Page 34

think you’ll ever run for office? It’s funny you ask that, because a good friend of mine in the music industry is trying to prep me to become the governor of Mississippi. He says that constantly. I don’t like the word “politician.” To me, a politician is a person who has an ulterior motive. Originally, a person who ran for office was supposed to be a regular person from the community who cared about the people. Today’s politicians only use politics to position themselves for other things – real estate, finances, war, power, or influence. Me, I love people. I love being around people and I’m not afraid to speak to people. It’s funny because in America today, with the exception of some parts of the South, people don’t even speak to each other. People would rather fight you than greet you. That’s not how I was raised. I love people and enjoy people. I love my fans and I love people who want to be around me. So, if God puts me in a position that fits for me to run for office, then that’s what I’ll do. When I ran for SGA president at Southern [University], it wasn’t because I had a motive. It was just the

position that the students at Southern were in at the time. It was bad. I’d always hear people say, “If somebody real ran for office, I’d vote for them and I’d be involved.” It was real pitiful around campus. I ran because of the state we were in at the time, not really because it was something I wanted to do. If you did decide to run for governor of Mississippi, don’t you think you’d have a lot of detractors who’d criticize your lyrics? I don’t worry about them. That’s the problem with a lot of politicians. Nobody’s perfect. You need somebody regular in office, who’s made mistakes, who can understand the plight of the common man. If you haven’t went through anything, how can you understand the average person? That’s the problem with America. You’ve got all these people who were born to be politicians. They don’t know nothing about real life and real people, therefore, they can’t adjust or cater to real people. They’re fake. They’re artificial people. You and Lil Flip had planned to do an album together, but that never happened, and he isn’t featured on your new album. Did the T.I. vs. Lil Flip situation cause problems for you since you’re friends with both of them? Nah. Me and Flip had a song together for this album, but we’d sampled the Eurythmics and the sample didn’t clear. When T.I. and Lil Flip had beef, they both were very understanding about the relationship that I had with each of them. Wasn’t Chaka Zulu managing you for a short time? Me and Chaka are still the best of friends. He just had so much on his plate, and didn’t want to compromise the friendship that we had. With me being as serious about my career as I can be at times, he just had too much going on. There was a rumor that you dissed Kanye West. That’s not true. One of the things I hate about rap is that it’s turning into the WWF. Everybody’s looking for beef and drama. I’m so sick of people talking about ‘Pac and Biggie and how much they cared about them, but they still perpetuate violence between rappers. A DJ brought me

“TO BE IMMORTALIZED IN HISTORY MEANS MORE TO ME THAN MONEY DOES. NOBODY CAN ‘X’ ME OUT OF HISTORY.” A34

OZONE AUGUST 2005

a beat he wanted me to rap over, [Kanye West’s] “Diamonds Are Forever,” and I did the song the way I woulda done it if it was my song. People turned that into a diss. You’ve always been very accessible to people in the industry. Why did you recently change your phone number? Somebody put my phone number on the internet and told people to call me if they wanted a deal. A thousand people called me and it was just overwhelming. Somebody called me and growled, “David Banner, you the realest nigga evaaaaaaahhhhh!” and hung up. I was like, wow, it’s time to change my number. When it comes time to narrow down the songs that are going to make it on your album, how do you choose? For Certified, I tried to put nothing but hits on there. Every song on there could be a single, I think. I just tried to stop being personal about it. I let people hear it. I called a lot of DJs and got their opinions. People wondered why you named your song “Cadillac on 22’s” and it wasn’t really about a Cadillac on 22’s. It actually did have to do with Cadillac on 22’s. People don’t wanna think about it. It was a message to God. I was basically saying that I want to do what’s right, but it’s hard when you’re trying to reach kids who come from nothing. They see the hustlers with Cadillacs on 22’s. It’s hard to get their attention and talk about something positive that may not materialize right now. They can see that Cadillac on 22’s; they can touch it. They’ve watered down rap so much that there’s no imagination no more. People don’t dig deeper into the songs. Like I said in a freestyle, “Cadillac on 22’s, that was cool / But y’all would rather see a nigga act a muthafuckin’ fool.” Record companies don’t want people to think. You don’t talk about death as much as you used to. I try to be a little brighter now. I went back and listened to my last two albums and it was so fuckin’ morbid and depressing. I don’t want to feel like that no more. A friend of mine was like, “Dawg, you not struggling no more. Smile, be happy. Your

Ozone Mag #37 - Aug 2005  

Ozone Mag #37 - Aug 2005

Ozone Mag #37 - Aug 2005  

Ozone Mag #37 - Aug 2005

Advertisement