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ACT TWO Quite. Well, le- let me then… Excuse me, did I interrupt you? I’m sorry. Uh, uh, let me ask you this: uh— uh, if in fact your concern, is to communicate, uh, your moral concern. To what extent have you spent, um, uh, time, uh, thinking about your techniques? I, I, I say this seriously, because, uh, it is probably true, that under, uh, certain circumstances, the communication of one’s own indignation and fury, and, and, uh, uh, strength is, is best communicated emotionally, i.e. to one’s own satisfaction, right, by, uh, screaming and yelling, if, uh, it becomes, uh, observable, that this doesn’t bring people around, then you’ve got to, uh, consider the problem of communication, which is visu-, which becomes a moral problem, just as you consent to argue Auschwitz or Buchenwald with somebody, if there was a chance of, of, of dissipating something of this sort. Now, when, if you have given, that problem any thought,

Yeh, yeh, go ahead.

Right.

Sure. Sure.

do you, do you, well how come that you, you end up saying, as you do in your book,

American Terror libretto © Jeffrey Lependorf 2008

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Profile for Jeffrey Lependorf

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

American Terror  

opera libretto by Jeffrey Lependorf based on the 1969 "Firing LIne" television debate between William F. Buckley and Noam Chomsky on America...

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