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The EASTERN STEWARD ENGAGEMENT

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REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP

BIENNIAL REPORT 2017 - 2018

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GOVERNMENT RELATIONS


One of the key challenges facing us as Kentuckians is greater access to education so that talented men and women can acquire the training and knowledge needed to join a workforce that operates across cultures and borders. EKU will be part of that solution, developing innovations in education, creating the building blocks for discovery and resolving issues within our community. The Office of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations combines the unique talents, ideas and specialties of our university communities to create new technologies and innovations, as well as to advance workplace safety and development. It also endeavors to educate across the Commonwealth, while leading the discussion in our civic discourse, as well as improving the educational, intellectual, cultural and economic vitality of our region. I invite you to follow our progress on social media and our website, as well as find opportunities to partner with Dr. David McFaddin and his leadership team, so that together, we make Kentucky a better place to work, raise our families and prosper. And always remember, we are in the business of making “No Little Plans!�

Michael Benson President

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BIENNIAL REPORT


David McFaddin, Ed. D.

Vice President of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations

ENGAGEMENT, REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS EXECUTIVE TEAM Tammy Cole, Ed.D. Executive Director, Center for Career & Workforce Development

Roger Duvall, M.A. Ed., Communication Media Manager, WEKU

Tom Martin, Ph.D. Executive Director, CEDET

Melissa Newman, M.A. Ed., Communication Director, Regional Stewardship

Jill Price, M.S. SSEM Executive Director, Conferencing & Events and Hummel Planetarium

Ryan Wilson, Ed.D. Senior Director, Regional Programming

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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ENGAGEMENT, STEWARDSHIP, RELATIONSHIPS CONTINUOUSLY WIDEN THE UNIVERSITY’S PATH Each time I walk across campus and see someone who is experiencing The Campus Beautiful for the first time, I can’t help but think back to many years ago when I was the new face. I am reminded of the path I took to discover my alma mater, and I am always curious to know the stories behind these new faces and the varied routes that brought them to our University. I offer a smile and a nod, knowing that their futures will forever be intertwined with Eastern, just like mine. What led you here – into our University – into these pages? What was your path? Undoubtedly, someone made a connection and showed you the way. Whether you came here first as a student, an employee, a partner, a donor, a proud Kentucky citizen supporting your local university, or something else entirely, you are here because a road to Eastern was cleared for you. Within these pages of this inaugural issue of “The Eastern Steward,” a biennial report for the Office of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations, you will find a sampling of the work that goes into making the ever-widening paths that lead people just like you to our University. The relationships and collaborations represented here help Eastern build programs and implement projects that matter to the people we serve, changing them and their circumstances, and making a better future for those who will be here after us. Through Workforce Development, we are making our economy and hardworking Kentucky employees stronger. Through strategically placed internships, we are helping to reshape and rebuild our service region. Through broadening our programs with new technology, we are making higher education more inclusive. Through research partnerships, we offer the world our solutions. The departments under the umbrella of the Office of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations are diverse in discipline and expertise. The tools they use and the work they do, however, accomplish the same task, to continue to build on that wide, well-worn road that connects our University and its works to the rest of the world. I am honored to be a champion for Eastern and provide leadership for our programs and projects, inviting and nurturing innovation and then sending it back out into the world. I invite you to read this issue and learn more about how our work impacts students, the University, the Commonwealth and beyond.

Dr. David McFaddin Vice President of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations #EKUEngages

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REGIONAL PROGRAMS #EKUENGAGES IN STUDENT SUCCESS

EKU IMPROVES COLLEGE ACCESS AND SUCCESS THROUGH TECHNOLOGY

Staples’ EKU professors, managers in the Regional Stewardship Office and staff in EKU’s Information Technology Department were quick to put her worries to rest. Using a newly expanded distance education technology called E-Presence, staff and faculty kept Staples on track toward graduation. E-Presence is an internet-based telepresence system that delivers “synchronous instruction,” which means that courses taught at EKU’s main campus in Richmond can simultaneously be taught at other locations, or professors can teach classes from home. This allows the University to expand programming to meet the educational needs of more diverse students with greatly reduced travel costs for both faculty and students. EKU worked toward this technological expansion for two years. The system was fully implemented in the 20162017 academic year, primarily to deliver courses to regional campuses. An added bonus is that it allows place-bound students to join the class with their laptop, tablet or phone.

It was almost like I was seated in the classroom. The staff was extremely caring and would always make sure I would be able to connect to each class, so I was able to keep up with all my classes and never felt like I missed a thing.

RACHEL STAPLES

In fall 2016, when her infant was diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and admitted to the University of Kentucky Medical Center, Eastern Kentucky University senior Rachel Staples knew she had to be there for her daughter. However, she worried that taking time away from her classes would negatively impact her studies in the fitness and wellness management program.

Working with staff from EKU’s Information Technology, Staples logged onto the nternet through the hospital’s guest wireless connection and attended every class. IT Associate Amy Graham even made the 27-mile trek from the Richmond campus to the hospital to serve as proctor for one of Staples’ exams. “It was almost like I was seated in the classroom,” Staples said. “The staff was extremely caring and would always make sure I would be able to connect to each class, so I was able to keep up with all my classes and never felt like I missed a thing.” Learn more at epresence.eku.edu

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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REGIONAL PROGRAMS #EKUENGAGES IN LEADERSHIP

EKU EAST REGION FOCUSES ON LEADERSHIP IN KENTUCKY’S APPALACHIA Located in the heart of Eastern Kentucky University’s service region, the EKU East Region Campus in Manchester is more than a school. It’s a leadership and economic development hub for the Appalachian Region of Kentucky. The 48,000-square-foot campus is home to several organizations dedicated to bettering the region, such as Leadership East Kentucky (LEK), located at the Manchester Campus since mid-2014. The campus also regularly hosts meetings for Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR), having welcomed their second SOAR board meeting in March 2017. LEK is devoted to regional leadership training and development, growing leaders who will in turn improve their communities. Each year LEK, which is headed by EKU East Region Director Terry Gray, recruits its leadership class from throughout East Kentucky and from diverse work areas such as business and industry, education, government, nonprofits, health care and economic development. “The 2017 LEK class allowed me to increase my knowledge, expertise and experience in order to

Leadership East Kentucky participants experience Portal 31 attraction in Harlan County

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BIENNIAL REPORT

contribute to the growth of my community,” said attendee Janet Jackson, director of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act for the BellWhitley Community Action Agency. “My objectives for participating in LEK were to increase my network of individuals who have the same vision for their communities, while increasing my knowledge of what has been successful in surrounding Eastern Kentucky counties that are similar to mine,” she said. “LEK exceeded my expectation and I have not only increased my network with viable leaders, I have enriched my life with a new group of friends.” The group’s 19th year of programming began in the summer of 2017. Every month, the group’s participants take part in interactive, communityfocused sessions or receive on-site skills training in topics such as community development, collaboration, working in teams, asset-based planning and visioning. This program plays a vital role in developing educated leaders who are poised to shape the future of Eastern Kentucky. As a host site for

Leadership East Kentucky participants


REGIONAL PROGRAMS #EKUENGAGES IN LEADERSHIP

Appalachian development initiatives, EKU Manchester provides an excellent venue for both small meetings and large conferences.

members and business owners and industry leaders.

In early 2017, the campus hosted the regular board meeting for SOAR. Both the EKU Manchester and the EKU Corbin Campuses are designated SOAR Regional Workspaces. In that capacity, both sites can accommodate SOAR’s need for meeting space allowing stakeholders throughout Appalachia to work alongside SOAR leaders, community

EKU’s Regional campuses go beyond just preparing students to make a difference in their communities, said Ryan Wilson, Director of Regional Programs. They are actively involved in improving job creation, regional opportunities, innovation, identity and quality of life. Learn more at lek.eku.edu and regionalcampuses.eku.edu/eku-east-region.

I am always searching for ways to increase my knowledge, expertise and experience in order to contribute to the growth of my community. My objectives for participating in LEK were to increase my network of individuals who have the same vision for their communities, while increasing my knowledge of what has been successful in surrounding Eastern Kentucky counties that are similar to mine. LEK exceeded my expectation. I have increased my network with viable leaders and enriched my life with a new group of friends.

JANET JACKSON Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Director Bell-Whitley Community Action Agency

Terry Gray, Director of EKU’s South Region Campus in Manchester (front), and Leadership East Kentucky participants

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CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES IN WORKPLACE SAFETY

INDUSTRIAL WORKERS SAFER WITH OSHA TRAINING INSTITUTE EDUCATION CENTER Alan Hall came to Eastern looking to reinvent himself. An iron worker for more than 30 years, Hall had plenty of knowledge about the industry, but little background or professional education in safety. However, he had always wanted a role that would allow him to keep his fellow iron workers safe on the job. He began training at EKU’s OSHA Training Institute Education Center (OTIEC) in October 2013. He finished 11 months later with 188.5 hours of training. Hall earned a Certified Safety and Health Specialist designation in both general industry and construction during his time at EKU, which included a training authorization to teach OSHA 10- and 30-Hour Outreach classes. Upon completion of the Certified Safety and Health Specialist Certificate program, Hall quickly gained employment as a safety coordinator with

Woodruff Contracting, where he protects his fellow iron workers from injury. “I truly appreciate the great staff at EKU’s OSHA Training Institute. I could not have possibly completed these courses without their help and encouragement,” Hall said. “This school was a lifechanging experience. I recommend EKU OSHA to anyone interested in the safety field.” The EKU OSHA Training Institute Education Center (OTIEC) is one of only 26 such centers across the U.S. and is consistently ranked in the top 10 by the U.S. Department of Labor based on number of students served. The center boasts a team of more than 25 instructors who serve as occupational safety subject-matter experts for general industry, manufacturing and the construction industry. The EKU OTIEC enjoys primary responsibility for Federal Region IV,

I truly appreciate the great staff at EKU’s OSHA Training Institute. I could not have possibly completed these courses without their help and encouragement. This school was a life-changing experience. I recommend EKU OSHA to anyone interested in the safety field. ALAN HALL Safety Coordinator at Woodruff Contracting

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CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES IN WORKPLACE SAFETY

which includes Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina and South Carolina. While pursuing certifications, students can also apply what they learn toward a degree. A partnership with EKU’s Department of Safety, Security and Emergency Management provides an opportunity for students to receive undergraduate or graduate credit once training contact-hour thresholds and admissions standards are met. This serves as a recruitment tool for the university, and enables students to stack their credentials.

training credentials for their various military assignments. Other courses were provided across the U.S., including Fort Huachuca, Arizona; Fort Drum, New York; Joint Base Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland; and Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. International courses were provided at military installations overseas at Camp Humphreys and Camp Henry in Daegu, South Korea, as well as the USAG Kaiserslautern Army Base in Kaiserslautern, Germany.

Additionally, EKU is proud to be a military-friendly school, and OTIEC conducts on-demand training for the U.S. Army Safety Center as well as the Marine Corps throughout the year. In February 2017, the newly hired U.S. Army safety interns arrived on campus to spend seven weeks earning the required occupational safety

Visit osha.eku.edu to learn how OTIEC helps Kentuckians like Hall improve their lives and make the world a safer place.

OSHA TRAINING INSTITUTE EDUCATION CENTERS BY THE NUMBERS

REGULARLY RANKED

SERVES OVER

12,500 students ANNUALLY

top 10

ONE OF ONLY

BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

ACROSS THE U.S.

26 centers

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CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES IN WORKPLACE ADVANCEMENT

WORKFORCE TRAINING HELPS KENTUCKIANS EXCEL IN THEIR CAREERS

Hyster-Yale referred Hatton to a training program at Eastern Kentucky University’s Center for Career and Workforce Development where he could learn the advanced skills he would need as a manager. He received his promotion in June 2017, and now holds a new leadership position within the company. “The Basic and Advanced Programs from Workforce Development were very informative and have helped me grow in the workplace,” Hatton said. “I am now in a leadership role, and I am grateful for the opportunity.” Hatton isn’t the only Kentuckian who has been able to advance his life and income through further education. In the last year, 37 in-depth workforce

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The Basic and Advanced Programs from Workforce Development were very informative and have helped me grow in the workplace. I am now in a leadership role, and I am grateful for the opportunity.

ANTHONY HATTON HYSTER-YALE

Anthony Hatton had been working toward a promotion for three years at his company, HysterYale, a material handling group in Berea, Kentucky. While already an expert in the technical aspects of his job, his busy schedule made it nearly impossible to learn the supervisory skills he would need to effectively manage others.

development programs were provided throughout eastern Kentucky, with enrollment exceeding 375 students. In alignment with Kentucky’s emphasis on work-ready skills, EKU Workforce Development currently partners with more than 75 manufacturing industries throughout the service region.


CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES IN WORKPLACE ADVANCEMENT

Programs are consistently offered for line workers, supervisors and managers. While some programs vary from year to year, the following programs are regularly offered: Manufacturing Maintenance Technician Certificate Program Basic and advanced training for industrial maintenance technicians. Leadership Excellence for Middle Managers Traditional and online learning to develop leadership skills for managers. First-Line Supervision Certificate Program Assists first-line supervisors in bridging the gap between technical skills and supervising others to increase overall company performance. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis Helps a team to identify potential failure modes, enabling the team to detect failures of systems and reduce development time and costs. Microsoft Office Classes Teaches Excel, PowerPoint, Word and project management skills. APICS Supply Chain Management Helps a team improve supply chain management, drive growth and reach global customers. With offices in Richmond, Corbin and Manchester, the Workforce Development team draws upon the expertise of faculty, area business leaders and professional trainers to develop and deliver programs tailored to meet the current economic needs of business and industry. In doing so, they help workers like Hatton get the expertise they need to make a difference and move up in their careers. Check out workforce.eku.edu for locations, schedules and more.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BY THE NUMBERS SERVING

75

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

375 STUDENTS SERVED

37

In-depth workforce programs provided last year

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

EKU PARTNERS WITH OSHA AND KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO OFFER CREDENTIAL TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS Eastern Kentucky University has partnered with the Kentucky Department of Education’s Office of Career and Technical Education to implement workplace safety training for high school students interested in construction and manufacturing sector careers. As a result, students in designated career and technical programs will graduate high school with an OSHA 10-Hour Training credential issued by EKU on behalf of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. This is beneficial not only to employers but to the students as well – the OSHA 10 certification is a nationally recognized credential in promoting safer work practices. The project was launched in summer 2017 with the teachers spending part of their summer break on campus at EKU, first completing the

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Standards Course and then continuing into the Train-the-Trainer Course. A total of 18 teachers participated in the construction track, while another 14 were in the general industry/ manufacturing track. Upon completion of the program, the authorized teachers will weave the safety course into the construction or manufacturing curriculum with students receiving an OSHA 10- or 30-Hour certification. The second round of training is scheduled for summer 2018 and will authorize the remaining qualified instructors. OSHA 10 courses provide information needed to help line workers, foremen, supervisors, managers, superintendents, safety staff and others become aware of common health and safety hazards to avoid.


CENTER FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT #EKUENGAGES WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

OSHA 10 BY THE NUMBERS

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teachers completed the construction track by fall 2017 completed the general/manufacturing track by fall 2017

Because of the teacher training, students in the designated career and technical programs across the Commonwealth will graduate high school with an OSHA 10 credential.

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REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN REFRAMING THE APPALACHIAN STORY

EKU STUDENTS SPOTLIGHT GOOD NEWS THROUGH A PROMISE ZONE PROFILES PROJECT

Curd is the coordinator for the Kentucky Promise Zone, a federal partnership dedicated to improving quality of life in high-poverty, rural areas through job creation, economic development, affordable housing, access to technology, education, employment training, substance abuse counseling and more. The Promise Zone encompasses eight counties in southeastern Kentucky: Bell, Clay, Harlan, Knox, Leslie, Letcher, Perry and Whitley. “The Kentucky Promise Zone has connected me with all our partners, including Eastern Kentucky University, and, most importantly, the citizens of eight of the most beautiful counties in Kentucky,” Curd said. “My favorite days are when a group of people sit around a table and put an idea into motion. It sets my world on fire.” One of Curd’s most recent collaborations was with EKU public relations students. Last summer, four EKU interns began sharing success stories from the Promise Zone on social media. Jared Barnard, Kelly Arnold, Kamille Johnson and Mikayla Estepp served as consultants for the Promise Zone Profiles project. In this role, they worked with students in the 17 high schools located in the Promise Zone. The interns edited and revised student profile pieces that shared the everyday success stories found throughout the area. The project also benefited the high school students, encouraging engagement in their communities and fostering a sense pride in their heritage. EKU’s Office of Regional Stewardship Director Melissa Newman and Outreach Specialist Maggie

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Bill collaborated with Curd on the plan to spotlight the achievements and successes of people in the Promise Zone, and the EKU public relations student

The Kentucky Promise Zone has connected me with all our partners, including Eastern Kentucky University, and, most importantly, the citizens of eight of the most beautiful counties in Kentucky. My favorite days are when a group of people sit around a table and put an idea into motion. It sets my world on fire.

SANDI CURD

Each day, Sandi Curd wakes at 5:09 a.m. and brews a cup of Coal Miner’s Blend coffee, a stout brew from a locally owned company. She then takes her dogs on a walk and plans her day. While she drives to and from her destinations, she sees the everyday lifestyle – good and bad – of people in the community she has sworn to improve.

DIRECTOR OF KENTUCKY’S PROMISE ZONE

interns work under the guidance of the Office of Regional Stewardship. Their work is made possible with the help of some grant funding from Brushy Fork Institute, through a larger funding stream from the Appalachian Regional Commission. Periodically, Curd checks Facebook, Twitter and the Promise Zone website to keep tabs on the continuous work being done by the students. However, having access to talented and hardworking EKU interns and the supervision of the Office of Regional Stewardship allows Curd to stay focused on her important work – making southeastern Kentucky better. “I spend 50 percent of my time in the field using my big red pickup truck as my office, meeting individuals or groups about projects or ideas,” she said. “I adore these times because the possibilities dance around the room.” Learn more at kypromisezone.com.


REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN REFRAMING THE APPALACHIAN STORY

Sandi Curd Promise Zone Coordinator

PROMISE ZONE PROFILES BY THE NUMBERS

20%

INCREASE IN SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT IN THE PROMISE ZONE

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PUBLISHED PROMISE ZONE PROFILE GOOD NEWS STORIES

PROMISE ZONE HIGH SCHOOLS ENGAGED WITH THE PROJECT

EKU Student Consultants for the Promise Zone Profiles Project (left to right) Kamille Johnson, Mikayla Estepp, Jared Barnard

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REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN STUDENT WORKPLACE RELATIONSHIPS

LINC CONNECTS INTERNS TO SERVICE REGION BUSINESS AND NONPROFIT NEEDS Annie Zomaya, a recent graduate of Eastern’s Public Relations program, grew up in the mountains of Harlan County, attending Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College for two years before transferring to EKU. Her primary goal in life is to use her passion for writing to give back to her community.

region, it opens doors and it is great for networking. EKU reaches out to rural areas, and students can apply the tools they are mastering and use them in real-world situations.” Because Zomaya is from Harlan, LINC staff set out to find an organization in Harlan that needed an

EKU is about creating opportunity, and that is exactly what it has done for me. I will be the first person in my immediate family to graduate college. Higher education has been my lifelong dream, and because of

However, dream jobs are hard to come by without experience. That’s why Zomaya was grateful to be part of the LINC (Liaisons Improving Networks and Connections) Internship Program, part of EKU’s Office of Regional Stewardship. The program specializes in networking with nonprofits and businesses within EKU’s service region, providing EKU students with paid work experience. “LINC is really beneficial, and I’m grateful I had that opportunity,” Zomaya said. “The best part is that it helps everyone involved. It benefits the service

the opportunities I have been blessed with, it’s coming true.

ANNIE ZOMAYA

Annie Zomaya, ’17, graduate of Eastern’s Department of Communication.

intern. Harlan County Judge Executive Dan Mosely was working to find support for the Harlan County Economic Development Authority. The county judge was excited to learn he could hire an EKU student from Harlan who had the expertise he needed for his project.

-African Proverb

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Jackson Energy Cooperative’s original mission opened in Beattyville. Through partnership with Jackson eration Energy, Teleworks was able to obtain the resourceswas to better the lives of its members by providing utility m Op group tting fro This Irvine cubicles, office furniture, and telephones- essential to services to all residents of its Eastern Kentucky service area. to benefi ayers. its operation. In just six months of business, Teleworks zation ver City Pl rming arts Having surpassed this goal, Jackson Energy is solely focused organi rfo has employed 70 local residents. Teleworks has given local l County Riinging pe on continuing to improve every member's quality of life. r he Owsley County the resources to attract industry and keep Anot P is Estil ion of br Jackson Energy is able to do this through grant programs-like communities’ ity iss dU un m hard workers local. un m Ro two-fold its com n-profit you? Operation RoundUP- and partnerships. Some of the current “For a small grassroots, we’ve made a huge impact. We a ng As a no t of its ean to r, s m izi ha th tal partnerships include: ve vi k. os were able to look at the need of our community and find a een ch mon , howe and re , the Mac receives m ntributions Redbud Ride nts ea nizations rence betw rd solution,” said Molly Turner, Executive Director of Owsley tre co ce tra thea zation, it private ng for an ga to affop and County Teleworks, addressing the commuting issue facing h ni few ex r some orake the diffe yi le a ga ug no pl ab a or ro es ap g Laurel County’s Redbud Ride was named 2011’s “Best Fo ga in do m g th So was Owsley County residents. What not much. ange can and not be gnized thise grant fundin ndraisers. dUP grant son Energy Century Ride in America” by Active.com. Rightfully so, the ly ch s bl co ck un d fu ty Probabare pocket l program erative re , a charitanwide. mid-April bicycle ride starting in London, KY had humble oup. Ja l Coun n an eration Ro Tiny House Project Op er for the grarded Estil ree grants this sp g successfu ergy Coop P in 2013 ves natio every citize beginnings in 2008 with only 26 participants. runnin Jackson En on RoundUl cooperati undUP is ity and lly brain erative aw ers with thants funded However, participation has since skyrocketed;; The T Tiny House project originated as a Kenan estimated 1500-1800 riders participated them. hed Operati by severa eration Ro l commun specificaeir Coopr City Play These gr ve the ca ve s 0. s ted ve th Op lo nc tuckyy Valley Educational Coop grant opportuSa ati er Ri lau ay l in the 2017 ride. Approximately 96 percent iser, d up" g $400 ildren’ m adop behind ort the Cooper e nityy called “Build it Forward.” Lee County City Pl d cultura of these riders are from 50 or more miles r totalin nual fundraon-free ch g, prograe principle ty to supp n Energy tion to "roununding th ve an Ri t Area Ar Technology Center students were rem ro eration Th opportuni Jackso rs an op the an and a tuiti purchasinthe Mack, through ar opened to away causing hotels, restaurants, and local ts. ge fro Op be quired to research, design, and conMack, camp. Byreopening economy spots wereRiver City isshops to flourish during the ride. Millions gets an ent projec,000 mem excess chan ted to theis $71.23 d struct a 3D model of a tiny house. In ine’s ral more tre camp. through th of dollars are brought in through theater ting, and bettermits over 51 bills. The llar is donayour bill nts is adde ve , ate Irv va d April 2016, students presented plans gives ly energy xt whole doinstance, if the 77 ce ywhere ar. reno s to stimulthis grant se for the thear youth an nce, poise event-surrounded tourism creating an de n in front of a panel and were rewardou hope . With month to the ne fund. For to $72 and n donate an 8 per ye childre nce of lf-confi ing arts. economic boom in Eastern Kentucky. ed a grant to build an an actual tiny house. tourismmmunity’s e importa children seof perform Board “I think the phenomenal growth and bill updUP grant round up embers ca cap of $11.8preferred, Several local businesses agreed to partner Se popularity can be attributed to the fantastic the co s knows thteach local ity-on top Players’ grants Roun uld opt to . Co-op m ly, with a nation, if donated is with Tiny House Project, but Jackson Energy scenery along the rotes, the willingness of Player is able to commun River CityRoundUP d its oney you co grant fund nts monthone-time do to entire community to take ownership of the All m was the t first to jump onboard. With the help gy camp ide in their s, chair ofOperation ly deplete ose ableour to the one to 99 ceo make a ly option. n Ener of Jackson Energy, Lee County students will Jack event, and most importantly the volunteers,”” said and prsan Hawkin without complete ages all th from bers can als the month Jackso th over y be able to upgrade the appliances and increase ings, has said wi Su cour d have Mem of using less waRodney Hendrickson, executive director of the Pictured above: Lee County's Tiny the overall worth of the house. This house will beginn nizations RoundUP e rectors,ects woul dget, and enP. in 13 ad Di pa 20 ga le. ste London-Laurel County Tourist Commission. d id os of in eductib House an ity,” sa proj s bu undU purp cal or eration ram’s be the first tiny house in Kentucky accredited un Redbud Ride couldn’t function without current l operationeration Ro such a quick tax-d e the prog awarded loograms Opve the clear e previous comm by the National Organization of Alternative Housing. Upon oor Sinc ve has es and pr t all ha me of th e County volunteers. Cyclists must be fed, maintained, and kept safe td genera ate in Op undUP is ort your bu pp So iti erati completion, this tiny house will be auctioned off; if profits pact Ou throughout the entirety of the event. This becomes tricky particip tion Ro and su Coop 0. Activ endously, an region. : Rockcastlayers, unty Im In 2016 ant most of the routes go through the rural areas of exceed $15,000, Lee County ATC gets to keep all $15,000 “Operagive back gr ay Cosentiment. ,200because $150,00vary tremAppalachi ts include ver City Pl y and 80 percent of anything over. Profits from the auction r $1 oo," Cl Laurel, lion Jackson, and Rockcastle County, where cell service to reallins. fundedttering our dup recipien unty Ri ith "B s a similareceived a a pavi Co Sm will go back into the “Build it Forward” fund. This project is l e wk ha til un us isholimited. To solve this, the day of the ride Jackson Energy Ha ylor build of be on Ro ures ent, oor d, Es not a one-time thing, but rather a project Lee County hopes John Taes’ presidoor Advent nds helpedects-a bunkOp t Boar pact Outd eratione volunteer their time and use of their vehicles and Operati . employees oj Fu pmen Im td ntur to replicate over and over again. If enough money is raised, th are stationed throughout the 100-mile ent Adve County Ou RoundUP. ith other prs are scarcetioradios. Develoay County n for Volunteers Lee County will build two houses next year, rather than just not able to provide necessary communication in case velopm0 route Clay Operation ’ camp. Ws, resource cessible op nt and Clntures. ures and 00 unty De one. tyle accidents, or mechanical issues. illness, es from for the kids the work enient, ac tdoor Advefiof Adve ckcastle Coa grant of $1was lif t Lee County ATC Principal, Craig Herald, sees tiny houses ey r an Ro ed shed cetrack- in more conv Impact Ou courage a drFor ug more information visit www.redbudride.com. is mon receiv fo as a way of the future for the Appalachian region. Tiny and radUP was a ay County ned to en spel-driven lems run n Boardril 2016. Th ston, KY ston is houses could be built with quality right here in Appalachia. a go drug prob ganizatio Roun zation. Cl ’ camp desig Teleworks in Ap to Living nd. Living within or o runs d This business model would bring industry and jobs into our n is organiruns a kids el, but als obesity an on, so an io donatedr playgrou wn” located lat region and stimulate economic development. gi pu only h the gospram. Both lachian re Owsley outdoo “Trail To ty; the po n tries to nce in County Teleworks is an organization that “Maybe someday, Appalachian-made will have the same differe yoresidents u. If throug tion prog our Appa nt. to work from the comfort of their own a smallcastle Coun Livingsto mulate ing a allows impact as American-made,” said Craig Herald, Principal of de w. in prevennt through is significaative is mak e to inclu home. Teleworks USA connects prospective employees ww Rock y 300. As and help sti g a Lee County Area Technology Center. visitremote 0st step not fi firrst rampa klesboth gy Cooper d would lik undUP, with jobs, such as: U-Haul. Starting at the roughlin tourists th, becomin is call 80fowork viioouuss dget coulds. r More information on the Tiny House Project can be or bv tac Ro ob n p er an at le th very beginning, Teleworks gives potential employees the ab draw ic grow destinatio nd is an n En ation undu gion n’s bu require found at: https://www.facebook.com/tinyhouseATC/ Jackso lachian re g to Operperation-rotionnecessary is avail skills to be employed into any customer service econom-friendly a playgrouy, Livingstoayground ilt the tin pa t/o t. Services include: resume building, literacy training, our Ap ted in donam/conten grant applica family . Creating fortunatel ction a pl vingston bu covered projecposition. 17 and mock interviewing. Once trained, employees are -Kaitlin Smith interesonenergy.co -friendly mmunity crucial rection. Unary construs grant, Li . Funding n costs, IL 20 , APR jacks 80. A userrthwhile co NG connected to several remote work employers and prepped that di the necessRoundUP’ playgrounder renovatioallows IVI L CKY 262-74with a wo affordOperation outdoor ing, shelt This space as a unit. es KENTU for hire. In July 2016, the newest Hub- a workspace- was those With to Create” ding: fencd signage. activities ildren ag “Spacepenses inclupment, an y outdoor ded for chr all ages. 4A KENTUCKY LIVING, APRIL 2017 all ex ound equi t and enjo inally inten e park fo playgr es to get ou was orig expand th famili to Create” n plans to “Space t Livingsto 1-6, bu 4A

Kaitlin Smith, a senior public relations major at Eastern, fulfilled an internship with Jackson Energy Cooperative, where she wrote and designed for Kentucky’s Electric Co-ops’ Kentucky Living Magazine. Here are two of Kaitlin’s designs and stories from the summer 2017 issue.


REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN STUDENT WORKPLACE RELATIONSHIPS

54 KENTUCKY COUNTIES IMPACTED

100%

EMPLOYMENT IN CHOSEN CAREER FIELD

17,141

STUDENT INTERN MILES TRAVELED SINCE THE PROGRAM BEGAN

Annie was a tremendous asset to the Harlan County Fiscal Court as a summer intern through EKU. She was able to help us set up social media accounts for the new Harlan County Economic Development Authority and was valuable in assisting in other projects in the Judge Executive’s Office. With Annie being from Harlan County, it was a natural fit. Our organization benefited from her hard work, and we hope the experience she gained working in local government will benefit her as she begins her professional career after graduating from EKU.

DAN MOSELY HARLAN COUNTY JUDGE EXECUTIVE

Zomaya designed a logo, enhanced existing website and social media platforms, and created an online StateBook account to market Harlan County’s economic development opportunities to outside industries. Immediately after graduation, Zomaya was hired as Berea Partners for Education program associate for strategic initiatives. Zomaya’s LINC story is not unique. Regional Stewardship staff have strategically placed qualified interns throughout the region. During the spring of 2017, Kaitlin Smith, a senior public relations major at Eastern, worked as an intern with Jackson Energy producing advertisements, planning events, writing stories, designing magazine pages and conducting communication research. Devin Breedlove, a

senior criminal justice major, interned with the U.S. Forestry Service London Ranger District. Unique benefits to potential employers include no new-hire paperwork, no long-term commitment and no payroll entries. Additionally, an EKU faculty supervisor will keep track of deadlines as students complete task-oriented projects. Interns can work remotely or on site, and those hired through EKU’s LINC program arrive with a University-assigned laptop loaded with employer-requested software, which includes IT support. Read more at regionalstewardship.eku.edu/linc.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN WORK READY

Members of the Work Ready Committee for Whitley and Knox Counties Front Row L-R: Pat White, Whitley County Judge Executive; Tammy Walker, Lake Cumberland Area Development District; Maggie Bill, EKU; Sandra Stevens, EKU; Kelli Moore, Berea Partners for Education. Back Row: L-R: Patrick Bowlin, Whitley County Schools; Susan Dixon, Whitley County Adult Education

EKU’S OFFICE OF REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP HELPS MAKE KENTUCKY WORK READY Bruce Carpenter wears many hats while working to serve southern Kentucky. He is the executive director of the Corbin Economic Development Agency, the Southern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Southeast Kentucky Industrial Development Authority, a regional partnership between six southeastern Kentucky counties. All of these organizations are designed to help other businesses thrive by creating a strong economic climate in the region. Carpenter says when he

learned about the Kentucky Work Ready program, which prepares skilled workers to attract potential employers, he knew the Tri-County area needed to become strongly engaged. Carpenter reached out to Dr. David McFaddin, Eastern Kentucky University vice president for Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations, who provided assistance with getting the program off the ground. The Office of Regional Stewardship staff worked with Carpenter to form

This program allows us to demonstrate to industries that we have a trained workforce ready and waiting. We are looking forward to continuing our partnership with EKU as we work toward full Work Ready certification.

BRUCE CARPENTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CORBIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

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REGIONAL STEWARDSHIP #EKUENGAGES IN WORK READY

the Work Ready working committees for both Knox and Whitley counties and facilitated meetings, producing the work needed to apply for Work Readyin-Progress certification. With EKU’s assistance, both counties were certified as Work Ready-in-Progress by the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board. In order to be certified as a Work Ready-in-Progress community, both Whitley and Knox had to meet predetermined thresholds in the areas of Graduation Rate, National Career Readiness Certificate Holders, Community Commitment, Educational Attainment, Soft Skills Development and Digital Literacy. The counties have approximately three years to implement the necessary requirements to move from Work Ready-in-Progress to Work Ready. “This program allows us to demonstrate to industries that we have a trained workforce ready and

waiting,” Carpenter said. “We are looking forward to continuing our partnership with EKU as we work toward full Work Ready certification.” In addition to work performed for the Whitley and Knox application, EKU Regional Stewardship staff allocated student intern hours from the LINC (Liaisons Improving Networks and Connections) program toward assisting Jackson County with its successful Work Ready-in-Progress application. EKU Regional Stewardship staff is also helping Laurel County put the finishing touches on its Work Readyin-Progress application. Kentucky is the third state to begin certifying counties as Work Ready Communities based on the quality of their labor force.

For more information about the program, visit workready.ky.gov.

WORK READINESS BY THE NUMBERS

5 high schools and 3 colleges FULL CERTIFICATION EXPECTED IN

5 years

ENGAGED IN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT EFFORTS

272 participated in the inaugural class NEW WORK ETHIC SEAL PROGRAM AT KNOX COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS

EKU AND UK CREATE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP WITH INTENTIONS TO GROW KENTUCKY ECONOMY Eastern Kentucky University and the University of Kentucky are generally known for their rivalries. For example, their sports teams often face off on the gridiron and on the court, and both colleges compete for funds and Kentucky students. Both universities are also passionate about making Kentucky better. That’s why EKU and UK recently set aside their differences and joined forces to help grow the state’s economy through research and intellectual property. Essentially, the partnership will allow EKU to draw on UK’s resources and expertise to turn research into revenue-generating products, services and technologies. The benefits of such a partnership reach beyond Madison and Fayette Counties and have the potential to grow Kentucky’s economy. “Regional universities like Eastern Kentucky University conduct research and develop inventions, but the costs associated with that effort are significant for institutions focused on instruction and service to their region,” said EKU President Michael Benson. “As a research institution, UK has the resources and organizational structure to assist EKU in the proper assessment and commercialization of basic discovery for the innovations of tomorrow.” The joining of two of Kentucky’s premier universities began with two departments focused on economic growth in Kentucky. EKU’s Center for Economic Development, Entrepreneurship and Technology (CEDET), headed by Tom Martin, and UK’s Office of Technology Commercialization (OTC), led by Ian McClure, worked together to forge the partnership, with the blessing of both university presidents. The partnership will allow UK’s Office of Technology and Commercialization (OTC) to act as an independently contracted partner and service provider to EKU for intellectual property and commercialization services.

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SPECIFIC SERVICES INCLUDE: • Helping EKU assess the potential value of intellectual property developments, and determining whether the developments can easily be patented or copyrighted. • Helping EKU with commercialization and intellectual property procurement transaction costs, including market research, patent prosecution and docket management, identifying potential licensing partners, business development efforts to solicit interest in partnership, and negotiating and executing license agreements in coordination with EKU. • Development and implementation of faculty education programs and strategies that UK uses to reach out to faculty and encourage invention disclosure and pursuit of IP protection. • Guidance to EKU on intellectual property and commercialization matters, including those related to what UK does with nonpatentable IP, particularly software. • Help in building a stronger EKU network by implementing processes and procedures. • Solidification of a commercialization partnership that can help build a “research corridor” for collaborative research efforts between UK and EKU.

Learn more at cedet.eku.edu or search for “University of Kentucky OTC.”


CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS

This partnership creates a research corridor between UK and EKU, leveraging their individual strengths for the benefit of all Kentuckians.

MICHAEL BENSON

PRESIDENT, EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

We are happy to partner with EKU to provide that kind of capability for their faculty when they have discoveries, and we are grateful for the partnership.

ELI CAPILOUTO

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

THE PARTNERSHIP QUICK FACTS

1. 2. 3. 4.

The partnership creates a research corridor between the faculty at UK and EKU, leveraging their individual strengths for the benefit of all Kentuckians. UK has the resources and organizational structure to assist EKU in the proper assessment and commercialization of basic discovery for the innovations of tomorrow. EKU and UK attract talented faculty, provide those faculty with an environment for discovery and create incentives for collaborations. The Commonwealth’s challenges related to health, access and application of technology, innovation capacity and economic development are better addressed when universities work together.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT

INNOVATION BREWING IN DOWNTOWN RICHMOND As part of EKU President Michael Benson’s “Make No Little Plans” vision of increasing the university’s town and gown relationship with Richmond, and as part of the Center for Economic Development, Entrepreneurship & Technology’s (CEDET) mission to demonstrate leadership in entrepreneurial and innovative excellence, CEDET has partnered with the Department of Chemistry to develop a unique lab and incubator space in downtown Richmond. The partnership between the Department of Chemistry and CEDET supports the idea that the best innovations occur in social settings. Both programs are dedicated to improving the economic health of the region by preparing students for indemand jobs. The rapid growth in the craft brewing and distilling industries has created a demand for employees with technical expertise, which EKU now provides. Fermentation Science is currently a concentration within the bachelor’s degree in Chemistry program. This relatively new program was the first of its kind in the state, focusing on distilling,

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quality management and responsible use, while allowing students to obtain a strong foundation in agriculture, chemistry, biology, safety and business. The Fermentation Lab and Incubator Space is a first-of-its-kind resource for EKU that creates new programs, and encourages research, commercialization and economic growth. It also supports EKU’s dedication to hands-on learning, preparing students for in-demand careers and empowering them to create their own career.

FERMENTATION LAB AND INCUBATOR HIGHLIGHTS • Strategic • Collaborative • Academic achievement

Visit fermentationscience.eku.edu and cedet.eku.edu to learn more about EKU programs that are tapping into something special.


CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS

Quick Facts Fermentation Center includes education, applied research and quality control center for the EKU Fermentation Science program and community education

Taproom and distribution operation where product that is generated from standard and experimental brew batches can be distributed to customers for commercialization

Entrepreneurship and economic development initiatives with incubators and accelerators for faculty commercialization, student start-ups and community small businesses

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN INNOVATION

EKU HELPS STUDENTS AND FACULTY BRING BUSINESS IDEAS TO LIFE Kentucky needs entrepreneurs, and colleges provide an endless supply of hard workers with great ideas. Starting a business or patenting a product is complicated, and all too often people give up between idea and execution. The Kentucky Innovation Network helps people channel their entrepreneurial spirit and see their ideas through to a successful launch. The Richmond branch of the statewide idea incubator is housed in the Eastern Kentucky University College of Business and Technology. “The Kentucky Innovation network is committed to helping faculty, students, and people in EKU’s service region, take an idea or passion, connect them with mentors and investors, and create or expand a small business.  In so doing, they accelerate economic growth in those communities,” said Terry R. Gill, secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

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Eastern students with great ideas have already benefited from the guidance of the program. For example, Simple Circle was founded by Austin Molen, Craig Hicks and Konnor Kimmel, three PGA Professional Golf Management students who created a patented tool that draws accurate, temporary circles with sand so golfers can measure their accuracy. Nathan Hall and Kyle Marcum founded Moe Mi, a mobile phone application that connects homeowners with lawn care specialists to provide hassle-free, same-day service without long-term contracts. With the help of EKU’s Kentucky Innovation Network, both start-ups placed in Kentucky’s Idea State U business plan competition. Simple Circle placed third and earned $10,000, and Moe Mi placed fourth, earning $2,000. The network does more than help students start their businesses – it’s helping faculty with


CEDET #EKUENGAGES IN INNOVATION

COVINGTON ASHLAND LOUISVILLE

OWENSBORO

MURRAY

LEXINGTON

ELIZABETHTOWN

MOREHEAD RICHMOND PIKEVILLE LONDON

BOWLING GREEN

The Kentucky Innovation network is committed to helping faculty, students, and people in EKU’s service region take an idea or passion, connect them with mentors and investors, and create or expand a small business.  In so doing, they accelerate economic growth in those communities.

TERRY R. GILL SECRETARY, KENTUCKY CABINET FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

lifesaving research. Dr. Margaret Ndinguri from the Department of Chemistry and Dr. Lindsay Calderon from the Department of Biological Sciences are currently conducting research in the area of drug design and targeted directed therapy for cancer. Working with the Kentucky Innovation Network, Dr. Ndinguri and Dr. Calderon have filed for EKU’s first pharmacological patent. They hope further research will verify that their compound has enhanced efficacy and selectivity toward cancer, with the end goal to improve patient lives.

Whether faculty, student or citizen in the service region, the Kentucky Innovation Network at EKU helps people grow their ideas and passions, connect with mentors and investors, and create or expand their small business, furthering personal success and economic growth.

Learn more at kyinnovation.eku.edu.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN HISTORICAL MOMENTS

SOLAR ECLIPSE EVENTS EDUCATE, ENGAGE COMMUNITY August 21, 2017, is a date that many Americans will remember for the rest of their lives. It was the date of one of the most spectacular solar eclipses in recent history, and thousands of people experienced it on Eastern Kentucky University’s campus. Through a partnership between the University’s Department of Conferencing and Events, the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the Madison County Public Library and KET, the local PBS station, EKU’s Hummel Planetarium delivered five free educational events to the local and surrounding communities in the days leading up to the eclipse. People of all ages were invited to learn about the various ways to safely view the phenomenon and receive a pair of highly coveted eclipse glasses. More than 2,000 community members took part in these programs. Thousands more came to the University to see the eclipse firsthand. Hummel Planetarium staff

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offered a short supply of eclipse glasses, live streaming of the most impressive views from all over the country, local food vendors and hands-on activities in the outdoor plaza. EKU Physics and Astronomy staff also hosted guests at the nearby observation deck and offered live viewings of the eclipse through specialized solar telescopes. Solar eclipses happen across the world approximately every 18 months, but the eclipse of 2017 was significant because its path of totality spanned the width of the continental United States. That means that everyone in the country was able to view at least a partial eclipse, weather permitting. At EKU, the eclipse reached just over 95 percent totality, which means only about 5 percent of the sun’s light reached the crowds at its peak. Hummel Planetarium began preparing to celebrate the eclipse with the community in January 2017 with the submission of a grant proposal to the


CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN HISTORICAL MOMENTS

The eclipse celebration day was such a great way to not only experience the phenomenon of the eclipse itself but also the outreach to our community in

Richmond. It didn’t matter if you were a student or someone living in Richmond, we all came together to view this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. KAYLAN DOWDY

EKU STUDENT

American Astronomical Society. Funding of $5,000 for a series of community-based and educational solar eclipse events was awarded to the Planetarium in February. As a result, thousands of people will think of EKU when they remember this awe-inspiring moment in their lives. Even people who didn’t attend in person were exposed to the University, as the local newspaper and all Lexington, Kentucky-area TV stations sent news crews to cover the event and interview EKU faculty and staff.

EKU student Kaylan Dowdy summed it up best: “The eclipse celebration day was such a great way to not only experience the phenomenon of the eclipse itself but also the outreach to our community in Richmond,” she said. “It didn’t matter if you were a student or someone living in Richmond. We all came together to view this oncein-a-lifetime opportunity.” Learn more about how EKU promotes astronomy by visiting physics.eku.edu or planetarium.eku.edu.

eclipse day START TIME 1:02 P.M. EKU President, Dr. Michael Benson and his two sons, Truman and Talmage visited the Observation Deck to view the partial eclipse using a technique referred to as optical projection with guidance from EKU Physics and Astronomy professor, Dr. Marco Ciocca.

END TIME 3:54 P.M. PARTIAL ECLIPSE MAXIMUM AT 95.3% 2:31 P.M.

2,400 guests EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN DETERMINATION

SPECIAL OLYMPICS MARK 23RD YEAR AT EKU FOR KENTUCKY’S SUMMER STATE GAMES For the past 23 years, Special Olympics of Kentucky’s State Summer Games have been held at EKU. During the first week in June, athletes beaming with passion and determination travel from all over the state to compete for a chance to advance to the national games.

Nearly 1,400 students, 600 volunteers and thousands of family and friends packed the Richmond Campus June 2-4. The campus buzzed with energy as young athletes competed in events like track and field, swimming, soccer, bocce and rhythmic gymnastics. Trish Mazzoni, president/CEO of Special Olympics of Kentucky, said the longevity of the relationship with EKU speaks volumes about the venue, and the staff and community who help support the event each year.

Torchbearer Eric Castle from Painstville, Kentucky

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“We have such a good experience in Richmond. More than any other campus we have been on, we are truly welcomed and our mission is understood at EKU,” Mazzoni said. “On our last day on campus, I looked over and saw a couple of athletes crying their eyes out on a bench. Their coach looked at me and said, ‘They don’t want to leave. They don’t want to go home.’ This is the one time a year that so many of our athletes get to get out of their hometowns and have the time of their lives.”


CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN DETERMINATION

700 COMMUNITY AND CORPORATE VOLUNTEERS

23

1,400 ATHLETES EACH YEAR

YEARS AT EKU

On our last day on campus, I looked over and saw a couple of athletes

crying their eyes out on a bench. Their coach looked at me and said, ‘They don’t want to leave. They don’t want to go home.’ This is the one time a

year that so many of our athletes get to get out of their hometowns and have the time of their lives. TRISH MAZZONI PRESIDENT/CEO OF SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF KENTUCKY

Mazzoni added that EKU’s Department of Conferencing and Events strategizes and works with the organization to ensure that all of its unique needs and last-minute requests are accommodated. “That is unique. It’s truly a partnership. I can’t stress enough it’s the staff that makes the difference,” Mazzoni said. “When we come to campus, we are event people who are working with event people and together, we are darn good.” The 2017 Kentucky Special Olympics State Games was one of more than 1,000 events that EKU Conferencing and Events facilitated and welcomed to campus. This year alone, more than 175,000 visitors have traveled to Eastern’s campus for experiences such as academic and professional networking and conferences, K-12 academic and athletic competitions, as well as summer camp programs.

More than 35,000 K-12 students participated in events such as the Future Business Leaders of America conference, the Kentucky State Science Fair, Model Lab School’s “All A Classic” Basketball Tournament, the Kentucky High School Athletics Association’s 44th District and 11th Region Basketball Tournaments and much more in 2017. More than 6,000 youth visited Eastern’s campus during the summer months to participate in summer programming offered by University departments, grant-funded programs, as well as organizations from across the state and Ohio Valley Region. “We had our best year ever this past June,” Mazzoni said. “We always leave EKU having a sense of that.” See what Special Olympics events are coming up at soky.org.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS

KENTUCKY LEADERS COLLABORATE AT 30TH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE The East Kentucky Leadership Foundation brings together leaders from 54 counties across the Commonwealth with a singular goal in mind – to help create a unified front in addressing issues prevalent in the region. The group chose Eastern Kentucky University to host the 30th Annual EKLF Leadership Conference.

Eastern Kentucky region,” said Greg Kitzmiller, entrepreneur and co-owner of Symbiosis Media Group in London.

The event was held throughout two days in April at the Carl D. Perkins Conference Center on the University’s Richmond campus. It was the first time the prestigious event was held in Richmond, and it brought to light one of the many opportunities that EKU’s Department of Conferencing and Events creates for people from across the Eastern Kentucky service region – namely collaborating, networking and forming beneficial relationships with business and community leaders dedicated to making improvements across the Commonwealth. “Because our business and service audience is focused on small businesses, it is very key for us to network with professionals from across the

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During the EKLF 2017 Conference, Kitzmiller was just one of many community entrepreneurial business leaders who led panel discussions.


CONFERENCING AND EVENTS #EKUENGAGES IN COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS

“We talked about our background and service experiences. We were asked by attendees in all the sessions about our failures and struggles as entrepreneurs,” Kitzmiller said. “There were also multiple conversations addressing support and education within the collegiate and grade school levels for students interested in pursuing small business startups.” Other conference topics included East Kentucky’s Healthcare Future; Adventure Tourism as an Economic Driver; From the Ground to the Air and Beyond – Kentucky’s Aerospace Manufacturing and Exports for Economic Diversification; and Leveraging New Federal Investments. EKLF board members choose a different host city for the conference each year, and Office of Regional Stewardship staff were honored that the board trusted Eastern and the City of Richmond to host its 30th anniversary milestone. The EKLF board of directors collaborated with EKU’s Office of Regional Stewardship to plan a memorable anniversary to celebrate the hard work and achievement of leaders throughout the University’s service region for the two-day event. One such leader honored was Dr. David McFaddin, EKU’s vice president of engagement, regional stewardship and government relations. He received the East Kentucky Leadership Award for a Public Individual. “All of our success has come from the hard work and dedication of our EKU team,” McFaddin said. “Without their support, we could not accomplish all the meaningful things we do.” Visit eklf.org to read more about the organization.

Because our business and service audience is focused on small

businesses, it is very key for us to network with professionals from

across the Eastern Kentucky region. GREG KITZMILLER ENTREPRENEUR AND CO-OWNER OF SYMBIOSIS LONDON, KY

Kitzmiller’s forum, called “Out of the Classroom and into Regional Service: A New Path to Entrepreneurship,” offered insight into how integral learning entrepreneurship is to lifelong success if offered to students early and often.

brings together leaders from

54 counties across the Commonwealth to address prevalent issues in the Eastern Kentucky region.

175,ooo visitors came to EKU during 2017 for academic and professional networking conferences, K-12 academic and athletic competitions and summer camp programs.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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WEKU #EKUENGAGES IN STUDENT MEDIA

Ronnie Ellis (left), Frankfort reporter for Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc. News Service, and Ryland Barton (right), Kentucky Public Radio, discuss the political climate with host John Hingsbergen.

STUDENTS LEAD THE WAY ON WEKU’S EASTERN STANDARD PROGRAM Nearly every Friday, student producers toss out programming ideas to John Hingsbergen, WEKU content manager. He quickly provides feedback designed to help them explore the value of their suggestions to Eastern Standard’s growing community of listeners. A program on hops and craft beer? The answer, “Not so much.” A show on a community program working to provide education about increasing racial tensions? The answer, “Sure.” Within the hour, the small, mint-green newsroom in the basement of the Carl D. Perkins Building is filled with chatter as students begin researching and making connections with potential guests. Students are integral to the weekly public affairs program focused on Central and Southeastern Kentucky. Besides pitching program topics, they also contact and book guests, and help with the technicalities of getting the show live on the air. (Students even picked the mint-green paint in the newsroom.) The students also interact with a wide range of community leaders, activists and scholars inperson as the guests come to the studio. It’s all part of a rich experience that prepares them to

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enter the workforce, allows them to see up-close the importance of public service and extends the stewardship of the University’s values. The hard work of students has paid off. Eastern Standard recently won a first-place award from the national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated. Students proposed the topic of the winning show, “Diversity in the Media.” Noah Day graduated from Eastern Kentucky University in 2015. Within two months, he was working part time in the news department of a local TV station, WLEX-18. Within a year, he was co-producing the talk show Hey Kentucky. Noah says his experience with Eastern Standard prepared him to immediately start his career, a rare opportunity that helped put his college course work to practical use. “I learned from organizing the show and writing how to take control and be the boss,” he said. “The great thing about my experience at Eastern Standard is that the more I put into it, the more I got out of it.” Find out the latest news at weku.fm/programs/eastern-standard.


WEKU #EKUENGAGES IN STUDENT MEDIA

Voices of Hope said their appearance on Eastern Standard helped draw record crowds to an Overdose Awareness rally in Lexington’s Jacobson Park.

From Left- Eastern Standard Host: John Hingsbergen Guests: Michael Randolph, Lisa Day, Yi Zhang

Brian Burkhart (left), Zach Redding (center) and Emily Hutchison (right) are student interns for WEKU’s interactive public affairs program Eastern Standard.

Noah Day worked as a student intern on Eastern Standard for three years. He is now a coproducer of Hey Kentucky on WLEX.

EASTERN STANDARD BY THE NUMBERS

5,600 THE ESTIMATED TOTAL AUDIENCE EACH WEEK. (SPRING 2017, ARBITRON, INC.)

35,000 estimated listeners HEAR PROMOTIONAL MESSAGES ABOUT EACH WEEK’S EASTERN STANDARD SHOW. (SPRING 2017, ARBITRON, INC.)

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COMMUNITY LEADERS, ADVOCATES, SCHOLARS AND EXPERTS FEATURED EACH YEAR

IN MEMORIAM John Hingsbergen died unexpectedly after contributing to this article, approving the story not long before his passing. The students he taught through Eastern Standard will continue to be his living legacy.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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WEKU #EKUENGAGES IN NEWS DELIVERY

WEKU RADIO NETWORK CONTINUES TO GROW THROUGH NEW INITIATIVES

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every weekday, listeners are kept informed by two-minute newscasts from the Kentucky Public Radio Network (KPRN), a unique collaboration boosting the reach of critical stories. KPRN is made up of four public radio stations: WFPL (Louisville Public Media), WKMS (Murray State University), WKYU (Western Kentucky University) and WEKU based at Eastern Kentucky University. The four stations’ long-standing collaboration has fortified their individual public service missions by sharing news content that’s relevant across the Commonwealth. As print media continues to cut staff and coverage, KPRN has continually expanded its cooperative reach. Loyal listener Elizabeth Wachtel has noticed, as WEKU became her most trusted source of news during her 40 years serving Eastern Kentucky University. She retired as director of EKU’s Training Resource Center in 2015, but still depends on WEKU. “I’ve always found that the reporting is intelligent, not superficial. That’s been very important to regional stewardship, which is so important to Eastern Kentucky University,” Wachtel said.

I’ve always found that the reporting is intelligent, not superficial. That’s been very important to regional stewardship, which is so important to Eastern Kentucky University. ELIZABETH WACHTEL

Whether you wake up to WEKU news with Bryan Bartlett during Morning Edition, tune in on your way home with Cheri Lawson and All Things Considered, or catch up on midday news with Here and Now, you’ll often hear stories by Frankfortbased Ryland Barton and other journalists across the state.

LOYAL WEKU LISTENER

Building on the success of KPRN, the four stations recently joined with three others to form the Ohio Valley ReSource. This seven-station collaboration covers issues of regional importance for Kentucky, West Virginia and Ohio. The Solutions Journalism Network nonprofit organization recently awarded the ReSource a $40,000 grant to highlight the challenges and successes of the Kentucky Valley Education Cooperative. The grant has funded a series of stories for fall 2017 and will extend into 2018. The stories focus on the best practices of educating children suffering from familial drug addiction and innovative training preparing students for high-tech jobs critical to growing the Kentucky economy. For more information or to read important news, visit weku.fm and ohiovalleyresource.org.

7 STATIONS

collaborating as the Ohio Valley ReSource

4 STATIONS

collaborating to support statehouse reporting and daily statewide newscasts via the Kentucky Public Radio Network

$40,000 GRANT received through collaborations for a series of stories on the success of the Kentucky Valley Education Cooperative

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BIENNIAL REPORT


WEKU #EKUENGAGES IN COMMUNITY ISSUES

WEKU PARTNERSHIP BRINGS POSITIVE CHANGE IN KENTUCKY COUNTIES CHALLENGED BY DRUG USE Pastor Brad Epperson, nurse Mandy Watson and physician’s assistant Troy Brooks couldn’t have been more set against a needle exchange program in Powell County, the place they call home, worrying that it would enable drug users to continue using. More and more they were seeing family members and friends dying on the streets of their small mountain community, finding used needles at playgrounds or hearing stories about outbreaks of HIV and Hepatitis C in other communities. With the help of another Powell County native – Kevin Hall, of the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department – they convinced local leaders of the critical need for this tool to fight the worst health risks of the heroin epidemic. Powell County hosted one of the first needle exchange programs in a region determined to be high risk for an HIV outbreak by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The needle exchange program provides clean needles, but offers health screens and referrals to treatment. WEKU-based Ohio Valley ReSource reporter Mary Meehan told their remarkable story using a long-form radio feature, an in-depth web story and a variety of data-driven graphics. Soon after, the Madison County Health Department used the success in Powell County, and Meehan’s story, to explain the need for a needle exchange in this area. That program is now up and running. Kacy Allen-Bryant, Lexington-Fayette County Board of Health chair, said that kind of in-depth health reporting produces real-world results. “When talking about the needle-exchange program, it’s easy for people to get swept up in the numbers,” she said. “While we are extremely proud of the number of people who have used our program, reports like the one by Mary Meehan for WEKU and the Ohio Valley ReSource show what’s truly important: the human lives that are being changed, and in some cases saved, through needle exchanges.”

7 OHIO VALLEY RESOURCE MEMBER STATIONS 3 STATES COVERED IN THE COLLABORATIVE 1 FULL-TIME HEALTH REPORTER COVERING THE CRITICAL ISSUE OF HEALTH The Ohio Valley ReSource is a regional journalism collaborative among seven public media outlets in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia. The sevenmember team is possible because of the support of Eastern Kentucky University and WEKU. Stories are shared and aired on all seven stations, broadening and deepening local coverage, which strengthens WEKU’s stewardship. The ReSource dives deep into regional issues of the economy, energy, environment, agriculture and infrastructure. The stories explore how dramatic changes to the region’s traditional economic base are intertwined with social and cultural challenges. The ReSource also aims to share challenges and best practices as communities cope with a shifting economy and increasingly dire health disparities.

Learn more about the Ohio Valley ReSource at ohiovalleyresource.org.

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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Office of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations Coates CPO 41A Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Avenue Richmond, Kentucky 40475 eku.edu 1-800-465-9191

conferencingandevents.eku.edu workforce.eku.edu regionalstewardship.eku.edu cedet.eku.edu regionalcampuses.eku.edu gov.eku.edu weku.fm Eastern Kentucky University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and educational institution and does not discriminate on the basis of age (40 and over), race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, ethnicity, disability, national origin, veteran status, or genetic information in the admission to, or participation in, any educational program or activity (e.g., athletics, academics and housing) which it conducts, or in any employment policy or practice. Any complaint arising by reason of alleged discrimination should be directed to the Office of Equity and Inclusion, 416 Jones Building, CPO 37, Eastern Kentucky University, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, Kentucky 40475-3102, (859) 622-8020 or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC. 20202 1-800-421-3481 (V), 1-800-877-8339(TDD)

Eastern Kentucky University Regional Stewardship Biennial Report 2017 18  
Eastern Kentucky University Regional Stewardship Biennial Report 2017 18  

Eastern Kentucky University's Office of Engagement, Regional Stewardship and Government Relations combines the unique talents, ideas and spe...

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