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So you’re born and raised in Detroit, huh? Yep. Born and raised. When most people think of Detroit, Eminem is the first rapper that comes to mind. Do you think Em has presented a good depiction of Detroit’s scene? There’s a whole other side of the tracks that I’m gonna bring. The street side, the hustlers. There’s a major hustle market right here. Our dudes and our women get money around here. I’m tryin’ to show you the realness. You know, the real shit they don’t want you to see. The stuff they sweep under the rug. What’s the sound of Detroit? Hmm. I’m gonna call it a Trick Trick sound. I got my own sound. I produced the majority of my album myself, so I truly bring my own sound. How did you get into production? I started out doing production. The first song I produced was called “Life of A Gangsta.” It was a real big record. I wasn’t deadlocked in producing. When I made this song, I knew what I wanted to hear so I wrote over it. And since I did it, it’s always been that way. This was back in 1991. I was in a group called GBK, and that’s what “Life of A Gangsta,” ended up being. It was me and a guy named Marc V. We put the album out, GBK’s Life of A Gangsta. Then Mark when to jail, he got sentenced to 15-20 for shooting at the police. So the group disbanded. Right. At that time I was by myself. I formed the Goon Squad. Then I went upstate. I was in the penitentiary for a year. I decided that I gotta find a way in this music, because I can’t come back. What was your charge? Was it related to your rap partner Mark’s charge? Possession with intent. Nah, he had got locked up like two years before I did. So that was a big transition time for you. Yeah, it was a big transition. 1995. I decided to get serious about this music. This is what I gotta do. I can’t do both, I have to make sacrifices. So you dropped a solo project? In 1995 my first big record was a gold single called “Booty Bounce.” When I got out of the joint, dance music was poppin’ off. Luke and 2 Live Crew, “Shake What Ya Mama Gave You,” that kinda stuff was real big. I had been on that gangsta shit, but it wasn’t flyin’ well with the public because dance music was all on the radio. “Too much booty in your pants,” all that shit. You gotta get in where you fit in. That’s the difference between being an artist and just being a rapper. Then I released another song called “Everywhere We Go We Deep.” That did real good. We did like 60,000 units of that. We hooked up with a distributor that moved the shit for us. The majors didn’t step to you after you’d sold that many albums independently? I had my run-ins with the majors here and there, but at the time I didn’t want no major deal. I really didn’t. 24

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Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition  

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition  

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition

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