Page 1

A U G U S T

2 0 1 5

A U G U S T

2 0 1 5

1


2


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S 56 CRAIG REID - ON THE COVER

8 CAMILLE DOMANGUE

18 C A R M E L' S T O P 1 0 T I P S O N S TA R T I N G A B U S I N E S S RIZA CARMEL

24 MIKE CHUANG

38 PERSONAL BRANDING 101 - JODIE ORR

44 GRANT NELSON (MEDASIN)

48 P L AY L I S T

49 LESLIE MEDLIN - JODIE ORR

66 K AT H L E E N G O L I G H T LY

76 D I Y : A B S T R A C T WA T E R C O L O R K AT H L E E N G O L I G H T LY


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

EV E N T H O U G H J A N UA RY I S T H E F I R ST M O N T H O F the year, there is no other time that signifies change and new beginnings for me more than August. I remember picking out pens for school and pouring hours into creating that perfect first-day outfit. August was when I started high school, college, and my post-grad life. And although I have no plans to use a TI-89 calculator or five-subject notebook again, August remains a month of new beginnings—at least in regard to the Koronette. That’s because I got to work with two of the kindest and most talented people I know, Jodie and Madeline. This issue is a product of months of planning, countless emails, and hardcore Google Docing. If it weren’t for them, the August issue would be half its size and not nearly as interesting. Want to know more about the new members of the Koronette team? I’ve asked them a few questions on the next page. And if that’s not enough, don’t worry. This isn’t the last you’ll see of them. Thank you for reading the Koronette. Sincerely,

4


5


8


CAMILLE DOMANGUE CAMIDO.CO MORGAN CITY, LA | 22

Graphic designer Camille Domangue has an inherent ability of harmonizing seemingly juxtaposing elements in design. Her work exudes a spontaneity even when every shape and and line is carefully placed. All in all, she makes serious art whimsical, and hard angles look natural. This new graduate is constantly seeking new techniques both traditional and non-conventional and her ever-evolving design will have you begging to see what she’s up to next.

9


Tell us a little bit about yourself. I'm a Scorpio and an INFJ personality type and I have been described as intense and loyal. I like hanging out with friends, watching movies, swimming, and reading. My favorite color to wear is black and I love macaroons.

Tell us about some of the designs you have created and their success. Most of my work so far is made up of hypothetical projects from school because I just finished my design program at the University of Houston. Some of the projects I've done in school include convenience-store branding, data-visualization posters, and a mutoscope, which is a mechanical flip book. One of my school projects which turned into a reality was for the Blaffer Art Museum. My identity and catalogue design were chosen by the Blaffer Art Museum from among a group of twenty-two designs for the 36th Thesis Exhibition. I've also worked on a couple freelance projects where I've designed wedding logos and various collateral for friends.

“GRAPHIC DESIGN IS ABOUT BEING ABLE TO PULL FROM EXPERIENCES AND KNOWLEDGE ABOUT T H E W O R L D�


What is your creative/production process?

What are your other hobbies? I really enjoy shooting both digital and film

I'll start by asking questions about the project

photography. I also want to find the time to

then doing a lot of research on what the project

embroider again because it's extremely time-

is about, then look into what's been designed

consuming. And I love reading classic novels.

already. After the research, I like to start

My favorite one I've read recently is The Picture

sketching in my sketchbook until I feel ready to

of Dorian Gray.

start building the design on the computer. Once the sketches are in the computer, they'll go through multiple rounds of revisions until both the client and I feel like it's finished.

What do you do to stay creative? The best way for me to stay inspired is by looking at other beautiful graphic design and photography. I usually look at magazines,

Something you’re still learning?

Pinterest, Behance, and keep up with major

I'm trying to teach myself how to get better

design studios I admire. I also need to ask for

at hand lettering, which is the art of drawing

ideas or critiques sometimes so I don't get

letterforms. I'm also learning how to code

stuck. I also stay creative by refreshing my brain

websites faster because I want to be able to

by picking up a book or going for a bike ride. A

design and then code websites one day. So I

lot of people don't realize that graphic design

have both handmade and technologic goals to

is about being able to pull from experiences

keep up with!

and knowledge about the world because the projects out there are so varied and diverse.


13


14


15


16


“ T H E U LT I M A T E G O A L W O U L D BE TO FREELANCE WEBSITE DESIGN AND BE ABLE TO CODE MY OWN SITES FROM A L L O V E R T H E W O R L D .�

How would you describe your style? This has always been hard for me to define. I've been told that my work is "clean with an elegant flare," but I like to think that my style is adaptable to any design situation. It's sort of like a chameleon in that regard. But like most designers, I try and let the project dictate which stylistic direction I should go in.

What are your next steps? My next step is to move out of Texas and go travel. I chose to pursue graphic design not only because I thought it would make me happy but because it would one day allow me to live almost anywhere in the world and still be able to work and create to make my living. The ultimate goal would be to freelance website design and be able to code my own sites from all over the world.

17


C A R M E L' S TO P 10 T I P S F O R S TA R T I N G YOUR OWN BUSINESS Business and life coach Riza Carmel is sharing her secret weapons to starting a business with Koronette readers for the very first time. Starting something new can feel a bit like you’ve lost your mind, but Carmel has your back. “Happiness isn’t measured by the number of zeros at the end of a paycheck,” she says. “It’s measured by your willingness to take risks and pursue what’s close to your heart.” Follow her tips and you’ll be on your way to doing just that in no time.

18


WRITTEN BY RIZA CARMEL RIZACARMEL.COM

19


1 FIND YOUR TRIBE.​ Surround yourself with like-­minded people. When you’re starting a business, your traditional support system (family, friends, etc.) might not “get” what you’re doing right away. By surrounding yourself with others starting their own businesses, you’ll be able to stay motivated and bravely walk (or blaze) through the path less traveled.

2 WORK WITH A BUSINESS MENTOR OR COACH. Having a mentor or coach will do wonders for you as you take the plunge into entrepreneurship. They’ll support you and keep you accountable, and they’ll stand for your goals and desires even when you may be ready to throw in the towel. They won’t give up on you!

3 DO YOUR HOMEWORK.​ What’s the need you’ll be fulfilling? Who’s your ideal customer or client? Again, this’ll be much easier to tackle if you’ve got your “tribe” and a coach or mentor to work with­­—you don’t have to do it all alone!

4 BE FLEXIBLE. S​ometimes life will throw you a curveball or two, and you may have to modify your original ideas and plans. Your ability to pivot and adapt to the changing needs of your customers, business, and your own life will be crucial to the success of your biz.

20


5 BE PATIENT. R​emember that success doesn’t happen overnight. It’ll take blood, sweat, and tears, and also some time, before you see desired results or profit. Treat it like a marathon—keep a steady pace, don’t stop, and just keep going.

6 NETWORK. D​on’t be afraid to get out there to meet new people or reconnect with old friends and classmates. The more people you share your new venture with, the more real it will feel and become. And you’ll never know who else may become a part of your tribe and be a source of support for you and your business.

7 “SHAKE IT OFF”. T​here’s a difference between someone giving constructive criticism or feedback and someone who’s quick to say you’re crazy and are going to fail. Again, there are people who just won’t “get” what you’re doing. Remember that “haters gonna hate” and you just need to shake ’em off. The negativity won’t serve you or your business. Keep your eyes on the prize and keep doing you!

8 START BEFORE YOU’RE READY. N​ow this might sound like it’s contradicting “do your homework.” But you don’t have to have all your ducks in a row before you can start. Creating a Facebook page for


your business and simply sharing your venture with family and friends are great places to start. Know that your business is a practice and not a perfect—­­there’ll always be something you can improve upon. Simply make the choice to dive in and the rest will follow.

09 EMPOWER YOUR CHOICES. T​rust yourself. Trust God and the universe. You get to decide how things turn out. Do you rise to the occasion or do you crumble with defeat? The only thing you have to do is c​hoose.​

10 “TREAT YO SELF.” ​ Above all, don’t forget to take care of yourself. You are the most valuable asset to your business. Without you, it wouldn’t exist! Starting a business is not easy, and you can find yourself in stressful situations. Be sure to make time for things that bring you joy­­—a massage, a trip to the lake or beach, a few hours curled up with a good book and a glass of wine. These little treats will go a long way in serving you and your business.


“ T R E AT I T LI K E A M A R AT H O N— K E E P A S T E A D Y PA C E , D O N ’ T S T O P, A N D J U S T K E E P G O I N G .”


MIKE CHUANG M I K E C H U A N G . S Q U A R E S PA C E . C O M VOORHEES, NJ | 20

Wanderlust is captured to perfection in the breathtaking cityscapes of Mike Chuang’s photography. In the mingling of light, movement, and unusual perspective, you’ll find yourself inexplicably drawn toward treasures yet to be explored by the heartbeat of a city come to life.

24


“I J U ST S H O OT A N D E D I T TO C A P T U R E S C E N E S T H E WA Y I S E E T H E M I N M Y H E A D .”

Tell us a little bit about yourself. I’m not sure where to begin . . . I’m currently a junior biology major at Baylor University, and I’m planning on applying to medical school within the next couple years. As a kid, I played lacrosse, swam, and did tae kwon do all throughout high school. I also played piano extensively and competed a lot. I learned to surf when I was little and have loved it ever since. My family is very active, and we would always spend summers down at the shore or traveling. I’m pretty extroverted, and I definitely enjoy making new friends. Connecting with others is never a problem for me. I love admiring everything that goes on in life. Whether it be individuals and their quirks, the places I visit, or the music I get exposed to, I know that admiring things comes second nature to me. Also, coffee. I love coffee.

How would you describe your style? Dang, I really hate this question! My style is all over the place sometimes, and it definitely changes based on what/ where I’m shooting. I spend most of my time in urban areas, and I’m definitely a street prowler at my core. At the same time, I spend a lot of time between semesters traveling and


“FO R ME, AT T HE EN D O F T HE DAY IT’S ALL ABOU T S H ARIN G M O M E N T S W I T H O T H E R S .”


Who or what inspires you? Instagram plays a big role in inspiring me. Following very, very gifted photographers from all over the world definitely helps broaden my horizons to the way different individuals shoot different things. However,

I love shooting landscapes. I would say that

being inspired by someone is definitely no

my street shots tend to be more grungy and

excuse for biting their own style.

raw-looking, while my landscape or nature photos tend to be smoother and more moody.

I’m a super sensory-oriented person, so just

Shooting people is another game altogether;

being in the environment I’m shooting in

I shoot whatever fits the scene, outfit of the

inspires me the most and influences how

person, and general aura I feel from it all.

I frame, shoot, and edit. Textures of brick walls, the scent of the ocean, the sound of

Honestly, I just shoot and edit to capture

a waterfall. . . .For me, everything works

scenes the way I see them in my head. That

together to form the picture I see in

changes from time to time, so I try not to get

my head.

bogged down in trying to develop one certain “style” for myself.

What type of cameras do you like to shoot with?

Why do you take photos? I take photos because I love everything about

I shoot with a Nikon D700, and I mainly use

it. To make a scene permanent . . . I see so

a 50mm lens and a 14–24mm lens. I love my

much value in that. For me, at the end of

50mm. It’s compact and discreet in the streets,

the day it’s all about sharing moments with

and it’s a prime lens. Shooting with a prime

others. To be able to show someone a photo

lens keeps me creative. It forces me to move

and have them feel the same thing I felt while

around a subject to get different perspectives,

capturing it—all just by looking at the photo—

to push in on a subject, or step back and

that’s it right there. That’s why I shoot.

frame farther away.

31


32


33


34


When did you become interested in photography? How has your work changed since then? I picked up a DSLR in junior year of high school, and would just go outside to my neighborhood lake and shoot around, getting a feel for the camera. It was on manual mode when I got it, and I didn’t know how to change that, so I learned how to shoot on full manual, control shutter speed, aperture, and ISO levels all the time. It was a blessing in disguise, because that laid down a very strong foundation and understanding of controlling light and movement right off the bat. My definitive start in really diving into photography as an art began just in December 2014. I was home from school, and spent those cold days walking around Philly and NYC with my camera, taking in everything around me. I’m not sure why I started getting super in to it at that time. It just happened, and I’m super glad it did. My work has definitely evolved since then, and I believe that it is still evolving today. I’m always learning or seeing things in a new light. The way I edit has changed from being a bit grainy to completely clean, but that’s only one concrete example I can think of.

35


36


Would you consider your photos more planned or spontaneous? Most of my photos are spontaneous. All of my street photography is just being at the right place at the right time and visualizing the moment in my head before it occurs. Of course, when I’m shooting a session with an individual, the photos are planned and staged. I get a lot of candids from those sessions too, though, since I tend to shoot as we’re walking somewhere.

What are your next steps? Oh, man. I’m always trying to keep the big picture in mind in my life. I’m planning on applying to medical school within the next two years, so school takes top priority. Photography for me is a passion, but I definitely couldn’t see myself doing it for a living. The types of things I shoot . . . it doesn’t pay bills. I do it because I love it, and that’s about it.

37


WRITTEN BY JODIE ORR PHOTOS BY NANCY MAGANA


PERSONAL BRANDING 101 In an economy that is increasingly entrepreneurial and freelance driven, people are talking more and more about personal branding. These days, people care about the person behind the product just as much as the product or service itself. People relate to people, so this makes perfect sense. But who or what are these personas that we are drawn toward? Is it their style? Could it be their values or behavioral trademarks? Is it their quality of work? It is almost always all of the above, packaged sleekly and cohesively as their personal brand.


40


WHAT IS PERSONAL BRANDING? Personal branding is most clearly explained in the context of job searching. It is a way for people to market themselves and stand out—selling yourself. It tells people what is so great about you—your strengths, your values and work ethic, your writing or design style, and more. It can also encompass your short- and long-term goals, your attitude, aspirations, and experience. Personal brand is generally comprised of two elements: visual brand, which includes a logo, website, resume, blog, photos, etc.; and brand messaging, which, in short, is everything else. Brand messaging communicates who you are, whereas visual brand highlights what you do. Your visual brand reflects your brand messaging, and vice versa. Think about Tim Gunn. When you hear his name, words such as fashion, style, design, and his famous catchphrase—“Make it work”—come to mind. You also might envision his frameless glasses and perfectly tailored suits. These associations, along with his expertise, are undoubtedly why he landed his role on Project Runway.

WHO NEEDS A PERSONAL BRAND? A personal brand is something that anyone could benefit from; however, if you are in a creative industry or profession and/or you do freelance work, you will especially reap the

41


Now that you have identified these core elements, consider consistency. Without

"YOUR BRAND WILL

consistency, brand recognition is difficult

E V O L V E A S Y O U D O ."

brand recognition). Building consistency

to achieve (and you want to achieve requires learning to say no. When making big decisions, consider whether or not the decision will reflect your brand. If it does not, then it does not reflect who you are and may

benefits. One of the differences between a freelancer and someone who provides services through an agency is that the latter individual can rely on the agency’s brand and reputation to help him or her find clients. The freelancer, however, is on her own. She must sell herself. And one of the most effective selling tools: a strong brand identity.

HOW DO YOU BUILD A PERSONAL BRAND? Whether you are aware of it or not, your personal brand already exists; you just need to hone in on what is important and polish it a bit. Out of the many things that make you you, what stands out the most? What are your most defining characteristics, skills, strengths, and interests? What beliefs and philosophies do you stand behind? Do you have any style trademarks? Does your work or wardrobe have a color palette? Do you have a sentimental necklace that you wear daily? A signature scent? Write these things down. Perhaps ask a close friend or family member to list some associations he or she has with you. Sometimes, the way others think of us differs

potentially be a bad decision in the long run. Consistency is also important if you are active on any social accounts or blogs. Your content should always have the same voice, images should be styled or edited similarly, and logos should be used appropriately.

WHAT DOES YOUR PERSONAL BRAND SAY TO OTHERS? A solidified personal brand is nothing more than the sum of its associations. If you are a photographer, perhaps your name instantly comes to mind when people think of wedding photography or nature photography. If you are a writer, your features in top publications will speak for themselves. If you are a fashion designer, the boutiques and shops your designs are sold in will communicate your caliber. Do not be afraid to associate yourself with other brands to convey your own. Your brand will evolve as you do, and it is important to reflect on the changes occurring in your life to determine how they will affect your brand. Revisit the questions you asked yourself in the beginning to keep things fresh.

from how we think of ourselves.

Take a step back every once in a while to

Looking at the list of words and phrases you

brand elements as tools to celebrate who

just wrote down, circle four or five that best reflect who you are and what you do and focus on them. These will be the core elements of your personal brand.

notice your own brand associations. Use your you are. That confidence will speak volumes to prospective employers, clients, and collaborators because when you know what you are selling, they will start buying.


“W H E T H E R

Y O U A R E A WA R E O F I T

O R N O T, Y O U R P E R S O N A L B R A N D A LR E A DY E X IST S”


GRANT NELSON (MEDASIN) SOUNDCLOUD/OFFICIALMEDASIN DALLAS, TX | 18

We live in an age of background tracks and top-of-the-chart hits, songs we scream along to in the car and tunes we forget as soon as their final note has disintegrated. Grant Nelson’s music demands that languid listeners become more than mere absorbers, challenging them instead to pay riveted attention to his mind-bending sound that captivates and lingers hauntingly in its own wake. Nelson’s music is not simply for amusement; it asks us to entertain the questions and complexities that arise from it.

44


45


“IT’S MO RE SO SOMET HIN G YOU WOULD LISTEN TO WITH FU LL AT T EN T IO N WIT H HE AD PHO N ES IN AN D LET YOU R M I N D WA N D E R .”

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

can't do it. Something is missing from my mood

I do a variety of electronic music. I’ve been in to

or inspiration. Other days I can create very

producing heavily ever since I was introduced

fluently and quickly. Ideas will just flow out of

to it when I was merely twelve.

me uncontrollably. Hopefully this makes sense.

How would you describe your style? Very electronic. I like to incorporate a lot of

Who or what would you consider your influences?

very mentally appealing sounds. I try to keep

I grab inspiration from all kinds of things,

it original, something new that you don't hear

people, and situations. It’s almost like

often; very detailed and atmospheric, almost

inspiration is a battery that is constantly

journey-taking. I like to think it’s not something

charging back up as you experience things

you can just play while you cruise in your car. It’s

and listen to new music. But as far as specific

more so something you would listen to with full

people that influence me, I would have to pay

attention with headphones in and let your

credit to Galimatias, Mr. Carmack, and Skrillex.

mind wander.

Those are pretty much my top three of all time.

What do you do to stay creative? To be honest, I don't do a whole lot. I go in and

What do you want listeners to take away from your work?

out of creative moods and phases constantly.

All I hope is that they want to come back.

It’s not necessarily something I have control

I hope for someone to feel intrigued after

over. I believe there isn't really something you

hearing my music for the first time.

can do to make yourself stay creative; I believe

Do you perform in public?

making something creative is more of a chance thing. A lot of factors have to align perfectly

I have before on smaller scales, but starting this

to set the right recipe for a mood to create in.

year I have a handful of shows lined up

Some days I will try to create, but I just simply

around America.

46


O U R FAV O R I T E ? " G I R L S T H AT D A N C E " FROM THE PINK POLO EP

What is your creative/production process? I like to be completely isolated while I create. Personally, I create the best when I’m alone. I don’t like to have other people’s energies in the room kind of interfering with what I am making. I know that sounds somewhat selfish, but that’s just how I am. Shut everything out, sit down, and get lost in making a song, as if I were writing a book or something.

What are your other hobbies? Not a whole lot! I will skateboard from time to time. It’s something I’ve done my whole life, just no where near as frequently as I’ve done music.

What are your next steps? As I mentioned before, the next major step for me is to start branching out into the world of shows and gigs.

47


P L AY L I S T 1 . GIR LS T H AT DA N CE - Masego x Medasin 2 . H E A RT BE ATS (FILO US & M O UN T R E MIX ) - José Gonzáles 3 . GHOS TS - Made in Heights 4 . LOVE LO CKD OWN (KA NYE WE S T C OVER) - Glass Animals 5 . SKINNY DIP - Avionics 6 . G OLD - Medasin 7 . T R AVOLTA C O OL - GRMM 8 . O C TA H AT E - Ryn Weaver 9 . T HX - Medasin 1 0. MUR A KA MI - Made in Heights

48


LESLIE MEDLIN

WRITTEN BY JODIE ORR


“In case you were wondering, my favorite color is chartreuse.” These words come from a colorful woman going through a “minimalistic, neutral” phase. Leslie Medlin is an entrepreneur who, when she penned her job description, wrote stylist, designer, maker, and then a blank space. The space is reserved for the other hats (read: baseball caps) she may want to wear depending on where life takes her. Her past experience includes fashion designing, visual merchandising, and branding. Leslie describes her childhood self as a “crazy rainbow girl” growing up in Grapevine, Texas. She always cared about fashion, and loved

she went to school. First was Roots Boutique,

experimenting with color and self-expression.

where Leslie worked on visual merchandising—

Halfway through high school she took up fashion

window displays, store atmosphere, and the

design, inspired by the way people feel better

overall look and feel of the store. Later there was

about themselves the better they dress. This was

Spice Village, where she helped design displays

what she wanted to do, so she studied fashion

throughout the store. Finally, she worked with

design throughout college at Baylor University.

Grae Apparel to help visually brand the line in an

Her classes threw challenges at her she had never

effort to make it stand out among the growing

experienced before. Creating quality designs that

number of shops in Waco.

lived up to her personal standards while working under due dates and grading metrics proved to

In February 2015, Leslie took a big step: she

be difficult.

honed the entrepreneurial skills her father taught her and launched Leslie Medlin || Design House.

“I had a hard time with assignments and

She set out to “create a multi-faceted brand,

deadlines because, to me, perfection can’t have

centered around fashion and creative design,

deadlines, and I’d rather make something perfect

with the goal of producing both a line of quality

and take a little longer making it.” This roadblock

and practical women’s goods and creative and

did not end her journey.

styling services.” Her motto: “Inspiration for the confident woman.”

After college, Leslie interned with Anna Sui in New York City. She then went on to help

But what about the unconfident woman? That

develop new boutiques in Waco, Texas, where

just does not float Leslie’s boat. “Clothes are an

50


51


“C LOT H E S A R E A N E X P R E S S I O N OF CONFIDENCE, AND I DON'T BELIEVE IN THE PHRASE, 'I C A N ' T P U L L T H A T O F F.' ”

expression of confidence, and I don’t believe in the phrase, ‘I can’t pull that off.’” Confidence radiates from knowing you look and feel awesome, regardless of what you’re wearing or what others think. Right on, Leslie. At her core, Leslie is all about bright colors; however, she claims to be going through a minimalistic phase where she is using a neutral color palette and her pieces are highquality and practical. She takes minimalism a step further when she neglects all jewelry (except for her wedding ring) and lets the focus of her outfit be the clothes. “If a shirt has a really great neckline, I don’t want to cover it up with a necklace.” She also plays around with androgyny, throwing on a baseball cap with an otherwise feminine outfit. Her friends would describe her style as “eclectic,” but she just likes to evolve and change with the times. Experimenting, after all, is the only way to learn and be confident in your own true style.


Koronette: Tell us your number-one style rule.

Instagram—following people/businesses that

Leslie Medlin: I don't really have rules

are doing similar things to me and learning

anymore, because my perspective is always

from them.

changing. I used to say no navy or brown on black, and now I do that. And I used to say no

COLOR, always the best inspiration.

denim on denim—then Gap changed all that.

My friends who are like-hearted and like-

Ha! So, I just decide my set of standards from

minded in style, creativity, and living out

season to season. I do always say, "if you like

beauty in the everyday

it, wear it with confidence, and everyone else K: What is your biggest takeaway from all of

will agree with you!"

your experiences with visual merchandising K: Where do you look for inspiration?

and fashion designing?

LM: Inspiration is my lens for life. So I get it

LM: My biggest takeaway over the last five

by just living and appreciating the beauty of

years is that when you start the process of

everything around me. I pull from so many

following your dreams, you also begin the

different things. Some of my sources are:

process of continually defining who you are and at the same time discovering that along

Keeping up with what my fav brands are

the way. So I've had to let go of things I

selling and allowing that to inspire my own

thought I would have or should have done,

creativity. (Some of my fav brands being

and then taken on some things I never

The Row, J. Crew, Madewell, Rachel Comey,

thought I would. The vision of your dreams

Everlane, Elizabeth Suzann)

is only the beginning, and usually the next big thing to happen is a major obstacle

53


or challenge because we have to have the

K: What is the best advice you’ve ever

character to sustain our dreams for the long

received?

haul. So basically the last five years has been

LM: I think one of the best things someone

me developing more of who I am, and being

has said to me about following my dreams was

refined along the way. And in that process, I

"you must decide, are you an artist that just

have watched glimpses of my true self come

wants to sell your art? Or are you an artist who

to the surface, then I grab hold of them, and

wants to create a lasting business? That will

start to build on them. Dreams require harder

determine the route you take." This was really

work than just doing a job. And we have to be

pivotal for me, because, as an "artist" type,

willing to stay the course and not give into the

it's easy for me to take the low road of being

moments of failure or disappointment. Things

okay with not making money and just surviving

may seem messy and slow for a while, but in

while I figure things out if it means I get to

the end it is absolutely worth everything.

create. But that is not sustainable. If you are good at something, and you are passionate

K: Describe your dream job.

about doing it for a living, you must decide

LM: I have a dream someday of being able

to take it seriously and put systems in place

to work for a time at Anthropologie as a

to grow that gifting. I don't have control over

Visual Merchandiser. And I hope to make

my success, but I do have the ability to be

that happen in the next couple of years. But,

smart about the way I'm doing business and

honestly, really. My dream job is what I'm

learn what works and what doesn't. I have a

doing now. I know that I'm made to have a

responsibility to both be happy with what I'm

business and use it for the good of the fashion

doing, and be diligent. Dreams are a tough

industry and the furtherment of the Kingdom.

business. But they change the world.

It has not been easy, especially as of late, but I wouldn't trade it for any job that pays tons of money or gives me fame.

54


55


CRAIG REID FA C E B O O K / P H O T O S F R O M C R A I G FA L M O U T H , C O R N WA L L | 2 3

Experiencing Craig Reid’s photography for the first time is like falling into a living dream. With minor photo manipulation, this "hunter" captures the spontaneity and true nature of fleeting moments with his photographs. The memory of Reid’s compositions will have you rushing back to relive the dream again and again.


58


Tell us a little bit about yourself. My name is Craig Alexander Reid and I’m a

How important is Photoshop to your final images?

student heading into my third year studying

Photoshop is only important for vamping

BA(Hons) Photography at Falmouth

colors and playing with your blacks and

University down in Cornwall, UK.

whites. I don’t do much manipulation at all; everything is usually left how it was when

Which is your favorite lens? Why?

I took it. I then just resize and sharpen my

My favorite lens has to be the 1.4/50mm

images.

prime lens which I use on my Canon 5D. It’s great for pretty much everything. So it’s a

Who or what inspires you?

great lens to just have for every occasion.

I find inspiration hard. However, if I had to choose, it would just be the world around

How did you get in to photography?

me and its beauty. I always seem to find my inspiration when I combine my partner and a beautiful backdrop.

Photography for me began in secondary school. However, I didn’t really get in to it

What are your other hobbies?

until my final months at college when I was applying for universities.

I’m an avid gamer and I spend a lot of my time reading graphic novels. I enjoy playing

What is your creative/production process?

basketball as a means to keep fit and to blow off some steam.

I’m very much a “hunter”-type photographer. I live in the moment and try

What are your next steps?

to capture what happens around me. On

I’m currently working on a book featuring

odd occasions I’ll ask for a portrait or two

all my favorite portrait and candid shots

but I just like to document my surroundings

spanning the first couple of years with my

with little influence on what is going on.

partner. You can purchase a copy of it from my Blurb account.

59


“EV E RY T H I N G I S U S U A L LY L E F T H O W I T WA S W H E N I T O O K I T.”

60


61


62


63


66


K AT H L E E N G O L I G H T LY I N S TA G R A M / K AT G O L I G H T MEMPHIS, TN | 21

If you were in the market for an artist-friend, you’d want Kathleen Golightly to be yours. A watercolerer up to her ears in a dreamy mix of the abstract and whimsical, Kathleen is kind, creative, and fresh. And if her existing body of work isn’t enough for you, she’s about to break out of her mold--she’s “done painting safely on tiny paper.”

67


Tell us a little bit about yourself.

like to write quotes or scripture on them and give

My current season is a severe dichotomy between

them away to friends.

science and art. I live in downtown Dallas, where I’m finishing up my nursing degree with Baylor. I

I used to sell everything I made, but truthfully,

will be either an emergency or critical-care nurse.

it didn’t feel “right.” It’s as if I’m selling a

I first started watercoloring three years ago as a

part of me! My niche is custom pieces. I get

stress-reliever during finals week, but have always

to collaborate with customers and then take

been interested in creating art. It was then I

creative rein based on their idea. It’s my work, but

finally found a medium that suited me best.

it’s the customer’s idea and motivation from the beginning.

What is your creative/production process?

Something you’re still learning?

I always make sure that I have a giant mason jar

Practically, I’m learning how to use watercolor

of water. This prevents me from having to bother

for lettering. Being a lefty, it is frustrating as I

changing the water every few minutes. I also have

am constantly smudging my work. On a deeper

to have paper scraps nearby as I am constantly

level, I’m learning that it is important to paint

double-checking colors that I’ve mixed and

pieces for the walls of my own home and not just

seeing if I need more or less water on my brush.

for others. Last summer I realized that I had sold

These scraps end up a beautiful mess of colors. I

most of the pieces that meant the most to me.

68


69


70


“IT IS A F IN E LIN E BET WEEN F IN D IN G INS PIR AT IO N A N D BECOMING CONSUMED W I T H C O M PA R I S O N .”

What are your other hobbies? Beside painting, I don’t stick with hobbies for long. Last year it was swimming laps. This year I’m really in to yoga and reading psychology books written from a biblical perspective.

How would you describe your style? I call my brand ColoredLightly because my style is vibrant and light. I can’t remember the last time I used black and was satisfied with the outcome. I paint mostly abstract or realistic objects with an abstract element to it.

What do you want your viewers to take from your work? I’d like my viewers to think that they could whip out their old paints and create something beautiful. I’m a huge believer that watercoloring does not require expensive supplies. I’ve used the same two eight-dollar palettes of paints for three years!

71


What do you do to stay creative? I used to look at blogs of other artists to get into a creative mood. However, it is a fine line between finding inspiration and becoming consumed with comparison. I love painting with people who have never really painted before. It’s exciting to watch them squirm looking at the blank, white paper. I just start doing my thing and gently remind them that this is about the process, not the product. People are always worried about messing it up. It reminds me to keep watercoloring simple. Also, keeping in close contact with other artists and photographers to talk through ideas and frustrations is so helpful.

What are your next steps? I have a few secret projects in the works. I am venturing into acrylic and gouache. Gouache is a bolder, more intensely colorful relative of watercolor. Recently, I’ve been dreaming of creating on huge watercolor canvases. I’m done painting safely on tiny paper.

72


73


74


75


DIY ABSTRACT WA T E R C O L O R WRITTEN BY K AT H L E E N G O L I G H T LY

76


77


01 Gather your supplies! Cut your watercolor paper (4x6� or 5x7� for a standard frame size) and fill a big mason jar with water. Start by spreading a good bit of water across the paper using your brush. This helps prevent the paper from curling up and will help the colors to blend..

02 Start simple. If choosing colors is too much pressure, choose one neutral and one bright color. Gray or tan looks magical with any bold, bright paint. Test your color on scrap paper. The more water on your brush or paper, the lighter the color will be. I like to start in the corners and work toward the middle. It’s less intimidating.

78


79


03 Continue to add different colors. Don't be afraid to mix colors on your palette to get the perfect shade. Sometimes mixing with white gives a color a creamy, richer, less-Crayola look. When you are happy with the amount of color, add even more water in random places by dripping on, but not touching, the paper. Then, pick up the paper and tilt it in any direction to allow the colors to mix. This can get messy, but gravity does what no paintbrush could do. It brings disengaged color patches into one beautiful, cohesive abstract piece of art!

04 After your watercolor completely dries, there are many options. Simply frame it for a classic look, or for a trendy calendar, use a black Micron pen to write out the month and its dates.


WA N T T O S E E Y O U R W O R K F E AT U R E D I N THE KORONETTE? We are always looking for new and creative talent! Email THEKORONETTE@GMAIL.COM with: Name & age 2-4 low resolution photos of your best pieces


CREDITS & LINKS INTRODUCTIONS

GRANT NELSON

written by Madeline Brown

(MEDASIN)

thateditingthing.com

soundcloud/officialmedasin

CAMILLE DOMANGUE

LESLIE MEDLIN

camido.co

lesliemedlin.com written by jodieorr

C A R M E L' S TO P 10 T I P S F O R S TA R T I N G

K AT H L E E N

YOUR OWN BUSINESS

G O L I G H T LY

written by riza carmel

instagram/katgolight

rizacarmel.com instagram/riza carmel

CRAIG REID facebook/photosfromcraig photosfromcraig.tumblr.com

M I K E C H UA N G

instagram/feohlor

mikechuang.squarespace.com Instagram/mike_chuang

PERSONAL BRANDING 101 written by jodieorr instagram/jodieorr photos by nancy magana nlmaga.com

82


KORONETTE.COM THEKORONETTE@GMAIL.COM @THEKORONETTE

83


84

The Koronette - August 2015  
The Koronette - August 2015  
Advertisement