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Slim Goodye’s attention-grabbing 16 bars are fast becoming a mixt ape favorite in the Central Flori Whether it’s his effortless flow or da area. wicked punchlines (“I gave more chicks nuts than a flight attendan actin’ like a hoe or somethin’ and t,” “She I’m lovin’ it / How you wifey and don’t even know my government?” grab your attention, one thing is ) that sure - he’s got potential. Born in the Bronx, Slim was once a basketba at the University of Missouri. Rath ll star er than pursuing a career as a prof essional athlete, Slim moved dow Orlando “for the weather” and settled into the street life. He’d n to always known he had a knack for but never taken it seriously. “The rapping, n I started seeing all these garb age rappers coming out,” he laug they getting paid to rap, I can get hs. “If paid to rap!” Judging from his lyric s, he’s already getting paid, as tales “peanut-butter Porsches” roll off his tongue. Fact or ficton? “I’ve of got one song called ‘True Fantasy,’ explains. “It’s gonna happen; I alrea ” Slim dy see it happening in front of my aren’t enough to secure fame and face.” These days, killer punchline fortune, but Slim’s confident in s his skills as an all-around rapper. lines are my strong point, but it’s “Punchnothing for me to put together a song easy. I could go in the studio and ,” he says. “It’s a talent for me; it’s make a song in 25 minutes, hook and everything.” His first mixtape, Goodye: Da Young Mobsta, is alrea Slim dy earning him rave reviews. In it, he boldly rhymes over Slim Thug a Boss,” proclaiming, “I’m the real ’s “LIke muthafuckin’ boss.” Only time will someone you’d want to battle lyric tell, Slim Goodye doesn’t sound like ally (contact info: Malik @ 407227Beverly, jb@ozonemag.com 8460). - Photo and words by Julia

chances are you’ve heard Maceo’s infectious If you’ve tuned into any Atlanta radio station in the past month, that’s been turned into a hit song by a saying everyday another club single “Go Sit Down” repeatedly. It’s yet gone through about three or four difhad we and crunk Atlanta artist. “Our producer Jamon made the beat, used to always say ‘Hoe, sit down’ brother younger My them. of any feeling weren’t really and ferent hooks the hook,” Maceo explains. Maceo being up ended that so e, downtim our during while we were fuckin’ around surrounding areas. He compares the and Atlanta in noise of and his entire QuickFlip clique are making plenty to point out that they aren’t quick is and Money, their “damn good chemistry” to the sounds of vintage Cash in the streets right now to prove s mixtape two got He’s Down.” “Sit like anthems crunk limited to creating Maceo is preparing his full-length album his versatility. While creating a buzz with radio and mixtape play, jammin’-ass music from this album,” some expect can “You Straight Out the Pot to be released this summer. to the street life, he says confidently. He plans to follow-up “Sit Down” with an ode in Atlanta] right “For My Hustla’s.” “Man, it feels good [to have the hottest record ul. I just successf be to things right the doing I’m that now. It just lets me know will continue. gotta work harder than what I did to get to this point, and the success your music, you’ll As long as you stay down with the people that support you and out. – Wally figured game the got already Maceo’s like Sounds says. be fine,” he Sparks/JB (Photo: JB)

Paying industry dues can make or break an artist. Fortunately for J Records’ recording artist Smitty, paying his dues gave him strength and determination. Many people would be surprised to learn that Smitty is a wellknown artist within the industry, having ghostwritten for the likes of Dr. Dre and Truth Hurts. Even P. Diddy’s verse on Nelly’s “Shake Ya Tailfeather” was written by Miami’s “Little Haiti” champion lyricist. “I never wanted to rush into the game as a starving artist with my hand out, begging, ” explains Smitty. “When people have to pay you, they always question your worth. The fact that I played a key role in such successful projects adds instant credibility. Now, people know I have something to offer - I can make them money!” This must be true, since his debut album Definition of a N.I.G.G.A. is loaded with big money production. Jazze Pha, Kanye West, and Swizz Beatz are all contributors, and Mannie Fresh produced his current street single, “One Time.” The single is in heavy rotation on underground radio and mixtapes throughout the South, and Smitty plans to come back with a radio-friendly joint, the Swizz Beatz-produced “Diamonds on My Neck.” Smitty takes pride in his versatility. Artists like Jamie Foxx, Lord Finesse, and Scarface can all vouch for his skills. “Different producers and artists love working with me becuase they know I understand the concept of making a song,” Smitty theorizes. “My experience in songwriting gives me that edge.” The muscle of a major label seems to be the last piece of the puzzle for Smitty, who’s poised to take the industry by storm. - Leaton Reid, koalintl@gmail.com (Photo: JB)

Profile for Ozone Magazine Inc

Ozone Mag #33 - Apr 2005  

Ozone Mag #33 - Apr 2005

Ozone Mag #33 - Apr 2005  

Ozone Mag #33 - Apr 2005

Profile for ozonemag
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