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can you play a party?” I set it up for them to come see me play, but they never made it through so I was mad. I was like, “I’ll come to wherever you’re at.” I went to the club the station was doing at the time and got to do the last hour, after the live broadcast ended, and I killed it. They hired me right after that, and I’ve been at WJLB ever since. That was about five years ago.

DJ DON Q How did you get interested in DJing? I just love hip-hop. I got into DJing after seeing Jam Master Jay back in the days. I wanted to be just like him. I wanted to be the guy that controlled the party, the absolute center of attention. How did you get your first set of turntables? I saved up my money like crazy, doing little odd jobs and everything. I bought all the wrong stuff. I had no guidance; nobody told me what to buy so I used to go buy garbage belt-driven turntables. I kept trying to practice with them, though. When did you realize DJing was something you wanted to pursue as a career? About three years ago I decided to take it real seriously. I looked at all the DJs in the area, and I was like, “These guys aren’t really that good.” I realized I could just take over if I wanted to. At the time, rave parties were real big in Detroit. I entered a DJ battle, and a guy went up to the head of WJLB’s mixshow department Kim James and was like, “The guy that wins this battle is the one you should hire.” They were looking for somebody at the time. I wont he battle, and he was like, “Okay, you can battle, but can you make me a CD?” So I made him a tape and sent him the tape. He was like, “Okay, you can make a tape, but 

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What’s the hot spots to visit in Detroit for Super Bowl weekend? It’s gonna be so many parties. It’s hard to narrow it down. I’ll be doing a club I’ve been doing for the past five years, St. Andrews. On Friday nights it’s a good place to come in and have fun when you just wanna throw caution to the wind and act a fool. Everybody’s gonna be having a party, so just come up to Detroit and try to soak up as much culture as you can. Detroit is a different place, just the attitudes and the way we dress and the way we talk, everything is completely different. Detroit is so different. It was techno city for years, so we have a strong house and techno influence on everything. That’s just one part. Then you have your street guys, and some backpack-type rappers. It’s so many different styles here. Who are some of the hottest local groups in Detroit? Definitely Rock Bottom, they’re on a street vibe. The guys from the Street Lordz Chedda Boyz too. On the R&B side we’ve got cats like Ray Ray and a young lady named Melanie Rutherford. And you’ve always got Slum Village out there making noise for the underground hip-hop scene. Do you think Detroit is influenced more by the East, West, or South? Two years ago it was more East coast, but it seems like we have more of a West coast influence these last few years. It seems like guys have been trying to develop their own style these days. I wouldn’t categorize us as anything. You can tell that everybody’s experimenting and trying to find something that fits Detroit. Are you affiliated with any DJ crews? I’m affiliated with a lot of crews, like the Violator All-Star DJs, the Hittmenn DJs, and the Shadyville DJs. I like networking with other DJs and seeing what’s going on in their cities; learning different styles. I’m a turntablist, so I’m always trying to learn a new style from other DJs. I get to go learn something new and take it back to my hood. I’m constantly a student of the game. - Julia Beverly

Profile for Ozone Magazine Inc

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition  

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition  

Ozone Mag Super Bowl 2006 special edition

Profile for ozonemag
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