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Felony da God is from Lil Haiti and has a long history as a rapper. Throughout the years he’s collaborated with some of the biggest names in the game. Here he discusses how he became known, who he’s worked with, and how he got his name. When did you start making music? What attracted you to it? I started makin’ music at the age of 9. Me and my brothers used to beat on the big-sized canned goods. We used to make beats and I’d try to put words together. I discovered I could put ‘em together kinda nice and I could make words rhyme. That didn’t really make me a rapper, but that’s when I learned how to put words together. So when did you get serious about it? In the year 2000 I was into a lot of street activity. I had some pa’tnas that was like, “Yo, you used to bust rhymes in stuff in school, you could do something better with your life.” There were older dudes in the neighborhood that used to say the same thing. So I got a couple beats from my dude who was with Lost Tribe named Phats. He was trying to put me down with Rap-A-Lot, but Rap-a-Lot wanted to deal with me instead of him. It was just complicated so it didn’t go through. What happened after the Rap-A-Lot situation didn’t go down? I picked my swag back up in 2004 and I’ve been on ever since. That’s when I got with Danger Zone. You’ve worked with a lot of people. Tell us who all you’ve collaborated with? I think the first known name was Keith Sweat.

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After that I got with Birdman, Elephant Man, Field Mob, Wacko from UTP with Juvenile and Skip, and I got the song currently right now with JW. I have a few more but I can’t think of ‘em all right now. What are the names of your songs? I have “Don’t Snitch On Me,” and I have “Day Shift Night Shift” with JW. The video for that is coming soon. We using the Scarface theme. My follow up single, which I just sent out to test, is called “Copy Cat” that’s with Wacko and Young Breed from Triple Cs. What part of Miami are you from? I’m from southside Lil Haiti. What other rappers are from around there? Red Eyez kinda set it off, and the whole Zoe Pound movement. I gotta show respect to them ‘cause they was the first outta Lil Haiti to take it to that level and bring the industry to the hood. So tell us about the label you’re with. Danger Zone was really the beginning of the new me. Before I was just doing music, but when I got with Danger Zone, I learned the music business. They’re an indie label from Jamaica, matter of fact, they’ve got the artist Jah Cure right now. But they had just about every Jamaican artist signed to that label. They got a piggyback deal with Sobe. But right now I’m with Keep It 100 Records and I’m about to start my own thing. When you talk to your fans what do they say they like about you and your music? I call my music Hip Hop Soul Music. I feel like people take to it. When they see me they be like, “Man, I really felt that song.” I don’t just talk about the streets or glorify the streets. I’m wellrounded. I give you the good side and the bad side. I talk about days when I have money, and I talk about days when I’m flat broke. I think

Profile for Ozone Magazine Inc

Memorial Day 2010 special edition side A - Brisco cover  

Memorial Day 2010 special edition

Memorial Day 2010 special edition side A - Brisco cover  

Memorial Day 2010 special edition

Profile for ozonemag
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