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June 2011 Issue No. 112

Now and Then A look back at Gwangju

Human Rights The story of Binayak Sen

Travel Tips Packing Light


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Gwangju News June 2011


What’s On

Gwangju News

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Cover Photo Photographer: Ju-young Hong Cover Photo: GIC Naju Tour with Warren Playing ‘tuho’ at Geumseonggwan - see page 32 Publisher: Gyonggu Shin Editor-in-Chief: Maria Lisak, Julian Warmington Editors: Julian Raethel, Minsu Kim Assistant Editors: Seth Pevey, Stephen Redeker Copy Editors: Kyle Johnson, Kathleen Villadiego Coordinator: Karina Prananto Layout and Design: Karina Prananto Proofreaders: Marion Gregory, Rob Smith, Jake Melville,

Buddhism

22 Hashing Running Club

Julian Raethel, Erin Fahrer, Lindsey Shear, Samantha Richter, Gina Covert, Kwangju Foreign School

Researchers: Yinhao Lu, Seoyeoung Park, Kyuri Park Address: Jeon-il Building 5F, Geumnam-no 1-1, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-758, S. Korea

Phone: +82-62-226-2733~4 Fax: +82-62-226-2731 E-mail: gwangjunews@gmail.com Registration No.: 광주광역시 라. 00145 (ISSN 2093-5315) Printed by Logos (Phone +82-62-444-8800)

Gwangju News Magazine is written and edited by volunteers.

Special thanks to the City of Gwangju and all of our sponsors. Copyright by the Gwangju International Center. All rights reserved. No part of this publication covered by this copyright may be reproduced in any form or by any means - graphic, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise - without the written consent of the publishers. Gwangju News welcomes letters to the editor (gwangjunews@gmail.com) regarding articles and issues. All correspondence may be edited for reasons of clarity or space.

30 Salt Flats of Bolivia Gwangju News June 2011

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Contents Featured Articles 10

Environment

2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords By Frances Herrington

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6

Upcoming Events

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Local News

Binayak Sen: 2011 Gwangju Human Rights Award Winner

26

Photo Contest

32

GIC Program Review

Feature

Bin Laden’s Alleged Death Leads to Threat of Nuclear War

33

Ganbare Japan! GIC May Concert was a Hit! By Stephen Redeker

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Feature

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Letters to KOTESOL

By Laura Won

By Dr. Dave Schaffer

History

39

Community

By Soo-a Jung

40

Hashing Running Club 43

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By Seoyeong Park

By Hughie Samson

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Photo Gallery

45

How to Pack Light

By Roy Arnaldo Cruz

By Kerri Strothard

Travel

46

Health

Haejangguk

47

Food and Drink

The Skin/ Green Smoothie

Kimchi and Tuna Rice Ball

By Justyna Jurczykowska

By Seoyeong Park

Health

48

Plastic Surgery to Get a Job Literature

Fashion

Fash-on with xxl jjdp By jjdp

By Kyuri Park

42

Food and Drink By Gabriel Ward

By David Holt

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Travel Tips

Land and Sea

Salar de Uyuni 36

Living Tips

Taxi Safety Guide

Mudeung Dream Garden 28

Review By Seth Pevey

By Trevor Homeniuk Community

Poetry by Noh Hyang-rim

The Servant

Study English & Conserve the Environment 24

Literature Translated by Chae-pyong Song and Anne Rashid

By Brian Wholehan Community

Language Study

Making Questions: ‘--아 (어/여)요?’

By Will Rawlins

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Language Study

Buddhism

Now and Then 22

News

Home Pages

By Thomas Middlehurst

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GIC Program Review

Feature

The Importance of GDP: A Snapshot of China 18

Naju Tour By Alan Brown

By Michael Bielawski

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This Month in Gwangju By Jon Ozelton

Feature

By Doug Stuber

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Regular Columns

50

Gwangju Reader Oases

Cartoon

Digby By Leroy Kucia

By Josh Kane

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Dear Korea By Jen Lee

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Gwangju News June 2011


Gwangju News June 2011

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Upcoming Events Exhibitions

Festival

2011 Gwangju International Tea Expo Date: June 23~26, 2011 Kimdaejung Convention Center Admission: Adults 2,000 won, Kids 1,000 won For more info: www.teaexpo.or.kr

The 6th Jeong Nam Jin Marathon Date: June 19, 2011 Location: Jangheung County, Jeollanam-do Courses: Full (42 km), 10km, and 5km courses Website: http://jeongnamjin.marathonlife.net/

Like Fire, Like the Wind: Dancer Choi Seung Hee Date: Until August 21, 2011 You can see 150 photos, 1 art painting Gwangju Museum of Art For more info: www.artmuse.gwangju.go.kr Phone: 062) 613-7100

Performances Musical Peter Pan Date: June 11 ~ 12, 2011 Gwangju Culture & Art Center Admission fee: 16,000~ 40,000 won For more info: www.gjart.net

Family Musical: Woodang Tangtang Ddonggojibjeon Date: June 21 ~ 22, 2011 Gwangsan Culture & Art Center Admission fee: 15,000 won For more info: www.gwangsanart.or.kr

Jasmine Gwangju Jasmine Gwangju celebrates the rich cultural history of the Korean city of Gwangju and tells the inspiring story of its famed Democratisation Movement, the uprising against military dictatorship in 1980, which, although brutally put-down, paved the way for later movements that eventually brought democracy and prosperity to South Korea. As the recent tide of popular democratic movements spreads across many countries, Jasmine Gwangju is a story about the human spirit, of hope, despair and ultimate triumph told through music, mass drums, traditional costume and ritual dance in this large-scale spectacular production. Venue: Bit Culture Center (빛고을시민문화관) Admission fee: R: 20,000 won, S: 15,000 won, A: 10,000 won For more info: Festival Project 062) 670-7466 Brand Performance Date and Time: 6:00 p.m., July 2 ~ 3, 2011 National Brand Performance: The National Dance Company of Korea, <Korean Fantasy> Date and Time: 7:30 p.m., July 27, 2011 This month’s Upcoming Events contributors: Yinhao Lu, Seoyeong Park, Kyuri Park

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Gwangju News June 2011

Birth of Buddha Date: Until June 22, 2011 Gwangju National Museum 2nd floor Buddha art room For more info: http://gwangju.museum.go.kr Phone: 062) 570-7000

Movies @ Gwangju Theater Chungjangno 5-ga (two blocks back behind Migliore) Phone: 062) 224-5858 Films change weekly to bi-weekly. Admission fee: 8,000 won for one film. 21,000 won for three films. 30,000 won for five films; 50,000 won for ten films. Check online for calendar and prices. (http://cafe.naver.com/cinemagwangju/) The following movies will be shown in June: Certified Copy Genre: Drama Language: French, English Director: Abbas Kiarostami Stars: Julette Binoche, William Shimell and Jean-Claude Carriere A British writer meets a French woman while promoting his latest book in Tuscany. They begin an unexpected journey together. The film premiered at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival, which picked up the Best Actress Award for Binoche’s performance.

Villain Genre: Thriller, Drama Language: Japanese Director: Sang-il Lee Stars: Eri Fukatsu, Satoshi Tsumabuki In a chance meeting, Yuichi and Mitsuyo embrace their love at first sight. However, Yuichi is a wanted fugitive. Mitsuyo blindly persuades Yuichi to run away together.


Sports This Month at Holiday Inn Gwangju

Gwangju FC Soccer Team June Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

11 18

Sungnam Ilhwa Jeonnam Dragons

19:00 19:00

A warm welcome to June at Holiday Inn Gwangju It is a great pleasure to share a moment with you again. Our beautiful new Hotel is progressing very well and we continue to seek innovative offerings to entice readers to come and enjoy our facilities.

Venue: Gwangju Worldcup Stadium (광주월드컵경기장) Direction: Buses 6, 16, 20, 26, 47, 74 get off Worldcup Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adult 10,000 won, Family (4 people) 30,000 won Website: www.gwangjufc.com

KIA Tigers Baseball Team June Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

7 8 9 10 11 12 17 18 19 21 22 23

Doosan Doosan Doosan LG LG LG Samsung Samsung Samsung SK SK SK

18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 17:00 17:00 18:30 17:00 17:00 18:30 18:30 18:30

Venue: Gwangju Mudeung Baseball Stadium (무등경기장) Directions: Buses 16, 38, 51, 53, 58, 89, 95, 98, 151 get off Mudeung Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adults 7,000 - 12,000 won; Students (13 - 18): 4,000 - 9,000 won; Children (under 13, 2,000 - 6,000 won) Website: www.tigers.co.kr (Korean)

OUTDOOR BBQ ON THE TERRACE – very special deal We have commenced our outdoor BBQ each Wednesday through Sunday. From 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. we have unlimited local beer, makgeolli and BBQ food for 39,900 won incl. per person. Yes, that’s all you can eat and drink, AND for readers of the Gwangju News, bring a copy of the magazine with this article inside and we’ll offer you a discount of 15% on this price. So that’s 33,900 won incl. per person EXECUTIVE LOUNGE BAR 10TH FLOOR This wonderful cosy (sky) lounge bar is now offering “Happy Hours” from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. For 30,000 won incl per person, you can enjoy unlimited house wine and cold hors d’oeuvre food. This is a great venue to rendezvous with friends or business partners and enjoy each others company in an intimate & luxurious atmosphere.

GIC Brothers Baseball Team (Gwangju International Center Brothers) GIC Brothers is recruiting members for their baseball team! Time & Date: Every Sunday 9:00 a.m. Contact Number: 010-5644-2370 Contact E-mail: yinhao2004@hotmail.com Don’t worry if you are not good at it! We will have a professional baseball player (Sol-bin Son) to guide us. Team is always open for anyone who wants to enjoy playing baseball together!

We all look forward to seeing at our great new Hotel. Thank you. Michael Wilson General Manager Holiday Inn Gwangju Michael.Wilson@ihg.com

Watch our website for further details www.holidayinngwangju.com Gwangju News June 2011

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Preview

Curious Encounters & The Things I Don’t Fully Understand Exhibition Period: June 11 ~ 25, 2011 Venue: GIC Gallery Opening with Artist Talk: June 11, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. at GIC Gallery Nadine Bouliane, Meaghan Ford and Ian Aherne are currently English language teachers in the Jeollanam-do province. Through contact and help from the Gwangju International Center (GIC), the current GIC Exhibition has been crafted. Nadine Bouliane graduated from the University of British Columbia in 2009 with a B.A. in Visual Arts and English Literature and in 2010 with a Bachelor of Education specializing in teaching Visual Arts and English at the secondary level. She has participated in several group exhibitions and in 2009 she won the Sharon Yacowar Memorial Fine Arts Award. Nadine Bouliane

Meaghan Ford graduated from the University of Guelph in 2007 with a double major in Studio Arts and Psychology. Since graduating, she has coordinated a community art show, taught at a children’s art school and donated art to various fundraising events. She has also participated in various group exhibitions. Ian Aherne graduated from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2008, he has been nominated for the RDS Student Artist Awards, selected for several group exhibitions, two solo exhibits and this is his second showing in Gwangju.

Collective Statement Discussions between the three artists revealed surprising points where ideas dovetailed together. Meaghan Fo While Meaghan constructed a collection of connected works, designed to be seen as one piece as a rd Veiled Woman whole, Ian was, independent of her, constructing four larger but disassociated pieces. Meaghan has created her own ‘Cabinet of Curiosity’, or Memory Theater, including images of disfigured skeletons, ancient photographs and natural relics. Like Meaghan, Nadine is interested in a visual experience and looks to the past as a source of imagery. She enjoys a playful approach to painting and drawing while exploring the possibilities for invention with texture, shape and colour. Her photos examine the process of memory as a narrative that gains power with repetition, but also degrades with each iteration. Taking in the show as a whole, the artists would hope at the very least, the viewer feel a sense of variety in the groups work and an honest interest in discussing their ideas further.

[ Tour Overview ] GIC Naju - Hwasun Tour with Warren Date: June 18, 2011 (Saturday) Venue: Naju - Hwasun, Jeollanam-do Cost: 25,000 won (20,000 won for GIC member ) Itinerary: Dolmen Park - Unjusa (Temple) - Dorae Village Anyone interested can join the tour. To register and for more information, please visit GIC Website: www.gic.or.kr or gictour@gic.or.kr

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News

This Month in Gwangju A brief roundup of news stories from in and around Gwangju

website www.juso.go.kr, which is in Korean and English. As well as information on the changes, it also features a handy mapping service, where you can zoom in on any street and find out the new addresses. Both the old and new address systems are presently in use, with the old system expected to be phased out starting from the end of this year.

Left: Old address system; Right: New address system www.juso.go.kr

New Street Naming System Residents in Gwangju found themselves living at a new address from last month, as the city officially rolled out its new street naming system. The old system was based on land-lot numbers, but unless you had a suitable map, finding a place with this information was like finding a needle in a haystack, especially when looking for small houses amidst tangles of narrow alleyways. Thankfully, the new system aims to put all that right, by making addresses more orderly and intuitive, to bring the city into line with international standards and hopefully make finding locations faster and easier. As is convention in many other countries, the system now assigns numbers in order to each building, residence or apartment block along the same street. The nationwide project actually dates back to 1996, when the Ministry of Home Affairs first began its working-level planning to improve street naming. Observant Gwangju residents will have noticed the distinctive blue plaques, bearing the new street name and house number, which have been cropping up on buildings and houses for several years. All residents should have already received an explanatory booklet, containing an alphabetical index of all of Gwangjuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3,350 street names, each with a grid-reference showing their location on the accompanying high-quality satellite photograph map of the entire city. To find out more, visit the New Address Information

Gwangju Joins International Coalition of Cities against Racism Gwangju officially joined the International Coalition of Cities against Racism this April 28, when it became a member of the regional Coalition of Cities against Discrimination in Asia and the Pacific (APCaRD). The coalition, which was first launched in 2004 by UNESCO, is a network of cities and local governments around the world who are trying to take a stand against racism, racial discrimination and racial exclusion through international cooperation, raising awareness of problems and sharing strategies to combat them. There are now 280 members from 70 different countries. Gwangju became the fourth Korean representative to join the 70-member Asia Pacific Coalition, along with Incheon City, Gyeonggi Province and Jeju Island. Collecting Old Cell Phones Gwangju is running a campaign to gather up old, used cell phones. With many people switching to smart phones, there is a resultant surge in used unwanted cell phones. However, they require careful disposal, since phones contain lead, cadmium and other heavy metals which can cause pollution. Residents can donate their used cell phones by visiting their neighborhood ward office, or by leaving them in one of the special bins which have been placed in many apartment complexes, large malls and supermarkets. For privacy reasons, people are advised to delete all contact information from their phones before donating them. Free cinema tickets, or entry into local attractions such as Uchi Park are on offer to encourage people to take part in the scheme. The campaign will run until July 31. By Jon Ozelton

Gwangju News June 2011

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Environment

2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords

Urban Environmental Accords hopes to curb GHG emissions from Urban Environments

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hey are the most important modern phenomena facing the population today: urbanization and our changing climate, and they are inextricably linked. Urban environments generate creative thinking, suspect art, innovation, nifty technologies and social change. Even with such contributions, urbanites are criticized for their inefficient energy consumption from vehicle useage, home utilities, convenience products and affluent lifestyles. They’re a little staggering, the statistics which chronicle people’s excessive consumption and inefficient use of energy, the major contributors to Green House Gases (GHG)’s. We’ve heard it before from the news and in journals, so I will attempt to frame it differently. Let’s compare (in tCO2e, tonnes of CO2 equivalent); Seoul emits 4.1 tCO2e per capita while Tokyo emits 4.89 tCO2e. That doesn’t look so bad, a mere 0.79 difference. But that’s probably because a tonne of carbon dioxide is difficult to imagine. When you think in terms of the weight of carbon dioxide, picture a tonne of ice or better yet dry ice—frozen carbon dioxide. Suddenly, 790 kilograms of dry ice per person per year comes across as a significant difference. London’s emissions are a colossal 9.6 tCO3e and higher still are New York City’s at 10.5 tCO3e; illustrations of how Seoul’s and Tokyo’s emissions are benefitted by population density.

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Discussion in Vienna City Hall

made us aware of the need to change our values from “conspicuous consumption” to “conspicuous frugality”. His words in the 1970’s reminded people that we are a vulnerable part of the natural world and subject to the same injury as the rest of the eco-system. A generation later and there is still a reluctance to accept the need to change. We believe that in order to advance as a species we need to “develop,” and develop is synonymous with increase, build and expand. Increase our possessions, build expectations beyond those of our parents and expand our coverage of the globe. With such a psyche it is difficult to believe that we may need to reduce our energy consumption, or at the very least fully utilize it, to advance with the environment still intact.

According to estimates from the International Energy Agency, (IEA) urban areas account for 71% of energyrelated carbon emissions. They also expect that number to rise to 76% by 2030. If all production and consumption based emissions that result from an affluent lifestyle and convenience purchasing habits are included, this figure increases to 80%.

At a talk at Catawba College, Brown said that "unless civilization changes its ways,...we're in a race between natural tipping points and political tipping points what we need most of all is for the market to tell the environmental truth.” Brown will speak again at the Gwangju Urban Environmental Accords (UEA), but this time directly to city mayors, spurring action.

Lester R Brown, founder of the Earth Policy Institute,

This October the UEA wishes to challenge the

Gwangju News June 2011


Environment

Mechanism (CDM) which will allow for the trading of urban carbon credits on the open market, the first of its kind. They will function much the same as current carbon credits, purchased by those who emit more than their allotment, and sold by the thrifty or industrious. The UNEP together with Gwangju City will develop the CDM to be adopted by United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) which means it will have respectable backing.

A meeting with Nairobi (Kenya) officials

common argument that efficiency must come at the expense of the quality of life. What the mayors of cities around the globe will be doing at the UEA Gwangju Summit is pledging to do their part to tackle environmental problems such as energy depletion, waste disposal, transportation, water demand, greenhouse gasses and environmental pollution. As decision makers, city mayors are in unique positions to respond to the natural ecology and climate change at a visceral level, with immediate and thorough actions catered to the specifics of their city. Implementing action on a smaller scale can bring about immediate meaningful change. They hope to do this without negative economical effects or hindrance to lifestyles. But besides sharing model cases of environmental policies with other mayors, how will they achieve this? I poised this question to Professor Kwi-gon Kim, Chief Commissioner of the summit, to which he replied, “The ultimate goal [of the UEA Summit] is to create a lowcarbon Green City. Based on two important tools, one is the Urban Environment Evaluation Index and the other one is Urban CDM.” [Clean Development Mechanism]. The Environmental Evaluation Index will establish a method of criterion for measuring cities’ success in becoming sustainable. It will also suggest policy changes aimed at assisting cities who suffer from environmental problems. A brief of the index will be constructed before the meetings in October, so as to encourage practical discussions. The agreed to index will provide mayors with a tool to improve the environmental standing of their city. It is expected that this index will become industry standard with the continued support from the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP). The most ambitious and rewarding proposal will be the construction of a Urban Clean Development

But what should city allowances of GHG emissions be? Should it be split evenly between urban environments based upon population, sprawl or size? Some cities are simply in a less fortunate position than others; lacking natural resources, battling harsh climates, grossly dispersed or located in remote regions. These factors cause some cities, such as the elevated La Paz in Bolivia, to emit more than others. These and other questions of measurement, analyses and the geographical definition need to be examined in great detail before the summit commences. With such extensive collaboration between leading environmental organizations, it’s appropriate that the keynote speakers include Dr. Achim Steiner, Executive Director of UNEP and co-host of the event; and Dr. Joan Clos, Executive Director of the UNHabitat speaking for the first time in an international meeting discussing climate change. In fact it is unprecedented that Clos and Stenier speak at the same event. Dr. Lester R. Brown will continue his work in encouraging sustainability by speaking also. Big name city San Francisco will co-host the summit, whilst 51 other cities have confirmed their attendance and commitment to the environment. Some attendees to note are Washington D.C, Freiburg, Germany, an innovator in solar energy, and Curitiba, Brazil, recognized as one of the world’s most sustainable cities known for its model practices in ecological, social and economic sustainability. As we quickly approach a world with 9 billion people, 70% of who are anticipated to live in urban areas by 2050, cities must address the harmful effects of their subsistence; mainly of GHG. I am inclined to agree with Professor Kwi-gon Kim, who believes that "the urban environment problem is a global issue, which can only be tackled through co-operation among international cities”. For more information click on www.2011uea.com By Frances Herrington Photos by 2011 UEA Gwangju News June 2011

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Feature

Binayak Sen 2011 Gwangju Human Rights Award Winner

his year’s Gwangju Human Rights Award winner is Binayak Sen, the Indian Medical Doctor who has served local patients in Chhattisgarh, while fighting for human rights to the extent that he was given a life sentence by the Indian government, “the world’s largest democracy.” Archaic laws and false charges were used against Sen because he worked hard to protect the original homeland, forest and waters of the indigenous Adivasis. PSOSCO, the huge Korean steel producer, has been the driving force behind development that would “steal iron ore at 60 cents per ton and not pay the tribe anything, while also setting up a steel factory on the land.”1

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His acceptance speech also covered the massive poverty, with 43% of children under five being malnourished, the average Indian lives on 50 cents a day, and 863 million Indians live in abject poverty. All the while India sports the largest number of US dollar billionaires in Asia.. He also noted that UNICEF estimates two million children per year die in India due to malnutrition and other related diseases.

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Gwangju News June 2011

His work for the People’s Union for Civil Liberties, and support of local unions and the land got him accused of helping Maoist rebels, and he was in Gwangju on parole from the Supreme court, after being arrested and jailed in 2007. After his recognised speech, he went to a different subject and asked, “Can you believe the world will still consider building more nuclear power plants after what happened in Japan?” For a complete rundown of his speech, and the two special prize winners, go to www.gicjournal.wordpress.com Daniela Kitain and Mazen Faraj, both members of the Parents Circle Families Forum, a group that promotes understanding and peace, along with justice in Palestine/ Israel received the Special award this year. Both have lost family members to each others army’s bullets, and their group is working with other families who have lost loved ones to the continued violence in an attempt to build human rights via peace. Daniela lost a 21-year-old son, Mazen, who, was born in a refugee camp and lived through a hellish young life, had the additional pain


Feature

Learning,” had a certain perspective about May 18. “Not enough people ever found out about May 18, 1980 in Gwangju in my home country of the United States. By 1980 the U.S. media had changed from a watchdog to a mouthpiece for government. This problem persists not just in the U.S. and Asia, but in Europe now as well,” he said. “We have so much more news going on yet hear more about Lindsey Lohan than the wars in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Even from economists all we get is blah, blah blah.”

Mazen Faraj (left, Palestine) and Daniela Kitain (right, Israel) from the Israeli–Palestinian Bereaved Families for Peace

applied when his father, at age 62, was gunned down. As always, human rights activists from around the world attended the ceremonies, including the memorial ceremony at the 5.18 ceremony. The night before, an evening overture to a series of seminars, performances, and flat-out crying occurred on Geumnam-no, as congregants of the May 18 Foundation’s 2011 Human Rights Award ceremony filed into the area that saw the worst scene of the 1980 massacre along with Sangmu Gymnasium in front of Provincial Hall and the last day of the massacre at Provincial Hall.

Kesten describes his Non-Government Organization (NGO) as a human rights corps. “A group of dedicated activists seeking to train people in villages, towns and cities about the importance of human rights. We are based in New York, but achieved a grant form the Swiss government,” the activist said. A typical worker in the PDHRE (a human rights organization) is not in it for monetary gain, but to instill the importance of human rights at a time when the globalized profit motive has turned billions into wage slaves. This poverty exacerbates the opportunities for human rights abuses, and amounts to one in itself.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_US_beef_prot est_in_South_Korea

On the home-grown side, Jung-gil Kim, the twiceelected assemblymen from Busan, and former General Affairs Minister in Kim Daejung’s cabinet, was on hand to usher in a new era that can gain the strength of the democratic movement in time for next year’s elections. As a “democracy professor” he came to keep the Gwangju flame burning, and looked for all the world like a presidential candidate as he enjoyed the triangular kimbap offered by volunteer ajummas on Geumnam-no.

Among Gwangju’s deaths was the Chonnam National University Student Union President, Gwan-hyeon Park, who died of a hunger strike in prison in 1982. A new Liberal Arts building at Chonnam National University is named after him.

The hope is that more middle schools, high schools and even hagwons create field trips to the events during this week, and encourage participation in more events coming up May 21 and 22 downtown. Here’s to the spirit of Oh Il Pal!

Such sacrifice was needed, and such sacrifice succeeded. Sadly, Japan, East Timor and India remain the only democratic or semi-democratic states in Asia. But the May 18 Foundation has a large group of human rights interns who are schooled in the technical realities of how to foster democracy back in their home countries.

Story and photos by Doug Stuber 1 http://gicjournal.wordpress.com/wpadmin/post.php?post=1824&action=edit

Robert Kesten, an activist in town for the Human Rights Award ceremonies and seminars, and director of the “People’s Movement for Human Rights Gwangju News June 2011

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Feature

Bin Laden’s Alleged Death Leads to Threat of Nuclear War eoul – For many people the ever changing story of Bin Laden’s death just made more confusion about the ominous Al Qaeda leader. Historian Webster G Tarpley had this to say on WBAI radio of NYC; “It does not make very much sense to get involved in the details of this story if only because they are constantly changing. We are told ‘fire fight yes, fire fight no, fire fight yes … Bin Laden resisted, didn’t resist, used a woman as a human shield, didn’t use her’ … the entire thing is a psy-op, this is mass brainwashing.”

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The real story is the US and nuclear-armed Pakistan are having military skirmishes almost weekly, and now the Chinese foreign ministry has “warned in unequivocal terms that any attack on Pakistan would be construed as an attack on China,” according to the Times of India. Former Pakistani intelligence commander Hameed Gul reports Pakistan is also communicating with Russia for military protection. While most of the world continues to focus on sports and celebrities, this ongoing stalemate is arguably the closest the world has come to nuclear war since the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Tarpley said Bin Laden has probably been dead for ten years and in any case no court has connected him to 9/11. It is true Bin Laden has never been indicted by a grand jury for 9/11, FBI’s Chief of Investigative Publicity Rex Tomb admitted; “the reason why 9/11 is not mentioned on Osama Bin Laden’s Most Wanted page is because the FBI has no hard evidence connecting Bin Laden to 9/11.” And several top government representatives have stated Bin Laden probably died around December 2001 from kidney disease. They include former Kissinger Assistant Steve Pieczenik, former Secretary of State Madeline Albright, Marine Corps officer Oliver North, CIA case officer Robert Baer, two former Pakistani Prime Ministers and the aforementioned Hameed Gul. Egyptian newspapers

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Gwangju News June 2011

blogspot.com

Al Wafd and The Observer of Pakistan ran funeral announcements for Bin Laden on December 26th, 2001. There are no photos of the body that was allegedly dumped in the ocean, and they are admittedly only 95 percent sure the (alleged) DNA was even Bin Laden’s. When the BBC interviewed 50 locals at a market about Bin Laden’s death, only one person believed it. One neighbor said “His name was Akhbar Khan, he owns the house … I know (knew) him very well.” “This (analysis of the Bin Laden story) is the equivalent of being a theater critic … it’s like I’ve been given a novel and told to write a review and I have to criticize the story as literature … but it is political fiction and it is the kind of political fiction that can start world wars,” Tarpley said on his radio show. What the story does is provide a pretext to attack Pakistan, where Bin Laden was allegedly protected. The reasons being strategic geopolitics… “no


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Pakistan energy corridor … no pipeline from Iran into China, no development of the Port of Quadra, no chance of an Iran-to-India pipeline which would give India a reason to be drawn into peaceful cooperation and away from the blandishments of the US/Indian nuclear deal,” Tarpley said. And there is the alleged Cache of Al Qaeda intelligence that can be used like a government-run Wikileaks. Tarpley said “the principal purpose of these Bin Laden reality TV… home movies, was to establish the credibility of the treasure trove … and of course the CIA is free to invent anything they want and say ‘Ah ha! We found it in the mother load of the Bin Laden offices.’” Most people don’t realize the CIA admitted to faking Bin Laden videos in 2010 to the Washington Post. And there is the recent visit by Prince Bandar of Saudi Arabia to Pakistan supposedly asking for military support against any US-backed color revolution or Putsch in Saudi Arabia not unlike what happened in Egypt and is ongoing in Libya.

And finally there are the renewed police state measures like TSA body scanners and groping that will expand from air ports to soft targets like trains, buses and shopping centers, all justified by the supposed intelligence treasure trove. To understand geopolitics today you need to know that there are two economic pillars in the world that are always competing for resources and power. There is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) primarily led by the US and Britain, and the “Shanghai Cooperation Organization” (SCO) led by China and Russia. Pakistan has traditionally been allied with the US, but has always looked to China for protection against aggression by India, and they are very angry over the hated drone attacks that routinely kill hundreds of civilians while allegedly targeting suspected terrorists. With the recent ultimatum by China, we have to hope cooler heads prevail among NATO command to prevent a potential nuclear war. By Michael Bielawski

Gwangju News June 2011

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Feature

The Importance of GDP: A Snapshot of China hina surpassed Japan as the world’s second largest economy by GDP (gross domestic product) in August 2010 and is expected to surpass the USA by the early 2020s. Around one in fivepeople in the world are Chinese. With such a high population China should be first, yet according to the IMF (International Monetary Fund), China’s GDP per capita is actually as low as 94th, down with economic powerhouses Turkmenistan and Ecuador. So how important is GDP exactly? To help me answer this question, I turn to a quote from Bobby Kennedy.

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"Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education, or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages; the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage; neither our wisdom nor our learning; neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country; it measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.” Let’s look at each of these in turn, and see where China ranks.

“The health of our children...” The CIA states that infant mortality rates in China are about 16 in 1,000 children. To compare, South Korea has about four deaths out of 1,000 births. Health care in China is rapidly improving, though it’s nowhere near the standard its GDP would indicate. China has been instrumental in improving health care in Africa, due primarily to the need for healthy workers to mine precious minerals. A hospital for copper, malaria drugs for iron ore; whatever deals happen, they seem to be a fair trade.

Chinese school children

asianews.it

its GDP on education. This is clearly unacceptable, especially with recent increases in military spending.

“The joy of their play...” There have not been many studies into the joy of play. China is not part of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) which gathers most of the data on these subjects. So I turned to suicide rates. Suicide is the main cause of death among young adults in China. However the same can be said for many countries. South Korea has one of the highest in the developed world. In 2004, China’s suicide toll was estimated at 250,000 people a year. Although this is incredibly sad, the suicide rate seems relatively low considering China’s enormous population. However, there doesn’t seem to be much data on this subject in China, a considerable problem. Transparency, if we are to believe the media, is not China’s strong point.

“The beauty of our poetry...” “The quality of their education...” China’s education budget has never hit the government’s goal of four percent of GDP. In 2004 the global average for education spending was 4.7 percent of GDP. That same year, China spent 2.79 percent of 16

Gwangju News June 2011

I have never read Chinese poetry so I cannot judge the beauty for myself. Statistics don’t prove beauty; you have to judge it for yourself. What is irrefutable is that poetry has to be read, music has to be heard and art has to be seen to be fairly judged.


Feature

Sadly this year, high-profile artist Ai Weiwei was arrested for suspected economic crimes. Bankers, big businesses and politicians commit economic crimes with their reckless spending, monopolisation, and a total lack of ethics. Artists attempt to make the world more beautiful. Economic crimes are not their forte. Arresting the artist on such suspicions will ultimately increase Ai Weiwei’s personal fame, but one must fear for the future artists who may not be so brave.

“The strength of our marriages...” In 2009, one in five Chinese marriages ended in divorce, according to a report by the Ministry of Civil Affairs. The report said 1.71 million Chinese couples broke up that year or 10.3 percent, a rate higher than the previous year. This is probably a good thing, though I have no doubt that a strong marriage is good for a child. High divorce rates seem to have a correlation with prosperity and liberalism. Divorce itself, may not be positive but allowing divorce most certainly is.

“The intelligence of our public debate...” How can a country have public debate if there is only one political party? Having one governing party has its advantages: decisions are certainly much more efficient. The problem with having one ruling party is that occasionally the public does not agree with government policies. Along with China, other single party states include North Korea, Syria and Turkmenistan. Last year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, an advocate of a multi-party state in China, is currently serving an 11 year sentence for “inciting subversion of state power”. He has been in jail three times before on similar charges, but Nobel Peace Prize winners don’t often spend time in jail. The last winner to be in jail when he received the award was Carl von Ossietzky, who was arrested by the Nazis for speaking against the state.

“The integrity of our public officials...” China, publicly at least, seems to be tackling corruption. In December 2010, China stated that corruption is "still very serious," and set out new measures to tackle it. In a report on the fight against corruption, the authorities said that more than 200,000 cases have been investigated since 2003. This is extremely positive news, and a sign that China cares about its reputation around the world.

“Neither our wisdom nor our learning...” The final points made in Bobby Kennedy speech are

Liu Xiaobo

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rather more subjective. Everything in education is debatable. Every year, the UK’s student pass rates go up. Most people argue that it’s not because teaching is not getting better but because test are getting easier.

“Neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country...” I’m sure most people have a devotion to their country. When people say they hate their country, they really mean they hate the government. They don’t hate the people, the landscape or anything else that makes life in the country worthwhile. Currently GDP is important in that it shows how a country is progressing economically. GPD statistics are used, rightly or wrongly, by governments to compare themselves to their counterparts. However a better counterpart for China might be India, which has a similarly-sized population, rather than the USA or Japan. According to the IMF, India is currently the world’s 10th largest economy. However when you look at India’s GDP per capita, they are a lowly 138th. China’s goal shouldn’t be to overtake the USA in terms of GDP, but to overtake the world average GDP per capita which would place at 61st in the world, 34 places above its current position. Looking only at GDP per capita has its flaws as well; you really need to look at income inequality. South Africa, for example has a terrible income distribution, despite making great strides in GDP per capita. Visitors can experience everything from the crushing poverty of shanty towns to exquisite mansions, all on a short drive out of town. The rise of CO2 levels and the acquisition of material commodities cannot go on forever. Eventually the world will look past GDP, and when it does GDP won’t matter anymore. By Thomas Middlehurst Gwangju News June 2011

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Feature

Buddhism ot too long after Easter, Korea was busy in preparation for another religious holiday, Buddha’s birthday. As that special day has come and gone, people tied lamps on the roads and streets to celebrate the day of Buddha’s arrival. In many Buddhist temples in Korea, people made delicious traditional Korean foods, such as rice cakes and wonderful kimchi. So, what is Buddhism all about?

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Dynasty in 372, and was mainly developed in the period of Goryeo, which came afterwards. The famous Tripitaka Koreana (팔만대장경) was also made in this period. The legend says that it was made to prevent the invasion of the Mongols through the power of Buddhism. After a long history, Koreans developed their own type of Buddhism by mixing their special traditions and cultures, resulting in Won Buddhism.

Buddhism, nowadays, is one of the most influential religions in the world, but it is also a religion that represents Asia. Except for India and some other countries, Buddhism makes up the majority in most regions of Asia. Ironically, Buddhism was started in India by a prince called Siddhartha, and then spread all over to countries such as Tibet and Burma. However, its strongest patron and supporter was China. With China’s support, Buddhism spread further to Korea and Japan, and was able to become the key religion in Asia.

Korea is now divided into North and South. However, they are united in terms of religion; both countries feel a connection to one another through Buddhism.

Buddhism was originally introduced to Korea (divided into Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje at that time) from the former Qin

So, who was Buddha? He was an enlightened one, but he was born as a prince called Siddhartha. At first, Siddhartha Gautama was a prince, unaware of the hardships of life. When he found out what death and hardship was, he decided to become a monk. Monks mortify themselves, both physically and mentally, in order to escape from earthly sufferings. Siddhartha went through long years of meditation, and finally reached a state of enlightenment. He became the enlightened one; or Buddha.

⇨ A Buddha statue at Donghwasa Temple, Daegu Photo by Joanne Whitham

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Gwangju News June 2011


Feature

Erin Heath

Lantern festival on Buddha’s birthday in downtown Gwangju Jessica Solomatenko

What had he learned? The answer is to discard all of one’s desires. But discarding one’s desires is probably the hardest thing to do in our lives; one must eliminate the will for everything: family, food, love, sex, and dreams. In other words, people have to discard all of the things they have possessed, and spend their time solely to achieve mind control. Siddhartha did the same thing. As soon as he decided to become a monk and came out to the world, he left all the things he possessed – power, love, dreams, and even family.

attached with different shapes of paper. When the kit rotates, these shapes are shown as shadows inside the lantern. At night, these lanterns are burned all together and produce a wonderful scene that everybody enjoys. If you live in Gwangju, you might want to visit Jungsimsa or Wonhyosa in order to see these lanterns.

Offering at Mugaksa Temple

Many temples and monks teach people to control their feelings: joy, anger, sorrow, and pleasure, so that they don’t get excessive. People tend to compare a good situation with a bad situation, which results in feelings. Whenever there are bad days, there are good days. Whenever there are good days, there are also bad days. So you shouldn’t feel too strongly about one or the other. On May 10, Buddhists gathered from all over the world to nearby Buddhist temples. During the day, people prayed to Buddha and listened to the teachings of wise monks. On Buddha’s birthday, free food and tea is provided to all visitors, and lunch is often prepared with sanchae bibimbap. The ceilings and outside of the temples are full of diversely-colored lanterns. These lamps can be in a variety of shapes: watermelon, turtle, lotus, and others. Each lamp is written with people’s names to wish for peace and the well-being of everyone. Sometimes, people set a ship loaded with lanterns afloat along the river. In other places, people hang special lanterns called shadow lanterns (연등); these lanterns each have a rotating kit

By Laura Won Laura is a freshman student at Kwangju Foreign School in Yangson-dong

Gwangju Temples Jungsimsa in Mudeung Mountain

Add: 56 Unrim-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju Tel: 062) 226-0107 Bus available: 9, 12, 35, 49, 51, 54, 76

Wonhyosa in Mudeung Mountain

Add: 846 Geumgok-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju Tel: 062) 266-0326 Bus Available: 1187

Gwangju News June 2011

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History

Now and Then A look back at Gwangju through the generations

wangju is fast becoming a robust and thriving metropolitan area. With culture landmarks such as Kumho World Electronics Market, Biennale, U-Square and the World Cup stadium, Gwangju has established itself as a lively modern metropolis. Also, Gwangju commemorates its past, which is evident at the Yangdong market place and the May 18 Memorial Park.

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Although these places create an interesting visual aspect of the city’s past and present, they can’t really elaborate about what it was like to grow up in Gwangju. For recent residents and people visiting Gwangju, the current state of the city is all they know. However, to understand more of how this city has evolved into what it is today and what it might become tomorrow, it is best to consult with people who have experienced it firsthand. Thankfully, two Gwangju natives, Go Un-suk (aka: Grace) and Kang Ji-Yeon, have volunteered to share their experiences of growing up in Gwangju in an interview with the Gwangju News. Both identify with different generations and can offer unique perspectives. Kang, being a young adult, offers a more recent perspective, while Go offers a more experienced understanding of the city’s evolution. What was your earliest memory of Gwangju? Go: I was born in Gwangju, so this city is my whole world. Gwangju is my hometown and when I feel nostalgic, I recall things being very peaceful and similar to a countryside or rural setting. There were very few buses back then, and I played after school with my friends. I really wish I could go back to that time in my life. Kang: I wasn’t born in Gwangju. I was born and raised in a smaller town, and when I was 10 years

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Gwangju News June 2011

Then: Gwangju Station in 1969

Now: Gwangju Station in 2010

old, I moved to Gwangju. I remember the city being very big for me. There were so many big buildings. I remember seeing tall department stores and I was very impressed. I had never seen a department store before that. So my earliest memory of Gwangju is that it was very big. What was Gwangju like when you were in middle school? Go: Around the 70s, thinking back to those days, I remember walking to school on foot. It took about 30 minutes to get to school every day. I was able to see the beautiful scenery going to and from school. May was especially nice, since during this time many roses were blooming. I felt the fresh air and enjoyed nature. Kang: In the late 90s when I was a middle school


History

student, my friends and I would go downtown and have fun. Downtown still looks the same from the time when I was a middle school student. These days, middle school students usually go to USquare or the Sangmu area. What were some concerning issues at that time in the city and the country? Go: I have three brothers and two sisters. I am the fifth child in my family. At that time, my brothers were Seoul University students. While at university, they were eager to be part of the democratic movement in Korea. I remember my parents being very anxious about what they would do, since they were leaders of the democratic movement at their university. At that time, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have freedom in Korea, so even though I was young, I was very aware of political issues.

Before: Geumnam-no in the 1970s

After: Geumnam-no in the 1990s

K a n g : I remember the I.M.F. (International Monetary Fund) crisis was also a major cause for concern. Since Korea had to borrow a lot of money to settle its debts, people were unsure of Koreaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. Also, when America was attacked by terrorism on 9/11,

people were scared of terrorists harming them. Then there was the 2002 World Cup. I was a first year high school student then, but during middle school it was a big issue.

Then: Yangdong Market in 1974

Now: Yangdong Market in 2010

What did you do for fun in your middle school days? Go: When I was young we would play hide and seek. I would also play house with my friends and family. Since there were no toys to play with, we would gather things like boxes and plastic items. We would often play with pebbles, since they were commonly available. We would also draw on the ground or play Ganggangsullae. Boys usually liked to play with balls and Jachigi (Korean traditional play, stick-tossing game). Kang: I would usually invite my friends to come over, or I would visit them, and we would watch TV. Also, we liked to go downtown and sing in the singing rooms or play board games in game rooms. By Will Rawlins Photos from Naver Blog

Gwangju News June 2011

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Community

Hashing Running Club ashing... it’s a mixture of athleticism and sociability, hedonism and hard work; a refreshing break from the nine-to-five routine. Hashing is an exhilarating combination of running, orienteering and partying, where bands of “harriers” and “harriettes” chase “hares” on four-to-seven kilometer-long trails through town, country, jungle and desert, all in search of exercise, camaraderie, and good times.

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Hashing as we know it today began in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in 1938, when a group of restive British company men started a Hare & Hounds running group. They named the group after their meeting place, the Selangor Club, aka the “Hash House.” Hash House Harrier runs were patterned after the traditional British public school paper chase. A “hare” would be given a short lead to blaze a trail, marking his devious way with shreds of paper, soon pursued by a shouting pack of “harriers.” Only the hare knew where he was going... the harriers followed his marks to stay on trail. Apart from the excitement of chasing down the wily hare, solving the hare’s marks and reaching the end was its own reward. For there, thirsty harriers would find a tub of iced-down beer. Today there are thousands of Hash House Harrier clubs in all parts of the world, complete with newsletters, directories, and regional and world hashing conventions. A typical hash “kennel” is a loosely-organized group of 20 to 40 men and women who meet weekly or biweekly to chase a hare. We follow chalk, flour, or paper, and the

trails are never boring. When forced to, we’ll run the occasional street or alley, but in general we prefer “shiggy”...fields, forests, jungles, swamps, streams, fences, storm drains, and cliffs. And although some of today’s health-conscious hashers may shun the icy beer in favor of water or a diet soda, trail’s end is still a party. Perhaps that’s why they call us the “drinking club with a running problem!” If you’d like to spice up your running program with fun, good company, new surroundings, and physical challenge, try hashing. Just remember one thing... never wear new shoes to the hash! The Gwangju Hash House Harriers was started in September 2010 by Brian Wholehan. The club is 23+ members strong and growing. The Gwangju Hash House Harriers will be hosting an International Red Dress Run on June 11. The cost is 20,000 won. This includes beer, food, and beer! Contact Brian Wholehan for more details: bwholehan@gmail.com/ 010-9453-8675 Or join the Facebook Gwangju Hash House Harriers group at GwangjuH3@gmail.com We hope to see you on June 11 or at any of our future runs! ON ON!!! Story and photos by Brian Wholehan

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Gwangju News June 2011


Community

"Study English and Conserve the Environment" or just over a year now, two local native English teachers have been volunteering their time on weekends to create and teach an environmental education program. The program is simply called EAEP or "Environmental Awareness Education Program." The EAEP "Green Seed" project, which is taught to elementary students, has just been approved by the Gwangju Office of Education to be taught in the city and surrounding areas. Population levels are predicted to be over 7 billion worldwide by next Halloween, so more efforts will be needed to reduce global warming. The "Green Seed" program aims to increase student exposure to the ever-present issue of climate change through art, games, music and even direct action government lobbying.

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With its recent successes and generous support, EAEP proves how much a little will and passion can achieve in the Korean bureaucracy. All the development costs of the program were fundraised. UNESCO and the GIC contributed greatly with many valuable resources and the program has been lucky enough to receive great write ups in the Gwangju News, Gwangju Blog and Unam Times. However, the current EAEP volunteers leave in August of this year. Therefore, the program needs new volunteers to manage, teach and continue raising awareness. The workshop primarily aims to inspire students with art-making and other creative activities. First the students play a flash card speed matching game (wonderfully illustrated by volunteer Andrea Hildebrand) and try to be the first team to match environmental problems with corresponding solutions.

Next is a puppet show that uses a Velcro earth as the setting. Students physically change the world by choosing to cut down trees for cattle farms, to ride bikes, build factories or even tap into available geothermal power. Each decision a student makes is enforced by a corresponding environmental consequence or benefit and by working quickly the kids can stop the planet from warming. After this the students get vocal and sing along with the original song "Let's make a change", which pumps them up to make postcards to send to environment minister Lee Manee. So far 300 of these cards have been made in preparation for an upcoming art show/mailing party. That's a lot of surprise reading for the minister! Who would think that a bunch of fifth graders would be interested in government lobbying? The cards bring together the information, fun and inspiration that students get from the workshop. EAEP would like to select a couple of inspired, dedicated teachers to teach and mange this valuable program. If you are interested please contact the coordinators through e-mail (andybrand9@gmail.com, or thomeniuk@gmail.com). As it is a good cause and seen as beneficial to the students, worthwhile incentives have been added by the Office of Education to give to any interested teachers. For more information, check EAEP out online at Facebook EAEP or at https://sites.google.com/site/eaepgreenseed/. Story and photos by Trevor Homeniuk

Gwangju News June 2011

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Community

Mudeung Dream Garden couple of weekends ago, Gwangju residents gathered together to raise funds for Sungbin Girls’ Orphanage. Unbeknownst to many, however, Sungbin Girls’ Orphanage is not the only orphanage in Gwangju.

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Several others exist, and one such center is called Mudeung Dream Garden. Mudeung Dream Garden was founded in 1928 as a shelter for homeless people. After the Korean War it became a children’s home (or orphanage). Children between the ages of two and 18 live there now. Their mission is to nurture the children spiritually as well as physically and to help them become independent, contributing members of their communities.

Eunkang Chung, originally from Switzerland but having lived in the United States in Seattle as well, has been working at Mudeung Dream Garden for almost two years. Known as Kang to many of his friends, he is the secretary general there, and he oversees all of the work that goes on in the orphanage and is especially responsible for ensuring communication between it, its local district office, and Gwangju’s city hall. According to Kang, his great-grandfather founded Mudeung Dream Garden in 1928, and he is a fourthgeneration member of his family to work there. “When I was living in Seattle I studied computer science at the University of Washington, and afterwards I completed my military service here in Korea. But I realized that I wanted to do something with people rather than computers, so I changed my major and I got a degree in social welfare instead. I've always been passionate about helping younger people, and I want to be a positive influence in other people’s lives. Given the history of Mudeung Dream Garden and my great-grandfather’s role in founding it, it is a good place for me to spend some time!” According to Kang, there are many ways in which people can get involved at the center, especially members of Gwangju’s expatriate community. The center tries to match its needs with volunteers' strengths, and for the expat community, that often means teaching English. However, Kang is aware that many of Gwangju’s expats are English teachers already, and he does not want volunteers to feel that visiting Mudeung would

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Gwangju News June 2011


Community

simply be an extension of their everyday routines. “We want everyone to have fun,” he explains, “and there are many ways for that to happen! “Whatever people’s strengths are, we want to help them find something that works for them. Some people like music, others like art, others like sports or games, and others like cooking. We want people to come down to our center, and as long as it is possible, we want them to do some of the things that they love to do and get the kids to spend some time hanging out with them. “Because the children at our center are between two and 18 years-old, we can do almost anything here. Toddlers who are living here 24 hours a day can always use some special attention in the mornings or afternoons. Once the older kids have come back from school, that’s a good time for people to get to know them too. Previous and current volunteers have undertaken such projects as teaching the kids English songs, teaching them how to make movie slideshows, and hosting evening arts and crafts classes also.

Learning English is always great, but it can also be an added bonus that simply comes along with spending time with volunteers. What’s most important is that people simply take the time to come down regularly.” Kang and his team are currently on the lookout for new volunteers and they are in the process of making their website more English-friendly as well. They have created a Facebook group also, but according to Kang, the best way to get involved right now is by sending him an e-mail, sending him a text, or giving him a call. “I am more than happy to set up a time for people to come down to our center and figure out a good way for them to get to know our kids. Making a difference in one's life can really be fun! The kids and I are looking forward to meeting you!” For more information please visit www.mdkids.org or look for MDream Garden on Facebook. You can also contact Kang directly. Send him an e-mail at silverkang@hotmail.com (preferably with the header “MD Volunteer” to help him recognize your inquiry) or contact him by phone at 010-4744-3762.

Mudeung Dream Garden building

By Hughie Samson Article first appeared in Gwangju Blog Photos provided by Mudeung Dream Garden

Gwangju News June 2011

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PHOTO CONTEST Submit your best shot of Korea! To enter the Photo Contest, simply send your name, photo and picture description to gwangjunews@gmail.com.

W I N N E R

A woman under cherry blossom

Sunset rays 26

Gwangju News June 2011

Photo by Nancy Harcar

Photo by Joanne Whitham


This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photo contest was judged by Debra M. Josephson Debra M. Josephson, a professional photographer for over 15 years, received her B.F.A. in Studio Arts, specializing in Drawing & Painting at The Ohio State University in 1995. She later embarked on her M.A. in Studio Arts at New York University in 1999.

Water drops

Photo by Stella Oh

Spring new bud

Photo by Van Hoang Gwangju News June 2011

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Photo Gallery

Land and Sea

By Roy Arnaldo Cruz

Sunrise

Roy Cruz is a Filipino photographer who relocated to his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hometown of Tongyeong, Gyeongsannam-do soon after getting married in 2008. His photography started in college while he was pursuing a Communications degree at the University of the Philippines, and later went on to become a freelance photographer in Manila. Royâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photographic interests are creative potraiture and travel photography. He is available for assignments or artistic collaborations all over the country. For more info, please visit www.roycruz.com

Tongyeong Harbor

Gateway to the sea 28

Gwangju News June 2011


Photo Gallery

Tongyeong Bridge Nap

Geoje Yeocha drive

Tongyeong Fitness Gwangju News June 2011

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Travel

Salar de Uyuni fter two minutes of driving there was nothing around. Our driver was hitting 80 kilometers per hour; it could have been double or we could have been stationary; it made no difference. It was the beginning of time, where nothing existed. The white of the salt was like a blank sheet of paper or an empty canvas. It was breathtaking, out-of-this-world; like God had come down from the heavens and hadn’t started his work yet. We awoke early in our warm tents in San Pedro de Atacama, a pint-sized dwelling in the midst of an expansive desert and the only stop between the Pacific Ocean and the picturesque. Salar de Uyuni.

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After an hour in the back of an old van, we quickly ascended up the 4,600 meters to the border crossing, nothing but a knackered hut with a torn Bolivian flag dangling from the pole above. The air was as thin as paper, everyone was gasping for whatever oxygen they could find. Our group was quickly separated into smaller groups and was assigned a driver that was going to chaperone us for the next few days. The paved roads of Chile suddenly changed into horrifying tracks in Bolivia with more razor-sharp rocks

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Gwangju News June 2011

than you would find on the moon. This did not unhinge our driver. He hit his pace and had no intention of slowing down. It was a 4x4 with one soul in the passenger seat, three in the middle and two more squeezed tightly into the back with all the food and equipment. For the first hour the jeep bounced around violently like a broken washing machine. Our first stop at the height of 4,300 meters was the sumptuous Laguna Verde. This jade lagoon with mountains the colour of caramel and a sky of sapphire made the bumpy ride worthwhile. On the edge of the waters were a number of flamingos idly poking at its edge. Then on to the Laguna Colorada – a red lagoon, inundated with a thousand more brightly coloured flamingos. Their rosé feathers, their long slim necks and slow, delicate sauntering across shallows make them arguably one of the most elegant creatures in the world. Time stood still whilst gazing at these stupendous creatures. A quick stop for lunch, then onto to Sol de Manana. These large volcanic geysers boiled at exceedingly high temperatures, shooting huge plumes of mud and water into the air. Watching them gurgle was like staring at a roaring fire – it was hypnotic.


Travel

Throughout the day our small group was beginning to feel the nauseating effects of altitude sickness. For this our driver pulled out a small bag of green leaves. He told us this was the “only” cure. He handed to each of us a small measure of coca leaves, the base form of cocaine, which grew prevalently in the area. “Masticate on this,“ he said, “and it will wake you up…” We all continued to get worse! The following day we’d continue our journey past more stunning lagoons and treacherous terrain. The highlight would be spending the night in a hotel made entirely of salt. It was difficult to see how anything could survive in this climate. To our surprise we saw a small herd of llamas as if appearing from a mirage. They came forward and became so comfortable in our presence that to get close was of no concern. Truly remarkable beasts. Another rough afternoon in the jeep, our driver told us we were now entering the edge of the Salar. Immediately the horizon looked a billion miles away. The curve of the Earth could be seen as it twisted into oblivion. We were on the edge of the world, an eternal abyss.

Our hotel – Hotel de Sal was completely made of salt, from the tables and chairs, to the doors and windows. After a hearty breakfast we loaded up the van and set off for the centre of the flats. We flew across this white desert into nothingness. The smooth calm surface rolled under our tyres and in every direction there was nothing. We remained quiet; we were soaking up this spectacle. Isla de los Pescados in the centre is home to thousands of giant cacti, the only vegetation around. These enormous plants, some at least 1,000 years-old towered over us as we made our way to the summit. At the top is arguably one of the most phenomenal panoramic views on Earth and in front lies before you over 12,000 square kilometers of nothing but pure sodium chloride! For more information and pictures please click on: http://davidholt.wordpress.com/ www.flickr.com/photos/davidandrewholt/ Story and photos by David Holt

Salar de Uyuni is in the Bolivian Altiplano. It was created 25,000 years ago when it was part of a prehistoric lake – Lake Minchin. It eventually dried up leaving the salt, making the flats Uyuni and Coipasa.

Gwangju News June 2011

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GIC Program Review

Naju Tour GIC Tour with Warren sk anyone in Korea about Naju, and you're likely to hear the same old cliched answers: "Go to Naju and eat Gomtang (the peppery beef soup synonymous with this town)"; or "Try Naju pears." Luckily, Naju has much more to offer. Scratch beneath the surface and you will find a history stretching back 2,000 years, green tea which grows wild on the slopes of Geumseong Mountain and one of Korea's most famous love stories, that of Wanggeon, a Goryeo king, and his quick-minded bride.

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In late April, a group around 30 strong took the trip to Naju. Our first stop was Dongjoem Gate, the recently reconstructed west gate that formed part of the original fortress wall which used to surround the city. Our second stop was Geumseonggwan. This was an administrative complex which supported Naju's role as the southern capital. Some historical buildings remain, including Gaeksa, a large structure built in the 1400s which served as the official residence during royal visits. After a lunch of (yes you guessed it) Gomtang, we took a walk through old Naju to the Naju Hyanggyo, a Confucian school dating back to the 1400s. Here we visited a tea shop, Geumseongdawon, where we were introduced to the subtle flavors of wild spring tea picked, roasted and brewed by Mr. Soeng, a master tea maker. We also listened to a musical performance by a Daegum (a traditional Korean flute) player who later accompanied one of the tour group members, a talented Pansori (Korean opera) performer, who gave an impromptu performance. It would be an understatement to say that the audience was left speechless.

The afternoon saw us travelling back in time to the Baekjae Period and a well named Wansa Cheon. Wansa Cheon, meaning Wansa Stream, was the place where the legend of Wanggeon took place. It was here that the Baekjae king Wanggeon met a young Naju woman, Janghwa. She gave him water in a wicker leaf and asked him to drink slowly as not to upset his stomach. He was so impressed with her intelligence and wit that they were married and she became Queen Janghwa. Our final two sights were a short drive into the countryside through pear orchards and barley fields. At the Bannam Tombs, we saw huge mound tombs which date as far back as 5 A.D. A leisurely walk brought us to Soenhansaesang, an organic farm and factory producing Bamboo Salt, doenjang (fermented soy bean paste) and a number of other pastes and sauces. We learned about the lengthy and arduous process of manufacturing the products by hand and were able to sample the different products and purchase a jar of the most delicious doenjang in Korea (I can vouch for this myself). A final mention needs to be made of our guide. This tour was led by Warren, who has the most comprehensive knowledge of Korea past and present that I have ever encountered. He also has an ability to animate historical descriptions to the extent that they are brought to life and are interesting for even the least scholarly of us. By Alan Brown Photos by Ju-young Hong

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Gwangju News June 2011


GIC Program Review

Ganbare Japan GIC May Concert was a hit! very year the Gwangju International Center hosts a benefit concert in May, with the mission of providing aid to other countries suffering from oppression or natural disasters. This year’s concert was a treat for the ears as well as a gift from the heart.

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On May 1 the GIC hosted a musical performance with the theme Folk Songs and Pop Songs. Tickets sold for 10,000 won apiece and all proceeds went to victims of the earthquake tragedy in Japan. Both professional and amateur musicians volunteered their talents in delivering a wonderful show to the audience at the Gwangju Culture and Arts center. The performance embodied a variety of sounds, arranged in such a way to provide a perfect mixture of musical genres. A brief yet poignant video about the plight of the Japanese people preceded the performance. Then the music started with the soothing sounds of the flute followed by delightful soprano tones, all accompanied perfectly by the grand piano. The soprano singers all had a style of their own, singing with majesty, deep-heartfelt tones and penetrating vocals. The solo violinist played an up-tempo, string snapping classical number and a solo piano piece was played with the precision of a virtuoso. The lone tenor of the night sang festively and left everyone grinning with his version of the Tom Jones hit Deliliah. The show was not finished until some local Gwangju expat contributors had their time under the spotlight. Dramatic and passionate songs were played by them with lyrics that echoed some of the sympathetic emotion that was felt throughout this benefit concert. There were also a few tunes which were uplifting in nature, injecting a little fun into the evening’s performance. To close out

the show, an elementary school choir wowed the crowd with their cute matching outfits and soft harmonious melodies. Olufemi Adeluyi was one of the expat performers who delighted the audience with his song sung in the Yoruba language which is native to southwest Nigeria. Regarding the performance, he had this to say, “I like singing and I believe in the GIC cause. As such, when I was asked to perform I was quite glad to, even though I knew the preps would be time consuming. I enjoyed the other performances and interacting with all the other performers. It was my first time attending the GIC May concert and I think it’s a laudable idea that gets us to think about the underprivileged people of the world.” This well organized event was an impressive, entertaining way to give help to those badly in need. Over 2,500,000 won was raised to benefit the victims in Japan, who are desperately trying to survive through their difficult situation caused by the terrible earthquake and tsunami. A great deal of appreciation goes out to the performers, the many people who donated money to the cause, and to the GIC for bringing everyone together for this benevolent purpose. By Stephen Redeker Photos by Stephen Redeker and Young-dae Kim

Gwangju News June 2011

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News

Home Pages Want to write about news from your country? Contact the Editor for more information: gwangjunews@gmail.com.

Scotland

U.S.A

The Scottish National Party, which campaigns for the independence of Scotland from the UK, won a historic victory last month in local Scottish elections. As a result they have promised to hold a referendum on full independence. Whether or not Scots want independence after 300 years of union with England is open to debate many people voted SNP as a protest against budget cuts implemented by the Conservative government in London. Some say Scotland would struggle without financial help from its larger neighbour, although the SNP point out that most of the UK’s (diminishing) oil reserves lie within Scottish waters. With a referendum due in the next five years the nationalists could achieve their dream of a “free” Scotland, over 700 years since the death of William ‘Braveheart’ Wallace at the hands of the English.

Battle of the “Whoopie Pies” Now that Osama bin Laden has been dealt with, people can now move on to more pressing issues. Pennsylvania and Maine are entrenched in a legal battle over the origins and rights to the whoopie pie. Maine is attempting to make the vanilla cream-filled chocolate cake sandwich the official state “treat.” PA claims that the Amish are the original creators. Rallies are being held to raise the whoopie to new levels of history, honor, and inspire new flavors. PA residents argue that Maine can keep its “lobster claws” off the renowned, delectable dessert. Source: www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2011-03-01whoopie-pies_N.htm By Aisha Hobbs

By Rob Clark

India

Canada They say that good things come to those who wait, which rang true for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper on May 2, as he finally won a majority government after two unsuccessful attempts. Harper's Conservative party garnered just under 40 percent of the popular vote to secure 167 of 308 seats in the House of Commons, ensuring four years of uninterrupted rule along with a chance to pass legislation without the support of the other parties. The result was a bit of a surprise, considering the election had been called after the Conservatives had been held in contempt of Parliament. But Canadians' unhappiness with minority governments, coupled with the decline of the Conservatives' greatest traditional rival, the Liberals, led to Harper's historic win. By Kreeco

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Gwangju News June 2011

As a developing country, India has to play its cards right to make sure it is headed in the right direction. Every move counts. Instead, the country has been hit by a list of corruption scandals. Who is eligible to play this game: Every government official who handles public money. Time duration: Until you get caught. The Telecommunications Minister sold mobile phone frequency licenses on a “first come, first serve” basis. A yard sale. It cost the country US$40 billion. Ashok Chavan, the chief minister of Maharashtra (a state in India) is allegedly involved in a scam involving homes for war widows. Suresh Kalmadi, the 2010 Commonwealth Games organizing committee chief has been under investigation over claims of corruption. To top everything, the head of India's anti-corruption unit PJ Thomas himself faces corruption charges. Game. Set. Match. We have a winner. By Mano Samuel


News

China

Vietnam

The Beginning of Summer Festival is one of the traditional festivals for the Han nationality but is popular throughout China. As the name implies, this festival indicates the beginning of summer according to Solar Terms. So the day for the festival is not fixed every year, but is usually at the beginning of May. This year, it was on May 6. Traditionally, Chinese people think that rain on that day is a good prediction of a bumper harvest for the whole year. Therefore, farmers attach great importance to this festival. As with other festivals in China, the Beginning of Summer Festival has some special foods and interesting activities. Different places have various kinds of foods because China is so huge, such as black boiled rice, eggs, bamboo shoot, etc. However, nowadays the most famous food is boiled eggs in tea, which take a long time to cook and always have a delicious flavor. Parents usually plait colorful strings together to make hand chains for their children to pray for getting rid of calamities and bringing blessings. People, especially children, play “Egg Touch”, a game with family and friends where two players hold one egg respectively and touch the egg’s pointed ends with power, the one whose egg is broken is the loser. Every year a King Egg will be born. Another special activity is to get weighed, with the aim of escaping from summer diseases and keeping healthy during the hot summer.

The rainy season in the south of Vietnam usually begins in the lunar month of April when farmers are busy with the harvest and preparing for a new crop. In the Mekong River Delta area, the rainy season comes along with a flooding period, when more than a half of this river delta is covered with water from Great Mekong. This period is very important for farmers because the water brings along alluvium to fertilize soil before starting the new crop. Besides, flooding water also provides the fields with other gifts such as various kinds of freshwater fish and crabs . However, the rainy season in the urban areas is not as useful. Ho Chi Minh City is located in a coastal area which is just one to two meters above sea level; hence rain and high tide seem to join hands with each other to dip the city in flooding. Almost every day at low areas in Ho Chi Minh, people have to “wade” in a “stream-used-to-be-street” with long lines of traffic jams and dead motorbikes. Many years and plans for drainage of the city seem still ineffective and people still struggle every day on their way home. By Tohong Phuong

By Pengna Chen

South Africa South Africa had municipal elections on the May 18. When Gwangju News went to press, it looked like the ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), would lose some seats to the Democratic Alliance (DA). This is mainly because of pathetic service delivery. Crime, violence, rape and murder are still having its way with the country. Corruption, especially in the government and public sector, is following suit. Speaking about the Bin Laden circus, our Muslim community is dead quiet. On the lighter side - the sun is still shining at home. Yes! By Pieter de Kock

Gwangju News June 2011

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Health

overlooked when we wash our face but during a facial the neck and face are as one. The third part of the process is the exfoliation. This is a slightly more aggressive cleansing. Exfoliating is simply removing the outermost layer of dead skin cells on your face and neck. It is not painful but rather enjoyable. The fourth part is optional. This is where the esthetician can remove black heads from your chin, forehead, and nose. A blackhead is a black bump on your skin from a clogged pore. A lot of people don’t really like this part because it can be painful. If you have a lot of blackheads then this part should be included. Ask the esthetician.

The Skin here is nothing better than lying on a heated bed, listening to calm soothing music and having an expert gently massage and clean your face. A facial is a relaxing experience that each person should try at least once in their life. A facial brings out the glow in dull skin, the freshness in tired skin, and the youthfulness in older skin. Facials are not only for women. Many men have facials for the rejuvenating affects that facials have. If you have never had a facial let me walk you through the process. It is not simply someone rubbing lotions all over your face without a process in mind.

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The first step is to assess the type of skin you have. The three most common skin types are oily, dry and a combination of both. After the assessment, the esthetician will choose products that are suitable for your skin type. Men and women have different skin needs therefore skin products are gender focused as well. The second part is the cleansing. This part removes the outer layer of oil and dirt that has been sitting on your face for the day or even a few days. Often, the neck is

Green Smoothie 36

Gwangju News June 2011

The fifth part is usually people’s favorite, the massage. The esthetician usually gives you a massage on your face, neck, the back of your neck, shoulders, arms, and your back. From personal experience, this sometimes hurts because they push at the knots. If you are holding any tension, this is the part where you can release it. The last part is the mask. Usually, the esthetician will put a damp cotton on your eyes and mouth and cover your face with a cool, thick and refreshing mask. They will leave nose holes for breathing.. The mask will stay on your face 10 to 20 minutes. At first you may feel a little claustrophobic but you will quickly relax and start enjoying it. Once the mask is removed, hydrating cream is put on and you’re ready to go. An average facial lasts about an hour. The average cost is between 30,000 - 50,000 won. It is worth experiencing a facial as a treat or as maintenance for radiating skin. There is a lovely place near the back gate of Chonnam National University. There are two major crosswalks near the back gate. Immediately in front of the crosswalk (opposite side of the university), next to Tous Les Jour, there is a skin shop on the second floor that is called, The Skin. It is an enjoyable experience there. Tel: 062) 430-5377, no English. By Justyna Jurczykowska Photo by Michael Angelo Pichay

The majority of us cringe at the idea of eating a huge salad every day. We always make a promise to ourselves to increase the amount of vegetables we eat. Some of us will actually sit down to a large, crunchy, fresh, raw and delicious salad for a few days, but then our addiction to salt and sugar takes over and that promise is out the window. Most people want to eat right but don’t really know how. Here is a great tip: drink your greens. Here is a simple starter recipe that will get you hooked on green smoothies for life. Ingredients: 2 cups of spinach, 1-1.5 cups of milk/soy milk (adjust for desired thickness) , 1 banana, ice (if you want it cold, mix the other ingredients first then add ice). Put it all in a blender and mix Your body absorbs the nutrients from the spinach exceptionally well when it is broken down like this. Give it a try. Once you feel comfortable with this starter green smoothie, experiment, add different ingredients and be amazed. Story and photo by Justyna Jurczykowska


Health

Plastic Surgery to Get a Job A Letter from the Kingdom of Plastic Surgery

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ave you ever thought about getting plastic surgery?

Plastic surgery is always a personal decision, reflecting one’s need for improvements in self-esteem and body image. South Korea has a reputation as the place to go for a nip or a tuck. Many Korean women crave to get more beautiful through plastic surgery. Seventy-six percent of Korean women in the 20- 30 age group have undergone plastic surgery. The most popular procedure is the double eyelid surgery. Nowadays, plastic surgery is not just about the competitive pressure to look beautiful in everyday South Korean society. Koreans still care about their personal appearance, even though many want to neglect it. One of the reasons they care so much is simply to get a good job. Twenty-seven percent of Korean college graduate job seekers blamed a failed interview on their looks, and 28 percent of job seekers have already undergone plastic surgery or plan to in order to correct this “problem”. Graduating university students have a tricky situation in preparing for employment. Companies want employees who have great skills and a high quality of education. These kinds of things are very important, however, now companies want to hire people with those qualities who also have a nice appearance. According to a recent survey (from a job portal site), over 40 percent of students have thought seriously about plastic surgery for getting a job. And 90.2 percent of students felt that after their interview test experience, appearance was the most effective part for employment success. Thus, many job seekers are going to plastic surgeons to reach that success. One student said, "It seems like plastic surgery is a great help for getting a job. I easily passed documentary screening but I couldn’t pass the interview test. It happened a few times, so I feel like I have a problem with my appearance. So now I’m considering plastic surgery."

Reuters

Competition for jobs is intense in this high-pressure society. When applying for jobs, even part-time jobs, attaching a head-shot photo of oneself on the resume is mandatory in South Korea. This social obsession with appearance even encourages young students to go under the knife for surgical improvements, as part of an effort to bring forth a successful future. The importance of appearance is great as women, and now even men, engage in social activities. People still care more about how they are perceived by others. Unfortunately, in South Korea it seems such a trend will continue. People’s craving to get more beauty is strong, but not just for the beauty itself. People also want to gain confidence through plastic surgery. It’s really unfair if only good looks can bring success. The most important asset must be your mind. Let’s never forget that! By Kyuri Park

Gwangju News June 2011

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Language Study

Letters to KOTESOL If you have a question for Dr. Dave, please send an e-mail to gwangjunews@gmail.com letting us know your question, student’s age and proficiency level

Dear Dr. Dave, How do you keep your students involved without making everything a game? I mean, how do you make materials more fun and engaging in an adult way that doesn't rely on competition or points? No name Dear No Name, Find out what your students are most interested in. You can do this as a class activity or as a written survey. If they are adults, you could ask them what kind of activities they would like to do in class, and for the ideas you think would be motivating and useful, you could ask the originator of the activity to lead the class in the activity. Dr. Dave Dear Dr. Dave, How would you recommend engaging English speakers or those looking to randomly engage you in English in the public sphere? People say "Hi" to me every day but often seem to struggle getting past that. Is it OK to use gestures or should I just try speaking in Korean? How can I not make them feel foolish for not speaking more English? D Dear D, In my years of living here, I have found that it is often the case that people whom I have never seen before saying “Hi” to me are most often not doing it as a sincere greeting. They are merely seeing if they can get the attention of the foreigner. It is useful to remember that Koreans do not extend greetings to other Koreans they do not know, and that Koreans who do not have confidence in their English speaking proficiency are not likely to say “Hi” to strike up a conversation. There is a difference in tone between a sincere and an insincere “Hi.” If it does not sound sincere, I would suggest that you ignore it, thus avoiding a potentially awkward situation. Dr. Dave Dear Dr. Dave, I'm from Ireland and often find students with a strong bias towards American accents rather than my own. How can I convince my students that my accent is useful and intelligible English? GY

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Gwangju News June 2011

Dear GY, It is good for students to be able to comprehend without much difficulty a wide variety of English accents, both native and non-native, because students are likely to encounter a variety of Englishes in their future (the majority of which are likely to be non-native). However, it is important that we provide significant amounts of comprehensible input for our students. If the teacher’s accent is strong, they should make an effort to speak in a more standard accent, especially in shorter courses, where students do not have enough time to get used to the accent before the course is half over. Dr. Dave Dear Dr. Dave, I'm going to be making the transfer soon from children to adults, what advice can you give me on making the switch? Jellyroll Dear Jellyroll, Remember not to treat adult students as you did your young learners. Even if you are teaching low-proficiency adults you must remember that they are still adults. Finger-plays and children’s songs won’t cut it. Activities that are challenging to adults, both linguistically and intellectually, need to be used. Dr. Dave By Dr. Dave Shaffer Dr. Dave Shaffer is a professor of English at Chosun University, where he has taught in the graduate, undergraduate, and TESOL certificate programs for many years. Dr. Shaffer is presently the President of the Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter of Korea TESOL and invites you to attend teacher development workshops at their monthly Chapter meetings. Web: www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam Email: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com

Gwangju - Jeonnam KOTESOL June Chapter Meeting Date and Time: Saturday, June 11, 2011, 1:30 p.m. Place: Chosun University, Main Building (Bon-gwan) 2F, Room 2123 (CU TESOL). Admission: free. Membership is encouraged. Visit our Chapter online for contact and schedule information: www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam E-mail us: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com


Language Study

Making Questions: '-아 (어/여)요?’ Dialogue 소라: 존씨, 안녕하세요? Sora: Hello, John!

aseyo?] [ jonsssi, annyeongha

Vocabulary 시내 [sinae]: downtown

존: 네, 안녕하세요? 소라씨, GIC가 어디에 있어요? [ ne, annyeongha aseyo?.. Sora assi, GICga a eodie isseoyo?] John: Yeah, How are you? Sora, where is the GIC?

가방 [gabang]: a bag 광주국제교류센터 [gwangjugukjegyoryusenteo]: Gwangju International Center/ GIC

소라: 시내에 있어요. [ sina aee isseoyo..] Sora: It is downtown.

책상 [chaeksang]: a desk 은행 [eunhaeng]:a bank

존: 그래요? GIC가 시내에 있어요? [geuraeyo? GICga sinaee iseoyo?] John: Really? Is the GIC downtown?

책 [chaek]: a book

소라: 네, 맞아요. [ ne, maja ayo o.] Sora: Yes, that’s right. 존: 그럼, GIC가 광주국제교류센터예요? [geureom, GICga gwangju gukje gyoryu senteoyeyo?] John: Also, does the GIC mean Gwangju International Center? 소라: 네, 맞아요. GIC가 광주국제교류센터예요. [ ne, maja ayo o. GICga a gwa angju gukje e gyo oryu senteoye eyo o.] Sora: Yes, that’s right. It means Gwangju International Center. 존: 그렇군요. [ geureokunnyo..] John: Oh, I see. Reference: 김성희 외. (2009). 서강한국어1A 서울: 도서출판 하우 서강한국어. Retrived January15, 2011 from http://korean.sogang.ac.kr

Grammar Making questions.'-아 (어/여)요?' In the Korean language, it is easy to make an interrogative sentence. There is no subject-verb inversion. You can make yes/no question with rising intonation at the end of the sentence. But for WHquestions, you should use interrogatives such as '어 디(where)` and '뭐/무엇 (what)`.

•이게 책이에요?(Is this a book?) •이게 책이에요.(This is a book.) By Soo-a Jung Soo-a Jung is an instructor of the GIC Korean Language Class

2011 GIC Korean Language Class Schedule

Examples: •가방이 책상 옆에 있어요. (There is a bag beside the desk.)

4th 5th 6th

July 9 - August 25 September 5 - October 22 November 5 - December 22

•가방이 책상 옆에 있어요? (Is there a bag beside the desk?)

For more information, please contact So-eun Moon at 062) 226-2733/4 or e-mail gic@gic.or.kr

•은행이 어디에 있어요?(Where is a bank?) Gwangju News June 2011 39


Literature

Poetry Translated by Chae-pyong Song and Anne M. Rashid Flowers Beyond Borders When flowers wither, where do they go? The world begins with little things— wildflowers that bloom without sound under the bright sunlight. Strung together, the size of a mung bean, they stand squarely while beads of their lives shake, making a slant in the sky. In my heart they tell me as if a hallucination that they have vulnerable insides and that they have sorrow, cold and clear. When it gets cloudy and the sleet falls, with the sound of a blue tendon breaking and murmuring, soon petals rustle down. Like tears, like smoke, they lie fallen down on the ground like people. In the place the flowers fell, time has already come and swarms like a school of larva. When flowers fall, where do they go? What border do they go beyond? Under what name do they get buried?

Noh Hyang-rim (1942 ~ ) is from Haenam, Jeollanam-do and studied English at Jungang University in Seoul. She has published poetry collections such as Travel to K Town, A Country Where Snow Doesn’t Fall, A Person Without Longing Can’t See Aphae Isle, A Broken Bell Sound Comes from the Sun. In 1987 she received the Korea Literary Award for A Country Where Snow Doesn’t Fall.

꽃들은 경계를 넘어간다 꽃들이 지면 모두 어디로 가나요. 세상은 아주 작은 것들로 시작한다고 부신 햇빛 아래 소리 없이 핀 작디작은 풀꽃들, 녹두알만한 제 생명들을 불꽃처럼 꿰어 달고 하늘에 빗금 그으며 당당히 서서 흔들리네요. 여린 내면이 있다고 차고 맑은 슬픔이 있다고 마음에 환청처럼 들려주어요. 날이 흐리고 눈비 내리면 졸졸졸 그 푸른 심줄 터져 흐르는 소리 꽃잎들이 그만 우수수 떨어져요. 눈물같이 연기같이 사람들처럼 땅에 떨어져 누워요. 꽃 진 자리엔 벌써 시간이 와서 애벌레떼처럼 와글거려요. 꽃들이 지면 모두 어디로 가나요. 무슨 경계를 넘어가나요. 무슨 이름으로 묻히나요.

Word 1 Without explanation, Word would sometimes lean alone on the apartment’s veranda rail to watch the sun set and disappear suddenly somewhere into darkness. Word appears to have bone and flesh. For awhile it is out of touch, and then one day it stands outside the window in a dark place or unexpectedly runs from the first floor to the fifth, thumping.

말.1 어떤 말(言語)인지 말은 가끔 아파트 베란다에 걸터앉아 저녁해가 지는 것을 혼자 바라다 보기도 하고 훌쩍 어둠 속 어디엔가 사라져 버립니다. 말에게도 뼈가 있고 살이 있는가 봅니다. 한동안 소식이 끊겼다가 어느날은 어둑하게 창밖에 서 있거나 느닷없이 1층에서 5층까지 쿵쿵쿵 소리를 냅니다.

Often I see it wandering around the village in the day and in the night. But I have never seen the face of Word. I can’t touch it either.

어느 때는 매일 밤 매일 낮 온 동네를 소리없이 헤매다니는 것을 봅니다. 그러나 말의 얼굴은 단 한번도 본 적이 없읍니다. 만져볼 수도 없읍니다.

Perhaps Word now is wind or a person who lives in the air.

--말은 이제 바람이거나 허공에 사는 사람인지도 모릅니다.

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Gwangju News June 2011


Literature

The Dead Sea

死海

There was another sea before the sea

한 점 꽃잎처럼 소아마비 소년이 서 있는

near which a polio-stricken boy stood like a speck of a petal.

바다 앞은 또 바다였다

Pickled fish lay on the street stall.

소금절인 생선들이 좌판에 누워 있고

Mother’s body always emitted a salty sea smell.

어머니의 몸에선 늘 짜디 짠 바다냄새가 풍겼다

To float on the dead sea, our family made our bodies and hearts light

사해바다에 뜨기 위해 식구들은 몸과 마음이 가벼워져서

and knelt down on the cold floor and prayed

언덕배기 뾰족탑의 새벽종이 울릴 때까지

until the bell tower on the hill rang at dawn.

찬 바닥에 엎드려 기도했다

Mother was a pickled sea that rested in the world.

어머니는 세상에 누워 있는 절인 바다였다

Aphae Isle 8 People in Aphae Isle cannot see the island. Shading the sun, I lift up my eyes, the isle startles more than people— this isle without ears. It is as though they have gone to Van Gogh’s village-the whistling sound that children with horn-rimmed glasses make. In the village of low-built houses where the grasses standing in one line dart around on their tiptoes, every house’s ears are cut off, and during all four seasons the grasses open only one ear. A person without longing cannot see Aphae Isle; she cannot listen to Aphae Isle.

The Floor Cleaning the living room with a scrub rag rubbing off the languor and time that covered it thinly cleaning the small space of concerns and worries covered with birch wood imported from America-I also silently rub my niece’s slumber who sleeps at midnight on the other side of the globe. Who is it that scrubs the back of my soul that has been worn out? Who is it that owns such a scrub rag?

압해도 8 압해도 사람들은 압해도를 보지 못하네. 이마받이을 하고 문득 눈을 들면 사람보다 더 놀란 압해도 귀가 없는 압해도 반 고호의 마을로 가는지 뿔테 안경의 아이들이 부는 휘파람 소리 일렬로 늘어선 풀들이 깨금발로 돌아다니고 집집의 지붕마다 귀가 잘려 사시사철 한쪽 귀로만 풀들이 피는 나지막한 마을 그리움이 없는 사람은 압해도를 보지 못하네. 압해도를 듣지 못하네.

마루 마른 걸레로 거실을 닦으며 얇게 묻은 권태와 시간을 박박 문질러 닦으며 미국산 수입 자작나무를 깐 세 평의 근심 걱정을 닦으며 지구 저쪽의 한밤중 누워 잠든 조카딸의 잠도 소리 없이 닦아준다 다 해진 내 영혼의 뒤켠을 소리 없이 닦아주는 이는 누구일까 그런 걸레 하나쯤 갖고 있는 이는 누구일까

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Literature

Gwangju Reader Oases I

f you’re like me, the ESL teacher-in-SK-lifestyle allows you both ample time and cash to spend on reading material. So where should you start? This is a brief primer on the best bookshops, websites, and other outlets for obtaining English-language literature in Gwangju. I wish you good browsing.

Yeongpung (YP) Bookstore YP carries lots of airport /”genre” fiction like King, Grisham, Koontz, Sparks, and more. This shop has lots of movie novelizations and novels that have been adapted into movies: The Reader, Stieg Larsson’s stuff, all the Harry Potter and Twilight tomes, etc. Some good finds: Oliver Sacks’ Musicophilia and No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. YP loses points for shrink wrapping their English books, which seems grossly unfair. Foreign readers have to deal with book envy at the sight of Korean readers casually flipping through a Hangul copy of Salem’s Lot.

Chungjang (CJ) Bookstore This shop is located in the occasionally aneurysm-causing downtown shopping district. CJ has the best selection of Korean literature translated into English of any shop in Gwangju. It carries most of the excellent Portable Library of Korean Literature series, Hollym’s Modern Korean Short Stories, and some other Korean folk and fairy tale books. CJ also has numerous volumes of Mariner’s Best American series. Plus, they don’t shrink wrap. The weirdest thing about this store is the chaotic shelf crammed with business and self-help books, which make up the bulk of the English selection here.

Kidari English Shop This store near the Ssangchon Campus of Honam University specializes in kids’ books. From picture books to young adult, there are plenty of choices. Kidari also devotes two shelves to general literature. Bonus: this shop has a rad (but pricey) board game selection, even if it is missing Settlers of Cataan. 42

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Top Foreign Language Company Around the corner from the GIC, Top sells numerous ESL books, hardly any fiction and a stellar reference section. It’s got Oxford, MacMillian, Merriam-Webster, American Heritage and others up the wazoo. If you’re an etymology geek and you're going to be in SK for a couple years, why not invest in a heavy-duty dictionary? When it's time for the inevitable change of pace stint in Saudi Arabia, you can always donate it to the GIC Library.

GIC Library For 20,000 won a year, one can become a member of the GIC and have full access to their astoundingly fantastic library. In nonfiction, you’ll find plenty of diverse books. There’s even an autobiography section. The literature shelf has gems like Cortazar, DeLillo, Borges, even an anthropology of Icelandic literature, plus plenty of modern and classic fiction. Other sections include: Crime/ Mystery / Thriller (with plenty of fine genre stuff), a small Poetry/ Essay shelf (though I found both poetry and essay collections in other sections), and Fantasy/ Romance / Drama.

WhatTheBook.com When you know exactly what you want, head to this SKbased site. Good things about WTB: they have fast, cheap shipping, you can order with a PayPal account, their markup isn't as bad as other retailers, and you can have book upon book delivered right to your door. Agoraphobic readers rejoice!

Other outlets Check out books from Gwangju’s libraries (Usan-dong (062-613-7753), Sansu-dong (062-232-6694), Gwangju Jungang (062-607-1310)), attend bookswaps around town, or visit Waygook.org, which has frequent posts of people selling books. The locations of all booksellers mentioned in this article can be found at GwangjuGuide.or.kr. By Josh Kane Photo by Kathleen Montesano


Review

Classic Movie Review

The Servant 방자전

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oday’s title delves deep into the many-storied and labyrinthine Korean past. In the West it is most often referred to as The Servant but Koreans may be more familiar with the title 방 자전¸ (Bangja Jeon), or The Chronicles of Bangja. The film proves itself a fascinating retelling of a classic story, told through the lens of the legendary Chosun Dynasty which wrought modern Korea. Dae-woo Kim, who got his start after winning a screenwriting contest in 1991, ably directs this historical drama. Much like Stoppard’s famed play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, which explores Hamlet from two minor characters’ viewpoints, this movie also takes a story that all Koreans know well – the ancient novel Chunhyangjeon (actually one of the oldest recorded novels ever written) – and tells it from the point of view of an unlikely and somewhat obscure character. The novel and famed Pansori (Korean song-story) of the same name tell of the courtship between a wellrespected nobleman and a somewhat lower-class beauty. You’ll find an interesting twist here in the film version as the servant of said noble tells the story of how he himself actually seduced the beauty in question. I’ll not commit the crime of saying more and spoiling the substantially engaging story. One of the things that really shines here is the art direction – the costumes, tools, architecture that all seem so fascinatingly old and ornate. As a Westerner without much knowledge of the splendid crafts of the period, I find my mind at times often less impressed with the acting than with the intriguing costumes and ornamentation – all of which signify different social standings and levels of birth. A drawback to the film is that the plot doesn’t really

allow for a lot of character development, and you might find that some of the protagonist’s motivations and behaviors feel a bit flat. While this detracts a lot from the film, it by no means ruins it. Do not fear, the otherwise flat characters are saved by the dynamic and hilarious one played by O Dal-soo. Trust me when I say you will know who I mean once you watch the film; his is a diamond amongst paltry performances. The restraints and complexities of the period play a huge role in the film, with character’s entire lives being determined by the situations of their birth. Characters often do things which seem outlandish in order to save face or keep up appearance. While there are many disorienting changes in tone, and some vaguely masked sexism in the film, it is otherwise a real pearl. The visuals, cultural displays and general passion of this historical piece make it a worthy recommendation – check it out! By Seth Pevey First published in the Gwangju Blog

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Living Tips

Taxi Safety Guide this was a very unusual case. A driver might offer something with good intentions, so if you ever have to face this situation it would be wise to say thank you and just keep it in your bag. 4. To be extra safe, when you’re taking a taxi, call a friend or family member with the taxi’s license plate number so that someone else knows which taxi you are in. It will help to find you in an emergency. Usually in Korea, when girls take a taxi, they text the number to their boyfriends or someone they know. Naver Blog

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he days are getting longer and, with the glorious weather, we can enjoy various outdoor activities.

After all the enjoyment, most of us return home by taking public transportation like the bus, subways or maybe taxis. This is the best way to return without reference to traffic conditions or whether we know the way back or not. Taxis are convenient because unlike other public transportation, they never get crowded or have to stop at stations. All we have to do is tell the driver where we want to go. But as there are two sides to everything, sometimes we hear some bad news about taxis. Although it rarely happens, we should still be aware of the risks that might be involved. Here are some safety tips that can be useful when you have to take a taxi: 1. When you're taking a taxi, its better to explain the most direct way to your destination. If you don't know enough Korean to do this, write down the directions to show the driver or practice how to pronounce it in Korean. 2. Do not share a cab with other passengers you don’t know as you might be exposing yourself to danger. Most of all, it is illegal to share a cab. If the driver asks about having you share your cab ride, refuse it politely. 3. If the driver gives you some sort of candy or chewing gum, do not eat it right away. Most taxi drivers do not offer passengers food. Several years ago, one woman got some gum from the driver and it was covered with sleeping pills. If she had eaten it in the taxi, she could have been in danger. However,

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5. There is a secret about Korean taxis. Before you get in the taxi, check out the license plate. By the current law, all cars for business use this (including taxis) and can only have the Hangul ‘아’, ‘바’, ‘사’, ‘자’ in front of the license number. The color of the plates are yellow, and the numbers vary in different localities. If it does not start with ‘아’, ‘바’, ‘사’, ‘자’, it means it is not registered formally. This advice is only for the rare instance of misfortune. Most taxis in Gwangju are safe and the drivers are innocuous. Drivers usually try to reach the destination as safely and quickly as they can. Also, taxi drivers know each other in each district because they have a so-called association, so it is not easy for them to commit a crime. By Seoyeong Park Useful pocket emergency numbers which you can connect to when you are in danger: 112 call this number to report crimes (similar to 911) 119 this number is for big accidents or disasters (especially when there's a fire, but it’s okay to call for any emergency) 1366 this number is for women who have an emergency 1588-5644 this number is an interpreting service and it’s managed by the police office. This service is for foreigner human rights and more. For more info: www.police.go.kr/KNPA/main.jsp 1566-0112 this number connects to the Gwangju police office directly. (For more information from an interview with taxi drivers in Gwangju, look at the “Hello Policy” blog)

Find more information on taxis in www.gwangjuguide.or.kr


Travel Tips

How to Pack Light W

Repeat clothes – You meet new people everyday, and new friends move on, so no one will notice if you wear the same clothes for a whole week.

Choose souvenirs carefully – Instead of buying a fridge magnet – which was probably not made in the country you’re visiting anyway – opt instead for a handmade piece of clothing or something else that you can use while you travel.

Be honest - If you’re not a hiker in your regular life, leave your hiking boots at home and admit that you’re probably not going to be hiking on your trip. If you do want to bring hiking boots, wear them on the plane, rather than packing them in your bag. Boots can weigh a lot, and take up a lot of space in your bag. The only shoes you really need are a good pair of walking shoes, and maybe a pair of sandals if you’re hitting up the beach.

hy lighten up? Packing light is the best gift you can give yourself when you travel. A light backpack or suitcase is easy to walk with and easy to lift. It also makes your journey more relaxing and less stressful.

Don’t bring an umbrella – Though planning for inclement weather may make you feel well prepared, it’s not necessary. In most places you’ll visit, it’s easy to find a shop where you can pick up a cheap umbrella if the need arises. Don’t even bother with those little plastic excuses for raincoats, because you can always use a garbage bag instead. And plus – you’re waterproof. Choose pieces carefully – You really only need a few key items: a few shirts, a pair of trousers, two pairs of socks and maybe a hat. For women, bring a long skirt. It can be worn with a t-shirt for attending temples during the day, but then can also be hiked up to become a strapless dress for nights out. And remember that bikinis or swimming trunks also double as underwear. No laptop – Use internet cafes and internet at hostels instead of lugging your laptop. You won’t have to worry about it being stolen, and laptops add a lot of unnecessary weight to your bag. Enjoy being disconnected from your internet life on days when you can’t get to a computer. Tailor your guidebook – If you have the guidebook to India, but only plan on visiting the north, cut out the information about the south, and places you definitely aren’t going to visit. Otherwise, you could easily carry around a lot of dead weight that ends up dragging you down –which is just as useful as carrying a jar of pennies in your pack. Simplify toiletries – Take the opportunity to be a bit lazy with your grooming. You’re not going to a job interview, so let yourself go, and enjoy the frizzy hair and overall unkempt style. You’ll probably fit in better with other travelers if you look disheveled anyway. Things like bug spray and sunscreen are necessary in certain places, but just buy these items when necessary.

Story and photos by Kerri Strothard

Bibliophiles fear not – a cut-up guidebook is the best kind.

Keep it simple – The only thing you really need is your passport

Hitting up the beach? Pick up some sunscreen from the local shops rather than lugging it from home.

A light bag allows you to focus on other things - like your travel companion. A heavy bag burdens everyone – taxi drivers and friends alike. Keep a small bag separate from your pack - It’s much easier to find what you’re looking for.

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Food and Drink

해장국 Haejangguk must have walked past Haejangguk restaurant in downtown at least a hundred times in my time in Gwangju. It was probably after having walking past it 40 or 50 times that I thought I should check it out. Thus in early May I finally dined there with a friend.

I

I like gukbap restaurants because they are purveyors of dishes for one person, unlike BBQ restaurants which require a group of people to dine at. Thus if you happen to be out and about by yourself, or just with a friend doing whatever, you can find a kuk bap establishment and have a quick, cheap, and more often than not, tasty meal. My friend and I got to Haejangguk and stopped outside its façade so I could take a picture. It was around 7:45 p.m. and we were a little disconcerted to see that there were no patrons inside; a full restaurant is usually the sign of a good restaurant. We went in anyway, as I had definitely seen people in there before so maybe it was just a rare occurrence. We walked in and got the obligatory o-seo-ose-yo, as a man came out of the kitchen at the back of the long rectangular room. The restaurant had a homely feel with wooden tables, and the interior decoration suggesting that the place is older than your standard shiny new kimbap franchise. There were both western style tables and chairs, and traditional Korean floor seating at the back of the room; we opted for western style seating. The menu was relatively small, which is something that I always like. It suggests that the restaurant is dedicated to making a small number of dishes well. They had both meals for one person, such as kimchi jiggae and bibimbap, and a few dishes more appropriate for groups, such as gamjatang. The man came and took our orders before we had

taken our seats – quick service by any standards. I got kongnamul gukbap (콩나물국밥); a very light dish comprised of bean sprouts, and a poached egg in a delicious boiling broth. Rice accompanied it and I put some of it in the broth. My friend got bibimbap. We did not have to wait long for our meals, and they looked like standard issue variations of our respective dishes. I ate a fair amount of the kimchi and the other side dishes that accompanied our meals while I waited for my broth to cool down. My friend did not have such problems, and tucked into their bibimbap immediately. They found it like any good bibimbap and I asked if I could have a little taste. I also enjoyed it, but then I always like bibimbap: the delicious gochujang paste, mixed in with rice, a fried egg, and vegetables is a wonderful combination. My kongnamul gukbap was also delicious. I felt like something light as I wasn’t feeling famished, and it hit the spot perfectly. I liked the broth as it had plenty of flavour, and the simplicity of the dish as it had only three primary ingredients. In this case less was a good thing. While we were eating, a couple of different groups came in and took tables, quelling our initial fears about the place being empty. One group, sitting at a table next to us, ordered something that I thought looked like gamjatang. Whatever it was, it looked pretty good. Haejangguk (해장국) is located downtown next to Toda Cosa, the perfume shop, and only a few metres from Baskin Robbins (the one in the middle of downtown, not the one next to the YMCA). Our meals were cheap as mine only cost 5000 won and my friend’s 6000 won. Next time you’re downtown around lunch time on the weekend, or dinner time on a week night, and need a quick, cheap, delicious meal I can recommend Haejangguk as a nice change from going to a run-of-the-mill kimbap joint. My friend and I enjoyed the homely experience of the place, while the food was both satisfying and reasonably priced. Story and photos by Gabriel Ward

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Food and Drink

Korean Easy-Cook Recipe

김치참치 주먹밥 Kimchi & Tuna Rice Ball

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umeok-bap (주먹밥) is a rice ball made from white rice formed into a ball.

There are many kinds of rice balls depending on what's inside them. And according to preference, it is often wrapped in ham, laver or anything else you like. It is popular for a quick lunchtime meal because of the simple recipe. Also, it is a perfect menu for a packed lunch. In fact, many children in Korean bring rice balls as often as kimbap for lunch when they're on a field trip. Story and photos by Seoyoung Park

How to make Kimchi & Tuna Rice Ball Things to prepare (three servings): A bowl of cooked rice (or hetbahn, an instant, cooked rice), half can of tuna, about three spoons of chopped kimchi, salt, sugar and sesame oil.

Cooking method: 1. Drain the oil from the tuna. 2. Stir-fry the chopped kimchi in sesame oil with 1 tsp of sugar and salt, if you don't have any sesame oil, it’s okay to use another cooking oil you have. After five minutes, add the tuna. (If you add the tuna at the beginning, it will get stiff) 3. Wait for the rice to cool down. If it is leftover rice, heat it in the microwave for about 30 seconds. (hetbahn - 2 minutes) 4. Mix the rice, kimchi and tuna. 5. Roll it with your hands into an appropriate-sized ball. 6. Now you can enjoy your balls. Also, you can wrap them with laver, hams, or decorate to suit.

Gwangju News June 2011

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Fashion

Fash-On with xxl jjdp Set summer a-light with Jeans and T’s

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elcome to summer. Hot, sweaty, where the nights are warmer and parties are in full swing. Plans come together at the last moment and all of a sudden you are off to yet another party. What to wear, what to wear?? Welcome to the June installment of Fash-on with xxl jjdp where this month we will simplify your summer wardrobe and assault all of those around you with a great splash of color. Fashion-wise, it is hard to enjoy the hottest season because of the stifling humidity and temperatures. But when push comes to shove, everyone looks good in a basic jeans and t-shirt combo. So let’s enjoy summer by celebrating being casually comfortable. Rule number one for summer: always have a handy stash of clean multi-colored t-shirts readily available as your ace in your pocket. T-shirts are the best way to update your look by adding color. Gwangju offers a wide variety of stores for both men and women to get really good quality t-shirts for a reasonable price, and here I mean under 10,000 won, and you can still look like a million bucks. On numerous occasions I have left my house wearing one t-shirt, gone downtown, and left wearing a newer purchase. It is as easy at that. Here’s some valuable info to help you pick the best ones just for you this summer. Color/pattern - as this edition is all about color - be bold and buy a few shirts in various shades and patterns. Trust me, it immediately refreshes your wardrobe and yes there comes a point where your five-year-old college t-shirt just looks sloppy and unkempt. Another great look to try for this summer is a t-shirt and blazer. Cool and casual, yet edgy. Lately, Anime and cartoon characters are also enjoying a retro-revival. And whilst in Korea why not indulge in a

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Fashion

cute farm character or two. It’s all in the spirit of fun right? Right. Other things to consider is the collar shape. What works best? V-neck or Crew Neck (round neck)? V-necks work best to elongate your neck and make you look slimmer whilst a crew neck - frames your face better and also work well as undershirts. Size - avoid buying a t-shirt that is too tight as chances are you will look like an overstuffed sausage. Which - no matter who you are - does not flatter anyone. Also keep a polo shirt handy in case you need to appear more formal. But, instead of a neutral color, opt for the brightest color you can think of. It adds an instant shock of creativity that will accent your summer sun kissed skin. Now on to jeans. Most people never diverge from the standard blue or black jeans, barely even giving acid/stone wash a turn, let alone trying a dab of color to their bottom halves. That is why I decided to be a little crazy and indulge in my love for wearing clothing that often requires other people to wear sunglasses just to be able to talk to me. Summer is juicy and vibrant so of course when I saw nearly luminescent orange jeans and a pair of hunter green skinnies, I had to have them. Although it might seem like a daunting task, adding some color to your jean repertoire can change your entire way of dressing. If you haven’t tried it before I would advise finding a cheaper pair of mildly colored jeans first so that you can see if it works for you before committing to a more expensive pair. My advice is that you should always feel comfortable in what you wear so it is totally up to you. But I promise, once you get used to your new vibrant self there is no turning back. To date I own green, orange, red, burgundy, purple and rose jeans. And especially in a sea of copycat dressing all around Gwangju… aim to stand out. Lastly, don’t forget about completing the look with even brighter sneakers and shades. Acid house colored sneakers are widely available downtown and even when worn with a regular pair of jeans they add a pop of color to brighten up any day. Finally round off your fashionista color makeover with a pair of signature sunglasses. Choose to go for the high end branded pairs or be more savvy and budget wise and buy yours from the street vendors downtown. This month’s edition was shot on location at Uncheon Resevoir. Closest subway stop is Uncheon or Sangmu. There is a laser fountain light show every night around 8 p.m. and there are ample restaurants and coffee shops to keep you entertained for a night out. Peace, By xxl jjdp Photos by Billy Cho Clothing was sourced at Vitamin Clothing - Near Megabox theatre Brand Market - Near German Bar Uniqlo - who has great offers on t-shirts at the moment and Have a nice day clothing store which is located on Geumnamro downtown with tshirts ranging between 5,000 and 15,000 won. Gwangju News June 2011

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Cartoon

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Community Board/ Dear Korea

GIC News GIC Journal: Social Discourse of Disquiet A new space for writers, artists and photographers. This publication allows people to explore different forms of art in South Korea. We would like to bridge the gap between arts that are perhaps lost in translation. We would like to hear your ideas and opinions. If you would like to get involved please e-mail selina.gicjournal@gmail.com Please join our facebook group - GIC Journal: Social Discourse of Disquiet. Please look at the work-in-progress at http://gicjournal.wordpress.com Check out the "What's On" page for art events in Gwangju.

art work by Hye-Seong Lee July 2 - Gilda Wilson offers tips on color July 9 - Produce your work Participation Fee: 60,000 won (GIC member 40,000 won) To sign up for events or for more details check out the group or page on Facebook: Gwangju Artist Collective.

term volunteers to join in our regular Saturday program. We would like you to give at least two Saturdays per month. As well as being a friend, you will be asked to teach basic English to girls aged 7 to 14. Meet every Saturday at 1:30 p.m. in front of downtown Starbucks. All are welcome. For more volunteering information please contact Al Barnum at: al_barnum@yahoo.com.

Sports

Apostolate to Migrants Center

Gwangju Men’s Soccer The Gwangju international soccer team plays regularly most weekends. If you are interested in playing, e-mail: gwangju_soccer@yahoo.com.

Gwangju Guidebook Volunteers

Gwangju Ice Hockey Team

Help GIC update the second version of Gwangju Guidebook due to print in October 2011. Korean and English speakers needed for fact checking and copy editing. Contact karina@gic.or.kr if interested.

Looking for men and women of all ages to join us every Saturday night from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. at Yeomju Ice Rink near World Cup Stadium. If you are interested, contact either Andrew Dunne at atdunne@gmail.com or Chris Wilson at kreeco@rogers.com

Art Gwangju Artist Collective Our group is organic and multi-disciplinary: painters, photographers, illustrators,media artists. It includes members from all around the world. Our aim is to stimulate the flow of creative energy through workshops, discussion and community art projects. Art supplies will be provided during the Workshop. Open Studio: Basic Drawing Every Tuesday night 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. at GIC is an open studio for drawing. Join us. GAC members will facilitate; Free of charge. Summer Workshops June 4 - Leroy Kucia will conduct an initial Portfolio Preparation workshop, with an extended workshop to follow up in the fall. June 11, 18, 25 - How to use drawing in your

Gwangju Chaoreum Taekwondo Add: 1187-3 Chipyeong-dong, Seo-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 384-0958 Location: Chaoreum Taekwondo Gym is located on the third floor of Jeong-yeon (K-1) building (just beside the bus stop) Buses : 62, 63, 64, 518 (bus stop: 상무대우아 파트 - Sangmu Daewoo Apateu) Taxi directions: "Sangmujigu Kumho Daewoo Apart ro gajuseyo". Method of instruction is in English Weekday Classes: 8:00 - 9:00 p.m.(from Monday to Friday) Sunday Classes: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Community Sung Bin Orphanage Sung Bin Orphanage is looking for creative/ active/ energetic/ outgoing/ enthusiastic long-

Address: 802-4 Songjeong -2dong, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 954-8004 Subway: Get off at Songjeong Park (송정공원) Station and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Busses: 29, 38, 39, 62, 97, 98, 99 Get off at Yeonggwang-tong intersection bus stop and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Sunday masses: 10:00 a.m. (Indonesian/ East Timor); 3:00 p.m. (English) at the Migrant Center; 6:00 p.m. (Vietnamese) . 2nd Sunday: 11:00 a.m. Mass for multi-cultural families Migrant’s Counsel Center is open! Gwangju Apostolate Migrant Center was appointed as the Supporting Center for Foreign Workers by the Human Resources Development Service of Korea. Workers and employers with problems can be given help and advice from counselors. Phone: 062) 959-9335/ 019-588-2133/ 011-9602-7266

Gwangju Jumbo Taxi If you’re traveling in a big party or simply need transportation in and around Gwangju, Gwangju Jumbo Taxi provides service to Bus Terminal, Airport and others. With a seat capacity of up to 9 people, you can travel in comfort. Friendy and hospitable, Mr. Kim will help you travel with safety and comfort. Whether you are going from/ to Gwangju Airport or simply to travel around the city, give Jumbo Taxi a call. Call to reserve at 010-5086-7799 (Mr.Kim) or refer to www.gjtaxi.co.kr for the price list.

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GIC Talk / Korean Language Class

[ GIC Talk ]

Time & Place: Every Saturday, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m., GIC office (5th floor of Jeon-il Bldg) For more information, visit www.gic.or.kr or contact Moon So-eun at: gwangjuic@gmail.com Check out pictures from previous GIC Talks http://picasaweb.google.com/gictalk Click for the highlight clips of GIC Talk at www.youtube.com/user/GICTALK

June 4 12 Years Commemoration of Gwangju International Center (GIC) Host: Michael Simning Discussing what GIC has done in the past, and the first six months of 2011. Let’s talk about what direction GIC should go in the future. Please come and share your opinion on the GIC’s role in the local community. The host of the day is Michael Simning, the forever contributor of the GIC, and the godfather of Gwangju’s local community.

June 11 Topic: Opening of an art show Curious Encounters & The Things I Don’t Fully Understand’ Speakers: Ian Aherne, Nadine Bouliane and Meaghan Ford This exhibition will show over 20 pieces of drawings and paintings in various mediums. For more information, please see page 8.

June 18 Topic: In Tandem: Foreign English Teachers Representing and Witnessing Cultural Diversity in Korea Speaker: Leah Kabigting Sicat (Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Grantee at Changpyeong High School) Korea is becoming increasingly diverse. With changes in the Korean education system and its English language education curriculum, there are more English teachers from various countries in Korea. More foreigners are immigrating to Korea as factory workers, college students, and immigrant brides. Transnational families with mothers and children living abroad and multicultural households with Southeast Asian mothers and mixed heritage children reflect the changing landscape of the Korean classroom and an ethnically heterogeneous society. This Talk will present an American English conversation teacher’s perspective on how foreign English teachers – as a diverse group - are witnessing a critical point in Korean society and will provide suggestions on how they must therefore find new ways to grapple with Korea's burgeoning multiculturalism.

June 25 Topic and Speaker: TBA

Ian Aherne: Light Instance - Sunset

2011 GIC 4th Korean Language Class Please register until July 5, 2011

Saturday Classes

Weekday Classes Level

Days

Textbook

Level

Textbook

Beginner 1-1

Monday & Wednesday

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 1-1

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 1-2

Tuesday & Thursday

서강한국어 1A (Lesson 2 ~ Lesson 6)

Beginner 1-2

서강한국어 1A (Lesson 2 ~ 6)

Beginner 2-2

Tuesday & Thursday

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 5 ~ Lesson 8)

Beginner 2-1

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 1 ~ 4)

Intermediate

서강한국어 2A (Lesson 5 ~ 9)

- Period: July 11 – August 25, 2011 (Twice a week for 7 weeks) - Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee : 80,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

Not

e

* The tuition fee is non-refundable after the first week. * A class may be canceled if fewer than 5 people sign up. * Textbooks can be purchased at the GIC

- Period: July 9 – August 20, 2011 (Every Saturday for 7 weeks)

- Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee: 50,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

GIC is located on the 5th floor of the Jeon-il building, the same building as the Korean Exchange Bank, downtown. The entrance is located immediately to the north of the bank. Contact Moon So-eun for more information. Phone: 062-226-2733/4 E-mail: gic@gic.or.kr Website: www.gic.or.kr

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Gwangju News June 2011


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(EN) Gwangju News June 2011 #112  

Featured articles: - Binayak Sen: 2011 Gwangju Human Rights Award Winner - Now and Then: A lookback to Gwangju through the Generations - Bin...

(EN) Gwangju News June 2011 #112  

Featured articles: - Binayak Sen: 2011 Gwangju Human Rights Award Winner - Now and Then: A lookback to Gwangju through the Generations - Bin...

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