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STIC.MAN THE BOTTLE

WORDS BY MAURICE G. GARLAND PHOTO BY CATHERINE WESTERGAARD

…I can’t call it, I just threw up in the toilet // And all my life I said I wasn’t gonna be no alcoholic // I’m flailing son, trying to stay sober // But the alcohol be calling son like a ghost // So let’s make a toast to my liver and my kidneys // Pour out a little Henny here’s to Gout in your twenties // Not many niggas make it to 30, we ride dirty // Breath stinking, already drinking, bright and early // I done hurled off Smirnoff, Gin and 8ball // Passed out on the bathroom floor with my clothes off // Remember them Mickies? Tall can’t fit in they dickies? // Before they put them cameras up in the corner store // We used to be so much fun when we was young // Tryin to holler at something smellin’ like 151 // Gettin’ thrown out the club all buzzed I’m bout to get the gun, dawg // But I ain’t even know where I was // My nigga M had to carry me home many a day // It was Heineken, Becks, E&J, and Andre // They say alcoholism is in my DNA // Cause my pops liked to get fucked up the same way… M-1, taken from “Fucked Up” on RBG: Revolutionary But Gangsta

C

I got here. My moms had a son and a daughter before she got with my pops. When he came out of the Air Force, since they grew up together, they got married and then I popped out in 1974. I used to smell the urb. I’d see my pops in a real serious, bad-ass mood all the time unless he was fucked up. When he was fucked up you could see it in his eyes. He’d be smiling and playing around with you and shit. But when he gotta go to work, he’d just be the worst. Basically, I didn’t want to do no kind of drugs, because I could see him and my uncles going through that. But even though my pops did all kinds of drugs, he still went to work and made me feel like we had a stable home. It just wasn’t a happy home. My older brother started going in my pops’ room and sneaking his pills. Him and my pops had a lot of friction, then my brother started getting fucked up and smoking cigarettes. Usually, alcoholism is something that is inherited. You spoke on that in the song One day when my brother was about 15 he didn’t come home when he was sup“Fucked Up.” Tell us what your childhood was like? posed to, and my pops kicked him out the house. We wound up all getting in a I don’t think my shit was no different from millions of other people. I grew up in fight; my brother and pops fistfighting and shit. Long story short, he got kicked the South, right outside of Tallahassee, Florida. My pops was an Air Force vet. He out for good. This was in the early 80s and you know what hit us in the early 80s, served in Vietnam. He had a hard life, his father was a real hard disciplinarian. I don’t want to say “abusive,” but just hard and disciplined. So, with him coming up that crack cocaine. My brother stayed with my grandma, basically on his own. He like that, as far as you seeing stuff like the Cosby show, where Theo gets hugs and started hustling, messing with chicks who wanted to boonk out. He got hooked on that shit and to this day he is hooked on that shit. He’s about 40 years old now. all this good shit, you ain’t getting none of that. My grandfather was real hardcore. My pops told me one time that when he went to the Air Force, he started Usually, seeing behavior like that makes kids want to stay away from it. getting into drugs and trying different things. He was already raised with a lack When I saw that, I said, “I ain’t never doing none of that.” I wouldn’t even drink of affection, and when he got in the military he got extra cold. He came back to a beer. But then my moms and pops eventually got divorced, so I was the man of a world that was anti-black folks. My pops was already the type of person that the house. I had mad stress on my brain, I wasn’t really fucking with school. I was will do what he want to do. So just to deal with things my pops wanted to get his mind off of life. He told me he did pills, coke, everything and that was before going through a lot of drama. I was with my homies and cousins and they’d be asual listeners of dead prez would assume that these musical freedom fighters came up living the “conscious” lifestyle that they rap about from the time they left the womb. But you should know that no true wisdom comes without some sense of struggle. Before DPZ was able to record self-awareness songs like “Be Healthy,” group member stic.man had to battle one of the most destructive diseases in our society: Alcoholism. In a rare interview, stic.man opens up about growing up in a household severely affected by drug and alcoholuse, catching Gout in his early twenties, and what he did to not only eliminate his sickness, but live a healthier lifestyle.

82 // OZONE MAG

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Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008  

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008  

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008

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