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thedjbooth

djSCREAM Words by Randy Roper

What other mixtape series to you have? So Seductive R&B. I got a radio joint, Hood Rich Radio. Hood Rich Radio helps promotes my XM radio show that I have on XM 66 Raw. That’s mainly it. I had Only The Crunk Survive. That was my first series, I retired that when the whole crunk movement kinda simmered down. Why do you think the crunk scene died down? What do you think happened to the crunk music? I mean, a lot of stuff that comes out in Atlanta is real trendy. Then when it crosses over, so to speak, then it plays out. The biggest that happened to the whole crunk era, Lil’ Jon took it to a whole nother plateau, You got people in Germany, Europe, Japan using this world “crunk.” So, when its just right here at home base, then its cool, we crunk. Just like the trap thing right now. But when it goes so far and the suburban kids get a hold on it and the international kids get a hold of it, it’s their fad for that summer or that spring. Just like snap music, you saw how it came and went. And that’s how the rock star thing came and went. When it blows up, it’s just because it’s the thing that’s in but when it’s out of style, you gotta move to something new. I mean, Crunk was around a long time before it got played, per say. I wouldn’t say crunk is got but I’d say the word is played out. But I as far as crunk music, you go to Atlanta, go to the club, you still see people being crunk. There’s still crunk music. With so many DJs out there what do you think you did that put you ahead of the game? I work harder and I strive to be different. In everything, production, DJing, rapping, everybody is trying to be the next person. If you strive to be original, innovative, bring something new to the game. As a DJ and if you break artists, then other people will recognize that. It ain’t really no rocket science, you just gotta bring a style to the game and that’s what a lot of people don’t understand. So what did you bring to the game? Definitely artists, I had a lot to do with bringing in some of those BME artists. Crime Mob, helping out Trillville and the whole D4L situation, the Shawty Lo situation, I get a lot of credit for breaking those acts first. It’s just the way I put my tapes together, it’s a little different from everybody else. When I do my parties, or radio shows, it’s different from everybody else’s radio show. My parties are different. I strive to be different. Of course there is different boundaries you have to stay in, with every game. I just try to take it to next level. Can you explain Shawty Lo’s movement from your perspective, being the DJ that helped break him and D4L? Lo, if you crack open one of the older OZONEs, they asked me who I thought was next, I had him at #1. He got the swag, his personality is good, a lot of people fuck with him. He’s like the next nigga, he’s here now. He got three or four hits under his belt, an album out that’s doing good, a damn near classic album in my opinion. This album and these singles are really just the beginning of his career. He has long way to go as far as what he can achieve and what he is going to achieve. Hood Rich Radio on XM, how is that show going for you? It’s going great, man, I gotta show every Thursday 11:30am est. on XM radio. Hood Rich Radio, that is where you can hear exclusives, freestyles even before you can hear it on my tapes. You know, it’s mostly Southern based but play some East Coast and some West Coast music. Just the best street music out there. It’s an experienced if you don’t have it already.

H

e helped break Crime Mob, Trillville, D4L and Shawty Lo, and now Atlanta native DJ Scream is one of the top mixtape DJs in the South. His mixtapes, both in name and quantity, are heavy in the streets and he’s is poised to become the next DJ that’s a household name. Move over Khaled. You’re heavy on the mixtape scene. What’s the mixtape series that you’re most known for? Heavy In The Streets. [I’m] on Volume 13 and that’s groundbreaking for a lot of artists. If you picked up one you know what is. The regular Heavy In The Streets showcases a lot of exclusives, freestyles and artists. While the Heavy In The Streets artists mixtapes are like street albums for the people, it’s a brand that I created. 80 // OZONE MAG

So, what’s next for you? Scream: Picking up some marketing, some more projects [for Hood Rich Entertainment]. We got credit for the marketing of the Shawty Lo project. That was the first one we visibly got credit for. We’ve been doing it for a long time. So we just looking for the next acts, that’s going to be successful. Continue the whole Hood Rich Radio thing, make that show bigger. I’m still making mixtapes like everyday, every week, that ain’t gonna change. Keeping it moving, working, and trying to get on the cover of that OZONE, man. You were nomination for Mixtape DJ of the Year in last year’s OZONE Awards. How did you feel when you received that nomination? Big up to OZONE for their nomination. They’re coming around again this year. Competitive field, I’m going for the crown this year. I don’t pay attention too many awards and nominations. A lot of times people will tell me I’m nominated for this or that, and it really don’t mean too much. That nomination meant more cause I felt like somebody was watching what I was doing. Last year, outside of this year, was my hardest working year, especially on the mixtape scene. It felt good, man. This year I’m going back in and hopefully I’ll get that crown. //

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008  

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008  

Ozone Mag #65 - Mar 2008

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