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We have saved historic buildings, filled a need, trained others and advocated for causes and legislative bills that affected all members of society.

– Emily Morrison, Author & Junior League of Tucson Sustaining Member

continued from page 239 “As I walk through our doors each day, I am reminded that our story could not have begun without the league’s vision, leadership and support,” she said. Among its lesser known contributions, the league opened the city’s first Well Baby Clinics in the 1930s to combat infant mortality. It helped restore La Cordova House at the Tucson Museum of Art, and members pitched in to refurbish the Temple of Music and Art. The Follies, a theatrical show starring league members that first started in 1950, raised thousands of dollars for the community. The annual rummage sale – almost as old as the league itself – still raises as much as $30,000 to help fund its charities each year. For Ann McKenna, JLT’s president in 1971, it remains her favorite league memory. “We worked so hard and we made so much money,” she said. Through the years, the league has wrestled with its image and purpose, as Morrison found while researching. Many newsletters included pleas that its members not lose passion for the league’s mission as it morphed from a social “hats and gloves” society to the group of modern professionals that holds the reins today. “In the early years, no one was employed,” Morrison said. “Today, most everyone works full- or part-time, and these women still make time for meetings, training and community service. There is much to be admired. They have to be very organized and responsible.” 240 BizTucson

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