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Fat Joe was in Atlanta shooting for the Mo’Nique Show and OZONE caught up with him before he headed out to the Hawks vs Bucks game that night. He told us about his new album The Darkside, COMING JUNE 29th, and the meaning behind the title. In the interview we talked about being pigeonholed as an artist, satisfying fans, his relationship with DJ Khaled and why he didn’t buy Kanye West’s 808 and Heartbreak album. Why did you decide to name your album The Darkside? I started out in the game as an underground rapper diggin’ in the crates. If you go back and interview somebody who was a Fat Joe fan of his first 4 albums, they would probably tell you they never thought he would make a “What’s Luv” or “Make It Rain,” or nothing like that – he was just real, hardcore, underground Hip Hop. Coming from there I got a lot of real fans throughout the years so that no matter where I go, a lot of the same fans come to the shows. They just kept saying, “Yo Joe, you gotta take it back to day one, you gotta take it to The Darkside – that’s the Fat Joe I love – the hardcore Fat Joe.” So, too many real fans that I know supported me and love me kept askin’ for it so I said I’ma take it there. Once I called it The Darkside I knew I had to fulfill it. The first single is called “Slow Down Son You Killin ‘Em” featuring Young Jeezy. The video [just dropped]; it’s crazy. I’ve got producers like DJ Premier, Buck Wild, Street Runner, Infamous, Scoop Deville, Just Blaze, and Cool & Dre. Cool & Dre have basically been there the whole project. After the last album, to keep it 100, they didn’t really like the vibe of the last album. You mentioned the fans. Were they supportive? Were they asking from a place of love, or from a place of anger? They were asking from a place of love, and also, they loved that Joe Crack, that hardcore Fat Joe gangsta nigga. On the last album I put together a bunch of hit-sounding records, and they didn’t approve, so I had to give the fans what they want. Do you regret the last few albums with that sound? I don’t think so. I don’t regret the last few albums at all. I mean, we had major success and I love making all kinds of music, but realistically, it’s almost like I’m pigeonholed. People know me one way, as Fat Joe, the realest gangster rapper, and they’re like, “Yo, we don’t want you to do that nice guy shit. We don’t want you to

pull off a Kanye West – you’re Fat Joe, we want you to kill people and sell drugs in your music.” So that’s a natural thing for me, as a hustler, so I stepped up to the plate. How does it feel to do that and live to tell about it? A lot of cats will do that and fall by the wayside and never get to redeem themselves. I really don’t know, man. I love Hip Hop music, and there’s really nothing I can’t do musicwise. Musically, I’m in the studio so much I know how to make all types of music. I can make you a dirty South smash hit right now. I could make you a New York banger to the highest level, a West Coast song, a girl song, whatever, I can do it all. Do you think people nowadays appreciate that versatility? Or do you think they always try to pigeonhole their favorite rapper? I think they pigeonhole their favorite artist. I’m guilty of that too. My favorite artist is Kanye West and when he did the singing album I purposely didn’t buy it. I was like, “I’m protesting. I ain’t with this shit.” People were saying DJ Khaled came up under Fat Joe, and they wanna know if you guys still have a working relationship? I passed him the baton and let him go. What we do is try to help our brothers grow. He took it from there, he’s growing, he got the We the Best thing and he’s doing his thing. We’re proud of him and want him to do well. That’s how it is. There’s a lot of people given opportunities – some people take it and go all the way with it and try to create history, and some people are passive and don’t wanna work as hard. They take the same opportunities, sit on their ass and don’t do anything. Khaled was a go-getter, and he did what he had to do. With your company and label Terror Squad, what’s the status of it right now? We got T.A., a young cat outta the Bronx. We got OZ outta Miami. We got a girl Shanice outta Miami, an R&B chick, she’s gonna be the biggest chick in the game. We’re just workin’, man. //

OZONE MAG // A-23 B-23

Profile for Ozone Magazine Inc

Memorial Day 2010 special edition side A - Brisco cover  

Memorial Day 2010 special edition

Memorial Day 2010 special edition side A - Brisco cover  

Memorial Day 2010 special edition

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