Page 1

Growing Concern

The

O CTO B ER 2 0 1 8

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Annual Meeting

Nov. 15, 2018 / St. Michael’s Woodside

PAGE 7

Dormant Pruning Clinic

Nov. 27, 2018 / Willoway Nurseries – Avon, OH Nov. 29, 2018 / Premier Plant Solutions – Hillard, OH

PAGE 21


Botson Insurance is the RIGHT CHOICE for Landscapers Insurance.

PROVIDING MORE SAVINGS AND BETTER COVERAGE! knows insurance for “ Greg Design-Build contractors. He has helped me for over 8 years. He gave me much better coverage to protect my equipment and trucks and saved me over 22%. I value our relationship. Bob Oster Green Source, LLC

Standard Policy

No No

COVERED RISK

Botson Policy

Replace a lawn that you sprayed with the wrong Pesticides.

Yes

Rebuild a faulty patio/retaining wall your employees built.

Yes

Replace your Large Equipment after a fire or theft with NEW!

Yes

(ODA Compliance coverage)

(Errors and Omissions Coverage)

No

(Replacement Cost on Equipment)

No No

Put MONEY back in your pocket!

(Average 22.5% savings)

Rebate check for average 7% for favorable claims experience.

Yes Yes

Greg Botson, CIC President 36480 Detroit Rd Avon, OH 44011

botsoninsurancegroup.com • (440) 537-2292


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

IT’S TIME TO MAKE IT PERSONAL As usual, September was hot and dry, then cool and wet. While last month I may have been holding onto every last ounce of summer, I am now ready for fall. For those of us in the nursery industry, this means the beginning of digging and shipping season – one of the craziest seasons we have. Not only are we trying to handle fall planting, we are also working through the marketing of plant material for winter trade shows – and, believe it or not – planning for spring. If you were to ask me what my favorite part of my career is, it would be said without hesitation that giving our customers the nursery tour and explaining the how, what and when of what we do and why we do it tops my list. Not only does it give our customers a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to get materials into their hands, but it gives me a chance to learn about their businesses, allowing for a better working relationship to be formed.

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

completion dates been effected,” and “How is your company surviving,” or “Have you had to lay many people off, or turn away much work?” Truth be told, until now I’ve tried to avoid writing about the labor shortage, because the news has not been good. That said, there may be a silver lining on the horizon – and while it may be a small one – it’s an impressive one. But, it also adds another question to my arsenal…

If you’ve been on the tour, then you know that I come prepared with a set list of questions. I ask these questions because it not only gives me the opportunity to understand your business better, but also helps me recognize whether we’re both open to learning and sharing with each other, which in the end, helps us form a long-term working relationship. Personally, I’ve always felt anyone can take an order, but taking a company from the status of a ‘prospect’ to a ‘customer for life’ is a real accomplishment.

In past issues of The Growing Concern, as well as associationwide emails, Sandy has discussed the efforts of some of our members to raise money for local politicians who can help us fight for H-2B reform. Most recently, in her September Directions column, she also let you know about the program that was initiated to raise money to attend the Ohio GOP State Dinner, held in Columbus, where our industry was afforded the opportunity to sit at the table with President Trump.

That said, up until this year, my list of questions has not varied much. My focus has always been on my customers’ plant knowledge, their operations and their personal life – because knowing a person (not just their business) is essential. So, what’s changed? You guessed it – labor. Where I was once asking fairly-easy-to-answer questions, I’m now asking the not-so-comfortable ones, like: “How have your

What might have been somewhat understated, though, is that these members have literally been making the fight personal; using monies from their own wallets – not their businesses – to make sure ALL OF OUR VOICES are heard, NOT just theirs. All-in-all, 33 individuals donated over $75,000 of their personal money, so that 22 of our members could attend the GOP dinner, 3 of which got to speak with the President face-to-face. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards merit award winner, J. Barker Landscaping, for their entry in the category of Residential Installation.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN It’s Time to Make it Personal

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS Fall Blooming Asters

12 FISCAL FITNESS Saving For College

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE

The No-Pressure Approach to Air Compressor Safety

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Thuja Occidentalis: Eastern Arborvitae

27 FEATURE ARTICLE

When the Competition is Trying to Poach Your Top Employee

30 DIRECTIONS 5 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 31 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OTHER GR EEN INDUS TR Y E V E N T S

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER cont...

TEST DATES & DEADLINES

OCTOBER 2, 2018 PLANT HEALTHCARE DAY

NOVEMBER 29, 2018 DORMANT PRUNING / CENTRAL OHIO

OCT. 2, 2018

This full-day workshop combines all aspects of Plant Health Care (PHC) for both technicians and managers, with live demonstrations of PHC techniques – services based on the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and proactive tree care management. Held on the grounds of Holden Arboretum.

OCTOBER 4, 2018 ONLPAC FUNDRAISER: CLAY SHOOT Enjoy a day with friends and get to know your fellow colleagues in the green industry while raising money for the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Political Action Committee. The afternoon includes a 16-station clay shoot course, dinner and raffle prizes.

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 15, 2018 OLA ANNUAL MEETING (NE OHIO) Tom Wasinski, CEO of Aerial Agents, LLC – a professional aerial photography and videography company – will discuss and demonstrate the ways that drone services can enhance your portfolios to help you do a better job of telling the stories of your work. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. See page 7.

NOVEMBER 27, 2018 DORMANT PRUNING / NE OHIO Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio. See page 21.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Premier Plant Solutions in Hilliard, Ohio. See page 21.

DECEMBER

WRITTEN TEST 9:00am @ Ohio State ATI 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

OCT. 9, 2018

WRITTEN TEST 9:00am @ OLA Offices 9240 Broadview Road, Broadview Hts., OH 44147

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

DECEMBER 6, 2018 BE MORE THAN A SALESPERSON: BECOME A TRUSTED ADVISOR

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

Marvin Montgomery, better known as the “Sales Doctor,” will conduct a one day sales training course that will provide participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term client relationships. Held at Indiana Wesleyan University, Independence, OH. Register online, or call the OLA offices. See page 26.

REGULAR MEMBER:

DECEMBER 14, 2018 LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINE Don’t miss the opportunity to become an award winning landscape contractor. Entries for the 2018 program are due in the OLA office by 5pm on Dec. 14. For rules, regulations and entry information go to ohiolandscapers.org. landscapeohioawards.html. Questions? Contact OLA at 1-800-335-6521. See outside, back cover.

J.F. Krizman Landscaping 2324 Dock Road Madison, OH 44057 440-428-7779 Joseph Krizman

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Greenes Fence PO Box 22258 Beachwood, OH 44122 216-258-4214 Larry Greenes Ready Field Solutions 1240 Ethan Avenue Streetsboro, OH 44241 330-562-0550 Kelly Kall

AFFILIATE MEMBER(S) Chris Donohue Sandy Valley Local Schools 5362 State Rt. 183 NE Magnolia, OH 44643 330-866-9371 The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3 So, how do these fundraisers and my tour-guide questions tie together? It’s pretty simple really. The last question of my ‘tour interrogation’ is this; “Are you a ‘wait and watch’ company, or have you joined the fight?” While I may not state it so blatantly on the tour, really, I want to know how YOU are getting involved in securing our future workforce. While there are other opportunities to contribute financially – such as pledging personal money to the upcoming PAC Clay Shoot fundraiser – getting involved doesn’t always have to be financial commitment.

their parents. At this age, parents are still the biggest influencer shaping their child’s future. Then, talk with counselors and science teachers at both high schools and vocational schools. Let them know that this is no longer just ‘a job.’ It’s a profession that has a ton to offer. And finally, don’t forget the collegiate level where these students have already decided to be part of our industry. Keep them engaged. Other places to get involved include youth groups like the Scouts, 4H, FFA. Invite them to your business, sponsor a meeting, or be a guest speaker.

The first, and probably most significant, way you can help is by telling your story! The more you share your story the more the public will understand what challenges we face as an industry. Keep it positive, make sure you’re informed, stick to the facts and talk to anyone who will listen! The OLA has online resources to help you search for your representative and is more than happy to supply sample letters to help you get started. Even if you have enough labor today, contact your representatives on behalf of your industry. Look at the bigger picture, because it could be you tomorrow.

We as a profession have so much to offer, but we also tend to stay to ourselves. Those days end today! This is not the time to sit back and wait. This is the time to make the fight personal.

Another way to get involved is with youth! Go to preschools, elementary schools and middle schools to talk with the kids and

• • • • • • • • •

In the 80’s, President Reagan foreshadowed that our country would turn into a service driven workforce and now we are living it. Don’t leave your service driven company’s future in other hands, join the fight and be a voice! Fall planting is upon us! Enjoy the colors this season presents, we know what is on its way… As always, Marie

Flagstone (40+ choices) Wallstone (30+ choices) Outcroppings Boulder & Chunks Step Treads (Sawn/Stepped/Irregular) Travertine Natural Veneer Stone (Thin & Full Bed) Barn Stone Decorative Gravel (20+ choices)

QUARRY DIRECT PRICES AVAILABLE JOBSITE MOFFETT DELIVERY UNMATCHED PRODUCT SELECTION ADDRESS: 9718 AVON LAKE RD, LODI, OH 44254 PHONE: (330) 948-1006 EMAIL: DOUG.FRANKBROS@GMAIL.COM

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA MEETINGS SERIES

EVENT INFORMATION

DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 15, 2018 ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM OLA ANNUAL MEETING 7:00 PM TO 7:30 PM PROGRAM 7:30 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND MEMBERS: NO CHARGE NON MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY NOVEMBER 8, 2018

OLA ANNUAL MEETING

Drones & the Landscaping Industry In late 2014, Green Scene Landscaping & Pools, a Los Angeles-based design and construction firm specializing in high-end landscapes, announced that it had begun using a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with a high-resolution camera to capture aerial landscape images. Fast forward to 2018 and videography for promotional purposes seems to be the fastest-growing use for small unmanned aircraft in the landscape industry. Small landscape, tree care or irrigation businesses typically hire an FAA-certified company specializing in professional aerial photography on a project-by-project basis. There are good reasons for doing so, liability being a big one since these professionals typically have property and casualty insurance. Join us at our Annual Meeting on November 15th, as Tom Wasinski, CEO of Aerial Agents, – Northeast Ohio’s premier professional, experienced aerial photography and videography company – discusses the rules for flying drones commercially, barriers to entry for flying drones, recommended drones & technology, and more.

GUEST SPEAKER

TOM WASINSKI, CEO OF AERIAL AGENTS, LLC Tom has been a remote pilot for over 5 years, and is commercially licensed through the

SPONSORED BY

EMERALD SPONSORS

FAA to fly for clients’ business purposes. Mr. Wasinski has flown for over 10,000 hours; he has a keen eye for capturing inspiring still images and exciting video; and he and his team make the magic happen using the latest editing software in the Aerial Agents media production studio. Previously, Tom worked in the automotive industry to deliver photo and video services to dealerships all over the United States. He has trained other drone pilots, is considered an expert in aerial imaging, and has served as a member on the advisory board for US Congresswoman Marcia Fudge, who has put together an innovative program to increase awareness, education and utilization of science, technology, recreation, engineering, arts, and mathematics fields in our region.

Aerial Agents prides themselves on offering courteous, professional, and affordable services, while providing clients with outstanding aerial view opportunities. Their services are designed to provide clients with captivating aerial imagery that captures inspiration.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR THIS YEAR’S MEETING SCHEDULE ARE NOW AVAILABLE. CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 1.5 CEU’S

Take this opportunity to learn from one of the best as to how drone services can enhance your portfolios to help you do a better job of telling the stories of your work.

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/NOVEMBER


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Aster novae-angliae ‘September Ruby.”

FALL BLOOMING ASTERS Twenty years ago, Asters were easy. There were several different species and cultivars. Since then, the taxonomists have been working hard to confuse us. Now, instead of one genus, we have many. The genus Aster now seems to be used exclusively for Eurasian species while our native Asters have been divided into several other genii: Symphyotrichum, Eurybia, Doellingeria, and Ionactis, just to mention a few. If we’re confused, pity the home gardener. The perennial Aster, with its many choices of color and height, should be a prominent feature in every fall garden even though many have often been considered merely as roadside weeds. Years of hybridizing, however, have created many cultivars that should be welcome in any garden. Asters should also be considered for home cutting gardens; they are specifically raised in greenhouses for the florist trade. Aster species are not picky about soil but they must have full sun and adequate moisture to keep reblooming. Some Aster species bloom in summer rather than fall but they all have flowers with a daisy-like appearance and alternate leaves.

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Aster cordifolius / Symphyotrichum cordifolium (Heart-Leaf Aster) is not well known but I have found it to be a very tough plant. Mine is sited in one of those “Oh, no” sites – waterlogged in spring and like cement in summer, as well as only getting water when Mother Nature sees fit. Hundreds of small, pale blue flowers, on five to six foot slender but strong stems, greet the eye in September. The foliage is heartshaped at the base but lanceolate on the stems. This Aster is excellent for flower arranging. ‘Little Carlow’ is a shorter cultivar, topping out at 2 feet, making it more usable in the perennial garden. continued on page 10


w o r G o t d e t o Ro AVON BROADVIEW HILLIARD


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

2

3

4 1. One of my back beds comes into its own in September when the dark-purple Aster novae-angliae ‘Hella Lacy’ and the blue Aster oblongifolius ‘October Skies’ vie with the pinks of Anemone japonica and Rosa Oso Easy ‘Happy Smoothie’ as well the yellow Solidago. 2. Aster cordifolius as part of a shrub border.

5

3. A closeup of the flowers of Aster divaricatus. 4. Aster novae-angliae ‘September Ruby’, Eupatorium purpureum and Cimicifuga (Actaea) racemosa combine to create a striking combination in one of the island beds at Bressingham. 5. This Aster, ‘Vibrant Dome’ has been close to my heart since it suddenly appeared and graced my garden in 1996.

1

6

6. A closeup of the flowers of Aster tataricus ‘Jin Dai’.

continued from page 8 Another little-known species is Aster oblongifolius/ Symphyotrichum oblongifolium (Aromatic Aster). This one tends to grow 2 to 3 feet high on stiff, hairy stems. The flowers, as one might expect, are lavender with yellow centers. The leaves are fragrant when crushed, thus the common name. It is a very useful perennial for pollinator gardens. I’ve grown ‘October Skies’ in my back garden and ‘Raydon’s Favorite’ in my front garden for several years but find that I need to cut ‘October Skies’ in half in June to keep it from being too tall since it is at the front of that bed. One of my favorites is Aster divaricatus/Eurybia divaricatus (White Wood Aster). This Aster is incredibly adaptable, willing and able to grow in sun or part shade, average moisture to dry sites under trees. Only 12 inches inch high, with heart-shaped foliage that remains evergreen, it becomes 18 to 24 inches when in bloom. Hundreds of tiny white daisies last from September to October and then, with their seed heads, still have an interesting presence in the garden well into the winter.

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

The best known Aster is A.novae-angliae/Symphyotrichum novae-angliae, the New York Aster. Usually 4 to 6 feet tall, this fall-blooming aster ranges in color from purple and pink to white. There are several excellent cultivars from which to choose. ‘Alma Potschke’ is only 4 feet but has considerable impact in the garden because of its hot pink flowers. ‘Hella Lacy’ has deep purple flowers on 5 foot stems while ‘September Ruby’ has ruby red flowers on 5 to 6 foot stems. There are several other cultivars but I have not grown them. Two dwarf cultivars are ‘Purple Dome’ which has flowers the same color as ‘Hella Lacy’ and ‘Vibrant Dome’, a magenta sport found in my garden. Both are only 2 feet high. These Asters need to be grown in lean soil. Highly enriched soil makes the stems lanky and floppy. Even in lean soil, I find it advisable to prune the tall ones as soon as the plants are a foot high. Cutting them in half will make them bushier as well as shorter. Try not to do this later than June 15 or flowering will be quite delayed. Even so, be prepared to use grow-throughs to keep them from falling over when it rains. This species is


Growing High Quality Plants, People, and Relationships

New/Used Commercial & Construction Equipment

SERVING GARDEN CENTERS AND LANDSCAPERS

Parts and Service

SINCE 1978 Now With 7 Locations To Serve You!

wooster

mansfield

mt vernon

330-345-9023

419-529-6160

740-392-6160

monroeville

copley

burbank

419-465-4622

330-666-8400

330-948-7437

north royalton

Annuals Combo Planters Grasses Hardy Ferns

440-237-4806

www.ShearerEquipment.com Shearer Qtr 0315.indd 1

Herbs Peonies Perennials

Proven Winners® Succulents Vines

Now growing Proven Winners® shrubs

800-948-1234 • www.millcreekplants.com • sales@millcreekplants.com 15088 Smart Cole Road, Ostrander, OH 43061

5/14/2015 11:31:24 AM

also a prolific self sower but the seedlings are easy to pull. Be aware that all seedlings of ‘Purple Dome’ and ‘Vibrant Dome’ should be pulled because they will be tall rather than dwarf. Similar to the New York Aster is Aster novi-belgi/ Symphyotrichum novi-belgi (Michelmas Daisy), the differences being that the flowers have half the number of rays and that the leaves are smooth rather than hairy. There are literally hundreds of cultivars, any of which are an excellent alternative to Chrysanthemums. Most of these Asters are short, generally no taller than 15 inches. The ‘Woods Series’ is particularly good, being mildew resistant.

from time to time, I get out the shovel to contain its spread. It blooms in early to mid-October with yellow centered, lavender flowers. Its serrated foliage is quite large and its stems are so sturdy that they never need staking. Propagation of Aster species should be by division in early spring or fall or by terminal cuttings. With all of these aster species to choose from, you should be able to find at least one that will work well for you.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties

The last species I want to mention is Aster tataricus (Tatarian Daisy). You will have to spend more energy finding this Eurasian species but it will be worth your effort. The species is very tall, growing six to seven feet. I’ve had the “dwarf ” cultivar ‘Jin Dai’ that only grows four feet in my garden for almost twenty years. The clump has enlarged very slowly but,

are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 11


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

SAVING FOR COLLEGE With mortgages to pay and clothes to buy, many families have difficulty finding the extra money to save for college. In addition, the markets have not helped the people who have been saving over the last decade. A time crunch has been an equally important deterrent against creating a college-savings program. The vast array of college-savings vehicles (529s, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, UTMA/UGMAs) seems hopelessly complex. Nevertheless, avoiding the issue won’t make it go away, and the sooner you tackle it, the better off you are. Plus, there are a number of college-savings solutions out there that you might not have considered. Step 1: Resist the urge to stand still. Thanks to compounding, a dollar saved today is usually much more valuable than a dollar saved 10 years from now. And even if you manage to save only a small amount between now and the time your child is ready for college, he or she is going to have to borrow that much less for tuition. The key is taking that first step.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Step 2: Don’t play catch-up chasing overly risky investments. Instead of sitting still, some parents who fear that they won’t be able to afford skyrocketing college costs might be tempted to do the opposite: swing for the fences in the hope of hitting it big. But as anyone who bought an Internet stock in the late 1990s or an emerging-markets fund in early 2008 will tell you, investments that have posted big past returns often carry extreme risks. Thus, the best way to save for college isn’t to concentrate in a single risky stock or sector but instead to build a well-diversified portfolio with a stock/bond mix that continued on page 14


1-866-666-SALT (7258) DRY BULK SALT & BAGGED MATERIAL 24 hour / 7 days a week availability 10-25 ton dry salt—same day delivery pick up of bulk salt every order weighed and ticketed state

- approved scale / delivery of bagged salt or deicing material

pickup

volume discounts available we supply clearlane™ enhanced deicer by cargill a sodium and magnesium blend

-

bagged deicing chemicals

DOME LOCATION 11444 Brookpark Rd • Brooklyn, OH, 44130

ROYALTON SUPPLY LOCATION 11528 Royalton Rd, North Royalton, OH 44133

The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 13


FI SCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 12 But given that 529s permit extremely generous contributions and offer tax benefits to boot, these programs can be ideal for late-start college savers who need to sock away as much as possible in a short period of time. The key is to choose carefully. Although Prepaid-Tuition Programs essentially allow you to lock in today’s tuition rates, such plans can be somewhat inflexible. You may also be able to earn a higher rate of return by investing on your own. In contrast to the prepaid programs, money invested in Section 529 college-savings plans can be used at any college in the United States. There are no earnings restrictions on who can contribute to a 529 plan. Contributions to a 529 plan can grow free of federal taxes, you can take tax-free withdrawals to pay for college expenses, and you may also enjoy a state-tax break. Finally, the 529 assets are held in the parents’ name, meaning that these assets receive more favorable treatment than the child’s assets, such as UTMA/UGMA accounts, in financial-aid calculations. Step 4: Accentuate the positive. Even if you haven’t established a dedicated college-savings fund, you have other options at your disposal. Parents might also consider tapping their own Roth IRAs to pay for college, for example.

suits your child’s time horizon. Bear in mind that if your child’s college years are drawing near, you’ll want to be taking fewer risks with any money you have earmarked for college, not more. While savings for children under 10 may safely be invested in stock funds, storing more and more of your child’s college savings in cash and bonds as they make their way through high school is sensible.

Regardless of your savings vehicle of choice, meet the collegesavings challenge head-on. Addressing the issue sooner rather than later will likely save you lots of headaches down the road. Saving for college involves a couple different strategies. You have to diversify, assess your risk and rebalance on a regular basis. Talk to your financial advisor to help with your specific needs.

True, bonds and cash don’t have the same return potential as stocks do. But if you’re afraid that your college savings will come up short when it comes time to matriculate, your best option is to plan to save more, or plan to rely on loans and financial aid, rather than venturing into inappropriately risky investments.

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

Step 3: Consider a 529 plan. 529 college-savings plans have their downsides, which can include high expenses and limited investment choices. And several plans got caught with overly risky investments in 2008.

Securities & advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company Registered Broker/Dealer Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 (800) 478-0788

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


L

ND

SCA

PE

A

A

D

S

C

L

S S I F I E

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Classified and Help Wanted ads? Want to post one of your own? You’ll find them at ohiolandscapers.org or myohiolandscape.com. HELP WANTED ADS Help Wanted ads are posted on both our industry website and our consumer website, along with bi-monthly postings via social media. CLASSIFIED ADS (I.E. Equipment for sale) Classified ads are posted on our industry website ohiolandscapers.org COST MEMBERS: $35 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. NON MEMBER: $70 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. Please send all inquiries and ad content to: info@ohiolandscapers.org or call the OLA office at 440-717-0002.

Oval Beats Round Every Time!

Choose Primo and experience the best in kamado style charcoal cooking. The Primo Oval XL Charcoal Smoker Grill is an extra large sized grill and one of the biggest ceramic cookers on the market. 

Proudly made in the USA since 1996

The unique oval shape allow you to grill, bake, roast or smoke more food at a time

Made of premium grade ceramic that offers superior heat, moisture and flavor retention

Your Outdoor Living Headquarters 7500 Northfield Road • Walton Hills, OH 44146

(440) 439-1040

www.masonsteel.com The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 15


FOR SAFETY SAK E

THE NO-PRESSURE APPROACH TO AIR COMPRESSOR SAFETY One of today’s most versatile tools operates based on a very simple principle: squeezing a volume of air into a smaller space dramatically increases its pressure. Air compressors produce highly pressurized air that can be used for everything from powering tools – like a jackhammer, or impact wrench – to blowing out irrigation lines. Pressurized air is remarkably powerful and, when used correctly, is very safe. The key to ensuring safe operation of air compressors is making sure that the operator has been properly trained and is familiar with the particular model that is being used. It’s important to read the operating manual and follow the proper steps for operation. In this article, we’ll review some of the best practices for safe compressor operation.

PRE-TASK PREPARATION Before using the compressor, verify that it is in good working order and has been properly lubricated. If necessary, check the oil level. If you need to add oil, be careful to avoid overfilling, or spilling oil on the compressor itself.

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Verify that the air filter is clean, and that the air entering the compressor is fresh. If the filter appears to be dirty, replace it. Make sure that any moving parts have been guarded so that workers can’t come into contact with them inadvertently. Because some compressed air tools can generate static electricity, be sure that the compressor is properly grounded before using it where any kind of flammable or explosive vapors may be present. You should not use compressors that burn gasoline or diesel fuel indoors, and you always want to ensure that the exhaust from compressors is directed away from air intakes and windows. continued on page 18


MIDWEST GREEN INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

Member Summit DECEMBER

12–13,

2018

Hilton Columbus at Easton

KEYNOTE SPEAKER Terri McEnaney President, Bailey Nurseries

What Is It? ONLA's Annual Conference—MGIX 2.0! This two-day event includes networking opportunities, professional development sessions, and sponsor displays.

Who Is It For? Our industry's most ambitious landscape and nursery business owners, managers, and crew members who are ready to change up their status quo.

Presenting Sponsors:

ONLA.ORG/MGIX The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 17


FOR SAFETY SAK E

continued from page 16 When using an electric compressor, plug the unit into a grounded power outlet. If you have to use an extension cord, verify that your cord is not longer than what the manual recommends, because a too-long cord can cause a voltage drop that may damage the compressor.

CHECK YOUR PRESSURE AND RATINGS An air compressor, the tools it powers, and the pipes, hoses, and fittings that connect the two make up a system. It’s important to verify that every element of the system has the capability to safely handle your needs. Check everything that will be attached to the compressor to ensure that it is rated at least for the compressor’s maximum pressure. It’s even better if the ratings exceed the compressor’s pressure. Make sure that you don’t use more pressure than required for the tool and the task. The shutoff values for the air supply should be located close to where the work will be taking place, so that the airflow can be interrupted immediately if necessary. Any air receiver tanks should have the correct safety valves (set below the tank’s maximum pressure) and pressure gauges. The pipes and hoses that carry the air should be in good condition, free from oil, grease, and dirt. If possible, hoses should be suspended from above the work area to reduce the

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

possibility of someone tripping over them, or of the hoses becoming kinked during operation.

AFTER OPERATING THE COMPRESSOR Before you remove a tool that doesn’t have a quick disconnect fitting, shut off the air supply at the control value and bleed the remaining pressure from the tool. If you’re finished with the compressor, shut the motor off (and unplug it if it’s electrically powered). After closing the regulator valve, release any remaining compressed air from the tank. Finally, to avoid damage from condensation, open the drain valve, and leave it open until the compressor is used again.

COMMON SENSE WITH COMPRESSORS Most compressor-related injuries or damage result from improper use, or from the failure to wear the appropriate personal protective equipment for the task. Horseplay with compressors, such as pointing the air stream or an impact tool at a co-worker, is especially dangerous. Nor should you use compressed air to clean yourself off. Most of all, make sure that your compressors and every element of your systems that use compressed air receive regular inspections by qualified personnel, and are kept clean and well-maintained. This story originally ran at safetymanagementgroup.com, a nationally recognized professional service organization that provides workplace safety consulting.


>>>

All n’ One

FIRE PI T & FIREPLACE

KITS

INTRODUCING

<<<

ALL N’ ONE FIRE PIT & OUTDOOR FIREPLACE KITS >> Designed to SAVE time and make things easy and simple for you >> No guesswork on quanities of wall block or caps >> Get everything you need to complete the job, including adhesive, inserts, and even stone veneer for one price! only at

330-483-3400

ValleyCitySupply.com

The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 19


U-CARA

U-MAZING

U-Caraâ&#x201E;˘, the revolutionary multi-face wall system. Unilock has once again reinvented hardscaping with U-Cara, bringing landscape walls to a whole new level. Two components. Endless possibilities.

One simple platform with unlimited possibilities.

Easy-to-handle U-Cara fascia panels and Sure Trackâ&#x201E;˘ backer blocks work together for ease, flexibility and efficiency.

Build more with U-Cara.

Unilock.com/ucara | 1-800-UNILOCK US Pat. 9,453,341


FOROLA SAFETY SAKE EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

SPONSORED & HOSTED BY

EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 27, 2018 WILLOWAY NURSERIES 4825 CENTER RD. AVON, OH 44011

NOVEMBER 29, 2018 PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS 6981 SCIOTO-DARBY RD. HILLIARD, OH 43026 AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:30AM – 9:00AM

DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC

The most important landscape maintenance practice is the control of plant size by the correct method of pruning to retain the natural branching characteristics of the plants and integrity of the landscape design. Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to get back to the basics and learn the proper way to prune in time for winter and early spring pruning. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar will include a lecture as well as hands-on training. Attendees will need to bring their own notepad and pen, hand pruning shears, a small pruning saw, and long handle lopping shears, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training.

INSTRUCTED BY

GAIL REINHART / HIDDEN CREEK LANDSCAPING Gail joined the Hidden Creek Team in 2014, bringing with her over 15 years of experience in Horticulture, Sales, Project, and Operations Management, and Employee Development. She has an Associate’s Degree in Landscape and Turfgrass Management from Owens Community College and has spent time working out of state in Michigan and Delaware gaining knowledge of Golf Course and Retail Garden Center operations, and Residential and Commercial Landscape Management. Gail grew up on a 500- acre farm in Northwest Ohio which cultivated her love of the outdoors.

CLINIC 9:00AM – 12:00PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 11/13/18 - $69 AFTER 11/13/18 - $99 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 11/13/18 - $99 AFTER 11/13/18 - $129

GIVEAWAY ITEM

As an attendee, you will receive a gift provided by A.M. Leonard. to be determined closer to the date of your clinic.

2018 DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 11/20/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE

FEE

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 27, Avon, OH

 November 29, Hilliard, OH

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

3.521 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association REGISTER ONLINE AT CEU’S OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PRUNING.HTML


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae, Thuja occidentalis ‘Bobazam’, is a hardy evergreen and makes a lovely, low hedge or foundation planting for the yard. They’re especially useful in areas where space is limited!

THUJA OCCIDENTALIS EASTERN ARBORVITAE

The Tree (arbor) of Life (vitae) is a genus consisting of five species, two from North America and three from Japan, Korea, and China. Anytime we are researching evergreens such as this, we consult the American Conifer Society literature to be sure we keep our ducks in a row. This society is hardcore about their research and record keeping and is viewed as an authority on cultivar origins. In the February 2017 issue of The Growing Concern, we discussed the Western Arborvitae (T. plicata) which is the other North American native hailing from the western states. As the common name implies, Eastern Arborvitae hails from the east – starting in Nova Scotia – and forming dense stands through the Northern States, thinning out as it travels south along the Alleghany Mountains. The botanical name, given by Carl Linnaeus, actually means “thuja of the western world,” referring to North America. The opposite name, Thuja orrientalis, was given to a similar species from China (now changed to Platycladus orrientalis).

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

There’s no doubt you are quite familiar with this Eastern Arborvitae of the western world. It is impossible to be in the horticulture field in Ohio and not have planted an uncountable amount of ‘Emerald Green’, ‘Techny’, or ‘Nigra’ Arbs. While these are landscape staples, with good right, we won’t speak much about these cultivars today, due to such high familiarity. What we want to discuss with you is a story of weird mutations and name changes. Witch’s Broom is a term for a phenomenon in plants that results in an explosion of growth in a small area of a plant


We Deliver!

Check us out on the web at www.davistreefarm.com 330-483-3324 sales@davistreefarm.com www.davistreefarm.com

and can be caused by a number of organisms including fungi and insects. Another somewhat mysterious cause is hormone issues within a plant. It seems these hormone issues are found more commonly in Evergreens, and in truth, have resulted in the majority of unique Evergreen cultivars on the market. Cytokinin – a type of plant growth hormone – is overproduced, interfering with chemical signals of auxin being sent by apical buds. This interruption allows would-be subordinate buds to rapidly divide cells, often resulting in a habit and tissues unlike the parent plant. There are people out there who hike around looking for these naturally occurring witch’s brooms, climbing trees and taking cuttings in an attempt to find a new cultivar. Thuja occidentalis is no stranger to witch’s brooms. While the straight species and common cultivars are upright conical small trees, some of the witch’s broom cultivars resulted in small, globe-shaped plants of various heights.

Back in the mid 1980s, Joe Stupka, a nurseryman from Pulaski, Pennsylvania was walking in Linesville Cemetery admiring the Evergreens planted throughout. He happened upon a Thuja occidentalis that had an unusual ball of growth near the top of the tree and attempted to take this witch’s broom for study. However, most of the broom had died off and only a few twigs remained, making grafting difficult. He managed to get a graft made, but was unsure it would take, so he mounded peat moss around the graft union. Much to Joe’s surprise, the scion itself rooted into the peat moss, so he grew it on to observe what it would turn into. He discovered it made a perfect, little, fuzzy meatball with no effort or pruning at all. It rooted quite easily from cuttings, thus making a perfect landscape introduction. Unfortunately, Joe didn’t have the marketing part down and called this new cultivar ‘Linesville.’ While it was a nice tribute to where he found the plant, it didn’t do much to sell the plant. continued on page 24 The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 23


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH continued from page 23

We couldn’t determine the exact means of the plant’s next journey, but Jim Zampini, of Lake County Nursery, ended up with the plant and put his marketing genius to work. Renaming the plant with a cultivar of ‘Bobazam’ – sticking to the family rule of keeping ‘zam’ on the end of all cultivar names to indicate the origin – he cleverly marketed the plant as “Mr. Bowling Ball.” Mr. Bowling Ball is a hit and makes such a cool addition to the garden, either as an accent or in a mass planting. It forms a near perfect globe shape, topping out around 2 ½ feet. The foliage tends to stay juvenile and gives the plant a very soft texture, more like a Chamaecyparis – often confused for one. With bright, sage-green foliage, this is a superior cultivar for us, as heavy snow loads don’t break it open like other globe forms tend to.

used with great caution if deer are an issue. Easy to transplant and fairly forgiving about soil conditions, it is best to plant T. occidentalis in well drained soils. In nature, these trees can be found anywhere from the side of the mountains to downright bog conditions. However, in nature, they are all seed grown and had time to adapt to such conditions, which is why we recommend any plant coming from a nursery be planted in well-drained soil to avoid failure. As long as you can keep deer issues to a minimum, go out and find some Mr. Bowling Balls for your next planting. They add a lot of interest and fun to the landscape.

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed

While the habit and/or color may change in the witch’s broom, cultural conditions usually do not. So, just like regular Eastern Arborvitae you are used to, these small cultivars are just as susceptible to deer browse and should be

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


Since 1986, VanCuren Tree Services has been Northeast Ohio’s complete tree care specialist. We provide comprehensive services for any residential, commercial, or utility tree care need. The tree professionals at VanCuren Tree Services have helped home and business owners throughout Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio maintain the beauty, vitality, and safety of their trees. We are proud to offer a full range of tree care services, from tree and stump removal to storm damage clean up to utility work and beyond.

To find out more about what VanCuren has to offer, visit our website at www.vancurentreecare.com, or call us at 440.338.5005 today for a free consultation. • Complete Tree Maintenance Programs

• 75’ Bucket Trucks

• Certified Arborists on Staff

• Deep Root Fertilization

• Tree Removal

• 24-Hour Emergency Service

• Tree Trimming

• Stump Grinding

• Land Clearing

• Tree Moving

• 178’ 40 Ton Crane SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Michael Sowul, Certified Arborist James DiRosa, Certified Arborist David R. Van Curen

PHONE: 440.338.5005 FAX: 440.564.9319

Your Complete Tree Care Specialists 25 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscapewww.vancurentreecare.com Association

continued on page 36


FOR SAFETY SAKE SERIES OLA EDUCATION “If you want to improve your results utilizing simple tools that you can immediately apply, make Marvin your first call.” – Sam A. Misseri, Vice President of Business Development

GET MARVINIZED! EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION DECEMBER 6, 2018 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM – 8:30AM SALES CLINIC 8:30AM – 12:00PM LUNCH (INCLUDED) 12:00PM – 1:00PM

SALES TRAINING CLINIC

Be More than a Salesperson: Become a Trusted Advisor

Are the sales techniques that your staff utilizes following a proven method of success, or are they simply implementing “trial and error” techniques while losing valuable sales opportunities in the process? It’s been proven that people buy from people who they know, like & trust. Marvin Montgomery better known as the “Sales Doctor,” will conduct a one day workshop that will provide the participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term relationships and benefit from the Three R’s: Repeat Business, Referrals and Request. You don’t want to miss this opportunity to send your entire team to “Get Marvinized.” This is also a great refresher for anyone who has already taken Marvin’s sales training!

INSTRUCTED BY

MARVIN MONTGOMERY / MARVIN MONTGOMERY & ASSOCIATES For more than 30 years, Marvin Montgomery has earned widespread national recognition and

SALES CLINIC 1:00PM – 4:00PM

praise for his informative, practical and stimulating programs that reflect his basic philosophy: “Preparation and practice are the keys to sales success.”

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 11/21/18 - $179 AFTER 11/21/18 - $209 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 11/21/18 - $209 AFTER 11/21/18 - $239

Marvin’s captivating presentations have assisted hundreds of organizations to meet or exceed their sales goals using his training programs. Many of Marvin’s clients have said that getting “Marvinized” has truly made a difference in their company and

Marvin has become a

mandatory part of company training.

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2018 SALES TRAINING CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 11/29/18

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email FEE

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

$

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No.

Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SALESTRAINING

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

6 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover


F EATURE ARTI CLE

WHEN THE COMPETITION IS TRYING TO POACH YOUR TOP EMPLOYEE by Rebecca Knight / The Harvard Business Review If you’ve got smart, talented people on your team, chances are they’ll get calls from recruiters. How should you respond when a competitor is wooing one of your employees? How do you know if your team member is really considering the offer or bluffing? Should you make a counteroffer? And what can you do to prevent your people from jumping ship?

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY No leader wants to see a top employee snapped up by a rival. “One, you have to replace the talent, and in a time of tight labor markets, that’s a very hard—and very expensive— endeavor,” explains John Sullivan, an HR expert, professor of management at San Francisco State University, and author of 1000 Ways to Recruit Top Talent. “And two, the talent is taking ideas with them to a competitor.” Unfortunately, says Claudio Fernández-Aráoz, a senior adviser at global executive search firm Egon Zehnder and author of It’s Not the How or the What but the Who: Succeed by Surrounding Yourself with the Best, managers are likely to be dealing with situations like these more and more, due to the globalization of business, demographic trends, and poor leadership development practices within companies. “The war for talent is going to intensify and it will get tougher” for managers to keep good

people, he says. When you fear that one of your employees is about to be poached—or already has an offer in hand—there are steps you can take to avoid or minimize the loss.

CONSIDER, BUT DON’T RELY ON, NON-COMPETES Organizations have long used non-compete agreements and non-solicitation contracts as standard tools to keep both employees from leaving and poachers at bay. “But while legal contracts “are essential in many cases, they are never enough,” says Fernández-Aráoz. Besides, he notes, times are changing. Not only is legislation going against non-competes but a growing body of research shows they stifle performance. “Employees are not owned, so acting like you own them and then purposely restricting their ability to make a living in the future will crush your... continued on page 28 The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 27


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 27

6

1. PROMOTE APPROPRIATELY When your best people are doing the kind of work that makes a difference, recognize it. One great way is to give them a well-deserved promotion. 2. PAY ABOVE-STANDARD RATES We aren’t talking about a ridiculously high salary, but pay that’s at or below the market rate for the position tells employees that their work is not truly valued. 3. GET EMPLOYEES’ INPUT – THEN APPLY IT Who knows what it takes to do a job right? The people who are doing it best. If you want to keep people, then involve them in the decision-making process. 4. ENCOURAGE CREATIVE INNOVATION Give your best people the time and resources to test out fresh new ideas. 5. CLEAN OUT THE DEAD WEIGHT There are likely people in your organization that hold others back. Their lack of a good work ethic, etc. can tear apart your team. 6. GET OFF THEIR BACKS Great employees know what they are supposed to be doing and when it needs to be done. Constant reminders and micromanaging will drive them right out the door.

...brand as an employer,” says Sullivan. So, even if your organization allows you to use these contracts, you shouldn’t rely on them. Instead, focus on being an employer that people don’t want to leave.

WATCH FOR SIGNALS Research suggests that employees are more receptive to recruiters—and therefore more likely to quit—around their work anniversary dates. (Annual reviews, which can often coincide with these dates, are typically a time of reflection.) Be mindful of those cycles, but be on the lookout for other kinds of signals, too. “There’s usually a trigger event,” such as getting turned down for a promotion or having a project postponed, that makes other options suddenly more attractive. Pay attention to work-place gossip as well. “Chances are they’ve already told someone at work that they’re entertaining other offers.”

TAKE ACTION If you learn that one of your most valuable employees is considering leaving, you need to be “proactive in trying to prevent it from happening,” Sullivan says. “Have a frank conversation. Say, ‘I’m not going to get mad, I want to fix it.’” Find out if there are simple ways you can improve the

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

employee’s work life. “Ask: ‘What are the factors that are most frustrating you? Are there any that I can take away that would cause you to reconsider?’” If the employee is seeking new challenges, look into options that you could provide internally, says Fernández-Aráoz. Place the employee on a strategic task force, offer him/her a new territory to cover, or help her find opportunities to join an external board. “If you can find an alternative, it’s a win-win,” he says.

DON’T JUMP TO A COUNTEROFFER On the surface, presenting your employee with a counteroffer seems like an obvious, easy way to make them stay. But, warns Sullivan, counteroffers are often counterproductive. “If someone has made the decision to quit, they’re unhappy. By giving a counteroffer, you’re paying to keep an unhappy worker.” And boosting one employee’s salary might create problems for you with the rest of your team, says FernándezAráoz, “Compensation is confidential for about 11 seconds,” he says. “Everyone finds out as soon as the person walks out of the boss’s office wearing a big smile.” And if you suspect your employee may be bluffing about his offer just to pad his paycheck, “let the person go,” he says. “I would hate to think I have someone on my team who would lie to me. In today’s workplace, it’s all about trust.”


BATTEN DOWN YOUR HATCHES When a team member leaves for a competitor, an immediate concern is whether he’ll “bring other colleagues along with him,” says Fernández-Aráoz. “You wonder: how many others are going to go too?” You’re not being paranoid, says Sullivan. “When someone’s been poached by a competitor he will probably try to take people with him,” he says. “It’s pretty easy to identify who they are.” (Hint: it’s often employee’s team members and friends.) In the aftermath of the departure, “you need to work on those people,” Sullivan says. Find out what they need to stay—be it Fridays off or a meaty new assignment—then do your best to deliver. Make sure they know how much you value their contributions. “Tell them: you make a difference here.”

Your success brightens our day... and night.

BE ATTENTIVE TO YOUR BEST PEOPLE “You need to continually treat desirable employees like they’re going to leave,” says Sullivan. He suggests identifying the people whom you cannot afford to lose and then conducting a “stay interview.” “Ask them: ‘why do you stay here? If you’re ever frustrated, what are the reasons? What would keep you from leaving?’” Then use that feedback to “reinforce the reasons” that they’re happy where they are, and create “personalized retention plans” to address the reasons why they’re not, he says. Perhaps allowing the employee to work a flexible schedule, work on different projects, or work more from home is enough to retain them. Ideally, your “employees stay with you not because they have to but because they would not possibly consider going anywhere else.”

KEEP IT IN PERSPECTIVE Managers tend to judge themselves on their ability to inspire loyalty in their team members and so the resignation of a star employee can feel like the ultimate insult. But “you mustn’t let one departure get to you,” says Fernández-Aráoz. “Don’t overreact. And don’t badmouth the person who is leaving — it will reduce your credibility.” Remember: “a certain degree of turnover is inevitable.” Sullivan agrees. In some cases, “there’s nothing you can do,” he says. The employee just needs to go someplace new. “You can’t keep everyone.” But you can retain your relationship with the person who’s been poached. “Sometimes the best strategy is to let them go and hope that they miss you and want to come back in the future.”

At Cascade Lighting, your success is our top priority and it’s been that way since we set up shop over 20 years ago. We’ll partner with you to provide expert advice on the best lighting solution to fit your project and budget. Our team also offers design and technical support at no additional cost. And to ensure the job gets done on time, our warehouse stocks a huge inventory of products ready for same day shipment.

Call us today at 800.758.6359 or visit cascadelighting.com

Providing over 40 lines of outdoor and landscape lighting products including:

Rebecca Knight has been a journalist for nearly 20 years. Today, she writes a column for Harvard Business Review focusing on management challenges. She received her BA from Wesleyan University. OLA_halfpage_BV1.indd 1

The Growing Concern | October3/1/18 20182:13 | 29 PM


D I RECTI ON S

IT’S TIME TO RENEW Our plan was to send this year’s membership dues invoices out using our new Association Management Software – WebLink, but we are still in the process of data conversion. It is quite a big job to make the switch, however, it will certainly pay off, giving us new capabilities and efficiencies. With that said, you should have already received your dues invoice in the mail and we hope that we have earned your loyalty for another year. Our membership year runs November 1st through October 31st, so your dues should be renewed this month for your company to stay current. We take workforce / professional development very seriously and want to help you, your staff and your business grow. To help, we are bringing back Marvin Montgomery in December. He does a great job with sales training and also incorporates customer service in his class. Everyone can benefit from this training, because when it comes right down to it – we are all part of the sales force and customer service team for our companies. We are also bringing Foreman Training back on March 11 in Northeast Ohio and on March 12 in Central Ohio. We sold out two classes this past March, so be sure to sign up in January when we open registration for these classes. In addition to these courses, our education committee has been working overtime to create some really great new classes. The committee created the OLA Plant Healthcare Day this year that took place at Holden Arboretum on October 2nd. They are currently working on a safety class for spring, so you can send your new recruits to be trained. This class will be a great place for new hires, along with your returning workers – for a refresher, of course. Another area of workforce development we are concentrating on is bringing new recruits into the industry. In an effort to do so, the PR and Marketing Committee will be making this

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

its main focus this coming year. To that end, Rick Doll and Board Member Josh Way attended the NALP Workforce Development Summit at the end of September. They will be sharing their feedback and ideas with the committee, and ultimately to the OLA Board of Directors. Additionally, I am part of a number of advisory boards for the horticulture programs at our high schools and colleges. These boards help to recruit new students and build relationships with current students, as well as occasionally help with teaching students. This involvement helps bring and keep students in our trade. I hope you will reach out to a school with a horticulture program in your area and see how you can help them. Don’t forget that we are here to help you, so if you have questions about something, please give us a call in the office 440-717-0002, and we will do our best to find the answer or to point you to another resource. If you have suggestions for topics for other educational classes that we haven’t done, or that you would like to see offered, we want to hear from you. We really do listen, and when enough members are asking for the same thing, we try to find a way to present that topic! Many of our best offerings have come from suggestions, so keep them coming!


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

13 2 A family owned and operated manufacturer of Wooden Lawn and Garden Products.

Square Tree Stakes Round Lodgepole Tree Stakes Plant Support Stakes Driveway Markers

A wide range of heights & thickness available.

(800)622-5510 5250 NAIMAN PARKWAY SOLON, OHIO 44139

INFO@GREENESFENCE.COM

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

29

Cascade Lighting, Inc.

23

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

6

• • • •

Abraxus / Royalton Supply

Frank Brothers Landscape Supply, Inc.

31

Greenes Fence Company

15

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

11

Millcreek Gardens

19

MRLM Landscape Materials

17

ONLA

15

O’Reilly Equipment

9

Premier Plant Solutions

11

Shearer Equipment

13

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

20

Unilock

19

Valley City Supply

25

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

17

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | October 2018 | 31


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

10/18

Get the recognition your company deserves...

ENTER TODAY!

Ohio’s most prestigious landscape enhancement awards program. 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Oh 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002 Toll Free: 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 OhioLandscapers.org MyOhioLandscape.com

DEADLINE TO ENTER DECEMBER 14, 2018

RULES, REGULATIONS & ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE @ OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG

The Growing Concern October 2018  

The official monthly publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

The Growing Concern October 2018  

The official monthly publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.

Advertisement