Page 8

surely you don’t end the book by saying, “ I’m kind of odd in, in feeling this.” you say, “E- everybody is odd who doesn’t agree with me.” Right? No, I don’t think so. But this is certainly the burden of your book, uh, which…

I, I wasn’t aware of that, um, I mean I, I think I’ve given, you know, an argument that…

Well, maybe this is, maybe this is a, uh, universal difficulty you’re having. Not being aware of certain people’s reading of your position.

Perhaps.

Well, then let me say I think there are, for example, I think I take a very qualified and temperate position on many, many issues in this book. [cough] Mm-hmm.

For example, take the issue of, uh, the background of the Second World War, because I have a lot of time on it, and if you notice I end up with a statement saying that I don’t see any way to give a clear, sharp resolution, clear sharp answer, to the question what we should have done in such ‘n such circumstances.

I discuss someone who did take a very strong, and I think very honorable position, namely A. J. Muste. Mm-hmm. [cough]

And I say that I wish I could come out, I wish I could answer the question for myself whether I feel that I would have taken or would have rejected that position, but I don’t see any way to do it

American Terror libretto © Jeffrey Lependorf 2008

8

Profile for Jeffrey Lependorf

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

Advertisement