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You might contend that this was terroristic and unnecessary, and you might be right Hmm. although you’re not a military expert and neither, neither am I, uh, But I do think there’s a point to that. uh, yeh, but I do judge that, uh, even if we all agreed that we did invest in was inexcusable, uh, uh as a moral question it’s got to be understood in the context of what was it that brought us to Dresden in the first instance. Absolutely. And what brought us to South Vietnam in the first instance, uh, in my judgment, was clearly, uh, a, an, uninterested, or I should say disinterest, of concern for the, uh, uh, stability and possibilities of a region of the world to which we were… What, uh, what period are you talking about? Uh, uh, what period do you feel we had this disinterested relationship to Vietnam? Well, right now!

Well… [cough] Well, uh, uh, I, personally wish, in order to increase my vulnerability, I wish we had, uh, helped the French.

No, at what period did we have it, did it begin, let’s say, in nineteen fifty-one, for example, when we, when the State Department Bulletin points out that we must help the French, uh, re-conquer their, uh, former colony and we must eradicate all Vietnamese resistance down to its last roots in order to re-establish the French in power. Was that disinterested?

American Terror libretto © Jeffrey Lependorf 2008

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Profile for Jeffrey Lependorf

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

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