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FUEL INJECTION: DRUM-AND-BASS DJ DIESELBOY RETURNS TO PITTSBURGH 22


EVENTS 8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3, FEATURING THE DEBUT SCREENING OF PSYCHIC TV: DREAMS LESS SWEET New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Scout Niblett 9.19 – 8pm

8.17 – 2pm

Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

ARTIST TALK: GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.24 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: QUEER AND BROWN IN STEELTOWN WITH RAQUEL RODRIGUEZ AND AYANAH MOOR Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.30 – 8pm FILM SCREENING: CREATING THE PANDROGYNE: CELEBRATING BREYER P-ORRIDGE WITH GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE IN PERSON Tickets $10

Angel Olsen 9.24 – 8pm Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

8.31 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: TROUBLING THE LINE: AN EXCERPT – POETRY READING AND CONVERSATION WITH JENNY JOHNSON AND ARI BANIAS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

9.7 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

Julianna Barwick, with special guests, Sleep Experiments CAN C E

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Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous

{EDITORIAL}

08.14/08.21.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writer LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 33

[NEWS] “A lot of it is perception. Two or three houses or two or three blocks make a difference in perception.” — James Eash of the Mount Washington CDC on the housing disparity in hilltop neighborhoods

[TASTE]

18

“There was nothing wimpy about the banana peppers which infused every bite of the arrabiatta.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Johnny’s

22

“The first club show I ever went to was at Metropol and he was performing at it.” — Internationally known drum-and-bass DJ and producer Dieselboy, on Pittsburgh’s DJ Strobe

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[ARTS]

complicates the act of 35 “Bubash ‘reading’ symbols, much as does a

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

swastika on a punk musician (unlike a swastika on a skinhead).” — Robert Raczka on work by local artist Nick Bubash

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[LAST PAGE] really like all the different 55 “Ipeople. They come from all over the city for this market.” — Local farmer Margaret Schlass on the joy of farmers’ markets

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 46 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 48 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 51 +

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“THERE’S ALL THIS OPPORTUNITY HERE RIGHT NOW.”

INCOMING Class Dismissed: Carnegie pulls plug on adult studio-arts program (Aug. 7) “Marilyn Russell’s statement that the museum’s mission is about training visitors to worship their sacred relics more deeply, not to enhance the public’s creative perception, has got to be the most dumbfoundingly ass-backwards remark I’ve ever heard from someone working in the humanities. The whole purpose of the museum and the display of those works is to perfect the public’s artistic vision. Clearly, the wrong people were fired.” — Web comment from “Donald Simpson” “Looking at art and understanding it and how it is made are two different things. … When people have the opportunity to obtain extended learning about the creation of art, they gain a better understanding of how art is made and then they start to spend more time looking at the art. I see these moves by the museum as lazy. There was a basic core group of classes that they could’ve easily fallen back onto — painting, drawing, ceramics and then re-built off of them. ... [I]nstead, they cancel all of them. Shame on you.” — Web comment from “Douglas Wayne Thomas” “Making art is about community and relationship building, about communication with self and others. Doing away with this opportunity is like turning the lights off. What good is [it] if a museum only sees itself as a place where people can go “appreciate” juried art, and not about where they can learn about themselves, too.” — Web comment from “Kenya Dworkin”

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

James Eash and Jason Kambitsis, of the Mount Washington CDC, say that homes on Eureka Street in Mount Washington recently sold for significantly higher than homes in nearby hilltop neighborhoods.

HOME REMODEL

Giving a Voice: “Queer and Brown” podcast sparking conversation for a marginalized community (Aug. 7) “[A]s a friend, I can attest to the coaster — even without a recorder going. Love the article and the reason for it. Keep it up! Much success! — Web comment from “Leshell”

“Surely this has got to convince all you non-knitters that knitting is cool!” — Aug. 12 tweet from “Spitalfields Music” (@spitsmusic) about the yarn-bombing of the Andy Warhol Bridge

6

T

HE HOUSE Connie Wellons first moved to in Beltzhoover in 1960 once sat five houses from the corner. Today, it sits just one house away: Three of its neighbors have burnt to the ground, and the city demolished the fourth. “No one is there to take care of them,” says Wellons of many of the homes and overgrown lots in her neighborhood. “The area is depressed.” Such problems are hardly unique in Pittsburgh. Many communities struggle with aging residents who are unable to take care of the property, or don’t have family to tend to it when they’re gone. But the contrast between progress and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

stagnation can be especially visible in the city’s “hilltop” neighborhoods — most of which are wedged between the South Side and communities like Beechview and Brookline.

Hilltop neighborhoods working to change public perception of their housing stock {BY LAUREN DALEY} While places like Beltzhoover and Allentown share borders with Mount Washington, their housing markets

remain far apart. On some Mount Washington streets, homes sell for more than $130,000. But on sites that are just a block, or even a few feet, away, homes go for much less — one as low $1,000 — if they go at all. “A lot of it is perception,” says James Eash, director of Economic Development for the Mount Washington Community Development Corp. “Two or three houses or two or three blocks make a difference.” Community planners are trying to change those perceptions. A detailed, five-year plan called the Allentown and Beltzhoover Housing Strategy is due in September.


But there are concerns that the low costs of entry into the community — the very things that make it ripe for revitalization — may attract investors who don’t have the neighborhood’s long-term interest at heart, and who purchase cheap properties without improving them. “There’s all this opportunity here right now,” says Aaron Sukenik, executive director of the Hilltop Alliance. “That opportunity is going to get more and more expensive because of folks who are just buying up [property and holding onto it].” HOWEVER Beltzhoover is perceived now,

longtime residents can recall better days. The neighborhood once had several vital community resources — among them a variety store, barbershop, hardware store, bakery and schools. In the 1960s, volunteers formed neighborhood patrols to protect the neighborhood from unrest during the civil-rights era. Such community institutions don’t exist today. Several bars moved into the area, Wellons says, some bringing a disorderly clientele with them. And as families and homeowners aged, “stability moved out,” she says. Or as life-long resident William “Bucky” Stephens puts it, “We went from a self-contained neighborhood that other communities wanted to be like — to this.” That’s partially why in the 1980s Wellons helped form the Beltzhoover Citizens Community Development Corporation to

help work on housing development. “We realized the housing stock in Beltzhoover had already gone down,” she says. “We wanted to rebuild. Little did we know in 2013 it’d be worse than when we started.” Statistics paint a grim picture. Across the 12 hilltop neighborhoods, homes sell for less than half the price of the average home in the City of Pittsburgh, according to a July analysis from the University of Pittsburgh Center for So-

cial and Urban Research (UCSUR). In 2012, homes in Beltzhoover sold for an average of $12,341 — the lowest on the hilltop. In Allentown, the average was more double that, at $29,898, while

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A mix of maintained and deteriorating property in the hilltop

Mount Washington’s average was the highest of all hilltop neighborhoods with an average of $94,969. So how can there be such drastic disparities in homes separated by a few feet? “Pittsburgh is really divided by geographic and historic lines,” says Bob Gradeck, project manager of the Pittsburgh Neighborhood and Community Information System, who worked on the UCSUR study. “They’re still in place and fixed in people’s minds.” The quality of housing stock also plays a role; in Beltzhoover, Gradeck notes, homes tend to be much older. “It wasn’t built expensively to begin with, and in a lot of cases you have people who have lived there a long time so there is an awful lot of deferred maintenance,” he says. “All that deferred maintenance adds up.” That leads to streets peppered with well-maintained houses situated next to crumbling and dilapidated buildings or overgrown, vacant lots strewn with trash. But community planners are hoping to buoy development by turning around some of the lower-cost properties — and the neighborhoods’ assets. The Allen-

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HOME REMODEL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

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town and Beltzhoover Housing Strategy project, for example, will identify and prioritize rehabilitation projects and key corridors for revitalization. For Sukenik, some areas are obvious places to begin: parts of Allentown that have sweeping vistas of the South Hills and Downtown Pittsburgh, for example, as well as areas along Beltzhoover Avenue and other “small gateways to the neighborhood.” The group also hopes to build off stronger existing markets — like Mount Washington — and assets like Grandview Park, McKinley Park and the Boggs Avenue light-rail station. Allentown has the Warrington Avenue business district, and both areas have easy access to mass transit, and proximity to parks and elementary schools. The Port Authority and the city, meanwhile, have been rehabbing Warrington Avenue and surrounding streets. The Allentown and Beltzhoover Housing Strategy project is funded by the Pittsburgh Neighborhood Renaissance Fund with support from the Mayor’s Office, the Urban Redevelopment Authority and the Department of City Planning. It’s administered by the Design Center through the Design Fund Program. “The potential here in Allentown is

more immediate because you’re building off the strengths — it’s got views, Grandview Park, it’s very close to Downtown and has a business district,” Sukenik says. “Beltzhoover has an opportunity, too — it’s similar in terms of the assets, but it’s going to be different in terms of the city living.” Because of Beltzhoover’s large size and ample green space, for example, “It would be more of a bedroom type of neighborhood.” LARGE housing-market disparities aren’t

unique to the hilltop. Kyra Straussman, real-estate director for the Urban Redevelopment Authority, points to an example on the other side of town — along Penn Avenue in Garfield and Friendship. “On the Friendship side of the street, there have been [many] more housing investments and opportunity,” Straussman says. “More people want to be in Friendship, so they are much more likely to come in and get a house that’s in disrepair and see their investment pay off, because there’s enough market draft behind you.” “What you have in Allentown and Beltzhoover … is a small number of transactions, period, so it’s just not a very strong housing market,” Straussman says. Because property costs so low, well-intentioned investors may think they’re getting a deal, but are then unable to invest the amount of work that’s

needed to bring the house or lot back from disrepair. “Any house you see selling for $20,000, $30,000 or $40,000: Immediately double or triple that,” says Sukenik. “Because chances are they need double the work.” And though home-ownership rates in the hilltop area were higher than the city’s overall rate, there’s been a steady decline in home ownership over the last decade, the UCSUR study notes. Gradeck at Pitt says half of the homes recently sold in the hilltop were purchased by housing investors. Most of those investors are “mom-and-pop-shop operations” that own a few properties for rent, Gradeck says. Then there are larger investor groups who buy up large numbers of cheap properties on speculation with the hopes of turning a profit by renting them, flipping them or re-selling them. “Some investors are really well meaning and really do a good job providing good, quality housing,” Gradeck says. “Some are a little less concerned about quality.” To residents like Wellons and Stephens, while housing stock is a critical component to improving their neighborhood, so too, is putting the right people in the houses. “It’s putting people in those houses that are prideful,” says Stephens. “Prideful enough to keep that property up.” L D A L E Y @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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55 Jefferson bus route due to budget constraints, it was hard to get around the Mon Valley using public transportation. But when the 55 got cut — along with 28 other routes in 2011 — things got even harder for riders like Robert “Waldoâ€? Whitzell, who found himself walking 10 miles from his Liberty Borough home to a chrome-plating job in Wilkins Township. After a DUI arrest, Whitzell says, “Public transportation and walking are my only way to get around. ‌ I thank the Lord for Mountain Dew and coffee.â€? Whitzell and others had a lifeline in a free shuttle operated by a nonproďŹ t, Heritage Community Initiatives, which helped residents get to work or job training. But when that shuttle, Heritage WorkLink, faced funding cuts, the area was in danger of being cut off from public transit completely. In response, the Port Authority is reinstating the route, now known as the 55 Glassport. “This route was cut in 2011, which was a tremendous hardship on the area,â€? says authority spokesman Jim Ritchie. “It cut people off from employment, cut them off from shopping. ‌ WorkLink thankfully stepped up its service to all of those communities.â€? WorkLink has been running since 2001, offering free Monday-Saturday service for some 3,000 qualifying applicants. It serves East Pittsburgh, Turtle Creek, North Versailles, McKeesport, Port Vue, Glassport, Clairton and the Jefferson Regional Medical Center and CCAC South Campus. “The Mon Valley has always had transportation issues,â€? says Sarah Morgan, director of transportation for Heritage Community Initiatives. “The community has no other transportation options — it’s either access to public transportation or they stay home.â€? Ritchie says that the authority “scraped togetherâ€? funding for the 55, which is expected to cost $460,000 a year. Restoring the service did not require a fare increase or other service reductions. The move was made, he says, “because of a speciďŹ c need in one area of the county that has lower-income communi-

ties and the potential to lose access to all public-transportation service. We felt it was prudent to ďŹ nd money within our own budget to pay for this.â€? But county ofďŹ cials say the transit agency likely won’t be able to reverse other service cuts made in 2011, when service was reduced 15 percent. “It’s going to be tough to bring others back,â€? says Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. While “[y]ou realign everything and try to provide as much service as you can,“ he adds, “you kind of have to rob Peter to pay Paul.â€? WorkLink previously relied on federal funding, which ran out June 30, says Morgan. Continued financial support was expected to be included in the state’s transportation-funding package, Morgan says. But state lawmakers failed to pass a transportation bill before summer recess (the legislature is expected to take the matter up in this fall). Morgan says the agency has temporary funding committed until Aug. 31. After that, “it’s still uncertain,â€? she says. One thing that is certain is that the 55 Glassport will start running Sept. 1, when the authority will change approximately 15 routes as part of its regular schedule adjustments. The route runs from Century Square in West Mifin to the North Versailles Walmart, passing through parts of Jefferson, Wilson, Port Vue, North Versailles, Clairton, West Mifin, Glassport and McKeesport. The route will pass CCAC South Campus, Jefferson Regional Medical Center, U.S. Steel Clairton Works and UPMC McKeesport. The authority attributed the route’s return to “cooperative effortsâ€? of local ofďŹ cials including Fitzgerald, state senators Jay Costa and Jim Brewster, state representatives Marc Gergely, Bill Kortz, Paul Costa and Harry Readshaw, and Allegheny County Councilor Bob Macey. The area needs that kind of help, says Morgan. WorkLink only provides services for riders to get jobs, training and other work-related support services. “WorkLink has ďŹ lled some of the work-related gaps,â€? says Morgan, “but it’s those day-to-day gaps people haven’t been able to ďŹ ll.â€?

“THE COMMUNITY HAS NO OTHER TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS — IT’S EITHER ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION OR THEY STAY HOME.�

L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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The National Security Agency is a “supercomputing powerhouse,” wrote ProPublica.org in July, with “machines so powerful their speed is measured in thousands of trillions of operations per second” — but apparently it has no ability to bulk-search its own employees’ official emails. Thus, ProPublica’s Freedom of Information Act demand for a seemingly simple all-hands search was turned down in July with the NSA informing ProPublica that the best it could do would be to go one-byone through the emails of each of the agency’s 30,000 employees — which would be prohibitively expensive. (ProPublica reported that companywide searches are “common” for large corporations, which must respond to judicial subpoenas and provide information for their own internal investigations.)

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To commemorate its 500th “deep brain stimulation” surgery in May, UCLA Medical Center live-tweeted its operation on musician Brad Carter, 39, during which he was required to strum his guitar and sing so that surgeons would know where in his brain to plant the electrical stimulator that would relieve his Parkinson’s disease symptoms. Carter had developed hand tremors in 2006, but the stimulator, once it is properly programmed and the surgery healed, is expected to reduce his symptoms, restore some guitar-playing ability and reduce his medication need. (And, yes, patients normally remain conscious during the surgery.)

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Firefighters are not infrequently called on to extricate adventurous men from sex toys. But one “armor-plat[ed]” “armor-plat[ed] d ” device,

6 inches in diameter, in which a 51-year-old German entrapped himself in July in Ibiza, Mallorca, was especially challenging, according to the Diario de Mallorca newspaper. Extrication took two hours and a dose of anesthesia toward the end. The saw blade the emergency workers used wore out during the rescue and had to be replaced, along with two sets of batteries. The man was kept overnight at Can Misses hospital, but was otherwise OK.

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Americans stage dog shows, and MiddleEasterners stage camel beauty contests, and in June, the annual German Holstein Show took over the city of Oldenburg, with the twoday event won by “Loh Nastygirl,” topping bovine beauties from Germany, Luxembourg and Austria. The event is also a showcase for the cow hairdressers, who trim cows’ leg and belly hair (to better display their veins). Said one dresser, “It is just like with us people — primping helps.” Groomed or not, cows with powerful legs, bulging udders and a strong bone structure are the favorites.

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Fruit of any kind retails for outlandish prices in Japan, but some, such as Yubari cantaloupes, are so prestigious that they are often presented as gifts to friends or colleagues, and it was only mildly surprising that a pair of the melons sold in May for the equivalent of about $15,700 at auction at the Sapporo Central Wholesale Market. The melons appeared to be perfect specimens, with their T-shaped stalk still attached. The record melon-pair price, set in 2008, is about $24,500 measured at today’s exchange rate.

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Briar MacLean, 13, of Calgary, Alberta, was reprimanded by school officials in May (and then lost an appeal) after he stepped between two students because one, holding a knife, was bullying the other. The vice principal appeared to regard Briar’s action as equal to that of the bully, telling Briar’s mother later that the school does not “condone heroics,” and that it was “beside the point” that Briar might well have prevented a slashing (which could have occurred if he had left the boys behind to go find a teacher).

unhinged, according to the Times, that standards from the iconic Sex and the City designer Manolo Blahnik are now low-price leaders, holding at about $595.

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Police in Boston are confident that Zachary Tentoni is the man who robbed a woman in the yard of Harbor Middle School in June because, as he grabbed her purse and fled, he dropped two bags he was carrying. Among the contents: Tentoni’s birth certificate and a letter from his mother.

Some crime-scene investigative techniques seem far-fetched, but police use of “ear prints” might be approaching the mainstream. Britain convicted its first burglar based on an ear print in 1998, and in May 2013, investigators in Lyon, France, tied a 26-year-old man from the Republic of Georgia to a string of about 80 burglaries — by taking prints from doors the man had leaned against while listening for activity inside the home.

Second-grader Josh Welch’s two-day suspension in March was upheld on appeal in June by Park Elementary School officials of Anne Arundel County, Md., even though his offense was that he had nibbled a pastry into the shape of a gun, which he then waved around. Said Josh’s attorney: “If this [school system] can’t educate a 7-year-old without putting him out of school, how are they going to deal with 17-year-olds?”

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The behavior of women descending upon New York City stores in June for the annual “sale” on designer shoes makes the city’s upscale commercial district look like “an insane asylum of very well-dressed women,” reported The New York Times. The shoes’ everyday prices require, wrote the Times, “the willful suspension of rational thinking.” The average transaction at Barneys is $850, still far below, for example, a pair of wicker-basket-like sandals ($1,995 by Charlotte Olympia) or a certain Christian Louboutin pump ($1,595 — $4,645 if in crocodile). Prices are so

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THERE WAS NOTHING WIMPY ABOUT THE BANANA PEPPERS IN THE SAUSAGE ARRABIATTA

NOT JUST ANY OIL {BY CHRIS POTTER} This is, apparently, a great time to be in the oil business. The olive oil business in particular. Olive & Marlowe, which offers gourmet balsamic vinegars and olive oils at the Strip District’s Pittsburgh Public Market, is poised to join East Liberty’s increasingly upscale retail mix. The new location, at 5931 Broad St., will open “in September at the latest,” says owner Heather Cramer. (The business bears the names of the Cramers’ daughters — and before you ask, “Olive” is a family name.) “We realized that if we didn’t open up a [bricks-and-mortar] shop, someone else would,” says Cramer. Both locations will offer oils and vinegars infused with flavors ranging from Persian Lime to Coconut Mango. All are shipped by a pair of California suppliers: Cramer brings to the table her own field research, and a chance to sample. For those of us who just buy the olive oil with prettiest peasant girl on the label, a tasting can be revelatory. Even if you do feel silly sipping oil from tiny plastic cups. Olives alone come in 1,000 varietals: “They’re like apples,” Cramer says. And the flavor possibilities increase once Cramer starts blending them — mixing rosemary-infused olive oil with strawberry balsamic vinegar, for example, to make a bright summertime blend. The goal, says Cramer, is to “give people a chance to taste [oil and vinegar] the way they do wine … so they know what flavors to look for.” Soon, they’ll have a second place to find them. CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.oliveandmarlowe.com

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Where are the spumonis of yesteryear? Along with White House cherry, marble fudge and mint chocolate chip, this once-popular ice-cream treat is harder to find these days. Make an extra effort to track down the fruity, nutty multi-colored ice cream by Aug. 21, National Spumoni Day.

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OLD-SCHOOL FAVES {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HERE IS A CLASS of local restaurants that can perhaps best be described as “Old-School Italian in an Old Working-Class Town.” Often dating from the days when foreign cuisine meant either Italian-American or ChineseAmerican, these establishments may or may not have updated their menus to reflect current trends toward seasonal, locally sourced ingredients and regionally inspired recipes. From outward appearances, it can be hard to distinguish the worthy from the withered on the vine. Of course, one sign that an older restaurant is keeping up with the times is the existence of a website, which also affords clues as to menu, decor and ambience. The website maintained by Johnny’s, an old-school Italian restaurant in Wilmerding, is enthusiastic to the point of hyperbole. In text peppered with exclamation points, it disputes the presumptive claim that “There is NO way that there can be an INCREDIBLE restaurant in WILMERDING” with the assertion that Johnny’s offers “Cuisine that you

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

Salmon with white balsamic-apricot glaze

will NEVER forget … EXCEPTIONAL service and a FANTASTIC atmosphere … all at EXTREMELY REASONABLE PRICES!” We set out to put this to the test. Johnny’s opened 20 years ago, and little seems to have changed over the years, leaving the decor in a mirrored, ivy-festooned state somewhere between

JOHNNY’S 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642 HOURS: Tue.-Fri. 4 p.m.-midnight; Sat. 5 p.m.-1 a.m. PRICES: Soups, salads and appetizers $4-10; entrees $11-35 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED dated and classic. The well-lit dining room wraps around a horseshoe-shaped bar at its center, and we were among several patrons following the Pirates game on the bar’s lone TV. Clapping broke out when the Bucs won, even as another table was singing “Happy Birthday.” It all gave credence

to Johnny’s claim that it is often compared to the famous TV bar, Cheers. Johnny’s menu of Italian restaurant standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories was tried and true. So we ordered what we felt like, trusting it would give us a good feel for the kitchen’s approach to these familiar favorites. Overall, we found the preparations to be fairly up-to-date: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. The calamari came out first, along with an appetizer of beans and greens. The squid rings were beyond tender, almost like a fine piece of sashimi. The accompanying marinara was mild, sweet and flavorful enough to invite double dipping. The beans and greens were elemental, served without the sausage that sometimes finds its way into this dish, and in a ladleful of their own light broth. Though lacking any kick or even much savor, the escarole retained its heartiness, tamed by wilting without being rendered bland.


Our entrees also ranged from good to excellent, with most toward the excellent end. The only exception was an aglia e olio (on the menu as “aglia oil”) that was by turns bland and harsh with raw garlic. Chicken Romano was pounded thin without destroying the poultry’s meatiness, while the light, wrinkly coating soaked up squeezes of lemon and offered a hint of egg flavor. Veal marsala was close to perfect, with thin morsels of tender meat in a sauce that was sweet yet deeply flavored. Shrimp, an uncommon addition, enlivened it by adding bursts of plump brininess. The side of risotto had good texture, but the chicken broth that was used to cook it came through too obviously. The vegetable side was a single, hand-sized stalk of broccoli, bright green yet tender, drizzled with butter.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

100 PROOF Emerging Pittsburgh liquor scene keeps booze writer busy

Arrabiatta was offered with chicken, shrimp or sausage. Angelique opted for sausage, thinking it would bring the most spice to this supposed-to-be spicy dish, which often gets a wimpy treatment in Italian-American restaurants. There was nothing wimpy about the banana peppers which infused every bite of Johnny’s arrabiatta, though. In fact, the sauce was more like a deconstructed sausage-stuffed banana pepper than a traditional arrabiatta, but that was fine because it was so good. Whether Johnny’s actually fulfills all the superlatives on its website is for each customer to decide. To us, Johnny’s tasted all the better for being a genuine community landmark, the kind of place where you can go for happy hour, a family meal or a celebratory birthday dinner, and always find the right experience.

When I started writing this feature two years and 99 columns ago, I wondered: “How the hell am I going to find something to write a column about every week?” For starters, Embury — the bar that brought craft cocktails to Pittsburgh — had just closed. But as it happens, Pittsburgh wasn’t just a city with strong traditions: Its drinks scene was on the verge of rapid expansion. There would be plenty of stories to tell. The Embury space itself was one of them. Even when four dudes from Greensburg promised to bring something dynamic to the site, it was hard to imagine that one day Bar Marco would become the force that it is today. And Bar Marco wasn’t alone in filling the void: Tender, Harvard & Highland and Butterjoint are just a few post-Embury craft-cocktail establishments. Acacia, the spawn of Embury, now provides welcome respite on hectic South Carson Street. I’m impressed by the scope of talent and passion I’ve found in Pittsburgh’s craft-brewing communities. One of the first stories I wrote featured Three Rivers Underground Brewers, and I was floored by the diversity of homebrew. East End Brewery has expanded into a larger space, and there are now numerous local microand nanobreweries on tap at Pittsburgh bars. It’s also easier than ever to find a six-pack store where you can assemble a take-home collection of craft beer. And although Pittsburgh’s wine culture still lags behind other cities, Spoon, Cure and Dish Osteria now have certified experts to help you select a bottle of vino. For a pre- or post-meal drink, The Allegheny Wine Mixer curates an affordable selection of lesser-known wines, plus terrific beer and cocktails. I’m looking forward to what’s on the horizon. The Bar Marco boys are set to open The Livermore, in East Liberty. Downtown will soon be awash in bourbon when The Butcher and The Rye opens. And there’s a rum maker ready to join Wigle Whiskey in the Strip’s burgeoning distillery district. There are many more stories to come. Cheers.

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Johnny’s chef Ron Zummo cuts steak to order.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-9407777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-4319313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red currypeanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. A bar that serves well-designed retro chic with its whiskey and beer, Brillobox is (for now) the cool place to be. The menu isn’t lengthy, but it’s broad: Choose from bar staples or more inventive (and veggie-friendly) specialties such as Moroccan roastedvegetable stew or herbed polenta wedges. JE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Dasonii Korean Bistro DASONII KOREAN BISTRO. 6520 Steubenville Pike, Robinson. 412-494-3311. Grilled meats and egg-topped dishes are among the specialties of this Korean restaurant, which also serves sushi. Dasonii offers the traditional Korean “BBQ” — thinly sliced marinated meat, grilled — as well as bibimbap, the savory hot pot combining

Gia Visto {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} noodles, vegetables and meat piled atop rice. Also worth trying: the stir-fried udon noodles, and short ribs. KE DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfastand-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J

tried-and-true breakfast-andlunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J

JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. www. per GIA VISTO. 4366 Old There’s a strong a p pghcitym William Penn Highway, emphasis on fresh .co Monroeville. 412-374pasta and inventively 1800. The menu at this prepared seafood, such welcoming Italian restaurant as crusted Chilean sea bass ranges from simple classics to in an orange buerre blanc and elegant inventions. Whether it’s a berry marmalade. LE fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 red sauce, or a perfectly cooked Penn Ave., Downtown. 412salmon on a Mediterranean325-7007. This restaurant inspired bed of beans and combines several current trends, vegetables, the fare exhibits the including revisiting staples of the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount lively Downtown space. Expect Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The everything from marrow bones revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) to burgers, flatbreads and new simplified menu seems a chicken pot pie, as well as pots near-perfect distillation of tasty, of rhubarb jam and handtrendy and traditional. Some crafted cocktails. LE dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. with fresh tomato and asparagus. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Others are ever-popular www.noodleheadpgh.com. In a workhorses like the BLT and funky atmosphere, Noodlehead fish tacos, or reinventions such offers an elemental approach as a Thai empanada or to the delightful street food Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken” of Thailand in which nothing (skewered pork). KE is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY “snacks,” among them fried CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., chicken and steamed buns with Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A pork belly. The freshly prepared musically themed diner offers dishes are garnished with fresh

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herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

LINKS TO THE PAST Salted Pig makes sausages by tapping culinary heritages IT’S A SATURDAY afternoon at Lawrenceville’s Farmer’s

Market, and resident Jane Collins awaits a bag of Italian habañero cheddar sausage from the market’s newest vendor, Salted Pig. “It’s the best hot sausage I’ve ever eaten,” she exclaims. Despite being established just two months ago by three lifelong friends — Brandon Gajdos, Blair Hohn III and Michael Pizzuto — Salted Pig is already making a big impression on Pittsburgh’s food scene. “What we hope sets us apart is that we don’t add any fillers, like soy protein or preservatives,” says Pizzuto.

THE WINE LOFT. 2773 Tunnel Blvd., SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-586-5335. A wellcurated wine list, cozy seating options and an expanded menu make this a convivial spot for socializing. Share a pizza — or try an entrée such as filet sliders, Hawaiian tuna tartare or pumpkin ravioli. Wines include unusual varietals alongside the more familiar chardonnays and shirazes. KE YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

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Each week, the trio meets in a Bloomfield commercial kitchen rented from Earthen Vessels Outreach, where they craft 135 pounds of market-ready, naturally-cased sausage. The 14-hour process calls on techniques that meld Pizzuto’s Italian heritage — his great-grandmother was from Abruzzi — with Gajdos’ Slovakian/Italian roots and catering chef Hohn’s Le Cordon Blue culinary training. Beginning with 150 pounds of pork butt — antibiotic- and hormone-free — sourced from Saxonburg’s Thoma Meat Market, the owners cut, trim and coarsely grind the sausage. This method, plus the addition of fennel (a blend of cracked, whole and powdered seed), comes from Pizzuto’s family. So does the most important ingredient: “My great-uncle used wine in his Italian sausage,” Pizzuto says. The wine “costs more,” he acknowledges, “but adds layers of flavor that you don’t get from water.” Perfecting their recipes, say the Salted Pig owners, took five years. And today, packages of Hot Italian, Sweet Italian and 7AM Maple — which uses local Yeany’s Maple Syrup —and other links chill in a cooler, awaiting new, and already loyal, customers. Salted Pig eventually hopes to expand to dry-cured, slow-fermented meats. But for now they seem more than happy to watch the contents of that cooler disappear at the weekly market (which is held from 12:30 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, at 52nd Street and Berlin Way). “There’s a lot of young people,” says Pizzuto of Pittsburgh’s food scene. “Everybody seems to be more educated now: Farm-to-table seems to be taking off.” And Salted Pig seems to be sprouting wings of its own. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412394-3400. The venerable Italian restaurant from Greensburg now has a Downtown outpost. In this elegant space, some classic dishes are updated; a few favorites, like turtle soup are retained; and the fresh mozzarella bar deserves to become a classic. Try the distinctive pizza, with a layered, cracker-like crust. LE WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-2211232. At this cozy, contemporary, candle-lit cottage, the Italianand Mediterranean-inspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF

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WORKIN’ PROGRESS

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BRAD WAGNER CD RELEASE. 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17. Club Café, 56-58 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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Oil City grad: Damian Higgins, a.k.a. Dieselboy

GROWING UP Still giggin’: Brad Wagner

“She wears tight pants / says she’s gonna be a star,” sings Brad Wagner about a fictional young wannabe Florence Welch, on “Little Julie,” from his album Barfly. “But there’s a guy in my band who’s 43 / Been sayin’ that same damn thing since he was 17.” A concept album, Barfly is a deglamorized, disillusioned description of the rock ’n’ roll lifestyle from someone who has been in it long enough to see dreams shatter, youths misspent and, occasionally, spirits endure. Wagner, 51, has gigged at Pittsburgh bars since the mid ’80s and has played in a variety of party bands and Springsteenesque working-class ensembles — all while holding a variety of day jobs. (He currently drives a truck for the post office.) Though there is a heady dose of humor, Barfly echoes with the jaundiced view one only earns through putting in that many years in a hardscrabble career. “I bounce around from job to job / Never gettin’ one done / We just sit around and mumble / ’Bout our insecure state / And we blame politicians / As we commiserate,” he sings of a group of pub musicians reaching the half-century mark without serious résumés. Wagner says he isn’t exactly speaking in his own voice but that of a made-up character from a similar background. “I wouldn’t say it’s totally autobiographical,” he says. “I have embellished to make the character more dramatic.” A concept album is an unexpected endeavor for an everyman rocker like Wagner. He says the project came about organically: “I had a few songs with these sentiments and wrote about a few more to flush it out.” The end result “shouldn’t be read as one storyline, like a play, but there is a thread running through it.” Despite his obvious anxiety about a creative life, Wagner says he’ll probably keep it up until he’s gigging in the community room of his nursing home. “If you can’t be discouraged enough to stop after a few decades of playing to 100-person rooms, you can’t be discouraged by anything.”

{BY RORY D. WEBB}

D

J AND producer Dieselboy is well known internationally, but when he was coming up — going to college at the University of Pittsburgh and leaning to DJ on WRCT at Carnegie Mellon — drum-and-bass was just getting its start. Now the electronic subgenre is a good 20 years old, and Dieselboy is a big name in the field, with plenty of feats under his belt — like DJing for 35,000 people in a hockey arena in Russia. After spending his early years in small towns in Florida and Colorado, Dieselboy (real name: Damian Higgins) moved with his family to Oil City, Pa. After graduating from Oil City High School in 1990, he travelled about 90 minutes south to study information science at the University of Pittsburgh. “I was a broke college student,” he explains. “I DJed on WRCT with these guys I know called the Techno Terrorists. They had a show, so I would go on there every Friday and I would spin for an hour. I

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

learned to pretty much DJ on-air, which is, like, trial by fire, ’cause I didn’t know how to beat-match or anything. But a couple years after I started DJing, my mom bought me turntables, and that’s when I started to be able to practice at home.

SHIPWRECKED 2013 FEATURING DIESELBOY, SCHOOLBOY, AK1200, MUST DIE

8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 16. Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, 7310 Frankstown Ave.,Homewood. $30-45. www.facebook.com/dieselboy

“I wanted to DJ as a hobby and it just got to the point where it became my job. Pittsburgh had a pretty small scene, it was kind of self-contained in a way. But, you know, we did our own thing. We had a drum-andbass night called Steel City Jungle for a while, which had some good notoriety.” Steel City Jungle was Dieselboy’s first

weekly event series, which he co-DJed with friend and fellow local DJ Andy Sine. Before he relocated to Philadelphia in the late ’90s, house parties and events at clubs like Metropol, in the Strip District, became common gigs for him as the EDM scene grew in popularity. “There were raves that happened,” he recalls. “One of them was inside the Corliss Tunnel, it was called Tunnel Vision.” The event took place in June 1995. “My friends who threw it convinced the city that they were shooting a video,” he says. “They did video the show, but the city thought it was a music video, so they managed to shut down an entire traffic tunnel and have a rave in it, which was unreal. It was super loud, and they actually had cops directing traffic and helping out. The next day, the people that were hearing the music all night were so upset. And then when they found out it was a rave it got to, like, the number-one news story of the year. People were like, ‘How the fuck does this


NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

THE LOPEZ FUR (SELF-RELEASED)

Three new tracks of fuzz-pop from the duo that, presumably, is fixating on a cat here, given that the songs are called “Furriest One,” “Kingdom of Cat Piss” and “Fur Babies.” Pop sensibility and a sense of snotty silliness pervade; fans of The B-52s, Bratmobile and Le Tigre would all do well to give this pink vinyl a spin. THE LOPEZ 7-INCH RELEASE with WEIRD PAUL AND BEN BLANCHARD, OC FEEF. 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17. Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. www.therobotoproject.org

Strobe (a.k.a. Eric Cohen), who is currently the music director and resident DJ at Static Nightclub, began DJing in 1986 and in 1992 produced a popular techno song titled “I Like Noise.” He later produced an official remix album by the Peter Malick Group featuring Norah Jones. He’s seen Dieselboy’s rise from a college student, building a record collection and learning the basics of being a DJ in Pittsburgh, to becoming one of the most prominent figures in drum-and-bass. “I think a lot of it has to do with being persistent and consistent with what you’re doing,” Cohen says. “From the very beginning, he was into this particular style and never wavered from it. If you’re devoted to it, people that are fans of this music and are very hardcore into it notice that kind of thing. They’ve always been respectful of his dedication to jungle and drum-and-bass. “He was always a cool guy, very focused and very talented, but there’s a lot of people that are like that but they waver in and out of different genres and don’t stick to anything. He never did that. Once drum-and-bass hit, he was always at the forefront of it.” +

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JACKSON SCOTT MELBOURNE (FAT POSSUM)

Although Jackson Scott isn’t from Pittsburgh, they tell me he’s living here now — but for the many tour dates he’s in the middle of. The young songwriter’s Fat Possum debut came out a few weeks ago, and it’s full of well-written psyche-tinged pop, lo-fi and reminiscent of the weirdest Olivia Tremor Control stuff. He doesn’t play in Pittsburgh until October, but that gives you a couple of months to familiarize yourself with all the twists and turns of the album before you inevitably decide you need to see him live.

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ZOM ZOM (SELF-RELEASED)

Six-track EP of stoner-rock tunes from ex-members of Dofka and Shovel Duck. Impeccable recording, big sounds and plenty of those earworm-y riffs that stoner bands do so well. The sprawling, sinister-but-pretty “Solitary” provides a nice respite from the otherwise mid-paced, churning tunes on the rest of the album; if you’re into growling vocals and sweet riffs, this one is worth checking out for sure.

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happen?’ because it was a rave and the city felt like they were duped or whatever.” Pittsburgh’s EDM scene grew and changed with the different sub-genres that gained popularity during the ’80s and early ’90s — techno and house in the ’80s, then later drum-and-bass and jungle. Dieselboy still remembers some of his peers and the scene’s early influences. “There was Soji Fu. Deadly Buddha and Controlled Weirdness were two guys that threw the original parties in Pittsburgh. 187 was a producer that produced drum-and-bass. There was another guy, Strobe, he had a couple big tracks back in ’91-’92 and was traveling around and performing. “When I first started getting into the rave scene, right before I started DJing, he had big hit tracks. Actually, the first club show I ever went to was at Metropol and he was performing at it, when I walked in the door he was DJing.”

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Post-post-hardcore: Survival (Jeff Bobula, left)

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EMOTIONALLY INVESTED {BY ANDY MULKERIN} BROOKLYN-BASED Survival is a relatively new band, but with a long history: Jeff Bobula, Hunter Hunt-Hendrix and Greg Smith met as college students, and previously played together in a band called Birthday Boyz. After the success of Hunt-Hendrix’s black-metal outďŹ t Liturgy, in 2011, the three re-formed as Survival, and earlier this year released a self-titled debut album that’s equal parts psych rock, ’90s mathrock and post-hardcore. Bobula spoke with CP by phone from his home in Brooklyn before the band’s summer tour began.

WHAT FIRST BROUGHT THE THREE OF YOU TOGETHER? We all met in college, exploring the New York City scene. Greg and I played together ďŹ rst; we started essentially an emotional hardcore, screamo type of band that Hunter ended up joining. So we’ve been writing music since the early 2000s. IS THIS BAND A BACKDROP TO THE OTHER BANDS YOU HAVE GOING ON SEPARATELY? I think the band that’s now Survival has always been a sort of home for us, regardless of what other bands we’ve been in. We all have diverse interests, with art in general, whether or not it’s music. I guess it’s fair to say it’s something we all come back to. It’s always an itch we can never fully scratch, so we’ll probably be doing it for a long time to come. I CAN SEE SOME OF THAT LATE-’90S, EARLY-’00S EMO-HARDCORE STUFF COMING THROUGH ON THIS RECORD; IS THAT THE MAIN MUSIC YOU ALL START

FROM? HAVE YOU STUCK WITH IT EVEN AFTER IT LOST POPULARITY? It’s deďŹ nitely what brought us together. We were lucky to be emotionally invested in the music when it was coming to its last real crescendo. As Birthday Boyz evolved, and Survival has evolved, that sort of dire tension that’s really great within that music is something we’re always trying to capture and evolve in new ways.

SURVIVAL 10 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

THESE SONGS REACH HUGE APEXES, MUSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY. IS IT A CHALLENGE TO BRING THOSE ABOUT? I think it’s a constant search. I think those big moments are never things we come to the table intending to write. Through sort of a strange, meticulous care for transition and ow within parts that are quite complicated, we just end up having a knack of getting there, hopefully getting there in a way we ďŹ nd surprising or enjoyable. That gives that feeling that I guess we had when we were ďŹ rst listening to that extremely epic, decadent music from the hardcore scene in the early 2000s. THE VOCALS ON THIS RECORD ARE SORT OF DRONEY, ALMOST A CHANT, BUT ALSO ARE COMPLEX CLOSE HARMONIES. HOW DID YOU COME TO THAT? It was deďŹ nitely difďŹ cult to achieve, and is an interesting departure for us, because before that we’d really just screamed and yelled, and sometimes [didn’t have] microphones. I think it helped us pace the longer songs that we wanted to start writing with Survival, and helped add another nice dimension. It helps add another level of depth. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry. N E W S

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CRITICS’ PICKS 23 Psaegz

[AVANT GARDE] + FRI., AUG. 16

like “sages”) features a rotating crew of musicians that create tunes somewhere between haphazard and harmonious. With up to 18 musicians onstage at once, and instruments ranging from tuba to glockenspiel and keytar, 23 Psaegz is a unique show each and every performance. Check it out for yourself tonight at Howlers. KS 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

Gender- and genre-blending antihero Genesis Breyer P-Orridge gets PTV3 — the reunited, updated iteration of ’80s “hyperdelic” band Psychic TV — together tonight for an amalgamation of provocative, psychedelic, industrial and experimental sounds that add up to nothing less than a night of dancing. Presented by The Andy Warhol Museum, which is also curating the performance artist’s exhibit S/HE IS HER/E, PTV3 will appear in a rare performance at the New Hazlett Theater. Kira Scammell 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-25. All ages. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

PTV3

[POP] + FRI., AUG. 16

[INDIE FOLK] + SAT., AUG. 17 Seth Faergolzia takes the eclectic genre of freak folk up a notch with his music project 23 Psaegz. Much like his first 13-year project, Dufus, 23 Psaegz (pronounced

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

[JAZZ] + WED., AUG. 21

Megan and Liz

The story goes that back in the ’50s, teenage doo-wop groups used to hang out on street corners, singing for whomever passed by — and sometimes, when they were lucky, someone from a record label might pass by. Anymore, YouTube is the street corner, the spot where teens test their talents and hope someone important will click through. It worked for Megan and Liz, fraternal twin sisters from Michigan who started posting homemade music videos, beginning when they were just 15, that went viral a few years later. They’re grown-up now — 20, in fact — and coming through town with their sugary teen-pleasing tunes. YouTube boy duo Kalin and Myles open. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-40. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

Pittsburgh has a long history of jazz, for sure, but not necessarily this kind of jazz: Last month saw the debut of the new Frenchmen on Penn series, featuring New Orleans musicians playing at the Pittsburgh Winery. The series was begun by Pittsburghers Tim and Debby Wolfson after they developed connections with Louisiana musicians through travel in that region; tonight, it continues with Lost Bayou Ramblers, a Grammy-nominated Cajun band that’s as much rock as it is traditional New Orleans music. AM 7 p.m. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15. www. pittsburghwinery.com


Seven Springs Mountain Resort presents the

21ST ANNUAL WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL The Seven Springs Wine & Food Festival is a celebration of Pennsylvania wine and food. Thirty wineries from all over the state will attend this event. Festival guests can sample from hundreds of different tastes, combinations and vintages, as well as purchase their favorites to take home.

August 24 and 25, 2013 Hours 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Festival Lodging Package August 22-25, 2013 Starting at

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WINERIES Allegheny Cellars Winery | Allegro Vineyards | Arrowhead Wine Cellars Benigna’s Creek Winery | Blue Mountain | Christian W. Klay Winery Clover Hill Vineyards & Winery | Courtyard Winery | Flickerwood Wine Cellars Franklin Hill Vineyards | Glades Pike | Greenhouse Winery Hauser Estate Winery | Heritage Wine Cellars | Kavic Winery Long Trout Winery | Maiolatesi Wine Cellars | Moon Dancer Mount Nittany Vineyard and Winery | Naylor Wine Cellars | Oak Spring Paradocx Vineyard | Pittsburgh Winery | Presque Isle Wine Cellars Sand Castle | Shade Mountain Vineyard and Winery Starr Hill Tamanend Winery | University Wine Cellars | Winery at Wilcox | AND MORE!

FESTIVAL ENTERTAINMENT

Tickets Start at Only $22

Unknown String Band | Drew Bentley Meredith Holliday | Runaway Dorothy Allegheny Rhythm Rangers | Mark Ferrari Duo

After August 20th, prices increase by $6

You must be at least age 21 to attend this event. Seven Springs encourages all festival attendees to please drink responsibly.

800.452.2223 | 7springs.com Seven Springs Mountain Resort is located off exits 91 or 110 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Seven Springs, Pennsylvania. N E W S

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP

2013

THU 15

LEASE FOR

179

$ 2013

*

$1999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $500 LEASE LOYALTY REBATE

31ST STREET PUB. Naam, Radkey, Lost Realms. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Blackberry Smoke. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Billy Price & the Lost Minds. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mark Ferari Duo. Murrysville. 724-733-4453. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Heather Kropf, Broken Fences. South Side. 412-431-4950. DAVID’S MUSIC HOUSE. Hillary Reynolds Band. McMurray. 724-941-9200. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Height, Mickey Free, Kane Mayfield, Lord Grunge, Mrs. Paintbrush, Vox Robotica. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Shivering Brigade, Napalm Donut, Christmas Bride. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. These Lions, The Bessemers, Stone Cold Killer. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Mickey Hart Band, Tea Leaf Trio. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. BoomBox. South Side. 412-381-6811. STATION SQUARE. Jeff Jimerson & Airborne. Station Square. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jake Simmons, Lincoln County War, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, Paddy the Wanderer. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

HAMBONE’S. Chris Hannigan, Jeremy Caywood & John Clark. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Weaving The Fate. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Hey Mavis, The Weathered Road. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MEADOWS CASINO. Tres Lads. Washington. 724-503-1200. NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Psychic TV / PTV3. Warhol: Sound Series. North Side. 412-237-8300. OUR LADY OF JOY. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. Plum. 412-795-3388. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Silkwood Shower. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. Bill Ali Band. Finleyville. 724-348-7118. SMILING MOOSE. The Dangerous Summer, Tommy & the High Pilots, Rare Monk, The Color Code (early) Lords of the Trident, The Bloody Seamen (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. California Honeydrops. South Park. STRAND THEATER. Walt Sanders & The Cadillac Band. Elvis tribute. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. TALERICO’S BAR AND GRILL. Blak Tye. Ambridge. 724-971-5086.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. American Wolf, Jupiter Vinyl, Partly Sunny. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Highland Brothers Band. Butler. 724-256-5769. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Bobby V. Monroeville. 412-372-9705.

SAT 17 31ST STREET PUB. King Lincoln Feat. Derek Trucks, Midnight Special. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Big Country. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRUSTER’S REAL ICE CREAM. Griffin Donley, Raven Clifton, Geoff Bland. Ross. 412-366-9899. CIP’S. Chris Capizzi & Co. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Brad Wagner. CD release show. Simply Chillin’, Morbid Sikosis, Under Indictment (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Motorpsychos, Black Plastic Caskets. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Osirus, Motometer, Guard Your Heart, Trades. Aliquippa. 724-378-7669. HAMBONE’S. Paul Tabachneck,

MP 3 MONDAY SNEAKY MIKE

FRI 16

LEASE FOR

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$ *36 MONTH LEASE. 12,000 MILES / YEAR. TAX AND STATE FEES ADDITIONAL.

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$1,999 DUE AT SIGNING

2020 W. LIBERTY AVENUE, PITTSBURGH 15226 PHONE: 412.344.6012

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

31ST STREET PUB. The Red Lines, Latecomer. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 99 BOTTLES. Total Package. Carnegie. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Scott Anderson & Pete Hewlett. O’Hara. 412-963-1514. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Old Friends Duo. Richland. 724-444-7333. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Charm & Chain, The Dressed Frets. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Geen Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Beauregards, Strong Young Teeth, In The Wake Of Giants (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Sneaky Mike; stream or download

“Aura” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at www.pghcitypaper.com.


Justin Storer. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Refuge. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Brownbird Rudy Relic, Elliott Sussman, 23 PSAEGZ. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KEAN THEATRE. Pure Gold. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. KOPEC’S. T-Tops, Secret Tombs, Crappy Funeral. Lawrenceville. 412-683-4190. LEGACY LANES. The Elliotts. Baldwin. 412-653-2695. LEVELS. Bobby V. North Side. 412-231-7777. MEADOWS CASINO. Walt Sanders & the Cadillac Band. Washington. 724-503-1200. MILLERSTOWN INN. The Dave Iglar Band. Unknown. 724-445-2157. MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. Tres Lads, Josie McQueen. Monongahela. 724-258-5905. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Lopez, OC Feef, Weird Paul, Ben Blanchard. Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Shady Ave, The Homeless Gospel Choir, Scattergun, Anti-Psychotics, Playoff Beard, The Otis Wolves, Chris Stowe. Millvale. 412-821-4447. NORTH BELLE VERNON RECREATION PARK. The Laurels, Southside Jerry. Belle Vernon. RIVERSIDE DR. Gone South. Beaver County River Regatta. Bridgewater. ROCK ROOM. No Reason To Live, Liquified Guts, Embludgeoned, United By Hate. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SMILING MOOSE. Tall Tall Trees, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts (early) Ken Mode, Rosetta, Complete Failure (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chris Vipond & the Stanley Street Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. LoveBettie. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 18 ALTAR BAR. Alex Goot. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Jeremy Frantz. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. CLUB CAFE. Tony Lucca, Honor By August. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Solidarity Tour, The Old-E All Stars, Anne Feeney, Michael O’Brien. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 40. Don Obusek’s Tribute to Elivs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MONROEVILLE COMMUNITY PARK. 8th Street Rox. Monroeville. 412-856-1006. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Grand Piano, AppalAsia, Batamba, Black Honey Rollers. Weather Permitting Concert Series. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. SMILING MOOSE. Kevin Seconds, Kepi Ghoulie, The Homeless Gospel

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Choir, Todd Christian (early). South Side. 412-431-4668. SUNNYSIDE/GALLATIN RIVERFRONT PARK. The Laurels, Southside Jerry. Monongahela.

SAT 17

BELVEDERE’S. 90z Dance w/ Sean MC, DJ Thermos. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. SOUNDCRASH ¡BOOGALOO!: PANDEMIC vs. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. TAVERN. Sputzy. North Side. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday 412-322-1850. Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. TAVERN. Tony Janflone. North 412-431-8800. Side. 412-322-1850. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. CLUB CAFE. Freedy Johnston, Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. Pete Donnelly, Brad Yoder. 412-904-2915. South Side. 412-431-4950. PERLE CHAMPAGNE SMILING MOOSE. Del BAR. DJ Michael Rios, Brazilian Wax, Joseph. Downtown. Unstitched, Belus, The 412-471-2058. Akabane Vulgars on REMEDY. Push It! www. per pa Strong Bypass. South DJ Huck Finn, pghcitym o .c Side. 412-431-4668. DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 412-781-6771. Space Exchange Series w/ RIVERS CASINO. Video DJ’s. Drum Ben Opie/Chris Parker/David Bar. North Side. 412-231-7777. Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 412-682-0177. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Johnny Angel’s All Star Jam Band. North Side. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage 412-322-1850. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. ATRIAS RESTAURANT & Electro, post punk, industrial, new TAVERN. John Sarkis. Wexford. wave, alternative dance. South 724-934-3660. Side. 412-431-4668. CLUB CAFE. Johnny Hickman, Ed Anderson Frank Fairfield, The Lone Pine String Band, Ben Collier. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. South Side. 412-431-4950. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. HARD ROCK CAFE. Satellite, Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. Jillette Johnson, Corey James. HAMBONE’S. Rock N’ Roll Station Square. 724-579-4571. DJ Mangler. Pub Game Night. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Xothogua, Show of Bedlam, THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. ? & Dopelake. Bloomfield. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. 412-682-0320. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

MON 19

TUE 20

FULL LIST E N O LIN

WED 21

SUN 18

POST 820. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. The Blues Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-904-3335. JUNE BUG’S. Ron & The RumpShakers. Sutersville. 724-872-4757. KENDREW’S. .32-20 Blues Band. Aliquippa. 724-375-5959. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Jimmy Adler Band, Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SAT 17 E. MAIN ST. AT N. WATER ST. Shot O’ Soul. West Newton. 724-872-0100. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. MINERAL BEACH. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Finleyville. THE R BAR. The Jimmy Adler Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 18 BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899. THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Avella. 724-356-3000. DUKE’S STATION. The Witchdoctors. Bethel Park. 412-835-0176. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. Kilbuck. 412-761-6700.

MON 19 DOMENICO’S RISTORANTE. Eugene & the Nightcrawlers, Rich Harper’s Blues Band, Renegade Roosters, Wonder-Bread, more. Blues for Food. Cranberry. 724-776-6455.

TUE 20 USX TOWER. The Jimmy Adler Band. Downtown.

WED 21 THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

JAZZ THU 15 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Dave Crisci. Scott. 412-668-0903. DOWNTOWN IRWIN. The Bone Forum. Irwin. 724-864-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Resonance Trio. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PALACE THEATRE. Eric Barchiesi Trio. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 21

PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 16 ANDYS. Adam Brock. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. No Assembly Required. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Elevations. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Teddy Pantelas Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 17 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Ortner-Roberts Duo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAFE NOTTE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Horn Guys The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

DJS

THU 15 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 16 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BELVEDERE’S. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Anthony Suzan. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Digital Dave. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

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HIP HOP/R&B FRI 16 CLUB CAFE. Artistree, Gina Yohe (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Grimey Click, B. White & the 58’s, The Wulords, BBG Boys, JSP (Justice Street Poets), Real Deal, Jung Phil. Joey Fattz’s “Bazooka Joe” Official Mixtape Release Party. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MON 19 SMILING MOOSE. Spose, TBL, Lil Jay, DePaul Spose. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 20 HEINZ HALL. Diana Ross. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

BLUES THU 15 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 16 AMERICAN LEGION GOLD STAR

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

THUR, AUGUST 15 • 9PM ALT COUNTRY/FOLK PUNK

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SUN 18 3RD STREET GALLERY. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Antionette. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Michele Bensen Quartet. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Tania Grubbs & Daniel May. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

{FRI., OCT. 11}

Hugh Laurie Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall {TUE., NOV. 05}

Broncho Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

TUE 20

{FRI., NOV. 08}

Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds

ANDYS. Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. KATZ PLAZA. Poogie Bell. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side

WED 21 ANDYS. Anqwenique Wingfield. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC THU 15

Experience the upscale diff difference of

EARLY WARNINGS

FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Steve Tori. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Four of a Kind. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. RIVERVIEW PARK. Marty Ashby Quartet. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493.

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Songwriters In Harmony. Songwriters Workshop. Harmony. 724-452-0539. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Rick Revetta. Robinson. 412-489-5631. LEVELS. Juan & Erica. North Side. 412-231-7777. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 16

MON 19 HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 20 PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 21 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FULL LIST ONLINE

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike Dunn. Robinson. www. per 412-489-5631. pa pghcitym ELWOOD’S PUB. The .co Unknown String Band. SMILING MOOSE. Survival Cheswick. 724-265-1181. (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. LEVELS. Rebecca Kaufman & Joe Garuccio. North Side. 412-231-7777. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. SALOON. Michael Todd. South The Flow Band. North Side. Side. 412-381-5610. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Brad Yoder. South Side. ST. CLAIR PARK. The SteelDrivers. Greensburg. 724-838-4324. CRANBERRY COMMUNITY PARK. Christian Beck Band. Cranberry. 724-776-4806. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Downtown. 412-255-0525. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

FREE GIFT

Text SEXY to 81018 7775 McKnight Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 I www.adamevepittsburgh.com I 412-548-3384

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

THE MAP ROOM. Mark Tamsula & Richard Withers w/ Ellen Gozion & Dave Krysty. Regent Square. 412-371-1955.

SUN 18 ORGANIST NICK CAPOZZOLI. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 16 565 LIVE. Hermie & Harry’s Dueling Pianos. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. In the Mood. North Side. 412-231-7777.

REGGAE

SAT 17 CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903.

SUN 18

WED 21

THE GREY BOX THEATRE. Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra. Lawrenceville. 412-897-6584.

COUNTRY

MON 19

SAT 17

SUN 18

CLASSICAL

SUN 18

THU 15

GET A

Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. PALACE THEATRE. The Charlie Daniels Band. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 16 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Jason Aldean, Jake Owen, Thomas Rhett & Dee Jay Silver.

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 20 FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH PITTSBURGH. Life In Balance. Shadyside. 412-681-4222.

WED 21 CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903.


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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

August 14 - 20 WEDNESDAY 14 FRIDAY 16 Don Juan Comes Back From the War

HENRY HEYMANN THEATRE Oakland. Tickets: picttheatre. org or 412-561-6000. Through Aug. 31.

THURSDAY 15

Free Summer Concerts BESSEMER COURT Station Square. Featuring Jeff Jimerson and Airborne. All ages show. Free event. 6:30p.m.

Blackberry Smoke ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Mickey Hart Band MR SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Tea Leaf Trio. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Alex Goot ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Sam Tsui Feat. Kurt Hugo Schneider & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SATURDAY 17

Jason Aldean

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guest Jake Owen & Thomas Rhett. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or call 800745-3000. 7:30p.m.

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. With special guests Chris Higbee and Abacus Jones. Free event. 7p.m.

The Charlie Daniels Band

Bill Cosby

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

THE MEADOWS RACETRACK AND CASINO Washington. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

Psychic TV / PTV3

Big Country

NEW HAZLETT THEATER North Side. 412-320-4610. Tickets: newhazletttheater.org or warhol.org. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Breaker & Steelesque. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Jam on Walnut

DIANA ROSS GREATEST HITS TOUR

Westmoreland Fair

TUESDAY, AUGUST 20 HEINZ HALL

WESTMORELAND COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS. Tickets: $7. Through Aug. 24.

James Hunter SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER South Park. Featuring The California Honeydrops. Free event. 7:30p.m.

Megan and Liz

Weaving The Fate

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Kalin and Myles. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Cylearian & Salvasin. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

TUESDAY 20

Carnival of Madness FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Featuring Shinedown, Papa Roach, Skillet, In This Moment & We As Human. Tickets: livenation. com, ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. 5p.m.

Diana Ross Greatest Hits Tour HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 18

Freedy Johnston

CHILDRENS MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH AND BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Tickets: pghmakerfaire.com. 10a.m.

CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Pete Donnelly & Brad Yoder. Over 21 show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

FOR WOMEN AND MEN

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PLANET HAVE-NOT

IT’S AN ENJOYABLE FILM, WELL EQUIPPED TO WRING LAUGHS AND TEARS FROM AUDIENCES

{BY AL HOFF} In the new dystopic thriller Elysium, from Neill Blomkamp (District 9), Earth in 2154 is a wreck, an orb of filth and slums. The one-percenters live on a nearby luxury space station known as Elysium. One of Earth’s angry, broken workers (Matt Damon) concocts a plan to get to Elysium — he could really use their health-care system — but first he must get past a particularly nasty mercenary (Sharlto Copley) and Elysium’s defense minister (Jodie Foster).

SERVING COUNTRY THE

Matt Damon wants to leave Earth.

Chalk Elysium up as this summer’s second disappointing sci-fi feature — the first was Oblivion — that pitched a meaty premise rooted in today’s problems (wealth inequality, depleted resources, privatized robotic security) but then abandoned its thinkiness to action and dumbed-down story-telling. On the upside, the film looks great (if you can manage the herky-jerky camerawork). Los Angeles is a dusty, monochromatic favela, where even the android cops are dented. Elysium, meanwhile, resembles some 1960s optimistic vision of the future, all gleaming white surfaces, manicured lawns (in space!) and shiny droids. Surely this is a good time for provocative tales about class struggles, and what obligations the haves owe the havenots, or what a have-not takeover might mean. But after setting up the parameters, Elysium whiffs the discussion, opting for a feel-good Band-Aid (literally). In English, and some Spanish, with subtitles AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JOBS. You might laugh to see goofball Ashton Kutcher playing Apple’s Steve Jobs. But there was laughter when dropout Jobs started Apple. See for yourself how it shakes out in this bio-doc from Joshua Michael Stern. Starts Fri., Aug. 16.

{BY AL HOFF}

Proximate to power: Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker), right, delivers coffee to President Eisenhower (Robin Williams)

T

.HE BUTLER IS an overly ambitious docu-drama that marries one man’s story to a century’s worth of African-American history, in an entertaining but hokey jumble. Directed by Lee Daniels (Precious), the film is “inspired by” the life of Eugene Allen, whose 34-year career as a White House domestic and butler was chronicled in a 2008 Washington Post story. In this re-imagining, we follow Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) on his journey from the cotton fields of 1920s Georgia through his more than three decades as a White House butler (from Eisenhower to Reagan). His work is intercut with his home life, and the rocky relationship he has with his son, Louis (David Oyelowo), a civil-rights activist. Whitaker makes the most of the material, underplaying to great effect. Oyelowo, too, knows that less is often more, but his character is saddled with being a stand-in for Black History 1960-80 — from lunch counters, freedom rides, Memphis with Martin Luther King, Oakland with the Black Panthers and protesting South Africa.

The film is best when it focuses on what these historical shifts mean to Gaines and his family. Cecil and Louis hold conflicting beliefs about what success means for a black man. For Cecil, it means diligently working — even a subservient job in which his greatest skill is being invisible — to provide a safe, middle-class life for his family. But the beneficiary of his sacrifice, Louis isn’t about to go along

THE BUTLER DIRECTED BY: Lee Daniels STARRING: Forest Whitaker, David Oyelowo, Oprah Winfrey Starts Fri., Aug. 16

to get along, and is willing to risk everything to change the status quo. (Later in the film, an argument is made that African-American domestic workers were actually subversive, but this provocative statement isn’t explored any further.) Cecil retires in conflict, juggling pride and confusion about the role he played in a

history that moved faster than perhaps he could navigate. The Butler is an enjoyable film, well equipped to wring laughs and tears from audiences, until its Hollywood-perfect ending when another black man, Obama, gets a job at the White House. But it overreaches to be too many things at once — a small domestic story about the Gaines household, a witness to nearly a century of African-American history, a civil-rights primer and an uplifting message movie. Packed into two hours, the mechanics show, with whiplash between slideshows of real-life tragedy and trumped-up melodrama. It’s the sort of world where a lot of “casual” conversation is pregnant with neat themes. (“You hear nothing, you see nothing — you just serve.”) There’s important history within the film — everything depicted likely happened to someone, just not the few archetypes presented here. And it’s this dramatic compression that pushes The Butler toward overly earnest self-conscious story-telling, rather than illuminating actual lives lived. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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$7. Tickets at web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/926740

FILM CAPSULES CP

CRY BABY. John Waters’ 1990 spoof of ’50s juveniledelinquent films features Johnny Depp as Cry-Baby Walker, a not-so-bad boy who falls for the good girl (Amy Locane). This gleefully anarchic musical features a rousing soundtrack and too many oddball celebrities to list. OK, here’s two: Traci Lords and Joey Heatherton. With shadowcasting by the Junior Chamber of Commerce Players. 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17. Hollywood

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE CRYSTAL FAIRY. Sebastián Silva’s loosely plotted road-trip dramedy charts a few days in the life of Jamie (Michael Cera), an abrasive, self-centered American freewheeling in Chile. Jamie’s goal is to acquire an hallucinogenic cactus and retreat to an isolated beach to take the trip. He’s accompanied by three local dudes — and unexpectedly, at the last minute, by a funky, hippy-dippy American woman calling herself Crystal Fairy (Gaby Hoffman). Not much happens — there’s some humor around the pursuit of the cactus, and the guys’ ongoing bemusement at Crystal’s eccentric behavior — and the fabled drug trip is mostly a McGuffin. The real journey is what happens when these random people are thrown together and begin challenging each other’s behaviors and dropping various masks. Silva’s handheld cameras and the cast’s improvisation work to put the viewer in the mix. Thus, your enjoyment of the film may depend on much you enjoy just hanging out with people while they squabble, talk nonsense and occasionally say something interesting. In English, and some Spanish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 16. Harris (Al Hoff) FILL THE VOID. Getting married is both straightforward and complex, in this lowkey drama set among Tel Aviv’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Eighteen-year-old Shira (Hadas Yaron) is eager to be matched with a young man — the marriages are arranged within tight-knit families and approved by the rabbi. But when her older sister dies, leaving behind a widower and a baby, things become quietly complicated for all. Should Shira marry her brother-in-law, Yochay (Yiftach Klein), thereby keeping the family intact, and ensuring both are paired? And what of Shira’s concerns and her desires for a “new” marriage? Writer-director Rama Burshtein is Orthodox herself, so such interpersonal dynamics intertwined with religion in this insular world are handled with sensitivity. Her beautifully shot film explores the tension between the cloistered nature of the community, particularly for the women, and the expanding of Shira’s life as she becomes an adult. Fill the Void is a meditatively paced but emotionally resonant character study — not just of Shira, but of her immediate family and that of her larger community, whose strictures define much of these people’s emotional lives. In Hebrew, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 16. Manor (AH)

CP

KICK-ASS 2. The amateur crime-fighters — masks, capes and funny nicknames — are at it again, in this sequel to the 2010 action comedy. Chloe Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and Aaron Taylor-Johnson star. Starts Fri., Aug. 16. THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES. A New York City teenager (Lily Collins) discovers that she comes from a bloodline of half-angel warriors tasked with rooting out demons. Harald Zwart directs this film adapted from Cassandra Clare’s book series. Starts Wed., Aug. 21. PARANOIA. Liam Hemsworth, Harrison Ford and Gary Oldham star in this thriller about corporate espionage. Robert Luketic directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 16. PLANES. Dusty is a crop-dusting farm-boy plane with dreams of becoming a champion racer. The

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SUNSET BOULEVARD. There’s much to recommend Billy Wilder’s noir-ish 1950 drama about faded silent-screen star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) and the much younger screenwriter, Joe Gillis (William Holden), who moves into her creepy Hollywood mansion as a kept man. The opening scene is a cracker, as we realize the dead guy floating in the pool is narrating the story; the tale, a searing look at the brutal studio machine, the vagaries of fame and assorted pathetic souls that live in halflight of reflected glory, only grows darker. 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18; and 2 p.m. Thu., Aug. 22. Hollywood (AH)

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The Crystal Fairy digitally animated family film from Disney, directed by Klay Hall, uses the voices of Dane Cook, Stacy Keach, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and others to tell this classic underdog tale. It is fun to watch the writers transform a human-centered view of the world into a vehicle-centered one. The kids at the screening laughed at most of the jokes, and there were a few moments of humor tucked into the script for mom and dad. The plot takes viewers to several countries around the world, from Iceland to India, from Germany to China, and the sweeping (and at times cringe-inducing) cultural stereotypes do keep things interesting. And all the country-hopping will likely grip kid-sized attention spans. In 3-D, in select theaters (Olivia Lammel)

depending whether your appreciation skews toward her acting or her abs.) Best reason to see it: Parks and Rec vets Nick Offerman and Kathryn Hahn, as a clean-cut couple who bring the funny without the f-bombs. (AH)

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 2, Wed., Aug. 14 (Schenley). Jumanji, Thu., Aug. 15 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 16 (Arsenal); Sat., Aug. 17 (Grandview); and Sun., Aug. 18 (Schenley). Casablanca, Sat., Aug. 17 (Riverview). Jack the Giant Slayer, Mon., Aug. 19 (Highland Park); Tue., Aug. 20 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., Aug. 22 (Brookline). Skyfall, Wed., Aug. 21 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free

RAGING BULL. Robert DeNiro stars in Martin Scorsese’s 1980 bio-pic about boxer Jake LaMotta, as his life takes a complicated path: The bullheadness and anger that serve LaMotta well in the ring prove destructive in his personal life. Beautifully shot in black and white, and filled with raw energy and great performances, this film has held up as one of the best for both Scorsese and DeNiro. The film continues a Sunday-night, month-long series of films featuring directors and their actor muses. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Regent Square (AH)

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EASY RIDER. Dennis Hopper’s wildly influential 1969 road flick depicts two motorcycle-riding drop-outs (Hopper and Peter Fonda) as they head out on the highway, checking out America in all its groovy and ungroovy forms. Both a celebration of iconoclastic freedom and a mordant reflection on its limits, Easy Rider became an instant classic, as well as becoming a touchstone for a new generation of audiences and filmmakers who demanded Hollywood dig their scene and the grave social concerns within it. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 14; 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 16; 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17; and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Hollywood. (AH)

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THE TRIALS OF MUHAMMAD ALI. This new documentary from Bill Siegel covers one of the internationally famous boxer’s biggest fights: not in the ring, but in the courts, when Ali faced charges for refusing to be drafted during the Vietnam War. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 15. Hollywood

Baseball’s Last Hero: 21 Clemente Stories WE’RE THE MILLERS. A pot dealer (Jason Sudekis), a stripper (Jennifer Aniston), a nerdy kid (Will Poulter) and a teenage runaway (Emma Roberts) team up to pretend to be an all-American family in order to transport a huge quantity of weed north across the U.S.-Mexican border. (This plot device put me in mind of the 1978 weed-transport classic Up in Smoke, and the realization that after a couple decades of antidrug hysteria, we’re back to rooting for the success of drug-smugglers.) Rawson Marshall Thurber’s comedy doesn’t break much new ground, providing all the “hits” of an R-rated comedy: awkward sexual encounters, prosthetic genitals, profanity in place of wit and a tacked-on, family-positive ending marginally designed to mitigate the preceding vulgarity. (There’s also a strip-tease from Aniston, which is either a new low or high for the actress,

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VACATION. Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) wants to take his family to Wally World, but the trip turns into a nightmare. Harold Ramis directs this 1983 comedy adapted from John Hughes’ National Lampoon short story. This film concludes the 2013 Moonlit Matinee series. 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 16, and 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17. Oaks LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. The classic 1962 epic about British adventurer T.E. Lawrence (Peter O’Toole), who joined the Arabs to fight the Turks in the World War I era. Directed by David Lean. With Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Omar Sharif. 1 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17, and 1 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Oaks BASEBALL’S LAST HERO: 21 CLEMENTE STORIES. This is the local premiere of a bio-doc of Roberto Clemente tracing the former Pirate’s life, from his achievements on the baseball field to his humanitarian work. The film is directed by former Pittsburgher Richard Rossi. 2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17, and 7:30 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Strand Theater, 119 N. Main St., Zelienople. 724-742-0400 or information@thestrandtheater.org.

Fill the Void BOY IN THE PLASTIC BUBBLE. John Travolta stars in this earnest 1976 TV movie about a bright, sensitive teenager born without immunities, who must live in protective bubbles or spacesuits. Though sentimental in a low-key way, the movie has a few groaners — including the shot of a spacesuited Travolta running along a beach hand-in-hand with a girl. For this So Bad It’s Good Screening, there will be live heckling by the Ink & Paint Club. 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 21. Hollywood. $10 DIABOLIQUE. A boarding-school principal’s mistress (Simone Signoret) enlists his put-upon, fragile wife (Vera Clouzot) in a plot to kill her lover, the other woman’s husband. The plan goes well … until the body disappears. Henri-Georges Clouzot’s stylish 1954 psychological thriller is an exercise in sexual intrigue, moody mise-en-scène and palpable tension. Time has rendered Diabolique less frightening, though it’s still a worthy and intriguing drama. If its plot twists seem familiar and much imitated, recall that many originated with this film. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Aug. 21. Melwood. $2 (AH)

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[BOOK REVIEW]

UNDERLYING BUBASH’S ART-MAKING ARE THE DUAL IMPULSES OF COLLECTING AND TRANSFORMATION

BEER AND BLOOD {BY FRED SHAW} If you like poems about work, or read Bukowski, Locklin and Levine, you’ll dig The Slaughterhouse Poems. If you’ve drank beer, underage, in fields, or come from a town down on its economic heels, you’ll find something of yourself in the 153 pages of Dave Newman’s first full-length collection. Newman, a poet, novelist and Westmoreland County native, is adept at re-creating his surroundings — particularly the slaughterhouse where he worked for what might be the worst part-time job ever. The narratives in The Slaughterhouse Poems (White Gorilla Press) move quickly and thoughtfully as the speaker examines life as a teen in the late ’80s. These are poems of perspective that remind this reader how quickly youth is overtaken by adult issues and desires. The imagery is striking, as poems dealing with slaughterhouses should be. Newman’s realist perspective conveys the truth of this work, never sugarcoated or judgmental. A great example is “Killing Floor”:

[ART REVIEW]

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Dead cows the size of small cars and pigs so fat

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ONSIDERING THAT acclaimed inker

It’s an insider’s tone, but Newman never gets preachy about meat, letting images speak for themselves. Instead of polemic, he’s more interested in the lives of friends and co-workers, drawn against the desperation of Reagan’s America. One way of dealing is through alcohol, and for better or worse, drinking occupies a large thematic role in the book — especially the epic quest booze signifies for the underage. However, these tales of drunkenness are heartbreaking and humorous, which keeps the collection from edging into sentimentality. Newman’s speaker learns the ropes of early-adulthood with self-deprecating wit, making this funnily accessible. Accessibility is what Newman seems after in the prose-y “A Line of Poetry,” railing against public schools’ inability to teach literature of the concrete world, giving poetry a bad rap amongst students. He writes, “I felt humiliated enough to move in the world and find poems written by the living and recently deceased, poems where the men and women on the page move like nurses and factory workers and musicians. / It took years to find a good book.” For readers of The Slaughterhouse Poems, it won’t take that long.

Nick Bubash is the proprietor of Route 60 Tattoo, in McKees Rocks, the exhibit title The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal and Other Works presumably refers to his enmeshment in tribalism. That’s where tattooing is favored as a sign of belonging in subcultures small (e.g., prison, or biker or street gangs) and large (those sharing a general alternative attitude, or pretending to). Bubash isn’t new to the art scene — there’s usually something by him hanging around at Artists Image Resource, for example, and he has exhibited his art for more than 20 years. In his first solo museum show, at The Andy Warhol Museum, he displays a not-surprising penchant for signs, symbols and icons, while often simultaneously acknowledging and subverting their intended meanings. Signs, symbols and icons: Nick Bubash’s “Jeez” (detail, foreground) In creating what he describes as vignettes, Bubash’s art-making material of all the while creating satisfying sculptural a swastika on a punk musician (unlike a choice consists of plastic toys, souvenirs, forms. In other words, Bubash complicates swastika on a skinhead). In assembling the used tattoo needles (what else you gonna the act of “reading” symbols, much as does components, pieces are generally stacked vertically, resulting in small monuments do with them?), mementos, bric-a-brac and to nothing in particular — pedestal pieces all manner of mostly smallish whatnots. without the pedestals, rebels without a NICK BUBASH: THE Some of it is campily collectible, some of cause other than (I’m guessing) a measure it upcycled but a step ahead of the landfill. PATRON SAINT OF of skepticism regarding the status quo. While generally retaining their recognizWHITE GUYS THAT The centerpiece of the exhibit is a long able identity, these items are carefully acWENT TRIBAL AND table displaying two dozen said assemblages cumulated in an unself-serious way that OTHER WORKS in close proximity, abetting the more-isvariously recognizes interpretations, councontinues through Sept. 15. The Andy more aesthetic, as it’s pretty much imposters interpretations, suggests new interWarhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North sible to view a single sculpture without pretations and confounds interpretations, Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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you could crawl inside their carcasses hung from steel chains dripping from the rafters. If I could have walked on the ceiling I would have looked up and seen terrible balloons.

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Henry Heymann Theatre in the Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland

By Odon Von Horvath in a new English version by Duncan MacMillan

Tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412.561.6000 x207 T H E A T R E

Professional Theatre in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh

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[ART REVIEW]

INKLINGS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Girl talk: panel from a 1958 “Gasoline Alley” strip, by Frank King

U.S. Premiere starring David Whalen as Don Juan. August 8–31

an overlapping view of some of the others. Some are relatively pared down, such as “Half Shell on the Venus With Child” (2012-13), with the shamelessly punning title pretty much describing the sculpture — and presumably suggesting it in the first place. Meanwhile, close at hand are 3-D mashups including a bowling ball, a craft-y Popsicle-stick construction, Jell-O mold, artificial flowers, plastic shark … you get the idea. Most of these sculptures signify broadly, playfully colliding disparate things in what seems a send-up, though one with some appreciation of art high and low. While this is all carefully contrived in terms of how things fit together as forms, there’s also an at-least-semi-random quality to the choice of objects that are combined. It doesn’t seem that Bubash is out to comment specifically on the scourging of Jesus, though the halo or crown of smiley faces does suggest willful irreverence stemming from some experience with religious upbringing; I suppose irreverence can be a form of commentary. Likewise, no position is stated regarding the efficacy of horseshoes in bringing good luck, or the enduring value of classical sculptures, except that in miniature they make good souvenirs. But when carefully lumped together with other stuff, they are pleasing to ponder. A few wall-mounted works, such as “Melting Self-Portrait With Bad Luck Elephant” (2011), take horror vacuui maximalism a little too far, cutting the threads by which we are able to connect the pieces: Joseph Cornell on steroids is not necessarily performance-enhancing. But over-the-top accumulations in a vaguely altar-like format, including the aptly titled “Cacophony of the Cacophonous” (2012-13), manage to pile it on without obscuring distinctions among the components. The artwork features a forest of figures as tightly packed as the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, yet each stands alone. Underlying Bubash’s art-making are the dual impulses of collecting and transformation. With few exceptions, the transformation is achieved not by altering the objects through painting, carving, etc., but rather through position and placement, which broadly speaking could be considered context. Generally, Bubash’s art of juxtaposition adds more than it detracts from his elected objects, which in their pre-existing symbolic value (monsters, iconic works of art, religious figures) are more alreadymade than readymade. (Duchamp’s readymades were essentially functional until he made them symbolic.) In Bubash’s world, taste is not conditional; it’s as absent here as it is in a dollar store or, for that matter, the Warhol Museum.

The Reuben is how cartoonists honor each other: the National Cartoonists Society’s Cartoonist of the Year award, chosen by members’ secret ballot since 1946. At The ToonSeum, And the Winner Is … is an unprecedented exhibit including original art by every winner. The show — perfumed with nostalgia as comics migrate to cyperspace — will thrill fans. From “Li’l Abner” and “Blondie” to “The Far Side” and “Bizarro,” you watch comics evolve, alongside work by the odd illustrator or political cartoonist. Near-forgotten winners like Walter Berndt (“Smitty”) and Otto Soglow (“The Little King”) get equal time with giants like Chester Gould (“Dick Tracy”). Meanwhile, the original artwork’s larger-than-funnypages size reveals shading and expressiveness lost to mass reproduction, like in a Snoopy-stalks-Linus “Peanuts” by Charles Schulz. Bonus: repros of each winner’s original, hand-lettered bio. Along with the poignancy of once-vital strips now vanished come suprises. In a ’56 strip, for instance, Mort Walker’s Beetle Bailey gets stoned on “happy pills.” And while Frank King’s “Gasoline Alley” is the longestrunning strip represented here (dating from 1919!), a 1958 sample reveals a sensitive, even intimate portrait of two female friends. In some ways, this exhibit’s no history class: Nearly half of the Pittsburgh PostGazette’s current funnies, for instance, are by current or reprinted Reuben winners. On the other hand … the very conservatism that keeps “Family Circus” and “B.C” in today’s comics feels too often mirrored in Reubens honoring middle-of-the-roadsters. Granted, early winners includes legendary editorial cartoonists Herblock and Bill Mauldin. But in the 1970s, as “Doonesbury” was revolutionizing daily strips, Reubens went to folks like Dik Browne (“Hagar the Horrible”) and Ernie Bushmiller (“Nancy”); Garry Trudeau didn’t get his until 1995. Too, the Reuben has largely been a white-guy’s club: Lynn Johnston (“For Better or Worse”) was the first woman to win, in 1985, and Cathy Guisewite won in ’92. There hasn’t been a third, nor has a cartoonist of color ever won. None of that’s the fault, of course, of cocurators Andrew Farago, of San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum, and ToonSeum’s Joe Wos. Meanwhile, we can thank them for unique pleasures like the sight of Walt Kelly’s first “Pogo,” from 1949 — a strip whose vibrant lines and open-hearted charm prefigure fellow winner Bill Watterson’s “Calvin & Hobbes,” a sample of which hangs nearby. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AND THE WINNER IS … continues through Aug. 31. The Toonseum, 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org


LEARNERS

[PLAY REVIEWS]

BLEAKER STREET

{BY F.J. HARTLAND}

{BY TED HOOVER} TEACHERS. Some of them impact lives IF AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN playwright Ödön

von Horváth is remembered at all, it’s because of the brutal, and brutally funny, circumstances of his death. After being chased out of Berlin because of the Nazis, then chased from Vienna, von Horváth died in Paris under a tree in a thunderstorm, killed by a falling branch. He’s definitely not remembered for his play Don Juan Comes Back From the War. This 1936 potboiler imagines Don Juan as a German solider returning to the rubble and nihilism of post-World War I Berlin. A lifethreatening wound sets him on a path to find … love? Expiation? Redemption? Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theater presents a new version by British playwright Duncan Macmillan. But, to tell you the truth, unless Macmillan gets crushed by a branch, this version will probably have less of a shelf life than the original. And that’s not because Macmillan’s version is anything less than strong, with great flashes of theatricality. It’s because the play starts out grimy and bleak, ends grimy and bleak, and in between there’s some grimy bleakness. It’s less a journey than a pit stop at an outpatient clinic. Macmillan — or possibly director Alan Stanford — attempts to jazz it up with flashes of nudity and “shocking” sensuousness, but like Narelle Sissons’ aggressively monotonous set, there’s no variation, just the same thing over and over for 145 intermissionless minutes.

DON JUAN COMES BACK FROM THE WAR continues through Aug. 31. Henry Heymann Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

But there is an impressive array of impressive actresses at work: Melinda Helfrich, Karen Baum, Lissa Brennan, Catherine Moore and Gayle Pazerski. A big hand to all, and especially Nike Doukas, who, in the script’s only sustained scene of drama, is exquisitely moving. David Whalen plays Don Juan and, like the pro he is, attacks the part feverishly. The issue might be that Whalen’s greatest asset as an actor is that he projects an aura of rock-solid decency … a quality which has saved a number of shows he’s been in. But here it works against him: He’s not Don Juan, he’s the best friend a woman turns to after being screwed by Don Juan. Whalen working fiercely to close the gap between what he presents

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Here comes Don Juan. Rear (left to right): Lissa Brennan, David Whalen, Catherine Moore and Karen Baum. Front (left to right): Nike Doukas, Gayle Pazerski and Melinda Helfrich.

and where the character needs to be is an exhaustive battle. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

POOR HOUSE {BY COLETTE NEWBY} ORGANIC THEATER’S new production, Scar-

city, is an intense story of poverty and domestic abuse where no character is left with any shred of dignity. You will not smile during the show, or on the drive home, or for a while after you return. This play by Lucy Thurber is, however, successful in everything it sets out to do. There is much in Scarcity for a prurient audience. It depicts a brutal setting where a father compliments his daughter’s ass before her mother hits her, and the only person with any chance at upward mobility is the object of his own teacher’s sexual advances. This is a domestic drama that requires a fight choreographer.

SCARCITY continues through Aug. 18. Studio Theater, Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave, Oakland. $15-20. www.organictheaterpgh.org

The set design is impeccable in its depiction of the stereotypes of low-income squalor, and even the lighting makes everything look soaked in tobacco. No doubt if the production were any more heartfelt, the actors would be tripping over empty

beer bottles every other line. The cast, as directed by Justin Zeno, is completely convincing in their roles — even when beating children or sexually assaulting people. Tense silences are so thick they congeal around you. Infrequent comic relief is provided by Bridget Cary’s Gloria, a childless woman who desperately seeks class mobility. At first glance, Scarcity seems to subscribe to the Dickensian idea that the poor remain poor because they cannot stop drinking, fighting and sexually assaulting one another for long enough to better themselves; they can be elevated only when wealthy philanthropists adopt pure-hearted orphans. This reading has one kink: Old Money’s sole representative is a teacher played by Meagan Reagle. She lusts after students, humiliates a family in its own home, and literally cackles upon learning her star pupil’s family income. This perspective leaves us in a deeply pessimistic and misanthropic world with no future for the young prodigy Rachel, played by 15-year-old Hannah McGee, who is a major character in four other plays by Thurber. Thurber is an acclaimed young playwright, but come to see Scarcity only if you have a strong stomach and want to see actors at the peak of their craft portraying awful people.

forever. Such is the case in Tuesdays With Morrie, by Jeffrey Hatcher and Mitch Albom, now at South Park Theatre. Based on Albom’s book of the same name, the play tells the story of Mitch, a college student, and his favorite professor, Morrie Schwartz. Morrie influences Mitch during his undergraduate years, but it’s only years later does the dying professor have a truly profound effect on his student. Hatcher and Albom’s script is alternately moving and clunky. Particularly awkward is the handling of Mitch’s wife, Janine. Although she is present for a scene, the playwrights neither show her nor let her speak. At one point, she does sing. It is understandable that Hatcher and Albom wanted their script to focus on the two men, but the handling of the wife seems out of step with the rest of the text. Despite the script glitches, Stephen Santa directs a tight production that is both funny and moving. The production shifts emotional gears quite seamlessly. Greg Caridi plays Mitch, and Bill Bennett is Morrie. Both actors have graced the stages of many Pittsburgh area theaters, and their experience shows in Tuesdays With Morrie. Bennett had a slow start on opening night, but both he and Caridi turn in charming and emotional performances. Caridi and Bennett convincingly capture their characters’ transformations, emotional and physical. Caridi also serves double duty as stage crew, making all of the scene changes that occur within the production.

THE TIGHT PRODUCTION IS BOTH FUNNY AND MOVING.

TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE continues through Aug. 24. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive at Brownsville Road, South Park. $12. 412-831-8552. www.southparktheatre.com

The set, by Adrienne Fischer, is beautiful, dominated by a large tree. Symbolically throughout the production, leaves fall from the tree. It is a lovely effect. Unfortunately, the way the light cues are timed — unless you are looking for it — this is easy to miss. Otherwise, however, lighting designer Jen James has complemented Fischer’s set nicely. The use of color is particularly good. This is a delightful production, sure to charm audiences. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.1508.22.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., AUG. 15 {ART} Just in case you’re ou’re seeing The Andy Warhol Bridge for the e first time in a while e and wondering ng what’s up: This is past weekend, d, some 1,847 knitting and crocheting arttists yarn-bombed bed it. The unmissable le stunt known as Knitt the Bridge e is a grassroots public art project of the Fiberarts erarts Guild of Pittsburgh. The he yarn-bomb won’t be defused used at least until Sept. 6. A community mmunity celebration is planned for Aug. 25. Bill O’Driscoll Seventh Street Bridge, Downtown. www.knitthebridge.org

{FASHION} Yes, Pittsburgh has its Fashion Week and now a Style Week, too. And it’s still got the

AUG. 15

Rae Gold Fashion Show

Girls: Live at the Inn. The paintings offer sincere and nostalgic snapshots of the ’90s British pop sensations through the lens of Boyd’s memory. Scary, Baby, Posh, Sporty and Ginger are dreamily depicted with oil paint on linen. The paintings will be accompanied by Boyd’s personal collection of Spice Girls memorabilia (think Tiger Beat and Spice Girls beach towels) that both prove his fandom and served as his source material. The Inn opened as a full-time gallery in Lawrenceville in March. Olivia Lammel 6-9 p.m. 5601 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-298-5703 or www.collegeinnprojects.com

{WORDS} and supporters of the Society for Contemporary Craft, which hosts the show. The event also caps SCC’s Summer of Fiber, including the Fiberart International 2013 exhibit, which closes Aug. 18. BO 5:307:30 p.m. 2100 Smallman St.,

Long-running reading series TNY Presents returns from its summer hiatus. Readers include Patrick Malloy, author of Bang Bang, a darkly comic science-fiction novel about funeral-home workers, um, ginning up business in a future where nobody dies. Joshua M. Patton is a Pitt student and U.S. Army veteran who contributes to Dadditudes and AND Magazine, and writes fiction and poetry. And writer Mark Sepe notes that he “has no life.” So there you go. At ModernFormations tonight, $5 gets you in the door, unless you bring a potluck contribution, in which case it’s free. BO 8 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-0274

+ FRI., AUG. 16 {STORIES}

AUG. 16

Three Rivers Storytelling Festival

annual Rae Gold Fashion Show. The locally based artist is known nationally for her wool and silk garments, hand-dyed using techniques including shibori and itajime. Gold’s jackets, vests, tunics and scarves are modeled by friends

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Strip District. Free. Reservations requested at 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org.

{ART} Artist Terry Boyd travels to Spice World in his new collection of paintings, The Spice

Story lovers, tellers and listeners alike, gather this weekend at Winchester Thurston-North Campus for the 13th annual Three Rivers Storytelling Festival. This year, the ghost stories are on Saturday night and will serve as narration for a dance performance. Also new is tonight’s Liar’s Contest. Acclaimed national storytellers Beth Horner, Bill Lepp (pictured) and Randel McGee perform Friday and Saturday nights. There are also a “Story Swap” open-mic event, a seniors’ lunch


sp otlight Some doomsayers have been predicting the demise of libraries. But this week, a library opens for the first time in Millvale. “We didn’t set out to build a library,” says Tricia George, secretary of the board of trustees for the Millvale Community Library. The new institution is the result of a project to create a community space for learning — one that took six years and more than 1,000 volunteers contributing 50,000 hours of service. The day-long grand-opening celebration, on Sun., Aug. 18, begins with a ceremonial good-luck Chinese lion dance, performed by the Gong Lung (Steel Dragon) martial-arts school. Attendees are encouraged to bring scissors to participate in the collective ribbon-cutting ceremony. There’s also a yoga class at 10 a.m., and kids can enjoy story time throughout the day. Small Press Pittsburgh offers its pop-up stand full of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and zines, among other selections. Several artists will provide the sounds, ranging from R&B group Smokin’ Section to the classic and underground soul and funk of Title Town’s DJ Gordy. The full schedule is on the Millvale Community Library website. While the library building — with its deck, backyard and community garden — has been the site of children’s programming for the past two summers, it fully opens for business Aug. 20. Olivia Lammel 1-8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. 213 Grant Ave., Millvale. Free. 412-822-7081 or www.millvalelibrary.org

with PBT instructors. Also at 5 p.m., there’s a ticketed barbecue dinner with PBT company dancers, dancers including live music and cocktails.

and beginners’ workshops. OL L 10 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Also 1-9:30 9:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17. 4225 25 5 Middle Road, North Hills. Some m events free; ticketed me events en nts start at $7. 412-9156976 76 6 or www.3rstf.org

+ SAT., AUG. 17 Forr the t fourth urtth year in a row, word nerds and puzzle zzzle junkies will try to solve their eirr way to victory at Soldiers & Sa Sailors ailors Memorial Hall. The Pittsburgh tsburgh Crossword Puzzle Tournament urrnament is op open pen to

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICH SOFRANKO}

{GAMES} GA AMES}

contestants t t t off all ll ages and d abilities. New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz provides the puzzles. Rachel Colangelo, a recent Pitt graduate, started this fundraising tournament to “solve the puzzle of bloodrelated cancers.” Proceeds from entry fees benefit the Western PA/West Virginia Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. OL 1-4 p.m. (registration starts at 12:30 p.m.) 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $25 ($40 per pair). 724-554-4838 or www.sites.google.com/site/ pittsburghcrossword

AUG. A AU G. 18 G. 18 Ballet Under the Stars

(Buying pre-show drinks for dancers is probably ffrowned d on, though.) th h ) Then Th comes Ballet Under the Stars, with works by famed choreographers Mark Morris (Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes) and Dwight Rhoden (Step Touch), the latter scored with doo-wop hits like “Under the Boardwalk.” BO 5 p.m. family activities (7:30 p.m. concert). Dinner: $20-75. 412-454-9137 or www.pittsburghballet.org

{SCREEN} “Nerdfighters” don’t fight nerds. Rather, they’re fans of John Green, the youngadult novelist who with his sibling, Hank, composes the Vlogbrothers. Their enthusiasm for collaborative online video projects sparked the movement for nerd-positive types (quick, flash the Vulcan hand sign!) who do charity initiatives and more to “increase awesome and decrease suck.” (The Greens’ YouTube channel has more than 1 million subscribers.) As her senior collegiate honors thesis, nerdfighter Hannah Lindgren made the documentary “A Film to Decrease Worldsuck,” now on tour. The 40-minute film — which, naturally, incorporates crowd-sourced video — screens today at the Carnegie Museum of Art. The evening includes live music and a trivia contest. Your price of admission is a nonperishable food for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, collected by the Pittsburgh Area Nerdfighters. BO 5-8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-1906

{MUSIC} Prepare for some old-school but ever-timely rabble-rousing

shops and protest, including tonight’s multimedia Notes From the Road talk, at Big Idea Bookstore. Then, at Howlers Coyote Café, the tactics turn musical. Local protest legends Anne Feeney and Mike Stout take the stage. So do partyfunksters The Old E Allstars and special guest Michael Fraser O’Brien. O’Brien, lead

as the Summer of Solidarity Tour hits town. The 13-city tour left Philadelphia just yesterday, headed for the West Coast, with union activists and community allies urging workers to join struggles against corporate power. Local union leaders, including Fight Back Pittsburgh, join national activists for work-

vocalist for Ontario-based band Kill the Autocrat, is a former union mine worker and self-described “raptivist” who gives this grassroots tour a hip-hop edge. BO Notes From the Road: 6:30 (4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield). Concert: 7:30 p.m. (4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield.) www.facebook. com/SummerOfSolidarityTour

{STORIES} A string of sell-outs at smaller venues under its belt, The Moth Mainstage takes over the Byham Theater. The fifth iteration of this annual showcase for storytellers working without notes, themed On Point: Stories of Balancing Acts, features both visiting talent and local notables. The best-known is David Newell, the actor who played (and still plays) Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood speedy-deliveryman Mr. McFeely. Also: Justin Strong (pictured), who founded the late, lamented East Liberty landmark Shadow Lounge; therapist Kelly Flanagan Dee, who produces Pittsburgh’s monthly Moth StorySLAM; Chicago Moth GrandSLAM champ Shannon Cason; and New York City-based interior designer and storytelling educator Trisha Coburn. The evening, co-sponsored by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, features music by local fave Joy Ike; the host is comedian and author Dan Kennedy (American Spirit), who also hosts The Moth’s weekly podcast. BO 8 p.m. 101 Sixth Ave., Downtown. $20-55. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{DANCE}

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The Th he Sp S Spi Spice pic ice Gi ice Gir Girls: rl Live at the Inn

+ THU., AUG. 22

+ SUN., AUG. 18 Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s annual Hartwood Acres show includes more than just some free open-air ballet. The concert is preceded by a couple of hours of games, crafts and other free family activities, including dance activities

Art by Terry Boyd

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THEATER BLUES FOR AN ALABAMA

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SKY. Play by Pearl Cleage. Sun., Aug. 18, 3 p.m. Creamy Creations, Penn Hills. 412-787-1780. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DON JUAN COMES BACK FROM THE WAR. Duncan Macmillan’s new adaptation presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thru Aug. 31. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. GREASE. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 17. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. JUST DESSERTS. Comedy dinner theater. Presented by Sing Hosannah! Sat., Aug. 17. Tanglewood Event Center, Lyndora. 724-287-8362. OEDIPUS & THE FOUL MESS IN THEBES. The Oedipus saga as told by Aeschylus, Sophocles & Euripides. Presented by No Name Players. Thru Aug. 17. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

OLD LOVE. A comedy by Norm Foster. Presented by the Bobcat Players. Aug. 15-18. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Staged readings to open the festival. Sun. Thru Aug. 25. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-489-5840. RABBIT HOLE. The story of a couple coping with the accidental death of their son. Fri-Sun. Thru Aug. 25. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-657-9369. RETRO NUNS. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 24. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. ROMEO & JULIET. Shakespeare in South Park. Bring blanket or lawn chair & picnic! Sat, Sun. Thru Aug. 18. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. SCARCITY. Play by Lucy Thurber exploring life on the wrong side of the tracks. Presented by Organic Theater Pittsburgh. www.organictheaterpgh.org Thu-Sun. Thru Aug. 18. Studio

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

JOHN MCDONALD and the MANGO MEN! Live at L

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE $3

F ridays 4:30-7:30 I.C. LIGHT MANGO BOTTLES

Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. SUMMER BROADWAY REVUE. Presented by The Heritage Players. Thru Aug. 15. Castle Shannon Borough Building, Castle Shannon. 412-254-4633. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE. Based on the book by Mitch Albom. Thu-Sun. Thru Aug. 24. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

REAL TRUE HISTORY. Thu, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SCIT SOCIAL. Thu, 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY

#1 PARTY SCHOOL. Fri, 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. COMEDY, MAGIC, & WINE DINNER. 6:30 p.m. The Wooden Nickel, Monroeville. 412-372-9750. HOTEL NOWHERE, WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. ISAAC KOZELL W/ HIPSTERPOTAMUS. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. TEST DRIVE. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 15 THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT: CHAOTIC IMPROV. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NINJA VS PODCAST: LIVE. 9 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

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FRI 16 - SUN 18 DOMINIQUE. Aug. 15-18 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 16

SAT 17 BOLDWAGON. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MARK EDDIE. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TALKING SHOP: AN IMPROVISED PODCAST. 7 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 19 808, WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PANIC, HOTEL NOWHERE. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 20 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 21 IMPROV W/ SHEETCAKE. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. CONTINUES ON PG. 41

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013


FORT PITT MUSEUM. LOG HOUSE. Historic homes Unconquered: History Meets open for tours, lectures and more. Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original Monroeville. 412-373-7794. movie props, photographs, & NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to costumes alongside 18th century more than 600 birds from over ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY artifacts & documents, comparing 200 species. With classes, HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military & contrasting historical events lectures, demos and more. artifacts and exhibits on the w/ Hollywood depictions. North Side. 412-323-7235. Allegheny Valley’s industrial Reconstructed fort houses NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. museum of Pittsburgh history rooms helping to tell the story ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. circa French & Indian War and of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. An eclectic showroom of fine American Revolution. Downtown. University of Pittsburgh. art sculpture & paintings from 412-281-9285. Oakland. 412-624-6000. emerging artists. North Side. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church 724-797-3302. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of features 1823 pipe organ, AUGUST WILSON Clayton, the Frick estate, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. CENTER FOR AFRICAN with classes, car & carriage 412-851-9212. AMERICAN CULTURE. museum. Point Breeze. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, 412-371-0600. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Renew, Remix. Feat. HARTWOOD ACRES. site features log house, blacksmith . w imagery, film & oral ww per Tour this Tudor shop & gardens. South Park. a p ty ci history narratives to pgh m mansion and stable 412-835-1554. o .c explore communities, complex, and enjoy hikes PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY cultures, & innovations. and outdoor activities in the MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Downtown. 412-258-2700. surrounding park. Allison Park. exhibits. Includes displays, walking BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large 412-767-9200. tours, gift shop, picnic area and collection of automatic roll-played KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the Trolley Theatre. Washington. musical instruments and music other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-228-9256. boxes in a mansion setting. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Call for appointment. O’Hara. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly 412-782-4231. Tours of a restored 19th-century, Forest. Watch butterflies emerge BOST BUILDING. Collectors. middle-class home. Oakmont. from their chrysalises to flutter Preserved materials reflecting 412-826-9295. among tropical blooms. Summer the industrial heritage of MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection Flower Show. Glass art surrounded Southwestern PA. Homestead. includes jade and ivory statues by colorful blooms. Feat. work by 412-464-4020. from China and Japan, as well Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF as Meissen porcelain. Butler. Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of 724-282-0123. rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature Arabia: Archaeology & History MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY exotic plants and floral displays of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Archaeological materials CONTINUES ON PG. 42 exploring the cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. BIKES: Science on Two Wheels. Feat. hands-on activities, demonstrations & a collection of historic, rare, & peculiar bicycles. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO with GALLERY. University of 6pm to Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Midnight Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany 526 NORTHPOINTE CIRCLE I CRANBERRY/SEVEN FIELDS I 724-741-6015 stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

VISUAL

EXHIBITS

ART

FULL LIST ONLINE

“Sunrise to Sunset,” by Mikyoung Jung, from Glassweekend ’13 at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK BOXHEART GALLERY. Julia. Paintings by Sonja Sweterlitsch. Artist reception: Aug. 24, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Donna Hollen Bolmgren. An estate sale of the artist’s works. Opens Aug. 16, 5:30-8 p.m. Benefits the Master Visual Artists exhibition. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. Escape. Work by Delilah Spring, Laura Lee Burkhardt, Keith Caves, John Faust Jr., Emile Goss, & Sema Graham. Opening reception: Aug. 15, 8-11 p.m. South Side. 412-481-1004. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors Annual Exhibition. Juried by Carolina Loyola-Garcia. Opening reception: Aug. 17, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING 179 STUDIO. Group Art Show. Call for a private showing. Lawrenceville. 412-621-1523. 707 PENN GALLERY. The Koraput Survivors Project. A photographic exhibition by Lynn Johnson & Jen Saffron exploring the destruction & recreation of a small community in Odisha State, India. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine. Multimedia exhibit. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and

Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Art for a Hire Purpose. The Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators Exhibition Illustration Show. Downtown. 412-263-6600. BE GALLERIES. Miniatures. Work by Caitlyn Burroughs. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Norweigan Flow & Others, Spiritual Energy Unleashed. Paintings by Mary Ellen McShea & Elaine Bergstrom. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Mythical Tales, Flight Paths, & Figures of the Sky. Mixed media works by John Humphries. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Seven Degrees of 7. Work by Distillery 7 Program artists Alexis Roberto, Cara Livorio, Crystala Armagost, Josh Mitchel, Elizabeth Brophy, Kate Hansen & Terrence M. Boyd. South Side. 412-381-7767. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE. RELDmetal. Robust finger sculptures by Sarah Jane Sindler. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0404. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection.

Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Obscuro Bezango! Work by Thomas Rehm, Elmore “Buzz” Buzzizyk, & Maximum Traffic. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Energetic Escapes. Work by Scott Hunter & Blake Anthony. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ghost Feeding Arena. New works by Leslie Minnis. Viewing parties: Aug. 16-17, 1-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Prelude & Fugue (A Game of Pairs). Photography by Richard Stoner. CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural imagery in lampworked glass. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 15 ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855. INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE FESTIVAL. Traditional food, music & more from over 20 different cultures. Thru Aug. 15 Renziehausen Park, McKeesport. 412-675-5020.

THU 15 - WED 21 BIKEFEST. Various rides & activities citywide. Benefits Bike Pittsburgh. bikepgh.org Thru Aug. 25 412-325-4334.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Ukulele Group at Hambone’s Pub, in Lawrenceville CRITIC: Mark Kerr, 51, a public-works supervisor from Sewickley WHEN: Sun., Aug. 11

I just kind of consider this a ukulele jam session. It’s a chance to get out and play with some other people. They charge you three bucks just to cover the cost of the room and they send you out all the information and say, “Here’s the songs we’re going to try to play,” so you can practice. It’s open to anybody, like even brand-new beginners; it could be your first night. I didn’t know Adam and Jack, the two guys beside me, but I met them and they gave me some tips and pointers as we went along. The guy that was running things is Drew Danielson. He’s the one that picks which songs we do and he leads and helps people along. It’s just a laid-back Sunday evening place to practice. Rather than being in a community-center room, you can get a beer here and have something to eat while you’re doing it. B Y OL I V I A L A M M E L

SAT 17 5TH ANNUAL JEHRU M. DONALDSON GATHERING. An event to promotes peace & remember loved ones who have lost their lives to violence. Food, live entertainment, kids games, guest speakers & vendors. Presented by the PROMISE Group. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. West Park, North Side. THE RODFATHERS FALL FESTIVAL EXTRAVAGANZA. Car cruise, Chinese auctions, craft & food vendors, live music, fireworks, more. Butler Farm Show Grounds, Butler. 724-822-5586.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 16 2ND ANNUAL WILD ORCHID PARTY. Cocktails, auction, more. Benefits the Ladies Hospital Aid Society’s Orchid Fund. 6 p.m. Fort Pitt Museum, Downtown. 412-584-5677. HMH & BCB: SUPPORT OUR TROUPES. Burlesque & drag show benefiting local film project, Gender Dances. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-345-3464.

SAT 17 PITTSBURGH CROSSWORD PUZZLE TOURNAMENT. Benefits the Western PA/West Virginia Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 12:30-4 p.m.

Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 724-554-4838.

SUN 18 4TH ANNUAL BROTHERHOOD MEMORIAL RIDE. Benefits the Brotherhood Memorial Fund. www.zelienoplefiredept.com 11:15 a.m. Zelienople Fire Dept, Zelienople. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS SUN 18 PITTSBURGH ANTI-DRONE WARFARE COALTION MEETING. Third Sun of every month, 1-3 p.m. Thru Sept. 15 Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 15 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking


VISUAL ART

for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. STEEL CITY SLAM. Poetry slam. 7-10 p.m. 720 Records, Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592.

Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. The New Art of Wen Gao. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Automata, a Kinetic Art Show. Work by Zac Coffin, Nick Romero, Alberto Almareza, Katy Dement, T.R. Reed, Jeannie Holland, Sylvia Cross, more. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Graphically Popular. Wood panel paintings by David Wallace. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Dear Universe: New

SAT 17 THE ARCHIPELAGO REVISITED. Storytelling performance by Robert Isenberg. 6 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-7852. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. RENEE ALBERTS, JILL KHOURY, MICHELLE LAYDEN STONER. Poetry reading, part of the Versify Reading Series. 7:30-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

SUN 18 RINA FERRARELLI. Reading from The Bread We Ate. Part of the CLP Sunday Poetry & Reading Series. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

MON 19 OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

TUE 20

Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. POEM SWAP. Readings by Karen Dietrich, Kelly Scarff, Meghan Tutolo, & Stefanie Wielkopolan. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

SAT 17 TIME & PLACE W/ FULL LIST E LAURIE BARNES. Alter a space w/ ONwLwIN w. an installation that

WED 21

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pghci m investigates time & CARNEGIE KNITS .co place. Ages 8-10. 12& READS. Informal 3 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE THE SMITHFIELD CRITICS. POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Sun. Discussing My Life in France Thru Aug. 25 Children’s Museum by Julia Child. 12 p.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-322-5058. 412-281-7141. ROOKIE OF THE GEAR CATAPULT TEST. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. VIBRATION & ART. Thru Aug. 15 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE North Side. 412-322-5058. HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Mon, 12-2 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall North Side. 412-322-5058.

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Encaustic Works by Benedict Oddi. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Steel Wool. A show of rogue needlepoint. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Hand tinted black & white photographs on tin, paper & glass. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside.

412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views. A collaborative exhibition curated from an open call for entries of images taken at the historic blast furnace. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. TRUNDLE MANOR. The Insidious Collection. Paintings by Jamie Apgar. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Thrifted. Found vintage art show, benefiting the MGR-Youth Empowerment Program. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. data.tron. Installation by Ryoji Ikeda. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net Check our website for more events & daily happenings 146 44th St . Pgh, PA 15201

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make a real connection

Park, presented by the Penn State Master Gardeners. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 412-473-2540.

TUE 20 CHESS CLUB. Grades K-7. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

SAT 17 - SUN 18

WED 21 FUN W/ ANIMALS: REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS. Ages 3-6. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RADIO IN THE STUDIO. w/ Saturday Light Brigade. Aug. 21-22 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 16 BOOM & BLAST FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA. Presented by Pyrotechnics Guild International. Tue, Wed, Fri, Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 1-866-856-8444.

SAT 17 BEGINNER PADDLES W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Ages 12+. 9-11 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564. GARDEN IN THE PARKS FIELD DAY. Tours, demos, children’s activities, garden market, more. Events at both North Park & South

KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

SUN 18 FULL MOON PADDLE W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Ages 12+. 6:30-9 p.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564. MOSS WALK. Learn about the strange lives of mosses, interesting uses & how to identify common mosses within the Wildflower Reserve. A good magnifying glass is suggested. 2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

TUE 20 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 21

Try it Free!

RACCOON LAKE EVENING NATURE PADDLE. Meeting at the boat launch by the Boat Concession along Raccoon Park Rd at 5:45 PM. 6 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-513-6740.

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

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WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 15

AUGUST 15 THESE LIONS AUGUST 22 NEVADA MOUNTAINS, DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE, CRASH CITY

AUGUST 29 EMO NIGHT $2 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot All Day ‘till Midnight

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CULTURE CLUB. Salon-style conversation & happy hour. Third Thu of every month, 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. IDENTITY THEFT: THE FACTS & PREVENTION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RAE GOLD FASHION SHOW. 5:30-7:30 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-261-7003. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

Culture, Downtown. 412-708-9129. 4TH ANNUAL BOCCE TOURNAMENT & FESTIVAL. 1-7 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. ARTIST TALK: GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE. Part of the Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HER/E exhibit. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. BUYING A HOME: FOR BEGINNERS. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. CRAFT CUBED: GROW PITTSBURGH & MARTY’S MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE MARKET. Participate in creating TRANSFORMATION. Supreme a collaborative farm stand Meditation & the Science of installation, custom-design a Transformation w/ Acharya flower pot, more. 7-9 p.m. Kedar. Free public Pittsburgh Center for program. Doors open the Arts, Shadyside. at 7:15, seating ends 412-361-0455 x 324. at 8 p.m. 7:30-9 p.m. DOWNTOWN Winchester Thurston, HAUNTED www. per pa WALKING TOUR. Upper School, pghcitym o .c Begins at City County Shadyside. 724-420-5826. Building, Downtown. Sat. THE REAL Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. “COMFORT FOOD:” 7 FOODS FUN, FIT & FABULOUS YOU SHOULD BE EATING TO WOMEN’S HEALTH MANAGE STRESS. w/ nutrition CONFERENCE. Interactive counselor Paula Martinac. 6-8 p.m. workshops, Zumba, cooking Hampton Holistic Center, Allison demos, health screenings, more. Park. 412-486-1829. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-391-4600. I MADE IT! MARKET. 1ST ANNUAL PITTSBURGH Nomadic indie craft market feat. SNEAKER CONVENTION. Buy, bicycle-themed items. 12 p.m. sell, trade. 1-8 p.m. August Wilson Carnegie Science Center, North Center for African American Side. 412-237-3400. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAKE-IT-A-DATE. Couples glassblowing event. Reservations required. 6-11 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. MEHNDI BY SOMA. Learn about the henna plant & the cultural significance of Mehndi body painting. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: THE LIFE OF WILLIE STARGELL. Discussion & book signing w/ Frank Garland. 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PLAYDATE. Game night for adults. 9 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 205-746-6539. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, THE ARTFUL GARDEN CRAFT SHOW. Handmade jewelry, paintings, photography, fabric & paper crafts, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 17 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622. NORTH COUNTRY TRAIL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE. Hikes, workshops, caving, museum visits, more. Thru Aug. 17 Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock. 724-290-4141.

3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VELOMUSE. Mountain biking skills demonstration. 12-2 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. WANNABE 80’S SCAVENGER HUNT. Challenge your 80’s trivia. www.thrillscavengerhunt.com/ event 3:30-6 p.m. Shadyside, Shadyside. 412-841-2433.

FRI 16

SUN 18

THU 15 - SAT 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 17

2ND ANNUAL SOUTH SIDE GARDEN TOUR. Check-in at 18th & Carson St., South Side. 10 a.m.2 p.m. 412-551-4165. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. PITTSBURGH MINI MAKER FAIRE. Family fun festival feat. creations by local roboticists, HackPittsburgh, kid inventors, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 20 FULL MOON MAGNIFICATION SOUND MEDITATION. Presented by Life In Balance. Email lifeinbalance@comcast.net for information. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-681-4222. THE STRIP DISTRICT SEMINAR. Speaker: Robert O. Stakeley. 11 a.m. The Legacy Theatre, Allison Park. 412-635-8080.

WED 21 ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOT NIGHT IN PORTERSVILLE. Book swap, music, wine tasting, more. 5-9 p.m. Nicolette’s Tailor Shop, Portersville. 724-368-1100. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TOUGH MUDDER

As the name suggests, Tough Mudder — a 10- to-12-mile obstacle course designed by British Special Forces — requires a certain amount of grit. The event takes place at Powerline Park, in Belmont, Ohio, but volunteers from the Pittsburgh area are encouraged to help with various aspects of the challenge, which benefits the Wounded Warrior Project. Volunteers receive a discounted participant entry fee and lots of free stuff. Visit toughmudder.com/ mudder-volunteer-program for information. RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & artist market. First Sun of every month and Third Sun of every month. Thru Sept. 15 Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-464-4020.

MON 19 BELLYDANCING LESSONS. 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. THE CIVIL WAR ERA: A GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. Discussion w/ Rodger Duffy. 10 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed.

Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS ACTORS & ARTISTS OF FAYETTE COUNTY. Auditions for Blithe Spirit. Aug. 19-20. Men/women, cold readings. www.geyerpac. com Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 724-887-0887. BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for 2013-2014 season. Aug. 24. Interested singers (especially tenors & basses) contact auditions@bachchoirpittsburgh.org for appointment. Prepare a song


[DIY] of your choice & bring a copy of the music for accompanist. Purnell Center for the Arts, Oakland. 412-241-4044. GEYER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Man of LaMancha. Aug. 25-26. Men ages 20+, 12-16 bars of a classic musical theater piece & cold readings. www.geyerpac.com Scottdale. 724-887-0887. HOPE ACADEMY. Auditions for Hope Academy’s Teen Theater Company. Applications due Aug. 23, audition times to follow. Looking for singers, dancers, actors & musicians. cathedralofhope.org/ hopeacademy/hat-co.html East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Fall auditions for talented 8th grade-12th grade singers for the 2013 season. Aug. 26-27. Email or call MaryColleen. mcseip@ themendelssohn.org. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 724-263-5259. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for male singers & female dancers, ages 18+ to perform in 2 upcoming touring shows, “American Bandstand” & “Christmas Memories”. Call for information. 724-853-4050. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for The Westing Game. Aug. 25-26. Men/women age 13-70, cold readings. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Fall auditions for all voice parts. Aug. 14-15. Those interested in scheduling an audition should review the audition criteria at www.themendelssohn.org. Email MaryColleen at mcseip@ themendelssohn.org or call. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for Turn of the Screw. Sep. 7-8. Seeking adult non-equity actors for the roles. SAG-AFTRA actors are also encouraged to audition. Prepare a 2-minute dramatic monologue using a British dialect. To schedule a time & for more information visit www.primestage.com. The Oakland School, Oakland. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Auditions for the 2013-2014 season. Aug. 19-20. For more information, email at jbj@ rccpittsburgh.com. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722. SOUTH HILLS CHORALE. Holding auditions for all singing parts starting August 19. Repertoire ranges from popular to classical selections. Concerts in December & April. Rehearsals are held Monday evenings in Mt. Lebanon. For information/ to schedule an audition time, call or email southhillschorale@gmail.com.

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If you worry that folks nowadays spend too little time on hands-on creative endeavors, head to the third annual Pittsburgh Mini Maker Faire, happening Sunday at Buhl Community Park and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. The family-friendly event features dozens of regional makers — from kid inventors to indie crafters to robotics buffs — plus interactive demos, and a chance to learn about soldering, embroidery, creative engineering and more. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Allegheny Square, North Side. $12-13. www.pghmakerfaire.com

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-780-9336. STAGE 62. Auditions for The Wedding Singer. August 19. Bring 32 bars of a contemporary musical theater or 80s rock song. Accompaniment provided. Dancers should prepare to audition for the choreographer. Cold readings will be provided, if necessary. www.stage62.org/auditions for information. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. WCCC BAND & CHOIR. Seeking singers & instrumentalist musicians for its community choir & band. Open to individuals of all ages & musical experience levels. Current members are high school & college students & community members. No audition, fees or tuition are required to join. Email bookerr@ wccc.edu or call for information. 724-925-5976. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Auditions for fall season. Aug. 21 & 25. Open to area high school & college string, woodwind, brass & percussion players. www.westmoreland symphony.org Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” tangible or otherwise. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. blastfurnace.submittable. com/Submit THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357.

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GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking non-traditional 2-D & 3-D work for upcoming juried art exhibit Different Dimensions: The Unpainting Exhibit. CD submissions only. Prospectus at www.greensburg artcenter.org/. 724-837-6791. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Online magazine seeking book reviewers, writers & artists to submit original essays, fiction, poetry, artwork, & photographs as well as pitched ideas for possible contributions. Visit www.newyinzer.com for current issue. Email all submissions/ inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 14. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to silvereye.org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information. 412-431-1810. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa. org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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BOBblehead n.

A person who moves their head up and down to the music of BOB FM

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Dear readers: Two writers stepped in to answer the Savage Love Letter of the Day while I was on vacation, and I wanted to share two of their responses. (The SLLOTD is blasted out to folks who have the Savage Love app.) First up is Daniel Bergner, an award-winning author whose newest book is What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire, which Salon said “should be read by every woman on earth.” I came out as gay during my marriage five years ago. (I’m a woman who doesn’t like the word “lesbian.”) I want to be in relationships with women, get married, etc., but I haven’t dated since my divorce. But I’m ready to start. I started on Craigslist in the w4w section and then moved to the m4w section, looking to fulfill a pegging fantasy. In working up the courage to respond to one guy’s ad — and then emailing/texting a total stranger that I was masturbating — I thought of asking for my own fantasy. I asked if we could “meet” without meeting: go to a coffee shop, sit across the room from each other and flirt via text. If that went well, I wanted him to follow me to my place (stalk me), break in, rough me up a little, fuck me and leave. That was too intense for him. I don’t consider this a rape fantasy. I’ve been raped, and it was the worst experience of my life. This is consensual sex. I don’t want to meet directly because I want him to remain a stranger. I want to be safe. I’ll have a safe word. I’d also like to discuss this with my therapist, because I was sexually abused by my father, my cousin and my mom’s boyfriend. I feel so hung up by the fear of being raped that it has restricted my ability to enjoy anything. Maybe by doing this I can face that fear. I’m also completely turned on by it. Can I do this safely? Is this healthy? Am I still a gay girl if I fulfill some kinky fantasies with men?

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

Chris Savage is Michigan’s most widely read progressive political blogger. Rachel Maddow calls Chris’s blog — Eclectablog. com — “the indispensable Michigan politics source.” He is also an organizer for the Michigan Democratic Party. Follow Chris on Twitter @Eclectablog.

WORDS WON’T ALWAYS BE HEEDED BY TOTAL STRANGERS YOU’VE ASKED TO GET ROUGH WITH YOU.

NOT WANTING RAPE

www.bobfm969.com

are among the most common sexual scenarios women imagine), but it does mean you’ve got deeper thinking to do before you take real risks. What I’m sensing is searing heat, confusion and a deluded hope that you can control the forces you’re about to unleash. “I have a safe word.” Not necessarily. Words won’t always be heeded by total strangers you’ve asked to get rough with you. I’m pretty sure you can pull off some version of what you wish — with a measure of safety — when you’re thinking more clearly. I’m all for seizing ecstasy while exorcising the past. I’m just saying, know thyself better. You’ll be a better judge of the right not-rapist. As for your last question — “Am I still a gay girl?” — let go of categories. If you’re turned on by both genders — and almost every bit of research I’ve encountered suggests women often are — count yourself lucky. Your options are enviably wide.

So you haven’t talked to your therapist but you’re reaching out for advice online, you’re declaring yourself a gay woman but starting your post-divorce erotic life hunting for sex with men, you’d like that sex to commence with a “meeting” that is a nonmeeting, and you want to be stalked, roughed up and fucked by an intruder in a way that bears only a minimal (and constructive) relationship to your having been raped and sexually abused. Since your letter is full of paradox, can I tell you something paradoxical? Your fantasies are utterly hot and are absolutely nothing to be ashamed of, but they scream out Slow down and seek serious counsel! Everything you lust for is at the same time somehow avoided or semi-denied. Father, cousin, mom’s boyfriend performed some work on the core of your psyche, and probably laid down some of the wiring for your current yearnings. This does not mean your fantasies are weird (rape fantasies — I’m going to call them that —

I am a 21-year-old male. My girlfriend has a bad temper and is extremely needy. She won’t allow me to see family or other friends because I have to spend all of my free time with her. Sometimes she hits me when she’s angry. She reads all my texts, but won’t let me read hers. The problem is, I love her. She says she can’t live without me, and I’m worried that if I break up with her, she’ll do something drastic. What can I do? MANIPULATED MAN

Let’s look at a few of the descriptors you used for this person you say you’re in love with: bad temper, needy, angry, violent. I’d add manipulative and controlling. Where are the positive words people in love normally use? Here in Michigan, the right-wingers that have taken over our state have demonized our teachers and made “union member” a slanderous phrase. They’ve worked to take away women’s reproductive rights and raised taxes on the poor and the elderly. They’ve been assholes to everyone but their business pals. But every now and then, they do something nice. When they do, people fall all over themselves to thank them. Then these assholes do the same stuff all over again. That’s the position you’re in. You have a choice to make — continue to be treated like a doormat, or recognize that you’re being abused and kick this woman to the curb. You’ll soon find out that she can live just fine without having you to wipe her feet on. You’re fortunate: You can do this now. In Michigan, we have to wait until 2014. On the Savage Lovecast: Brazilian waxes for men, from the waxer’s perspective, at savagelovecast.com

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.14-08.21

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” When I came across that quote while surfing the Web, I felt that it jibed perfectly with the astrological omens that are currently in play for you. Every website I consulted agreed that the speaker of this wisdom was Socrates, but I thought the language sounded too contemporary to have been uttered by a Greek philosopher who died 2,400 years ago. After a bit of research, I found the real source: a character named Socrates in Way of the Peaceful Warrior, a New Age self-help book by Dan Millman. I hope this doesn’t dilute the impact of the quote for you, Leo. For now, it is crucial that you not get bogged down in quarreling and brawling. You need to devote all your energy to creating the future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do you know that you are a host for more than 10,000 different species of microorganisms? Many of them are bacteria that perform functions essential to your health. So the stunning fact of the matter is that a large number of life forms share your body and constantly help you in ways about which you have no conscious awareness. Might there be other examples of you collecting benefits from unknown sources? Well, do you know who is responsible for providing you with the water and electricity you use? Who sewed your clothes and made your medicine? Who built the roads and buildings you use? This is an excellent time to take inventory of all the assistance, much of it anonymous, that you are so fortunate to receive.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): More often than not, your fine mind does a competent job of defining the problems that need solving. It comes up with concise questions that lead you in the right direction to find useful clues.

It gathers evidence crisply and it makes smart adjustments as the situation evolves. But after studying the astrological factors currently at work, I’m a little concerned that your usually fine mind might temporarily be prone to suffering from the dreaded malady known as paralysis through overanalysis. To steer yourself away from that possibility, keep checking in with your body and your feelings to see what alternate truths they may have to tell you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): By the standards of people who don’t know you well, the triumph you achieve in the coming days might seem modest. But I think it will actually be pretty dramatic. Here’s my only concern: There’s a slight danger you will get grandiose or even a bit arrogant in the aftermath of your victory. You could also get peeved at those who don’t see it for the major achievement it is. Now that I’ve given you this warning, though, I’m hoping you will avoid that fate. Instead you will celebrate your win with

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humble grace, feeling gratitude for all the help you got along the way.

write it out on a piece of paper and tape it to your bathroom mirror.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“All my life, my heart has yearned for a thing I cannot name.” So said French writer André Breton. I suspect that many of us feel the same way, which is kind of depressing. But the good news for you, Sagittarius, is that there will be times in the coming months when you will get as close to naming that mysterious thing as you have ever gotten. On more than a few occasions, you may be able to get a clear glimpse of its true nature. Now and then you might even be fully united with it. One of those moments could come soon.

Normally, International CAPS LOCK DAY happens only once a year, on June 28. But in alignment with your current astrological omens, you have been granted the right to observe the next seven days as your own personal International CAPS LOCK DAYS. That means you will probably be forgiven and tolerated if you use OVERHEATED ORATORY and leap to THUNDEROUS CONCLUSIONS and engage in MELODRAMATIC GESTURES. You may even be thanked — although it’s important to note that the gratitude you receive may only come later, AFTER THE DUST HAS SETTLED.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Paris Review did a story on novelist William Gass. The interviewer asked him why he wrote his books. That was “a very dumb question,” he sneered. Nevertheless, he answered it, saying, “I write because I hate. A lot. Hard.” In other words, his primary motivations for expressing himself creatively were loathing, malice and hostility. I beg you not to use him as your role model, Capricorn. Not now. Not ever. But especially now. It is essential to your long-term health and wealth that you not be driven by hate in the coming weeks. Just the opposite, in fact: The more you are driven by love and generosity, the better chance you will have of launching a lucky streak that will last quite a while.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

William Turner was a 19th-century English landscape painter born under the sign of Taurus. His aim was not to capture scenes in realistic detail but rather to convey the emotional impact they made on him. He testified that on one occasion he had himself tied to the mast of a ship during a snowstorm so that he could experience its full effects firsthand. The result was “Snow Storm — Steam-Boat off a Harbor’s Mouth,” a painting composed mostly of tempestuous swirls. What would be the equivalent for you, Taurus? I’m trying to think of a way you could be perfectly safe as you treated yourself to an up-close encounter with elemental energies.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

“Until we have seen someone’s darkness, we don’t really know who they are,” said author Marianne Williamson. “Until we have forgiven someone’s darkness, we don’t really know what love is.” Your assignment, Aquarius, is to seek out the deepest possible understanding of these truths. To do that, you will have to identify the unripe, shadowy qualities of the people who are most important to you. And then you will have to find it in your smart heart to love them for their unripe, shadowy qualities almost as much as you do for their shiny, beautiful qualities.

Some years back, the Greek government launched a huge anti-smoking campaign. In response, cigarette sales spiked dramatically. When my daughter was 6 years old, I initiated a crusade to ban Barbie dolls from our home forever. Soon she was ripping out pictures of the accursed anti-feminist icon from toy catalogs and leaving them on my desk. With these events in mind, I’m feeling cautious about trying to talk you into formulating a five-year master plan. Maybe instead I should encourage you to think small and obsess on transitory wishes.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Aldous Huxley was the renowned 20th-century intellectual who wrote the book Brave New World, a dystopian vision of the future. Later in his life he came to regret one thing: how “preposterously serious” he had been when he was younger. “There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet,” he ruminated, “trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That’s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling … Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply.” I would love for you to put this counsel at the top of your priority list for the next 10 months, darling Pisces. Maybe even

“Wings are a constraint that makes it possible to fly,” the Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst reminds us. That will be a good principle for you to keep in mind during your own adventures during the coming weeks. I suspect that any liberation you are able to achieve will come as the result of intense discipline. To the degree that you cultivate the very finest limitations, you will earn the right and the power to transcend inhibitions that have been holding you down. Is there an area of your life where your effects are different from your intentions? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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Ink Well

SERVICES

COPY EDITS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

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ACROSS 1. Vocal quality for Tom Waits 5. Newton’s math, briefly 9. Bluth twin 14. One who takes the cake (in order to decorate it) 15. Where to find Canton, Toledo, Lima, Medina, Dublin, and Athens 16. General feeling 17. Sell-off when Hostess went bankrupt? 20. Farmville maker 21. Chooses pieces 22. Slugger’s pickup, quickly 24. “Rumor has it ...” 25. “She lost her voice on ‘Poker Face’ and fell down dancing to ‘Bad Romance’”? 29. Statistical hypothesis trial 33. Person at a reunion 34. Modern navigation letters 35. “Cue the ___” 36. Org. for out athlete Jason Collins 37. Org. that lobbies for looser restrictions on ballerina costume sales? 39. New York-based kitchen gadget maker 40. Afraid to fire 42. Got the hell out of there 43. Lovers’ discussion (it’s not an argument) 44. Dealt some blow? 45. Viral video in which

a defendant gets a light sentence? 47. PLO Chairman Mahmoud 49. Sappy, in slang 50. One who brings two sides together 53. Toe problems 57. Nanobot’s hypothetical ability, and the process that’s overtaken this puzzle’s theme answers 61. Lightened (up) 62. Fill with stuff 63. Jay Z’s hubristic nickname for himself 64. Has the lead 65. Trees that may be slippery 66. Like sausage fests

DOWN 1. César of fancy hotels 2. Painfully dull? 3. Caught, in a way 4. Handout before a show 5. Commonly mislabeled food fish 6. “It all makes sense now ...” 7. Where the golf ball is 8. Duke men’s basketball head since 1980, familiarly 9. Loud and dramatic, as a voice 10. Cold War-era Indonesian president 11. Cease to bleed 12. AIDS activist Arthur 13. Vintage vehicles 18. Controlled environments 19. Saturn SUV

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23. Dude attending to networking emergencies, e.g. 24. Covers, as a car 25. Weed- and turfobsessed groups? 26. Pitchfork review subject 27. Batshit 28. On the nose 30. Emulate Megan Fox and Brian Austin Green 31. When the night shift ends, often 32. Liberty Bond, e.g., for short 35. Carter’s Secretary of State Cyrus 37. “Psycho” follower 38. It’s good to shoot under it 41. Recipient of a candidate’s sexts, often 43. Irons (out)

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45. Agatha Christie character Miss ___ 46. Song with the lyric “Young man, are you listening to me?” 48. Sacramento newspaper 50. Dr. Bronner’s, notably, has a great many of them 51. Anal 52. Cult classic “___, She Wolf of the SS” 54. Sly & the Family Stone’s “There’s a ___ Goin’ On” 55. Cold-smoked salmon 56. Buy before it’s sold out 58. “Funny vid, thx” 59. Conclusion of a Cartesian conclusion 60. Software installation needs, at times

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Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer? r? Meet M eet Bob! Bob! SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

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See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both n I know I have Whe ke. evo they e ons the resp subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City thin tely edia imm I p, age grou Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions.

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Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart.

VARIOUS LOCATIONS Luxury apartments available. Various locations. Call 412-983-3810

Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100.

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

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EAST FOR RENT PT. BREEZE 1 Month Free Rent Townhouse with garage, 2 BR, 1.5 BA, C/A, Dishwasher, Laund, HW Floors $995, 412-393-9910 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 NOW LEASING final units in the new Walnut on Highland building located at 121 S Highland in the revitalized East End neighborhood. Steps to Shadyside, Whole Foods and bus line. This property features unique floor plans, parking, gourmet granite kitchens, and energy efficient building materials. Limited spaces available. See full listing at www.walnutcapital. com or call 412-683-3810.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

1.800.586.0365


WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

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Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.14/08.21.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116

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GROWTH BUSINESS Margaret Schlass runs One Woman Farm by tending to local roots {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

IT’S A SCORCHER today, and the asphalt lot at the East Liberty Farmers Market isn’t making things any better. Under the canopy that shields her produce from the sun, Margaret Schlass bustles around her lettuce and kale, snap peas and Swiss chard. Her long brown hair flowing like an untamed river, she is meeting, greeting, schmoozing. “Thanks for coming,” Schlass says to a customer in a bluejean skirt and red plaid blouse. “Despite the heat.” The woman smiles, having bought regular beets instead of the conical variety — which, Margaret says, are more dense and a bit sweeter. “For really fresh produce,” the woman says, “it’s worth it.” It’s worth it for Schlass as well, which is why she trucks her farm-fresh produce from her fields in Gibsonia and Valencia every Monday. “I really like all the different people,” she says. “They come from all over the city for this market.”

Despite the operation’s name, though, she quickly found the work too much for just one woman to handle. She’s retained three full-time hands along with seasonal part-timers, even volunteers like her dad, who pulls counter shifts at the East Liberty market. If Schlass is not in the fields, she’s working elsewhere. Winter means the greenhouse, seeding peppers and onions. Early spring sees seeding broccoli and cabbage, spinach and beets. By May 1, she’s selling summer squash. In June, she was seeding winter squash and heirloom beets. This year, she also spent some time praying the rain would stop: Too much rain means the ground will remain too wet for fall planting. Summer brings harvesting and selling. After that, she’ll have to focus on maintenance, including making repairs to her half-dozen tractors, ages 35 to 68. They need a lot of coaxing, Schlass sighs, and more than a little love. Through it all is the tax of paying taxes, payroll, benefits — all

DO WE REALLY WANT ALL OUR FOOD COMING FROM CALIFORNIA? APPARENTLY NOT, AT LEAST NOT ON A STEAMY MONDAY IN EAST LIBERTY. Indeed they do, hundreds of them, a crowd as diverse as the city itself. Schlass seems to know them all, or at least the hundred she’ll admit to. And they seem drawn to Schlass for her own home-grown good cheer, as much as for whatever comes out of the ground. “My favorite shopper!” Schlass greets a slender woman in a straw sun hat, coming around her makeshift counter to give the woman a hug. This one prefers the candy-striped beets, and points to a positively glowing bunch of carrots. “There’s nothing like fresh carrots,” Schlass beams, and bags ’em up. In another life, the Pittsburgh native went south to Delaware, to study art history and anthropology. Traipsing off for her senior year in Peru, she discovered herself — not by dusting off old ruins, but through observing food planning and agriculture. “It was eyeopening,” she recalls. “I found I was very good at understanding the process.” She pauses. “It made me feel like myself.” Back in America, she started working on farms, first here, then on Long Island. Finally, she returned home, leasing farmland in the North Hills. She’s been operating One Woman Farm since ’08, producing 100-odd items every year: beets and cabbage, squash and zucchini, cukes and beans.

of which she handles herself. All told, running the One Woman Farms equals 12- to 14hour workdays. Despite the schedule, this is a nice business for Schlass, and scores of other farmers who grow and sell in Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio. But she’s in it for something more. Her produce is certified organic, meaning she uses only natural substances, including limestone, manure-based fertilizer, and such cover crops as oats, rye, buckwheat and legumes to enrich her fields. And as part of the Community Supported Agriculture network, she drops off weekly pre-paid baskets — each containing of six to 10 items — to 130 customers in Allison Park, Glenshaw, Squirrel Hill and Mount Lebanon. “By subscribing to CSA farms,” she says, “people are saying, ‘Yes, this is something we want in our community.’ They’re opting for food that is organic, fresh and local.” She pauses. “They’re saying, ‘Do we really want all our food coming from California?’” Apparently not, at least not on a steamy Monday in East Liberty. “I have such great admiration for you,” a woman in a gray Reizenstein Rams T-shirt says, holding aloft a bag of redskin potatoes. “You’re doing such a great thing.” Schlass smiles. “See you next week!” INF O @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

August 14, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 33

August 14, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 33