth of the New York City subway system. Unless noted, films screen at Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $10-20. www.jfilmpgh.org

Men, Women and Children POLTERGEIST. In Tobe Hoper’s 1982 thriller, a family is initially amused by the presence of ghosts in the home … until somebody disappears. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22. Hollywood YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN. Mel Brooks’ loving spoof of the classic film Frankenstein features Gene Wilder as Dr. Franken-STEEN, Teri Garr as his comely assistant, Peter Boyle as the creature and the incomparable Madeline Kahn as the doctor’s taffeta-clad fiancée. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22. AMC Loews FARGO. In the Coen brothers’ Oscar-winning 1996 dark comedy (and affectionate send-up of the upper Midwest), a pregnant, down-to-earth cop (Frances McDormand) calmly sorts out a kidnap-murder case, you betcha. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. Melwood BRADDOCK, AMERICA. Braddock is the focus of Jean Loic Portron and Gabrielle Kessler’s recent

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full-length documentary, which uses the history of the once-lively mill town to examine larger issues around de-industrialization. The pair did extensive interviews with local residents, who shared how the town’s shifting fortunes have impacted them and the community. But as the title suggests, the filmmakers also cast Braddock as the representative of towns in similar situations worldwide. Concludes a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free BLACKENSTEIN. This 1973 exploitation horror feature from William A. Levey cashes in on both the Mary Shelley classic about a rebuilt man and the 1972 hit Blacula. Eddie is an injured AfricanAmerican Vietnam vet whose experimental medical treatments cause him to go on cannibalistic rampages and develop a squared-off Afro resembling the head of Boris Karloff’s creature. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. Hollywood. $5

-TONY DUNGY, SUPER BOWL WINNING COACH & ALL PRO DAD NATIONAL SPOKESMAN A

HALLOWEEN. The original is still the best: Bite your knuckles as Jamie Lee Curtis takes the worst babysitting job ever, in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29; 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 30; and 8 and 10:15 p.m. Fri., Oct. 31. Hollywood

DYLAN BAKER FILM

BASED ON AN INCREDIBLE TRUE STOR Y

NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. Some dead creep called Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is haunting the dreams of teens in Wes Craven’s 1984 scream-fest. A cheapie in its day, Nightmare is now ranked among the best of the early-1980s teen-slasher genre. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29. AMC Loews. $5

WRITTEN BY

BRAM HOOVER AND TONI HOOVER DIRECTEDBY DYLAN BAKER

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STARTS FRI.OCT . 24 visit

MY LIFE AS A DOG. A 12-year-old boy relocates to a small village to live with his uncle, in Lasse Hallstrom’s 1985 coming-of-age story. In Swedish, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29. Melwood. $2

23BLAST .COM for the Theater Near You!

‘‘EVERYONE SHOULD SEE THIS MOVIE... AS SMART AND FEARLESS A DEBUT AS I HAVE SEEN FROM AN AMERICAN FILMMAKER IN QUITE SOME TIME.’’ CRITICS’ PICK

‘‘A SMART, SM HILARIOUS SATIRE OF THE OBAMA AGE.’’

PARKWAY FILMS. On Sat., Oct. 25, catch 1987’s The Monster Squad (5:30 p.m.); the 1948 neo-realist Italian classic, The Bicycle Thief (7:15 p.m.); and 2007’s horror thriller, The Hatchet (9:15 p.m.). On Sun., Oct. 26, there’s a family double-feature — Fat Albert’s Halloween Special and Disney’s Legend of Sleepy Hollow (5:30) — followed by 2005’s horror feature 2001 Maniacs (7:15 p.m.). Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $2-3. 412-766-1668

‘‘NON-STOP FUN. THE HYPE IS JUSTIFIED.’’ ‘‘‘NON-STO

PITTSBURGH 48-HOUR HORROR FILM PROJECT. See the results of the horror-themed filmmaking contest, in which local teams had just a weekend to write, cast, film and edit a short horror film. Adding to the challenge: each film had to incorporate an assigned character, prop and line of dialogue. Films will be screened, and prizes awarded. To be followed by a wrap party. 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. Hollywood. $10

ONE OF THE SHARPEST AND MOST AUDACIOUS COMEDIES OF THE YEAR.’’

‘‘THE VERY DEFINITION OF A ‘‘T CONVERSATION-STARTER.’’

‘‘EXHILARATING.

97% FRESH!

‘‘YOU NEED TO SEE DEAR WHITE PEOPLE.’’

THE OTHER SIDE. Not getting enough flesh-eating on The Walking Dead? This locally produced zombie film is making its theatrical premier this weekend. Cast and crew will be on hand. 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 26. Hollywood HOVERLA UKRAINIAN-AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. The month-long film festival continues with films screening each weekend through October. The final program is Expedition, a new documentary by Kostyantyn Konovalov about Ukranian poet Taras Shevchenko (5:30 p.m.), and Ivan the Powerful, a family-friendly 2013 bio-pic about Western Ukrainian strongman Ivan Firtsak (7 p.m.) Sun., Oct. 26. Frick Fine

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[DANCE]

CORPS STRENGTH

PERHAPS THE PARANOIA IS WARRANTED

In a great story ballet, the principal roles provide the emotional adrenaline and the corps de ballet the pulse. The corps creates the world for the main characters to play off of, and is integral to advancing the narrative and creating much of the beauty audiences associate with such ballets. What would Swan Lake be without its swans, or Giselle without its ghostly wilis? For its part, the classic The Sleeping Beauty has a multitude of roles that audiences shouldn’t sleep on. Letting one’s eyes wash over the many corps roles adds depth to the experience and nuance to the familiar tale of the cursed princess Aurora and her prince. On Oct. 24-26, at the Benedum Center, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre opens its 45th season with its lush production of Sleeping Beauty. PBT’s corps de ballet has five new members; one of them, Marisa Grywalski, is getting her first real taste of life in the corps and the rigors of dancing in more than a half dozen roles, including the Fairy of Beauty (in the Oct. 25 matinee). That character’s solo is “quick and you need to show picture-like moments in it,” says Grywalski, 23. (The others new corps members are Michaela King, Masahiro Haneji, Jake Unger and Lucius Kirst.) Entering her eighth season in the corps, by contrast, Danielle Downey is accustomed to dancing multiple roles. Her experience has earned her ever more visible roles, including the White Cat in a playful third-act pas de deux she will dance alongside partner Cooper Verona, as Puss ’N Boots (in the Oct. 24 performance and Sunday’s matinee). “We have a feisty relationship,” says Downey, 27, an Erie native. Set to music by Tchaikovsky, performed live by the PBT orchestra, and with choreography after Marius Petipa, The Sleeping Beauty is staged and directed by PBT artistic director Terrence S. Orr. The two-hour production features regal costumes and sets originally created for the Royal Ballet of London. These include a jeweled snake-and-spider costume worn by the evil fairy Carabosse (a.k.a. Maleficent in the Disney tellings) and her ghoulish carriage that will careen onstage in a swirl of fog and thunder. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE performs THE SLEEPING BEAUTY 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 24; 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25, and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 26. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $27-112. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

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Gabrielle Thurlow and Nurlan Abougaliev in The Sleeping Beauty, at Pittsburgh Ballet {PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[ART REVIEW]

RECORD TIME {BY DAVID BERGER}

T

HE PITTSBURGH Biennial at SPACE

is a multimedia presentation by artists whose intelligent concepts add to each other’s power and resonance. Today’s art delves deep into socio-political relations, both those that bind us and those that separate us. In Public Record, nine local artists offer works that go “on record” to explore issues of identity and yet expose a world flooded by information — one that fails to protect privacy, support the poor and disenfranchised, or save innocents caught in intractable conflicts. As one approaches the gallery from the street, speakers outside broadcast President Eisenhower’s iconic farewell speech of 1961. One is struck by the idealism of the speech, which talks of trust and love and world cooperation, but also warns of the burgeoning military-industrial complex, the demise of creative thinking in universities and the waste of material resources. Inside, in an installation by Aljosa Abrahamsberg, Matthew Biederman, Marko Peljhan and Brian

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

Facing up: video projection by Rafael Abreu-Canedo in Public Record

Springer, one side of a wall is hung with facsimiles of the speech’s 26 pages, with Eisenhower’s actual televised speech projected on the other side. Caroline Record’s “She” depicts a woman in business attire singing and typing on video. But she’s typing the 614 sentences of Anna Karenina that begin with the word “she.” The sentences are projected on a large screen while a printer

PUBLIC RECORD continues through Nov. 9. SPACE, 812 Liberty Ave., and 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 www.spacepittsburgh.org

spits slips of paper bearing the words onto the floor. There is something here about digital and analog languages, but it also comments on the absurdity of our lives, the rat race and the redundancy of our work, all separated from real meaning. In “Taking Stock,” Two Girls Working presents short video portraits of 10

males who are asked: “What do you do that makes you feel valuable?” We learn how important family and community are, that helping others in need is valuable, and about the subtle racism that persists in America. The artists want to explore the meaning of value from a male perspective. These interviewees share the same hopes and dreams and want to do the right thing. In “Aspirations,” by Martha Rial, photos and a video offer “snapshots” of six people with Asperger’s syndrome. These people may have trouble showing empathy or intuiting emotions, but they still enjoy socializing. We see how they struggle to be accepted into the social fabric. Being different is a positive thing. As interviewee Elana says: “If everyone was the same, the world would be boring.” A work by Rafael Abreu-Canedo masterfully uses technology to allow us to instantaneously identify with the emotions of others. On a pair of 8-by-8foot screens are projected faces in slow motion as the subjects are tickled on the


JOKING MATTER MICHAEL CLARK {BY DANIELLE FOX} COMPANY

TODAY’S ART DELVES DEEP INTO SOCIO-POLITICAL RELATIONS. Susanne Slavick’s skillful prints and paintings decry hunger, poverty and genocide. In her work and her wall plaques, she stands up for the Palestinian cause. Her images of empty and bloodstained tabletops make reference to the Jesus of Cana, who turned water into wine — but also to Qana in Lebanon, where, during operations in 1996 and 2006, Israeli forces killed many innocent civilians. Says Public Record curator Murray Horne: “If I can plant one seed of empathy and understanding in a single person, that would be a success.” But sometimes you can learn more from a fun experience than from a serious one. So it was at nearby 707 Penn Gallery, which hosts a satellite portion of the exhibit. Well Played: Paul’s Vinyl Records allows visitors to select, and play on a turntable, tracks from Paul Rosenblatt’s massive collection of vintage vinyl. Along with literalizing “public record,” Rosenblatt’s interactive installation provides a breath of fresh air. Two tracks from Frampton Comes Alive (let’s say) might transport a visitor back to a time when the world seemed much simpler. Despite everything learned at SPACE, you might find empathy (or understanding) in the simple spin of an old LP. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

[COMEDY]

Tig Notaro

ribs by someone unseen. Laughter unites. Surveillance is another subject explored. Paolo Pedercini’s video game “Leaky World” posits political elites connected across the globe who deny people “freedom, autonomy, and self-realization.” Tellingly, the game’s players must take the role of the elites, using a joystick and button to connect nodes and destroy leaks before the “tide of resistance” reaches a critical point. This sounds like a radical concept, but in light of NSA surveillance and the tracking of personal data by companies like Google, Facebook and Apple, perhaps the paranoia is warranted. Love also finds its way into Public Record. Inspired by Madeleine de Scudery’s 1654 Map of Love, Carolina Loyola-Garcia made short videos of the towns the map identifies. Four videos on the wall, with earphones, relate personal stories that deal with such themes as Sensibility, Exactness and Friendship. Film montage, poetic voice-overs and choreography make these videos very exciting.

TA S T E

There’s making light of a dark situation — then there’s turning your life-threatening disease into a comedy set. Comedian Tig Notaro has mastered the latter. In 2012, she revealed at Los Angeles comedy club Largo that she had just been diagnosed with Stage 2, bilateral breast cancer. Then she delivered a gut- and heart-wrenching set that Louis C.K. called “masterful.” A double mastectomy and a Grammy-nominated album later, Tig says she’s now healthy and “embarrassingly” without a complaint in the world. On Oct. 25, Notaro — also known for her podcast Professor Blastoff — brings her international Boyish Girl Interrupted Tour to town. She answered CP’s questions by email.

SAT, NOV 1 ST 2014 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER WATCH: TrustArts.org/MichaelClark

YOU’VE SAID THAT AT THE TIME OF THE LARGO SET, YOU HADN’T GRASPED THE POWER OF TWITTER AND HAD “GONE ONSTAGE THINKING I WAS HAVING A PRIVATE MOMENT WITH THAT VENUE.” WOULD YOU HAVE HAD THE SAME MINDSET IF YOU KNEW YOUR ROUTINE WOULD GO VIRAL? I’m so glad I didn’t know anything and didn’t have knowledge of that whole world of Twitter. There’s a huge chance I could have overthought things and the rawness would have been absent in the performance.

TICKETS START AT $19

Featuring the music of DAVID BOWIE and IGGY POP

expect to be jolted out of your seats – British Theatre Guide

TrustArts.org/dance • 412.456.6666 Program contains partial nudity. In partnership with the British Council. Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

DO YOU THINK YOU’LL ALWAYS WRITE ABOUT CANCER? I always do whatever excites me and what is authentic to me as a person and standup. I always want to do whatever feels right to me in any aspect of my life at any given point. My current hour of material has a nice mix of personal stories and just ridiculousness.

W Y E P & T h e P i t t s b u r g h C u l t u r a l Tr u s t p r e s e n t

CAN YOU GIVE US A COUPLE HINTS ABOUT YOUR NEW MATERIAL? I touch on everything from bombing at a comedy club in Vegas, to stories about me and my friend searching for Santa Claus, to even more personal events. I honestly love doing this new material, I think, more than any other previously. IN YOUR LARGO SET, YOU SAID, “WITH HUMOR, THE EQUATION IS: TRAGEDY PLUS TIME EQUALS COMEDY. I AM JUST AT TRAGEDY RIGHT NOW.” WHERE ARE YOU NOW? I am past tragedy now and hopefully at “time” right now — a lot of time. And [I] hope with more time, I could one day look back on that horrific four months as just a blip in my life and story.

with special guest

JIMBO AND THE SOUPBONES

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 8PM • BYHAM THEATER

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square

TIG NOTARO 7:30 and 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org +

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October 24-25 at 8pm October 26 at 2pm Greensburg Garden & Civic Center $17 - Advance $19 - Door

by Stuart Ross

gctheatre.org

Opens Tonight! {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Keaton Jadwin (left) and Jeffrey Gorti in 21 at the Conservatory Theatre Co.

[PLAY REVIEWS]

ROBERTO SINGS

A New MUSICAL COMEDYY

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

NOW - January 18

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com

Groups 412-325-1582

THE CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE IS A PROJECT OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

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P R E S E N T S

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WE PUT THE MOCK IN DEMOCR ACY!

TO PITTSBURGHERS of a particular if broad age range, the number “21” connotes not the (long-ago) beginning of adulthood but a baseball player whose untimely death sealed a legend that will never die. Alki Steriopoulos’ hagiographic new musical works well here because Roberto Clemente is still so revered. It also helps that the Point Park University Conservatory Theatre Co. has a wealth of design talent and an enviable depth of performers. In its world premiere at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, 21 is spotty — not surprising for a new play. If you’re not already immersed in Clemente history, the plot may be hard to follow. Fortunately, the audience can fill in most of the details. Roberto Clemente Walker, unpopular with Pittsburgh Pirates fans as a hot-dog rookie in the 1950s, was

21 continues through Sun., Oct. 26. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft St., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

“The Capitol Steps make it easier to leave public life.”

—Former President George Bush

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2

4 PM • BYHAM THE ATE R BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE • TRUSTARTS.ORG 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

cheered as a superstar by those same fans even before the 1971 World Series made him a household name nationally. That transition — by white Pittsburghers — from racist rejection to hero worship, is one of Pittsburgh native Steriopoulos’ main themes. But it’s somewhat undercut by casting a light-skinned actor as the robustly black Clemente. Jeffrey Gorti, largely adequate in the title role, leads a cast of 31, directed and superbly choreographed by Richard Sabellico. Music director Douglas Levine conducts a most capable orchestra.

Much of the music is by-the-yard Webberism, but some numbers sparkle, especially the Damn Yankees-meets-West Side Story “Hey Hoolie!” dance for Gorti and Bucs. Bruce Franz and Nick McDonough shine as slick Pirate scouts in the vaudevillian “Take Good Care of Our Boy.” Beatriz Naranjo, as Vera Clemente, sings of the sexy joy of a virtuous marriage in “Only One.” Keaton Jadwin upends the legendary manager Danny Murtaugh with the jaunty “A Pain in the Neck.” The huge production, though stunning, often stumbles. The dancing, great. Vocals? Meh. Sloppy anachronisms don’t help. My “favorite” is the historically ad-free Forbes Field scoreboard depicted in 1960 with a late-’60s-Pop-design logo for a beverage not then even available in the ’Burgh. Still, 21 celebrates the life and memory of the Great One, and for many Pittsburghers, that’s enough. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

DON’T LOOK NOW {BY TED HOOVER} JUST IN TIME for Halloween, Off the Wall

Productions presents the Pittsburgh premiere of Canadian playwright Carole Fréchette’s deceptive ghost story The Small Room at the Top of the Stairs. The tale is told by Grace, a young woman who in the eyes of her mother (and to the dismay of her sister) has hit the jackpot by meeting, romancing and marrying an extraordinarily wealthy man. So besotted is Henry with his new bride that he builds her a 28-room mansion … a garden in which she can blossom. There’s just one caveat: Grace can go anywhere except a small room at the top of a hidden staircase. You can probably guess


what happens next. Except maybe you can’t. The deception of Small Room isn’t the twist of plot, but rather the transformation of the play’s intent and purpose. Fréchette relies heavily on gothic tales of the past — Jane Eyre, The Tell-Tale Heart,

THE SMALL ROOM AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS continues through Nov. 1. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 888-718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.com

built garden in which all the performers bloom. An achingly tormented Daina Michelle Griffith, as Grace, leads stand-out performances by Sharon Brady, Amanda Brooke Lerner, Ken Bolden and Amy Landis. In a way, the evening is a precise minuet, and all five actors weave in and out of Fréchette’s linguistic melodies. To fully appreciate the work, my advice is to ignore the haunted-house expectations the playwright sets up and focus instead on her glorious words. It’s unlikely you’ll ever hear them spoken as well.

yes, the long-unrequited love of the heroine is finally returned by the most un-alert male in all of Ireland? And Brigden, also not surprisingly, deftly lets the characters speak and unfold in a most pleasant theatrical exercise for the audience. Shanley, who is American, says he was inspired by his Irish forebears and con-

Noble Shropshire (surely one of the greatest names in theater today) portrays the cranky but worried patriarch who loves the land and his family — and even his son, whom he threatens to disinherit. But Shropshire’s finest moments are his character’s telling of his love for his late wife. Mary Rawson is perfect as the too-brieflyseen Aoife Muldoon, a new widow looking forward to her own death with morbid relish. (Always well served on Irish dishes.) But it’s their grown children, hardworking neighboring farmers, who are at the

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

the legend of Bluebeard — to fuel the first half of her story. In the second, however, the “spookiness” gives way to a melancholy tone poem perfumed with more than a little magic lyricism about love and loneliness. None of which is, necessarily, a bad thing. No matter what style she’s writing in, Fréchette has a gorgeous command of the language. Though you could say that Small Room is a quite talky play, when the talk’s this captivating there’s little cause for complaint. Especially when that talk is talked so brilliantly by this intensely talented cast. Director Ingrid Sonnichsen, with impeccable style, has herself fashioned a solidly

OUTSIDE MULLINGAR continues through Nov. 2. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

BITTERSWEETS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} {PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

THE IRISH can be irritating or endearing

— often simultaneously — as John Patrick Shanley demonstrates in his recent Broadway hit Outside Mullingar, now at City Theatre. The one-act moseys through five years of life, death and love in the Irish countryside. But mostly love. City Theatre artistic director Tracy Brigden has a way with bittersweet romance. That’s not the way Mullingar is billed, but can it possibly be a spoiler to admit that,

Megan Byrne and Ron Menzel in Outside Mullingar, at City Theatre

temporary relatives, whom he has visited. (The family farm is indeed outside a village near the town of Mullingar, in County Westmeath.) The production’s program notes the story of the playwright’s visit to his Shanley grandparents’ grave with his cousin Anthony, the name he gives to the father-son characters. The cast is small but well chosen.

heart of the tale. Rosemary Muldoon wears hers on her sleeve, but the amazingly obtuse Anthony Reilly can’t see it. No, what he sees are “signs” in anything amiss that love is not for him. Megan Byrne and Ron Menzel make this odd courtship credible as they imbue their characters with spirit and charm (a not-so-easy feat for Anthony). There’s plenty of wit and humor, and perhaps a bit of wisdom, in Outside Mullingar, a romance for grown-ups. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again September 6, 2014–January 12, 2015

Culture Club is sponsored by

Rethink the Everyday Get an insider’s view on how designers approach problem solving from Pittsburgh's hottest designers. Visit the exhibition, sketch on Errazuriz’s interactive table, and cheat death while photographing yourself under a piano suspended from 70 feet above!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.2310.30.14

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SONYA SONES}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Brown and Chuck Timbers, with Delana Flowers as God. The first performance at Maker Theater is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Nov. 2. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $15-20. 412-431-0773 or newhorizon theater@yahoo.com

+ FRI., OCT. 24

r e n n i D B eer

{ART}

with

6:30pm - Wednesday, October 29 $55 reservations required

–First Course– Paired with Threadless IPA

Sweet & Spicy Shrimp, Thai Salad, Curry Aioli

–Second Course–

Paired with Chimera Hardcore Ale Country Boudin, Pineapple BBQ Sauce, Cajun Slaw, Fresh Baguette

–Third Course–

Paired with Secret Stache Stout Flat Iron Steak Kabob, Coffe Crusted, Vanilla Scented, Auna Potato, Grilled Rapini

–Fourth Course–

Paired with Fascist Pig Ale Almond Cake, Creole Cream Cheese Frosting, Banana Filling, Sazerac Sauce

Live Music Sweaty Betty

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 nolaonthesquare.com

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OCT. 26

Jon Klassen Kllas asse sen n and and Mac Barnett

+ THU., OCT. 23 {STAGE} The one singular sensation that is A Chorus Line gets a special new production at the Byham Theater. Staged by Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s Rauh Conservatory, it stars young musical-theater hopefuls as the show’s young musical-theater hopefuls, with live music by the Pittsburgh CAPA Orchestra. The iconic show, with songs by the late Marvin Hamlisch including “What I Did For Love,” is directed by Justin Fortunato. The choreography is by Lisa Elliot, with musical direction by Robert Neumeyer. The first of four performances this week is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Also Fri., Oct. 24Sun., Oct. 26. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $15-30. 412-456-6666 or www. pittsburghmusicals.com

{STAGE} Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Etta James and Koko Taylor are in purgatory, and God dispatches the father of gospel music, Thomas A. Dorsey, to get them out. That’s the story as New Horizon Theater stages the world premiere of Joe Plummer and Sanetta Y. Gipson’s Queens of the Blues. Plummer, a veteran Chicago-based playwright and

composer, calls the show a musical comedy. But while it’s filled with signature songs — from “Pig Foot and a Bottle of Beer” to “At Last” — the play also relates its protagonists’ struggles as black women. “These women went through a lot in their youth, and in their life,” says Plummer, who also directs. The ensemble cast includes Stevie Akres, Jacquea Olday, Karla C. Payne (pictured), Terri Smith, Kevin

The artists in Silver Eye Center for Photography’s new exhibit Close to Home work to capture the emotional and spiritual sense of home. Locally based Jake Reinhart, Elizabeth A. Rudnick and Justin Visnesky are among the seven featured artists from across the country. Reinhart explores nostalgia’s effect on memory. Rudnick combines photography and paint to create ghostly family portraits, and Visnesky’s work tenderly documents daily family life. The exhibit opens with tonight’s reception. Danielle Fox 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 10. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

OCT. 25 Jose Ramos Santana


sp otlight Don’t confuse Bricolage Productions’ SCarrie: The Musical with 1988’s infamous Broadway-flop musical adapting Carrie, Stephen King’s best-selling horror novel about a bullied, telekinetic teenager and her uniquely disastrous senior prom. Rather, it’s descended from Carrie White The Musical, a 2002 comedy by Atlanta troupe Dad’s Garage. (Neither show is related to Scarrie! The Musical, an Illinois-based troupe’s send-up of both the Broadway show and Brian DePalma’s classic 1976 film adaptation.) Bricolage artistic director Tami Dixon borrowed Joel Abbott’s songs from Carrie White for her own new adaptation, which is drawn straight from King’s book, with twists. Bricolage’s show, which transplants Carrie from Maine to Allderdice High School, is staged in the troupe’s signature Midnight Radio style, with a six-member cast backed by a live rock band and live sound effects. With Carrie played by actor Connor McCanlus (pictured), it’s still a comedy, with a touch of camp. “But there is a heart to it, and there is horror to it,” says Dixon. Matt M. Morrow directs SCarrie, which bids to join Night of the Living Dead and War of the Worlds as Halloween-themed Midnight Radio hits. Get tickets early; at Bricolage’s intimate space, sell-outs are common. A Halloween-night show includes a Bricolage prom, with patrons encouraged to wear their “best (or bloodiest) prom attire.” Bill O’Driscoll Oct. 23-Nov. 8. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. 412-471-0999 or www.bricolagepgh.org

{TALK}

{STAGE}

When everything else is hurting and healing, architecture critic Charles Jencks doesn’t believe your medical center should be an eyesore, too. Jencks co-founded supplementary cancer-care facilities Maggie’s Centres with his late wife, Maggie Keswick Jencks. The centres, based in the U.K., integrate architecture, art and landscape to promote wellness, a theory that Jencks will discuss today in an illustrated talk at the Carnegie Museum of Art. The exhibit Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care runs at the Heinz Architectural Center through Jan. 5. DF 6:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Avenue, Oakland. Free. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

It’s the fastest theater in town: Future Ten, Pittsburgh’s annual festival of 10-minute plays. Year 11’s all-comedy slate, 10x10x10, is drawn from submissions from around the

{STAGE} It’s not just this week’s second show set in purgatory (see Thursday’s Queens of the Blues). The Last Days of Judas Iscariot is also the latest local premiere of work by Stephen Adly Guirgis, the critically acclaimed talent whose salty, provocative works like The Motherfucker With a Hat have earned a Pittsburgh following. Guirgis’ celestial 2005 courtroom tragicomedy depicts an attempt to spring Judas from Hell. Called to the stand are Jesus, Pontius Pilate, Mother Teresa and Satan, among others. The production concludes Throughline Theatre Company’s “Mortality and Divinity” season. Tonight is the first performance at Grey Box Theatre. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Sat., Nov. 1. $12-15 (opening night add $10). www.throughlinetheatre.org

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Queens off Q the Blues

country. The one-acts cover everything “from urinal politics to the Wild West of suburbia, from zombie civil rights to the secret life of television spokespeople.” The independently produced show runs two weekends at Future Tenant gallery, starting tonight. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Nov. 2. 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10. www.futuretenant.org

presents his compositions in Groove Aesthetic: Winds of the Sahel. The Alloy Studios host this multidisciplinary performance with guests including Texture Contemporary Ballet, Kinetic and Trio+. DF 8 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-15. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

OCT. 24

Close to Home

{PARTY} The CATtivo HOWLoween Bash has a trick that’s a treat: a dozen local rock bands come disguised as notable groups from the ’70s and ’80s. The Cheats play Devo, Thunder Vest is The Cars, Murder for Girls is the Ramones, and Bloated Sluts are Siouxsie and the Banshees, among others. All proceeds benefit Hello Bully and Homeless Cat Management; encouraged attire is cat/dog/ Halloween-themed, and the two floors of live music is supplemented by DJs. BO 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-6872157 or www.cattivo.biz

Art by Lisa Lindvay {COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

+ SAT., OCT. 25

London, Carnegie Hall, the Orchestra of L’Hermitage of Saint Petersburg — the list goes on and on. Tonight, the Julliard-trained, Puerto Rican-born Santana returns to Shadyside Presbyterian Church with a repertoire including Beethoven’s “Sonata in E Flat,” Isaac Albéniz’s “Triana” and other Spanish and classical compositions. DF 4 p.m. 5121 Westminster Place, Shadyside. $10-15. 412-682-4300 or www.shadysidepres.org

{MUSIC} Pianist Jose Ramos Santana seems to have graced every big concert hall. His résumé includes the New York Philharmonic, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of

OCT. 24

Groove Aesthetic

{FILM}

{MUSIC}

The popular “48-Hour Film” concept — teams have just a weekend to script, cast, shoot and edit a short film — gets spooky for the season. Tonight, entries for the Pittsburgh 48 Hour Horror Film Project will be screened at the Hollywood Theater; prizes will be awarded (including audience favorites), and there will be a wrap party. Production teams were assigned a category of horror, along with a required character, a line of dialogue

Composer Joe Sheehan returned from his first trip to Ghana with that country’s dances and rhythms still drumming in his mind, calling for him to return. Thanks to a grant from Duquesne University (where he teaches), Sheehan’s wish came true: He returned to Ghana to create music reflecting Africa’s cultural roots. Tonight, with help from jazz vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield (pictured), Sheehan

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and prop. Now’s your chance to see how well the filmmakers tackled the challenge — and maybe even get a few goosebumps. Al Hoff 6-10 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $10. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

+ SUN., OCT. 26 {WORDS} Children’s author Mac Barnett and illustrator Jon Klassen, a New York Times best-selling team, join forces again in their new book, Sam & Dave Dig a Hole. It’s the story of two boys who have a spectacular time shoveling and scooping but doing little else. Barnett and Klassen open the season for Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Kids and Teens — Authors. Stories. You. They visit the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall today to share their stories with Pittsburgh. DF 2:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 21. World premiere musical

Piper’s Pub $ .50

2

bottles During Pittsburgh Hockey Games and all day Sunday

written by Alki Steriopoulos tells the unforgettable story of the life & death of Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 26. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ANNIE. That musical about the loveable orphan w/ the hard knock life. Oct. 23-30, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 2, 1 & 6 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE BEGGAR’S OPERA. Benjamin Britten’s rendition. Presented by Carnegie Mellon University Opera Wed-Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 25, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 24. Purnell Center for the Arts, Oakland. BOOK OF EZRA. The world premiere of a 1-man play written & performed by spoken word artist & national slam poet Leslie Ezra Smith. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. CRIMES OF THE HEART. Beth Henley’s dark comedy of sisters raised in a dysfunctional family

who reunite following a tragic event. Thu., Oct. 23, 7 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. DAY ROOM WINDOW. Bonnie Cohen’s play, telling the stories of 9 teenage girls incarcerated as adults. Based on a true story. Wed-Sun, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. FOREVER PLAID. Stuart Ross’ comedic musical. Oct. 24-25, 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 26, 2 p.m. Greensburg Civic Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE GAME SHOW MURDERS. An interactive murder mystery which takes place during the taping of the popular TV game show “Stump the Stars.” Sat., Oct. 25, 8 p.m., Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 8 p.m. and Nov. 7-8, 8 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. THE GLASS MENAGERIE. A brand-new production of Tennessee Williams’ classic play. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 28. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

THE LAST DAYS OF JUDAS Oct. 25. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-PLAY. ISCARIOT. In a courtroom in MACBETH. Presented by Purgatory, an upstart defense Shakespeare in South Park. attorney files an appeal to redeem the soul of Christianity’s most noto- Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. rious sinner. Presented by Through- Thru Oct. 26. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8553. line Theater. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru NEW WORKS AT CMU. 3 fully Nov. 1. The Grey Box Theatre, produced new plays by CMU’s Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. Dramatic Writing MFA candiLITTLE WOMEN: THE dates. Purnell Center for MUSICAL. Presented by the Arts. Thru Oct. 24, The Heritage Players. 6:30 & 9 p.m. Carnegie Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, Mellon University, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 26. . w ww per Oakland. 412-268-2000. Seton Center, Brookline. a p ty ci h pg OUTSIDE MULLINGAR. 412-561-5511. .com A comedy about Tony LOST IN YONKERS. Neil Reilly, an aging Irish cattle Simon’s coming of age story farmer, written by the Pulitzer, about a highly dysfunctional Oscar, & Tony-winning author of family. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Doubt & Moonstruck. Tue-Sun. Nov. 2-9, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. The Thru Nov. 2. City Theatre, South Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. Side. 412-431-2489. LOVE, LOSS & WHAT I WORE. THE PAJAMA PARTY MURDERS. Nora Ephron’s work about the Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner existential state of having nothing Theater. Fri., Oct. 24, 7 p.m. to wear. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. Crown Plaza Hotel, Green Tree. 1. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-344-2069. 724-745-6300. QUEENS OF THE BLUES. MACBETH. Something wicked this A world premiere presented by way comes. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru New Horizons Pittsburgh. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Nov. 2. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-431-0773. THE SMALL ROOM AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS. Carole Frechette’s play about Grace, who has stumbled into a fairy-tale marriage complete with her own Prince Charming & resplendent mansion, but finds herself drawn to the mysterious room her husband has forbidden her to enter. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Thru Oct. 26, 3 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

COMEDY THU 23 JOHN HODGMAN. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 23 - SUN 26 IAN BAGG. 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 24, 8 & 10:30 p.m., Sat., Oct. 25, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 24 - SAT 25 GHOSTBUSTERS: LIVE READ. Oct. 24-25, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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HYPNOTIC ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS:

5pm-5am at the new Crave Entertainment & Banquet Hall 2405 Brady’s Run Rd Beaver, Pa Featuring Live Music by: The Legendary Aphrodite, Frankie Bones, Queen of Bass Baby Anne, Trap & Twerk Producer Danny Diggz, Exclusive 3D Horror Show by DJ KOS A $1000+iPad Air for 1st place Best Costume, Haunted Maze, Scare Theater, Indoor & Outdoor Entertainment, Laser & Light Show, Magicians, Face Painters, Psychics, Vendors. Experience concert quality sound, lighting & fantastic haunted decor from local renown artists!

This is an ALL AGES event! Tickets are just $35 and VIPS are only $60! So get your tickets now at www.cravebanquethall.com or www.dancingskeletons.net

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

THE NEW MOVEMENT: STUPID TIME MACHINE & RUDE. Oct. 24-25, 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SHAWN BANKS. 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 25, 4:30 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: The Andrew Alden Ensemble performs with Nosferatu,

SAT 25 AARON KLEIBER, SHAUN BLACKHAM, TONY “T-ROBE” ROBERSON. Seven Springs. 814-352-7777. DENNIS ROSS, JOHNNY DAM, TIM ROSS. 8 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. 412-920-5653. KEVIN JAMES. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. TIG NOTARO. 7:30 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

MON 27 UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 28 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR

Hollywood Theater, Dormont CRITIC: Tyler Mannion, 27, an adjunct professor from Rochester, Pa. WHEN: Oct.

I’ve honestly put off seeing Nosferatu for the longest time, primarily because it’s kind of daunting to sit and watch a silent film by yourself, especially with a more dated kind of score. It’s really interesting to see a fresh take on something that’s nearly a hundred years old. The actual live set was better than anything I imagined. To go with a tag that I’m not too fond of but I think is appropriate, I think if someone was a fan of post-rock bands such as Grails and This Will Destroy You — [The Andrew Alden Ensemble] is a little more string/pianooriented — but if someone is into that kind of music, I couldn’t see why they wouldn’t be into this. You had some nice crescendos, multi-instrumentalists. Two of the gentlemen were playing percussion. We had guitar, violin. I think there were some vibraphones in there. So, pretty massive, all things considered, for three guys.

AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the Revolution. Downtown. industrial heritage of Southwest412-281-9285. ern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Designers on Design. Get an Clayton, the Frick estate, with insider’s view on how designers classes & programs for all ages. approach problem solving from Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. a few of Pittsburgh’s hottest KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the designers. Oakland. 412-622-3131. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF 724-329-8501. NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. We So Different? Text, photoTours of a restored 19th-century, graphs, interactive audiovisual middle-class home. Oakmont. components, & related arti412-826-9295. facts challenge perceptions MARIDON MUSEUM. about race. Oakland. Collection includes jade 412-622-3131. and ivory statues from CARNEGIE SCIENCE China and Japan, as well CENTER. Ongoing: as Meissen porcelain. www. per pa Buhl Digital Dome Butler. 724-282-0123. pghcitym o .c (planetarium), Miniature MCGINLEY HOUSE Railroad and Village, USS & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Requin submarine, and more. Historic homes open for tours, North Side. 412-237-3400. lectures and more. Monroeville. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, 412-373-7794. Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to rare examples of pre World more than 600 birds from over War II iron-making technology. 200 species. With classes, lectures, Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. demos and more. North Side. DEPRECIATION LANDS 412-323-7235. MUSEUM. Small living history NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 museum celebrating the rooms helping to tell the story settlement and history of the of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-486-0563. 412-624-6000. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed PHIPPS CONSERVATORY Frank Lloyd Wright house. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 724-329-8501. indoor rooms & 3 outdoor FORT PITT MUSEUM. Recongardens feature exotic plants structed fort houses museum of and floral displays from around Pittsburgh history circa French the world. Fall Flower Show. & Indian War and American Oakland. 412-622-6914.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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19,

2014

BY DANIELLE FOX

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. 412-454-6000. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium:


The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use realworld minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

HOLIDAY THU 23 GHOST LEGENDS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

THU 23 - SAT 25 ZOMBIES OF THE CORN. Zombie shoot & corn maze. Thu-Sat. Thru Nov. 1 Three Rivers Paintball & Airsoft, Zelienople.

THU 23 - SUN 26 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE & THE VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 1 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. 412-823-4813.

VISUALART

FRI 24 ANNUAL HALLOWEEN BASH. performance by Soul Searchers. Costume & dance contests. Raffles. Special appearance by Chiller Theater’s “Terminal Stare” benefit local Elks charities, Veterans and Youth programs 7:30 p.m. Wilkins Elks. 412-823-6300. THE CATTIVO HOWLOWEEN BASH. Bands, raffles, DJs, more. Benefits the Homeless Cat Management Team & Hello Bully 7:30 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. HAUNTED MUSEUM.. AFTER DARK. Cocktails, screenings of Creature from the Black Lagoon & Nosferatu, presentation by Western Pennsylvania Paranormal Hunters, more. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. HOWL-O-WEEN PET COSTUME CONTEST. Registration 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Mall at Robinson.

FRI 24 - SAT 25 TRAIL OF TERROR. Benefits Pitcher Skatepark Project. www.pghtrailofterror.com Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 25 Carnegie Park, Carnegie. 724-228-9267.

SAT 25 HALLOWEEN MAYHEM. Zombies, a costume parade, puppets, live performances, games, more. 12-4 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. SIN SEASON TOUR/HALLOWEEN RIDE. PA Brew Tours visits multiple breweries to give behind the scenes tours, beer samples & more. 1 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

SUN 26 THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW LIVE. 7 & 11 p.m. and Thu., Oct. 30, 7 & 11 p.m. Cavo, Strip District.

“Titanic” (detail), by Bill Miller, from Fly On In … Take Off Your Shoes … Have a Seat! at Gallerie Chiz, in Shadyside

NEW THIS WEEK CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. The Architecture of Hope. Artist, Charles Jencks, discuss exhibit. Oct. 24, 6:30-9:30p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Opening reception Oct. 26, 4-6 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. MASER GALLERIES. Hessam Abrishami. Almost 40 works by the world-renowned artist. Opening receptions Oct. 24, 6-9 p.m. & Oct. 25, noon-3 p.m. Shadyside. 412-687-0885. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. Opening reception Oct. 24, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Reception Oct. 24, 6-8p.m. Pairing artwork with artisan food and drink by Bar Marco. Strip District. 412-261-7003.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Suzanne Colvin: Recent Work. Place-based abstract works. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League. Group show. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday giftgiving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUNKERPROJECTS. Somewhere Over The_. A solo show by resident artist, Shikieth. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. Keen 2013. Photographs by Xenia Guthrie. Monroeville. 412-371-8651. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232.

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Once upon a time . Pittsburgh. Paintings by Fritz Keck. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. When the Space Shuttle Was. Photos of space shuttle & astronauts press conferences. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In . Take Off Your Shoes .Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Something Alien: An ART Show

by two people who don’t belong. New Works by Nick & Noell Romeo, feat. 3D digital renderings, music, photography, fractal generations, sculpture, & oil pastels. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/ Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan.

North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. 412-231-3169. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Pittsburgh Society of Artists 49th Annual Juried Member Exhibition. Closing reception Oct. 25, 1-3 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Artist talk & closing reception Oct. 25 2-4 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. 68th Annual International Aqueous Exhibit. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society’s annual group show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An African-American Art Exhibition,. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

SCAREHOUSE UNMASKED! A BEHIND-THE-SCENES PITTSBURGH SCAREHOUSE TOUR. Meet at 2:45 PM at 25 W Station Square Dr. Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 26 Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709.

MON 27 ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Feat. an all-Star cast performing during the screening, plus audience participation & customary Rocky Horror Picture show fun. 9 p.m. Regent Square Theater, Regent Square. 412-682-4111.

TUE 28 3RD ANNUAL ZOMBIE BOWLING BALL. Costume contest, music by the Rocking Bones, more. 9 p.m. Arsenal Bowling Lanes, Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993.

WED 29 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE & THE VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 1 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. 412-823-4813. HAUNTED LIBRARY. Wed, Thu, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 1, 2-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 30 Carnegie Library, Carrick, Carrick. 412-882-3897.

SPECIAL SUN 26 - MON 27 SHALE DRILLING & PUBLIC

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

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FRI 24 GROOVE AESTHETIC: WINDS OF THE SAHEL. An evening of dance, instrumental, hip-hop, classical, & African folk music, feat. Jazz vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield & composer Joe Sheehan. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321.

Try for FREE Ahora en Español

Teligence/18+

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

SAT 25

TUE 28

MY THOUGHTS. presented by Kyiv Ukrainian Dance Ensemble 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

GENERAL DAVID H. PETRAEUS. Talk presented by the American Middle East Institute. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

WED 29

LITERARY

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE TOUR. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS THU 23 PRO BONO ROCKS KARAOKE EDITION. Benefits pro bono legal services w/ joining the Allegheny County Bar Foundation.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FALL FOODSHARE

It’s time again for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank’s Fall FoodShare Drive, now in its 15th year. Starting this weekend, volunteers are needed to tend donation stations at 60 area Giant Eagle stores, Saturdays and Sundays through Nov. 27. Families and groups are welcome. Visit www.pittsburghfoodbank.org for information.

FRI 24 - SUN 26 THE SLEEPING BEAUTY. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. 8 p.m., Sat., Oct. 25, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 26, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

DANCE

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861

HEALTH: DAYS OF DISCOVERY. Experts present the latest research on “fracking” and public health. Advance registration required. 1-6 p.m. and Mon., Oct. 27, 9 a.m.6 p.m. University Club, Oakland.

Food, prizes, raffle items. 5:30 p.m. Olive Or Twist, Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SAT 25 15 YEARS OF CHANGING HEARTS MASQUERADE GALA. Cajun cuisine, music by local Jessica Lee, auction items, more. Benefits the Change A Heart Franciscan Volunteer Program. 6 p.m. Sts. John & Paul Parish, Wexford. 412-821-0861. AUTUMN WINE & BREW FEST. Benefits the Mars Area Public Library. 6-9 p.m. Treesdale Community Center, Gibsonia. 724-625-9048. GEMINI THEATER FUN & FREAKY FUNDRAISER. Food, games, treats, dance party & a special performance of the “Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

SUN 26 6TH ANNUAL MGA POOCH PARADA. 1 mile dog walk & canine/owner costume event. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. South Park, South Park. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS THU 23 LIVING W/ DISASTER: STORIES FROM NORTHEASTERN JAPAN. Stories from the Fukushima disaster area from Prof. Ronni Alexander from Kobe University. Posvar Hall, Rm. 3431 4-6 p.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-624-4141.

THU 23 59U BOOK LAUNCH. By Mark Possanza. Ft. poets Kris Collins & Scott Silsbe. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. NICOLETTE STEELE. Author of Elite Deception-Let The Games Begin 5-8 p.m. Crystal, Strip District. 412-434-0480.

FRI 24 ANDREEA DECIU RITIVOI BOOK SIGNING. “Intimate Strangers in American Political Discourse” by CMU professor. 12 p.m. Carnegie Mellon Bookstore, Oakland. HUANG XIANG. Reading by the internationally renowned poet. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

SAT 25 “CRUSHES & MOUNTAINS” QUEER WRITERS TOUR. featuring Elisha Lim and Vivek Shraya, two acclaimed queer Canadian writers of colour with Joy KMT, Michael David Battle and Anjali Sachdeva. 5:30 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

MON 27 AUTHOR VISIT W/ MICHAEL SIMS. author of “The Phantom Coach: A Connoisseur’s Collection of Victorian Ghost Stories” 6 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. JUDITH COOPEY. Author of “Juniata Iron Trilogy, Book One: the Furnace” 6:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

TUE 28 PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 23 SKIPPYJON JONES. Theatreworks USA’s production based on the book by Judy Schachner. 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. Marshall Middle School, Wexford. 412-456-1390.

THU 23 - WED 29 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

[LITERARY] BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES $4 TOP SHELF DRINKS & $2.25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVE EVERY NIGHT

$2 THIRSTY THURSDAYS

FRI 24 SKIPPYJON JONES. Theatreworks USA’s production based on the book by Judy Schachner. 7 p.m. Moon High School, Moon. 412-456-6666. SPOOKY SCIENCE SLEEPOVER. A spooky live science demonstration, a family Halloween laser show, more. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

FRI 24 - SUN 26 DISNEY’S ALICE IN WONDERLAND, JR. Presented by Mon River Arts Youth Theatre. 7:30 p.m., Sat., Oct. 25, 2 & 6 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 26, 2 p.m. Grand Theatre. 412-405-8425.

SAT 25 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OWL-O-WEEN. Crafts, candy, & owls of every shape & size. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SKIPPYJON JONES. Theatreworks USA’s production based on the book by Judy Schachner. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-456-6666.

SUN 26

THE HELLBOUND COMEDY TOUR

1/2ISOSIFONF

“4 comics and a band”

THURSDAY OCT 30/10PM

Saturday, Elisha Lim and Vivek Shraya bring their

Crushes and Mountains Queer Writers Tour from Canada to the Big Idea Bookstore. Each offers diverse bodies of work, including solo and collaborative projects. Lim, an advocate for the adoption of the non-gender-specific pronoun “they” in Canadian media, reads from the new graphic novel 100 Crushes; Shraya, a Lambda Literary Award finalist, reads from his new novel, She of the Mountains. The evening also features music, film (the above still is from Queers Who Pray, in which Lim draws a portrait of Shraya), as well as locals Joy KMT, Michael David Battle and Anjali Sachdeva. 5:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. 4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-4323 or thebigideapgh.wordpress.com

SAT 25 MINGO CREEK PARK OCTOBER STAR PARTIES. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 5:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150.

OTHER STUFF THU 23

AFTER DIGGING COMES THE HARD PART: DECODING FLORENCE CATHEDRAL W/OUT LEAVING FRICK FINE ART. Lecture by Franklin Toker. 4 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Building, Oakland. CAPTAIN RICHARD PHILLIPS. Part of the New Horizons Speakers Series. 7 p.m. St. TOT TIME: COSTUME Vincent College, Latrobe. PARTY. Costume parade, 724-539-9761. stories & more for THE COLOR OF NOISE. children 18 months A Film About the artist - 3 years. Oct. 28-29 www. per a p ty Haze XXL & his Children’s Museum of pghci m o .c notorious record label Pittsburgh, North Side. Amphetamine Reptile 412-322-5058. Records. With Q&A Session from Director Eric Robel & Haze XXL + Art Show. 8 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S SKYWATCH. Learn about ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. globular clusters, nebulas & Social, cultural club of American/ planets by seeing them w/ your international women. Thu First own eyes. On clear nights, Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. visitors are invited to come to pittsburgh@gmail.com. SkyWatch to get up-close and RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. personal with amazing celestial Learn a variety of dances from objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Side. 412-237-3400. Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie SKIPPYJON JONES. Theatreworks USA’s production based on the book by Judy Schachner. 2 p.m. Seneca Valley Intermediate School, Harmony. 412-456-6666.

TUE 28 - WED 29

FULL LIST ONLINE

OUTSIDE

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Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.

THU 23 - FRI 24 FALL COIN SHOW. presented by the Pennsylvania Association of Numismatists. Buy, sell, or trade rare coins, medals , gold, and silver. 12-6 p.m., Fri., Oct. 24, 10 a.m.6 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 25, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville.

FRI 24 CELEBRATE DESIGN IN THE HILL DISTRICT. Presentation by architects Troy West, David Lewis & Walter Hood who have worked in the Hill District Community. 7 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554.

FRI 24 - SAT 25 FALL COIN SHOW. presented by the Pennsylvania Association of Numismatists. Buy, sell, or trade rare coins, medals , gold, and silver. 12-6 p.m., Fri., Oct. 24, 10 a.m.6 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 25, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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Celebrating 20 Years!

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

Carole J. Obley, Soulvisions,LLC, variety of metaphysical readers & home party vendors. 12-5 p.m. Library Fire Hall, South Park. THE NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. Feat. Zeke’s coffee, vintage finds, pumpkins, costume contest, more. 23rd & Penn Ave, Strip District. www.neighborhoodflea.com CREATIVITY BOUND ART 10 a.m.-3 p.m. WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. Pgh Disabilities Film Festival. Mul412-688-0417. tiple locations. JFilmPgh.org 7 & HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. 7:30 p.m. and Thu., Oct. 30, 7 p.m. WASHINGTON WALKING TEA CLASS & TASTING. TOUR. Begins outside of History of tea, steeping Monongahela Incline on techniques, Storing Tea, W. Carson St. Sat, Health Benefits, more. 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 Tea samples & European 412-302-5223. www. per cookies will be served. pa pghcitym HOLIDAY CRAFT Reservations required. .co SHOW. Crafts & vendors, Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 bake sale, auction, more. Margaret’s Fine Imports, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. South Avenue Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. United Methodist Church, Wilkinsburg. 412-371-7421. MASTER CLASS: MAKEUP AND PGC LECTURE SERIES: EFFECTS ARTISTRY. instructed ROBERT BECKMAN & ASHLEY by Drew A. Talbot, a SyFy Face-Off MCFARLAND. 6-7 p.m. Pittsburgh Contestant. 10 a.m. Prime Stage Glass Center, Friendship. Theatre Rehearsal Studio, 412-365-2145. West End. “REDESIGNING HEALTH CARE FOR CHILDREN W/ DISABILITIES: STRENGTHENING INCLUSION, AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL CONTRIBUTION & HEALTH”. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly Dr. Heidi Feldman to present letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. ideas on redesigning healthcare Panera Bread, Oakland. for children with disabilities. 412-683-3727. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom MYSTICAL HALLOWEEN PSYCHIC Congregation, Oakland. FAIR. Lecture, message circle by 412-621-6566.

FRI 24 - SUN 26

20TH ANNUAL AUTUMN QUILT SHOW. Presented by Beaver Valley Piecemakers. www.bvpiecemakers. com Oct. 24-26 Brady’s Run Park Lodge, Beaver Falls.

SAT 25 CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 29

SUN 26

AUDITIONS THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for their Holiday Spectacular Family Variety Show. Oct. 26-27. Call or visit www.bphp.org. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. MON RIVER ARTS. Seeking male actors age 20s-30s for stage adaptation of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Email monriverarts@gmail.com or call for information. 412-405-8425. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Open auditions for the Annual Holiday Radio Show. Oct. 26. Seeking men & women. Readings from the script. 724-775-6844. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for It’s a Wonderful Life Radio Play. Oct. 26-27. Men, women & children. Prepare 2 minute monologue, be prepared to try it in a voice, accent or character style. Call or email tfauditions@gmail.com for appointment. 412-374-9200.

SUBMISSIONS THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer. com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.22-10.29

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The average serving of pasta on a typical American’s plate is almost 480 percent bigger than what’s recommended as a healthy portion. So says a research paper titled “The Contribution of Expanding Portion Sizes to the U.S. Obesity Epidemic,” by Lisa R. Young and Marion Nestle. Muffins are 333 percent larger than they need to be, the authors say, and steaks are 224 percent excessive. Don’t get caught up in this trend, Libra. Get what you need, but not way, way more than what you need. For that matter, be judicious in your approach to all of life’s necessities. The coming phase is a time when you will thrive by applying the Goldilocks principle: neither too much nor too little, but just right.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Children are the most desirable opponents at Scrabble,” declares Scorpio author Fran Lebowitz, “as they are both easy to beat and fun to cheat.” I don’t wholeheartedly endorse that advice for you in the coming days, Scorpio. But would you consider a milder version of it? Let’s propose, instead, that you simply seek easy victories to boost your confidence and hone your skills. By this time next week, if all goes well, you will be ready to take on more ambitious challenges.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You are entering a phase when you will have more luck than usual as you try to banish parasitic influences, unworthy burdens and lost causes. Here are some projects you might want to work on: 1. Bid farewell to anyone who brings out the worst in you. 2. Heal the twisted effect an adversary has had on you. 3. Get rid of any object that symbolizes failure or pathology. 4. Declare your independence from a situation that wastes your time or drains your resources. 5. Shed any guilt

you feel for taking good care of yourself. 6. Stop a bad habit cold turkey.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Are you ready to be as affable as a Sagittarius, as charismatic as a Leo, as empathetic as a Cancerian and as vigorous an instigator as an Aries? No? You’re not? You’re afraid that would require you to push yourself too far outside your comfort zone? OK, then. Are you willing to be half as affable as a Sagittarius, half as charismatic as a Leo, half as empathetic as a Cancerian and half as inspiring an instigator as an Aries? Or even a quarter as much? I hope you will at least stretch yourself in these directions, Capricorn, because doing so would allow you to take maximum advantage of the spectacular social opportunities that will be available for you in the next four weeks.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the coming weeks I hope you will find practical ways to express your new-found freedom. All the explorations and experiments you have

get your yoga on!

enjoyed recently were fun and provocative, but now it’s time to use the insights they sparked to upgrade your life back in the daily grind. Please don’t misunderstand what I’m saying. I love it when you are dreamy and excitable and farseeing, and would never ask you to tone down those attractive qualities. But I am also rooting for you to bring the high-flying parts of you down to earth so that you can reap the full benefits of the bounty they have stirred up. If you work to become more well-grounded, I predict that you will be situated in a new power spot by Dec. 1.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

The heavy metal band known as Hatebeak broadened the definition of what constitutes music. Its lead singer was Waldo, an African grey parrot. A review by Aquarius Records called Waldo’s squawks “completely and stupidly brilliant.” For Hatebeak’s second album, they collaborated with animal rights’ activists in the band Caninus, whose lead vocalists were two pitbull terriers, Basil and Budgie. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I’d love to see you get inspired by these experiments. I think you will generate interesting results as you explore expansive, even unprecedented approaches in your own chosen field.

Astronauts on the International Space Station never wash their underwear. They don’t have enough water at their disposal to waste on a luxury like that. Instead, they fling the dirty laundry out into space. As it falls to Earth, it burns up in the atmosphere. I wish you had an amenity like that right now. In fact, I wish you had a host of amenities like that. If there was ever a time when you should be liberated from having to wash your underwear, make your bed, sweep the floor and do the dishes, it would be now. Why? Because there are much better ways to spend your time. You’ve got sacred quests to embark on, heroic adventures to accomplish, historical turning points to initiate.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The driest place on the planet is the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. It gets about a half-inch of rain per year. And yet in 2011, archaeologists discovered that it’s also home to a site containing the fossilized skeletons of numerous whales and other ancient sea creatures. I’m detecting a metaphorically comparable anomaly in your vicinity, Aries. A seemingly arid, empty part of your life harbors buried secrets that are available for you to explore. If you follow the clues, you may discover rich pickings that will inspire you to revise your history.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Businessman Warren Buffet is worth $65.5 billion, but regularly gives away 27 percent of his fortune to charity. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates owns $78 billion, and donates 36 percent. Then there are the members of the Walton family, owners of Walmart, where 100 million Americans shop weekly. The Waltons have $136 billion, of which they contribute .04 percent to good causes. You are not wealthy in the same way these people are, Taurus. Your riches consist of resources like your skills, relationships, emotional intelligence, creative power and capacity for love. My invitation to you is to be extra generous with those assets — not as lavish as Buffet or Gates, perhaps, but much more than the Waltons. You are in a phase when giving your gifts is one of the best things you can do to bolster your own health, wealth and well-being.

You have two options. You can be in denial about your real feelings and ignore what needs to be fixed and wait for trouble to come find you. Or else, you can vow to be resilient and summon your feistiest curiosity and go out searching for trouble. The difference between these two approaches is dramatic. If you mope and sigh and hide, the messy trouble that arrives will be indigestible. But if you are brave and proactive, the interesting trouble you get will ultimately evolve into a blessing.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What are those new whisperings in your head? Are they messages from your inner teacher? Beacons beamed back through time from the Future You? Clues from the wise parts of your unconscious mind? Whatever they are, Leo, pay attention. These signals from the Great Beyond may not be clear yet, but if you are sufficiently patient, they will eventually tell you how to take advantage of a big plot twist. But here’s a caveat: Don’t automatically believe every single thing the whisperings tell you. Their counsel may not be 100-percent accurate. Be both receptive and discerning toward them.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the English-speaking world, a sundae is a luxurious dessert that features ice cream topped with sweet treats like syrup, sprinkles and fruits. In Korea, a sundae is something very different. It consists of a cow’s or pig’s intestines crammed with noodles, barley and pig’s blood. I expect that in the coming week you will be faced with a decision that has metaphorical similarities to the choice between a sundae and a sundae. Make sure you are quite clear about the true nature of each option. I invite you to carry out a prank that makes someone feel really good. Report results by going to FreeWillAstrology.com and clicking on “Email Rob.”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

CLASSES

AUTO SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads. TV. Film. Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Syed & Sons

GENERAL

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLASSES

AUTO SERVICE

Local company looking for a

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Rent -A- Bay for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

STUDIES

full-time shipper/receiver. Benefits, vacation, health coverage. E-mail resume to jobs@kruman.com

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

412-403-6069

STORAGE

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

ADOPTION

ABC SELF STORAGE

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

412-403-6069

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

412.363.1900 CTRS

ADOPTION

ADOPTION

STUDIES

ADOPT

ADOPTION

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

START YOUR CAREER AT THE TOP! We are growing and now hiring experienced roofing technicians with residential, commercial, and sheet metal experience! Full Benefits Available. Questions or to Apply: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application or Submit your resume via -email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884

A loving, financially secure, safe happy home awaits your newborn. Expenses Paid Karen

1-877-492-8811

Adventurous, Creative, Bilingual, Financially Secure Couple, Travel, Music, LOVE awaits 1st baby. Expenses Paid Erin & George

1-800-354-2608

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

BIRTH CONTROL PATCH STUDY CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

is seeking an Acct in Pitt. Duties to include: preparation of account statements, reports, financial and tax documents for employer accounts, and budget and receipt statements. Completing all required tax documents for employees and busi-

nesses, maintain all financial and tax records, any other financial or accounting related issues which may arise. Requirements: Have 6 yrs of exp as an acct, Assc’s Degree or foreign eq in: Finance, Accounting, or related field. Send resumes to: bashirakhter@ gmail.com

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF! We are currently seeking staff for IMMEDIATE openings to support an adult 1:1 in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org or call 724-933-5166

Transporting students in Allegheny, Butler, Westmoreland and Armstrong Counties. Hiring at a location near you visit us at www.wlroenigk.com Come be a part of our family

Now Hiring School Bus Drivers and 9 Passenger School Bus Drivers Apply online at www.monarktrans.com 1-888-317-4144 HIRING NOW! Black Lick, PA Mercer, PA • CDL Frac Equipment Operator • CDL Nitrogen Equipment Operator • CDL Cement Equipment Operator • CDL Wireline Equipment Operator • Mechanic • Crane Operator Apply on-line at www.nabors.com/careers • Select Field Opportunities or DOT Opportunities (CDL Jobs) • Under Rig Work Locations, select USA-NORTHEAST

U.S. Census Bureau is hiring Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.

Nabors offers Competitive Pay, Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance & 401K. EOE/M/F/V/D

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz N E W S

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*Stuff We Like GET HELP NOW

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

1-800-243-1001

www.glenbeigh.com

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

EXPERIENCED SALES PROFESSIONAL to join the Sales Team Candidate should have:

• DIGITAL EXPERIENCE A PLUS

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Tree Frog Farms’ Goat Milk Soaps The soaps made by this Central Pa. company are great for sensitive skin, with a smooth and creamy lather. Plus they smell amazing. The pumpkin spice is perfect for fall. www.treefrogfarmanddairy.com

Hartzell Memorial Fountain “For Man, Beast & Bird” reads the inscription on this 1909 monument at North Commons and Federal streets, on the North Side. The granite sculpture incorporates a fountain for people and basins for birds (on top) and other critters (in front). Sadly, the plumbing is defunct, but the sentiment (by James E. Hartzell, for his late wife, Annie) remains poignant.

EMAIL RESUMES TO: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. Steel City Media is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.22/10.29.2014

@Getfitpgh The Fittsburgh Twitter account has regular updates on fitness and food events throughout the city.

Enon Valley Garlic It’s garlic-planting time! Choose between multiple varieties of bulbs at its weekly booth at Market Square’s farmers’ market on Thursdays, then plant unpeeled cloves in late October. www.enonvalleygarlic.com

Voter’s Self-Defense Manual This guide, published by the non-partisan Project Vote Smart is available free to all voters online (www.votesmart.org) and in a pocket-sized print copy (call 888-VoteSmart). The guide not only culls data on your representatives, it even rates their level of political courage.

Recovery Without Judgement™

Pittsburgh City Paper is looking for an

• 5 YEARS OF MEDIA SALES EXPERIENCE TO QUALIFY FOR THE POSITION OF SELLING PRINT, WEB AND RADIO

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

Gilm Gilmore Girls N Nothing ssays fall like this te television series about a mother and daughter living in a small Connecticut town. Now on Netflix.

The Kansas City Royals It may seem odd to root for another baseball team, but the young and hungry Royals are just like our Pirates. If they can pull off an October miracle, then that means there’s definitely hope for our Buccos.

“Before the Law.” Jennifer Gonnerman’s harrowing story from the Oct. 6 New Yorker, about a teen held for 1,000 days on Rikers Island after being accused of stealing a backpack, illustrates how the justice system can be both dysfunctional and rigged against those without money or power. www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/06/law-3


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

Aming’s Massage Therapy

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Asian/European Girl

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pregnant? We can treat you!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR

China Massage

Superior Chinese Massage

$60/hr FREE Table Shower

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

724-519-7896

412-595-8077

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

TIGER SPA GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Xin Sui Bodyworks

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Grand Opening

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com N E W S

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$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 22, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 43

October 22, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 43