Page 1

視界

Spring 2015

SHI JIE - TO LOOK OUT INTO THE WORLD THE MAGAZINE OF DISCOVERY COLLEGE Spring 2015 Grow. Discover. Dream.

Focus on the

Learner Profile Tournament Play

Cobra teams compete through ACAMIS

Wonderful Wonderland Primary Production is a hit

WONDERFUL WONDERLAND

1


2

WONDERFUL WONDERLAND


Spring 2015

EMBODYING THE LEARNER PROFILE Lifelong learning is something we can each aspire to. This learning goes beyond the classroom, and can come in many forms. We can likely each think of a time when we have learned something new by considering the point of view of another person, or when we participated in an activity that taught us something about ourselves or others. These everyday occurrences give us the opportunity to be continual learners who are inquiring into the world around us. At Discovery College, we strive to instil this passion for lifelong learning in each of our students. Through the IB learner profile attributes, students are introduced to the ten capacities that support learning within the curriculum and into life beyond school. Through their classroom learning, school activities and experiences, students reflect on these attributes and the way they exhibit them. Throughout the pages of this magazine, you will see examples of how the learner profile attributes are brought to life across the College. As relatively privileged members of society, the IB Learner Attributes can also help us reflect on our responsibility to other people and the world in which we live. The IB learner profile unites all of us—students, staff, parents and community members—in a common focus on the whole person as a lifelong learner. We are all continually learning from one another and with one another. I hope that each of us will continue to seek out these opportunities to discover new things and remain interested and engaged learners. Mark Beach Principal

EMBODYING THE LEARNER PROFILE

1


Spring 2015

CONTENTS

視界 Shi Jie

17

Spring 2015 EDITOR Michelle Mouton

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

15

20

Contents | Spring 2015 FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE The Heart of the IB Thoughtful Inquirers Courageous Action Recipe for a Thinker Being a Knowledgable Language Learner Communicating through Music Being Principled Finding Balance Learning to be Open-minded Reflection in Action Caring for Others

4 6 6 7 7 8 9 9 10 10 11

STAFF PROFILE Kylie Harrison Bruce Taylor

12 13

HAPPENINGS Foreshore Progress 14 Celebrations 15 The Library Project 16 Welcoming the New Head of Primary 17

2

STUDENTS TedX Talk Preparing for University ESF Choral Concert Primary Production Advertising Gurus

18 18 19 20 21

SPORTS Expanding the Field of Play

22

ALUMNI Where Are They Now? Class Notes

23 24

CONTENTS EMBODYING THE LEARNER PROFILE

Chania Baldwin Susie Blomfield Sarah Buring Boris Choy Martin De Barr Frank Donnoli Donna Ellery Terry Evans Michael Fraser Adrian Gan Julia Klocek Peter Lasscock Nicole Lau Brian McCann Peter Muir Miranda O’Brien Francesca Philips Aeden Reyes Debbie Tai David Thapa Damian Trimingham Catriona Tuimaka Kim Ward Lawrence Wilkinson

PHOTOGRAPHY Claire Fraser

CIRCULATION & CONTACT Discovery College 38 Siena Ave Discovery Bay HONG KONG

Tel: +852 3969 1000 Fax: +852 2987 8115 Email: office@dc.edu.hk Website: www.discovery.edu.hk Circulation (1500)

視 界 is printed on Alpine Satin which is PEFC certified, Elemental Chlorine Free (ECF) and manufactured under ISO14001 certification, using 100% virgin fibre from well-managed forests.


Spring 2015

BATTLE OF THE BANDS The annual Battle of the Bands is a high-energy favourite of the DC community, providing an energetic finale to Term 2. Each of our five Houses forms a band with members from Years 6-13, selects their songs, rehearses and then performs in front of the whole school. It is an excellent way for our students to authentically demonstrate many of the learner profile attributes. This competition provides an outlet for students to express themselves and their passions. It not only shows their talent, but also the determination and time students are willing to commit to putting on professional-level performances. One of the key purposes of the House system is to get students to mix and work with others in different year levels. The Battle of the Bands shows this purpose in action. Each and every member of the bands demonstrates their courage by being willing to put themselves up in front of a whole school audience. This year Re Tu (Yellow) House earned top honours closely followed by Lie Huo (Red) and Jin Shu (Purple) Houses. All Houses gave complex performances that showcased their talent and teamwork.

BATTLE OF THE BANDS

3


Spring 2015

FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

Learner Profile: The heart of the IB The aim of all International Baccalaureate® (IB) programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognising their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. At the heart of all of the IB programmes is the Learner Profile, which is essentially the IB mission statement in action. The IB learner profile describes a broad range of human capacities and responsibilities that go beyond academic success. They imply a commitment to help all members of the school community learn to respect themselves, others and the world around them. The IB learner profile defines the type of learner that Discovery College hopes to develop through our programmes. We aim to develop internationally minded people who display the following ten IB learner profile attributes: •

4

Inquirers: We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life. Knowledgeable: We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance. Thinkers: We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators: We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups. Principled: We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences. Open-minded: We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience. Caring: We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us. Courageous: We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change. Balanced: We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives—intellectual, physical, and emotional—to achieve wellbeing for ourselves and others. We recognise our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live. Reflective: We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

THE HEART OF THE IB

It is the aim of Discovery College to look for opportunities to develop these capacities in our students. In the Primary Years Programme (PYP), you will see the Learner Profile attributes being explicitly taught and focused on in all of the written, taught and assessed work. As students get older and enter the Middle Years Programme (MYP), these attributes become increasingly implicit in the taught curriculum and in our Community Engagement programmes. In the Diploma Programme (DP), opportunities to develop these capabilities are embedded in the academic curriculum and CAS programme, however, students are also expected to make explicit connections to the learner profile attributes for themselves. Teachers and students take the opportunity to inform parents regarding the progress being made towards developing the learner profile attributes, through written reports, conferences, goal setting and personal reflections. In 2013, the IB released a paper, inviting schools to review the language of the learner profile attribute ‘risk-taker.’ In different cultural settings this term can be interpreted with negative connotations, therefore schools were given the opportunity to decide on remaining with the term ‘risk-taker’ or changing to ‘courageous’ or to use both interchangeably. Our staff were surveyed on the change, and provided some feedback and rationale for the change in language. The staff decided to move towards the term ‘courageous.’ For example, one teacher noted, “I feel courageous is a more real-world term. When you read about people in the world who have taken action, which has placed them in some jeopardy, they are often described as being courageous. Risk-taker feels more contrived, and limited to school use only.” Similarly, this line of thinking was reflected in other teacher responses regarding how the term ‘courageous’ more broadly reflects what is meant by the previous term ‘risk-taker,’ and more accurately encompasses the idea of thoughtful action. As a school, there has been and will continue to be a transition in learning environment displays and curriculum documentation to reflect this new terminology over the next year. This issue of the magazine offers insights into each of the ten learner profile attributes in action across the school community. Donna Ellery, Adrian Gan and Brian McCann PYP, MYP and DP Coordinators


FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

Spring 2015

LEARNER PROFILE:

5


Spring 2015

FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

THOUGHTFUL INQUIRERS

Guest speakers support inquiry

Students in Year 3 have been inquiring into the transdisciplinary theme “How we express ourselves.” People from our Discovery College community were invited to speak to the students and share the particular ways in which they expressed themselves across a range of art forms. The central idea for this inquiry was: People express their appreciation of nature through the arts. The guest speakers gave the students the opportunity to inquire more deeply into various topics, by asking questions of these experts. Hearing from these individuals directly provided a unique way for students to practice their inquiry. They also provided an opportunity for students to reflect on the entire learner profile throughout the process. One of the presenters, Mr Jamie Coote, spoke to the students about how he uses photography to capture images of leafy sea dragons in their natural environment and how he uses these images to create awareness, attract attention and promote the need to protect these delicate, beautiful, rare and precious creatures. At the end of the presentation the students reflected on what they had learned and understood from the session. They connected their understandings to all of the learner profile attributes and also started make plans for how they will continue to develop these attributes through their unit of inquiry. Students noted that they displayed traits of an inquirer by asking many questions about nature and using the internet to learn more. They also noted how being good inquirers can support other attributes of the learner profile. For example, the students reflected that they were open-minded by listening to what other students thought and not just focusing on their own opinion, and communicators when they shared their thinking with Mr Coote and the class. We are grateful to the many experts in our community who share their expertise with our students to support their learning. These types of experiences help students put their skills into action and reflect upon the attributes they can demonstrate. Catriona Tuimaka Year 3 Teacher

COURAGEOUS ACTION

Drama showcase

In the last few months, Year 11 students have been devising their own plays that incorporate the ideas of naturalistic theatre. In creating these performances, students had to have courage in developing characters and a story that would reproduce reality as far as possible. This final unit for drama would see all the students perform their pieces on stage as an evening performance, demonstrating their understanding of the material and their prowess in performance. Using ideas from the theatre practitioner Stanislavski and film director Mike Leigh, they focused exclusively on subjects that were contemporary and used every-day speech in real time. Often many of the ideas that came in preparing these pieces came directly from using improvisational exercises as a way of creating a story and defining characters. The challenge lay in preparing a piece of drama that was not only original but had a plot and characters that were fully researched. Often the issues raised created great scenes of power struggles and deceit set against the back drop of the kitchen or roadside. Every student had the sole responsibility of directing a scene. In doing this they used Stanislavski’s system to make sure their characters knew their given circumstances: What are their motives? What background do they have? How well do they react to others? This type of teamwork gave the students the opportunity to work together toward a common goal. Certainly they had to be willing at times to step out of their comfort zone, communicate with their peers, and explore a dramatic style that may have been unfamiliar to them. They displayed tenacity and courage by putting forth their new ideas and performing them for the audience. For a lot of these students, this was the last time they would be performing on stage, adding tension and excitement into getting the piece right and playing their roles truthfully. Miranda O’Brien Drama Teacher

6

THOUGHTFUL INQUIRERS


FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

Spring 2015

RECIPE FOR A THINKER

Cooking up knowledge

In Year 5, we look for authentic ways to connect our learning across subject areas and the IB Learner Profile attributes. By paying mindful attention to planning in this way, the learning experiences are more meaningful and relevant for the students. In a recent unit of inquiry and language programme, we focused on instructional and procedural writing. This involved ensuring that the students know, understand and can use the structure and features of the genre. They worked on analysing texts to identify features and demonstrate their understanding of the purpose of each feature. This learning required a great deal of thinking involving learning new skills and being able to apply them to new situations. As a team we decided to give the students the opportunity to apply their new skills for writing instructional texts, using the learner profile attribute of being a thinker as a stimulus. Recipes are one form of instructional texts that had been explored during our language programme. We asked the children to think creatively to come up with a recipe for a thinker. In other words, what special ingredients would be pertinent and relevant to being the best thinker a person can be, and how would these be combined to produce a final product of an amazing thinker?

We were very impressed by the level of creativity and ingenuity that emerged from this learning engagement. Not only were the students using their learned skills effectively, they were also doing so imaginatively and they were having fun while doing it. After producing the recipes, the students were encouraged to read and share one another’s recipes, exchanging ideas and engaging in rich discussions about what it means to be a thinker. Kim Ward Year 5 Teacher

BEING A KNOWLEDGABLE LANGUAGE LEARNER

Chinese flea market helps students share knowledge In Primary Chinese classes, students are consistently encouraged to think about what it means to be knowledgable as a language learner. They explore their ideas and understanding through three different lenses: “learning the language”, “learning about the language” and “learning through the language.” Practical opportunities such as the Year 4 Chinese Flea Market this spring created opportunities for students to apply their knowledge in real-life contexts. During the flea market, students had to speak with customers only in Chinese as they bargained with fellow students, parents and teachers to sell their items. Following the event, students reflected on questions such as: What language do you need to know to be a succssful vendor? What did you notice about the way shoppers used language? How was it different using Chinese at the flea market compared with when you practiced it in class? What new language did you learn during the unit? What additional vocabulary would it have been useful to know in this situation? This practical application of the language, as well as the reflection on the experience, helped students to think about and measure the knowledge they have gained during this unit of language study. Debbie Tai Primary Chinese Teacher

RECIPE FOR A THINKER

7


Spring 2015

FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

COMMUNICATING THROUGH MUSIC

Live performances give students opportunities to share Music students in all year levels have the opportunity to perform live throughout the year. These opportunities range from classroom activities to lunchtime concerts in the courtyard to recitals and concerts in the Performing Arts Theatre. Each of these opportunities gives students the chance to communicate with others through music. Performing live has definitely helped me increase my confidence and communication skills. Even more than public speaking, through performing, I understand what it feels like to have an audience accept and appreciate what I have to share. Because of this, I have developed a hunger for performing. After gaining experience from performing several times, I have started to compose my own songs. I have been able to express various feelings through my songs. When I am not singing an original, I put myself into a song’s ‘shoes’ and feel as if I am truly experiencing it. This is how I can sing the song’s meaning and understand what the composer felt while writing it.

8

COMMUNICATING THROUGH MUSIC

When I was performing my first original song to the Vocal Arts team, I was really impacted by how sad the song was. I had writen about past sadness, pain and love. As I kept singing, I heard each word coming out of my mouth sounding softer and quieter. In the middle of the song, I started crying! After my performance, the Vocal Arts members, including Ms. Lashley, truly understood what the song was about. They told me that I should embrace the positive emotions in the song as well as the sad. I felt as if all my energy was drained out and my nose and eyes were drowning in warmth. That was the very first time I expressed true feelings, and it was Music that gave me the opportunity to do this. Aeden Reyes Year 8 Student


FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

Spring 2015

BEING PRINCIPLED

Students explore through art This semester, Year 10 Visual Arts students have been working on an Urban Studies unit, which has been quite challenging, and therefore also both intriguing and interesting. Our final product was designed to be a lino print inspired by the beauty of the urban jungle we live in, Hong Kong. We researched and sketched the old and the new surrounding us and used our photos and drawings to start designing our prints. Reflecting on the ‘principled’ attribute of the learner profile, we ensured our artworks reflected integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individuals, groups and communities represented in our art. We hoped our art pieces would educate and make people aware of the development that has occurred here. We tried to capture how Hong Kong has changed due to the economic growth, how it affects the community of Hong Kong and, by sketching, we documented how our own actions and those of others have affected the environment we live in. Lino is a unique form of artwork, using a material consisting of a canvas backing thickly coated with a preparation of linseed oil, which sort of resembles a stamp. A drawing is sketched onto the surface of the linoleum and then lines and shapes are carved into it. This is a challenging concept to grasp, as everything you cut becomes white when you print it. This is the exact opposite of normal drawing, therefore you brain must work in the negative and concentrate extra hard to make the right decisions. You are forced to be principled and think twice about your next cut. Actually printing is no walk in the park either. Getting the exact amount of ink onto the lino, making sure the coat is even, carefully turning over the lino, successfully transferring the ink onto paper takes countless tries to perfect.

However, once this concept is mastered, we could move to the next level of adding collage. Heavily explored by Pablo Picasso, collage is a very popular art form. It combines two sophisticated forms of expression, and this meant we had to plan ahead in our artwork. I experimented and reflected on every piece of work I created. The good thing about lino is that you can use it over and over again, experimenting with various media backgrounds, but keeping the print consistent. This allowed me to focus my time and energy on the backgrounds, perfecting composition with colour, collage and getting the print right. As a class, during this unit we had to work together and organise our space in order to do our prints creatively. We worked together and showed respect for each other’s creativity and work ethic. Helping each other print, carve and design our images is a process we all contribute to and learn from in order to complete our artwork. Julia Klocek Year 10 Student

FINDING BALANCE

Balancing body and mind

Balance is a necessary part of all our lives. No matter who you are, a balanced life plays a fundamental role into living a happy and healthy life. Overall wellbeing is achieved through both mental and physical health. The Wellness Centre is not only a gym packed with new state-of-the-art equipment, but is also home to friendly faces ready to kick start their health. The Wellness Centre supports students of all abilities and fitness levels. By being open to everyone, an inclusive environment is developed and all feel welcome to join. The importance of exercise is crucial, and while your mind is exercised in the classroom, your body also needs to be managed in a healthy way. Physical exercise simultaneously clears the mind and activates the body. With the diverse classes offered at the Wellness Centre, such as yoga, which helps with relaxation and flexibility, and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), which pushes physical limits, students can improve their fitness and gather mental clarity.

Exercise is not the only service the Wellness Centre provides. Students can obtain information regarding nutrition, relaxation and wellbeing. Optimum nutrition enables students to achieve their physical goals and also feeds the brain to help hardworking students keep up with their studies. The balance between school work, exercise and healthy choices is sometimes tricky, but the Wellness Centre helps students of all abilities find that balance within the hectic rigours of the IB Diploma. Chania Baldwin Wellness Centre Ambassador

BEING PRINCIPLED

9


Spring 2015

FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

LEARNING TO BE OPEN-MINDED

CAS opens students eyes to other cultures The IB Leaner Profile defines being openminded as, “We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.” It could be said that open-mindedness is a part of the cure for many conflicts; it can certainly aid in fostering more positive relationships between members of a community who may come from different backgrounds. An IB education encourages exposure to the views of others, as well as tolerance of different ideas and opinions and others, even when these differ from your own. The IB Diploma CAS programme encourages students to engage in activities with various members of the community, and therefore offers an opportunity for students to learn about others—people from different economic, social, and cultural backgrounds. This year, several Year 13 students were involved in

delivering learning programmes to asylum seekers in Hong Kong. “It was a brand new experience to teach people who come from different countries and have different cultures. Their refugee identity made the experience even more interesting to me,” said Tim Wong, Year 13 student. “After the first class, they totally changed my opinions on refugees. My assumptions on refugees made me nervous, however they all turned out to be wrong. Their stories and cultures deserve to be more well-known.” The students’ experiences provide a glimpse into how CAS develops open-mindedness. These students were working with adults mostly from African and Middle-Eastern countries, whose life circumstances are poles apart from their own. “During one of the class activities, I got the chance to have a chat with a participant, a

REFLECTION IN ACTION

Students reflect on activities in PE The IB Learner Profile attribute of reflection emphasises the need for students to give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and personal development. This year in Primary PE sessions this has been brought to life through the use of Apple TV. This new resource is being utilised in PE to support student reflection through real-time video feedback. Using this resource, students can reflect on their peers’ performances and give more meaningful feedback to improve their learning. One advantage to this style of reflection is enhanced student performance based on the reflections they receive and give. In addition, teachers are able to model and share the language of feedback when reviewing video evidence of proper form or skills. Using the Apple TVs to record and watch performances in class gives students the opportunity to instantly review their performances and make improvements. This reflection helps students to reflect on their own performance in class, enhancing their skills in both communication and PE along the way. Martin De Barr and Damian Trimingham Primary PE Teachers

10

LEARNING TO BE OPEN-MINDED

refugee from central Africa. He told me how he really liked Hong Kong compared with his home country, where he literally had no freedom,” said Tomas Lau, Year 13 student. “His story has made me appreciate the life style that I am enjoying at the moment, and also made me think differently about the plight of refugees. It changed my thoughts, and made me be more open minded towards people form different backgrounds.” Engagement activities such as this one can change minds, develop tolerance and understanding. It is exposure such as this that helps IB students develop the attribute of being open-minded. Peter Muir CAS/Community Engagement Coordinator


FOCUS ON THE LEARNER PROFILE

Spring 2015

CARING FOR OTHERS

Unit explores community needs The Year 11 collaborative design project is an opportunity for students to work in groups across the design disciplines to solve a design problem. Students are using the theme of social entrepreneurship to identify the design problem. Social entrepreneurship is empathetic, innovative, sustainable, but is not charity. Social entrepreneurship aligns closely with the caring learner profile attribute: “Students show empathy, compassion and respect to the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the life of others and to the environment” (IB Learner Profile, 2013). Max Geilenkirchen, Mikhail Jaura and Kengie Tang are working in group that has brilliantly demonstrated caring through their design project. Through their research, they noted that less economically developed countries often have a mismanagement of waste, creating poor living conditions for children and families. They focused on an impoverished area in Manila,

where children are not allowed to go to school if they do not have shoes. Since most of these families cannot afford shoes, the children are then denied the right to education and also face health dangers from walking in dirty or unsafe areas without shoes. To get an idea of what others have to deal with, Kengie tried walking home from the Tung Chung bus stop one day without wearing shoes. “Towards the tunnel to the bus stop, the ground was extremely rocky and painful to step on,” she noted in her project. “The experience really helped me empathise with the target audience. Even walking for an hour felt like a day, and the pain really showed me how some children are going through such pain in such unsafe places.” Their project focused on designing a type of shoe that is sustainable, inexpensive, protective, and made from resources available

in the area, to try to address this critical need. They researched materials commonly found in the targeted area, such as gunny sacks, tires, and felt to determine which materials would be practical, comfortable, safe and appropriate to the environment. They then put their ideas to work by producing a 3-D model from their sketches and are now conducting testing to determine what can be improved to ensure that their product meets the needs of their audience. As this project evolves, students will demonstrate their understanding of a social issue, and the ways in which a design project can address a critical need in a community. Michael Fraser Head of Design

CARING FOR OTHERS

11


Spring 2015

STAFF PROFILE

KYLIE HARRISON

Primary Teacher

As a primary teacher at DC, Kylie Harrison has been working with our students for nearly four years. She currently teaches in Year 6, though she also taught in Year 2 for three years previously. Originally from Australia, Kylie worked first at St. Joseph’s Primary school in Belmore, Sydney, before moving abroad. In 2004, she moved to Singapore to teach at the Australian International School, then continued her experience with teaching posts in Dubai and Hanoi before moving to Hong Kong in 2011. Kylie is currently working on a year-long project with her class in Mathematics that involves having students use a digital rubric to identify and set goals for themselves, as well as providing a storage and retrieval platform for evidence of their learning. Throughout this there has been an emphasis on using a growth mindset in order to improve their understanding of particular concepts as well as gain a better understanding themselves as learners. “I am lucky enough to spend the day with 30 fabulous students who are enthusiastic, independent and just amazing,” says Kylie. Kylie is delighted to work at DC alongside other dedicated and talented staff, the lovely students and the supportive community. The great facilities and the breath-taking view from her classroom are another bonus. In her spare time, Kylie enjoys playing netball, participating in boot camps, and trail running. “I also try to squeeze in some reading when I have time, which is usually during the holidays.” she added. She runs a weekly after school boot camp programme for DC staff, which has many enthusiastic participants. Her expertise and passion in this area is evident as she encourages staff to stay active and fit. Kylie also spends some of her time volunteering. She is actively involved with the Crossroads Foundation, where she volunteers on weekends to help sort the thousands of donations being delivered to help those in need. Her caring personality shows through in her contributions to our students and school as well as the greater Hong Kong community. David Thapa Communications and Scholarship Assistant

12

KYLIE HARRISON


STAFF PROFILE

Spring 2015

BRUCE TAYLOR

Humanities Teacher

A self-proclaimed busy person, admittedly through his own doing, Bruce Taylor has been instrumental in connecting DC students to some of the world’s foremost intellectuals and activists. His own passion for lifelong learning is what moves him to share that enthusiasm with his students in the humanities and economics classes he teaches. “The drive has always been to directly connect these individuals to the student body with the aim of creating meaningful and lasting connections between real world situations and their course work,” he said. “The impact that such opportunities have on the students is very real and long lasting, which only encourages me to continue to work towards future lectures and visits.” Bruce grew up in Kankakee, Illinois, in the United States, which is a very diverse city, both economically and culturally. This helped shape his interest in human sciences. He holds a Masters of Arts in Secondary Humanities Education from Olivet Nazarene University with undergraduate degrees in both Economics and Astronomy from the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. After graduating, Bruce embarked on a career in teaching. He worked at some of the poorest districts in the state of Illinois for more than six years, finding the experience both challenging and rewarding. After meeting his fiancé, a fellow teacher at DundeeCrown High School in Illinois, they quickly decided to teach abroad. Both met Mark Beach at a Toronto recruitment fair and found their way to Discovery College.

Bruce has always strived to engage in current global politics and economics. He and his colleagues are working on a Social Entrepreneurship unit to incorporate into classes, which will hopefully add an interesting depth to the courses for the coming school year. In the meantime, he concentrates on his evolving economics course. “The course, it seems, is undergoing a shift away from the free market policies that have dominated since the early 80’s, so it’s a very interesting time to be teaching economics.” he said. In addition to teaching, Bruce also runs or co-runs a number of student clubs, including Model United Nations, DC Labour Rights, and the Astronomy Club. He is also involved with CAS actions such as the TedEd Club and the Top Activists of the Year Publication. “I’ve been involved with labour activism for about seven years now and it’s something that I would like to be more involved with over time. The DC Labour Rights group has been working on a project for about two years, which has been very exhilarating to lead and help facilitate,” he said. “I couldn’t ask for a better group of students to work with and I’m always humbled by their drive and enthusiasm in tackling such difficult topics.” Outside DC, Bruce remains engaged with labour activism, spending time connecting with NGOs and activists throughout South East Asia. A travel junkie, Bruce loves scuba diving and observational Astronomy. When not on the move, he can be found sitting comfortably with a good cup of coffee. David Thapa Communications and Scholarship Assistant BRUCE TAYLOR

13


Spring 2015

HAPPENINGS

FORESHORE PROGRESS

Project nears completion

The completion of the new foreshore will see the realisation of a project that began more than six years ago. A collaboration between Discovery College, DB Community, Hong Kong Resorts International Ltd. and City Management, the artificially turfed area will be a wonderful school and community asset that will be open to public use, with group bookings managed by the school. As this magazine goes to print, plans are underway for the opening ceremony in late May. The sports area will be covered in “Poligras� artificial turf, a FIFA 2-Star certified system, which had featured at the 2012 Olympic Games. On the ground will be markings for two pitches of dimensions 51.4 x 22.0 m and 37.3 x 20.1 m. The larger will be put to use for football and rugby, and is equipped with special dual-use goalposts. The smaller will lend itself to football again, as well as netball. The foreshore area will also feature a small shaded area to rest or hang out in, as well as a set of long steps alongside the pitches that will accommodate spectators. Our amazing DCPTA is also generously supporting the project, contributing a large storage shed for sports equipment. Additionally, they are also funding a drinking fountain, the canopy for the shaded area as well as the many trees that will provide cover from the sun.

14

FORESHORE PROGRESS

We are looking forward to seeing this space come to life. The added space for our PE classes will be a welcome addition, and we especially look forward to seeing our Cobra teams play on their home turf and enjoying the new space from which to cheer them on. Boris Choy and Sarah Buring Student Council Representatives


HAPPENINGS

Spring 2015

CELEBRATIONS

Lunar New Year Fun Fair explored cultures and gratitude Show your appreciation – “A Thankful Heart”– was the theme of this year’s DC Lunar New Year Fun Fair, which took place on Friday 13 February. Lunar New Year (Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival) is the most important of the traditional Asian holidays. This year’s Fun Fair gave students, staff and the community an opportunity to engage in elements of Asian culture. Secondary learning teams planned activities ranging from learning the tradition of Lai See to chopstick challenges, and primary students earned stamps in their passport for each activity they participated in, as they were led around by secondary students. It was a great opportunity to celebrate this important festival together, as one community. CELEBRATIONS

15


Spring 2015

HAPPENINGS

THE LIBRARY PROJECT

Library in rural China opens through DC initiative Funds raised during Discovery College’s Book Week last spring have been used to provide the Tai Xi Teaching Spot, an elementary school in Huai Ji County, Guangdong Province, China, with its own library. The new library recently opened and the students are enjoying the new facility. The initiative was launched in conjunction with The Library Project, and consisted of a reading challenge within the school community with the goal of funding a complete reading room to support students’ learning and reading and teachers’ professional development needs. Discovery College students attempted to read as many books as they could, and sought sponsors who pledged an amount for each book read. Students across the whole College participated, and by the end of the academic year HKD $21,082 (16,987 RMB) had been raised for The Library Project, meeting the goal necessary to establish the library. “The students worked very hard to read books, knowing that their reading was helping children in another school to have access to books and education,” said Principal Mark Beach. “We are very proud of their efforts and grateful for the opportunity to participate in this initiative.”

16

THE LIBRARY PROJECT

The funds were used by The Library Project to purchase necessary supplies including 750 Chinese children’s books ranging from history and science to comic books and fairy tales; teacher’s books for local teachers to develop their skills; colourful chairs, tables and bookshelves to create a comfortable, safe and inviting space; artwork packages and educational toys; and training materials and supplies to support the local staff managing the library. “It’s such a meaningful event to build a library in rural China. It takes a continuous effort to encourage and sustain reading among children from everywhere,” said Kelly Lui, Discovery College library manager. When the Tai Xi Teaching Spot Library was officially opened, a plaque recognising Discovery College was proudly placed at the entrance. Discovery College students continued their tradition of service during Book Week 2015 participating in a reading challenge to support the building of a reading room in Hebei, China. Michelle Mouton Communications and Development Manager


HAPPENINGS

Spring 2015

WELCOMING THE NEW HEAD OF PRIMARY

Getting to know Chris Barr This April, Discovery College welcomed a new Head of Primary, Chris Barr. Chris brings a range of educational leadership experience to the Discovery College Primary School. Chris joins DC from Clearwater Bay School in Hong Kong where he was Vice Principal. Prior to arriving in Hong Kong, Chris was Assistant Principal at Coatesville Primary School in Melbourne, Australia. A highly trained educator, Chris holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Monash University in Australia, and has participated in numerous trainings and workshops related to school leadership, mentoring and coaching, restorative practices and the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) curriculum. Here, he shares some information about himself and his goals for Discovery College.

Q: When did you decide you wanted to pursue a career in education and why? A: As a 14 year old I participated in a work experience programme at school. I selected primary teaching as the profession I would like to experience. At this stage of my life I didn’t really know what I wanted to do, but I knew teaching and physiotherapy interested me. I think it was the fact that both professions had the opportunity to work with people and make a difference to the lives of others. After completing my two-week block in a small school in Victoria, witnessing the passion and enthusiasm one teacher had for her job and the smiles on the faces of the students she taught, I quickly realised that this was the job for me. Q: What are some of your most gratifying accomplishments in your career thus far? A: Being offered a position at ESF, specifically Clearwater Bay, as a Vice Principal is as an accomplishment that I am extremely proud of. This has since been topped, when offered the position of Head of Primary at DC and moving to DB. However when I reflect on my time in schools, one event stands out as the most gratifying accomplishment of my career. At my last primary school in Melbourne, I organised a Fathers’ Day Camp Out on the school oval. The day and night event involved activities, sharing of learning and games. The first year we had 100 people attend the night, and the second around 230. I am proud to say that this is a tradition that still occurs every September at the school and last year had over 300 participants. In a school where we identified a need for greater involvement by fathers, this was a lovely opportunity for students and fathers to spend quality time with each other.

Q: What attracted you to Discovery College and this community? A: Last year, I participated in an ESF Mathematics review at DC. During this visit I gained an understanding of the collaborative nature in which staff worked, the enthusiastic way students participated in their learning and the sense of community at DC. It was fortuitous that the position become available, and it was an easy decision to apply for the job. The other factor was the opportunity Discovery Bay provided for my children and my wife. The open spaces, beach and local plazas all became very attractive after living in a village house. Q: How do you think the IB programme enhances student learning? A: After working in IB schools for more than 10 years, I believe the IB programme provides an excellent framework, which enables students and teachers to collaboratively inquire into the world around them. Our job as educators is to provide our students with the skills and knowledge to creatively think for themselves and be successful in what ever it is that they may choose to do in the future. Within an IB education, students have opportunities to participate in engaging, relevant and challenging learning experiences within units of inquiry, as well as stand-alone units. Through the teaching of the IB Learner Profile attributes and by encouraging our students to demonstrate these on a daily basis, we look to develop students who have an understanding of themselves and others, as well as students who strive to make a better world.

Q: What was your childhood ambition? A: My childhood ambition was to play Australian Rules Football for the Melbourne football club. I wanted to wear Number 2 on my jumper and run up and down the wing of the Melbourne Cricket Ground like my childhood hero Robbie Flower.

Q: What is something people might be surprised to know about you? A: As a 23-year-old, I competed in two events at the World Life Saving championships at Bondi beach, Australia. I competed in both the beach sprint and beach flag competitions, finishing in the quarterfinals of both.

Q: How long have you lived in Hong Kong? A: I have lived in Hong Kong for just over just over a year and half, after arriving in August 2013. My wife, three children and myself lived in Clearwater Bay for most of this time and recently made the move to the Discovery Bay community.

Q: What do you like to do for fun? A: Since moving to Hong Kong, I must say that spending time with my family exploring the city, visiting different countries and holidaying in beautiful places have become some things that I enjoy very much. I also enjoy watching all sports, especially Australian Rules football. I still play for the Lantau Lizards and the HK Dragons Australian rules teams. WELCOMING THE NEW HEAD OF PRIMARY

17


Spring 2015

STUDENTS

TEDx TALK

DC students are leading the conversation DC Labour Rights is a student-run organisation that was founded at Discovery College in 2012. The group is committed to making a change regarding labour rights globally. After learning about numerous global issues for many years, we truly want to make a difference in workers’ lives and to educate people about just how widespread labour issues really are. Working in the group has been a great opportunity to learn more about global issues and to collaborate with knowledgeable individuals. Through the organisation, we have been able to connect and work with like-minded students from across Hong Kong, meet with established labour organisations in Hong Kong and visit a labour group in China who we are working with in our efforts to collect first-hand information. The group was asked to speak at a TEDx event at Chinese University Hong Kong, which took place in March. Speaking at the event was an incredible experience, as we were presenting alongside accomplished individuals and professionals. The TEDx talk was a positive demonstration of the efforts of the group over the past few years. It was fantastic to be able to promote education regarding labour issues at such an event. Francesca Phillips, Year 12 Student

PREPARING FOR UNIVERSITY

Higher Education Office provides tools and support This year has been a very busy one for the Higher Education Office. With an increase in the number of DC students, more opportunity and choice in higher education options, and greater overall competitiveness in admissions, the journey to finding the right university can be a daunting and confusing one. Our students have enthusiastically embraced the challenges that have come their way. We started 2015 with Year 13 students receiving impressive offers from a wide range of universities around the world and we are very proud of all of their achievements.

18

admissions representatives from large groups of colleges such as Colleges That Change Lives (CTCL) in the US and University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, Western University and McGill in Canada, students have been exposed to a wealth of exciting opportunities. Academic lectures from the University of Southampton in Law and Psychology, Leeds University in Ethics, Keele University in Pharmacy and Medical Science and CUHK in Medicine have given students a clearer understanding of career prospects and what they will be studying in their majors.

Some highlights include offers from Emily Carr University and University of Toronto in Canada; New York University (NYU), Hamilton College, Washington University in Seattle, Parsons School of Design in the United States; University of Cambridge, Durham, UCL and Kings College in the UK; and HKU, HKUST and SCAD in Hong Kong.

Our Year 11 HEO Ambassadors have been a great help in meeting and greeting university reps and giving them a tour of the school. Feedback from the universities has been impressive and the HEO are hugely grateful for the assistance of these students.

Year 11 & 12 students have kept very busy with a constant stream of visiting institutions from around the world. A key part of the HEO philosophy is to encourage students to be flexible in their choices, keep an open mind and make sure they always have options. In this regard, students are encouraged to attend as many events and talks as possible. It is amazing how many of them change their minds after speaking to an admissions representative or considering an option that they have never even contemplated before.

As the end of the academic year approaches we will be waving goodbye to our Year 13 students with a pre-departure briefing and an interactive session with our recent alumni. Meanwhile Year 12 students will be getting serious about their university essays and taking part in several intensive workshops, and Year 11 will have finalized their IBDP subjects. At the same time we will be planning for our second DC University Fair in September with more than 100 institutions visiting our campus. It has been quite a journey for everyone.

From learning first hand from the experts about summer courses from Rustic Pathways and Cambridge Programmes, to speaking to

Susie Blomfield Higher Education Counsellor

TEDX TALK


STUDENTS

Spring 2015

ESF CHORAL CONCERT

Conducting with pride

On 20 March 2015, the Year 5 and 6 students from Discovery College’s Cobra Choir joined 800 other ESF primary students and participated in the biannual ESF Primary Choral Concert, “The Rhythm of Life.” Over the past year, the Cobra Choir has rehearsed extremely hard every Thursday after school to prepare for the challenging repertoire, which included songs ranging from classics to contemporary musical-theatre pieces. They did a stunning job of performing the pieces as a large cohort on the night. As Music Captain, I have been very lucky to have assisted and accompanied the choir for several years now, and therefore was delighted when given the opportunity as the first ESF student ever to conduct a piece at the concert. This year, the concert featured songs in a various languages which ranged from Latin to Yoruba. I got to conduct a rendition of the traditional folk song “Mo Li Hua.” Although I’ve previously conducted our own choir several times, it was never to the large scale of 850 children, and needless to say I was completely terrified at first. However, as rehearsals went along, I became so comfortable with it that I practically skipped onto the conductor’s platform at their final dress rehearsal.

Of course, there is no such thing as a flawless performance. Yes, I was shaking as I walked up on stage for the actual thing. Yes, I almost tripped over as I walked off. Nonetheless, not only was it a smooth performance, but I loved every second of it and am so completely grateful to have had this experience. I am definitely going to miss working with the Cobra Choir when I graduate at the end of this year. Nicole Lau Year 13 Student

ESF CHORAL CONCERT

19


Spring 2015

STUDENTS

WONDERFUL WONDERLAND

DC stages Primary Production

On 25-26 March, the Year 5 and 6 students of Discovery College staged the production of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. This dramatisation, by Tim Kelly, of the Lewis Carroll classic follows the White Rabbit into a delightful, entertaining world of childhood fantasies. Alice entered into a world of talking animals, comic royalty and races where the contestants ran in circles. There was also the Mad Hatter’s frantic tea party, the watch-carrying White Rabbit and the talking flowers. Along the way Alice dealt with a sneezing Duchess and a baby that turned into a pig. The finale had Alice watching a trial, and suddenly finding herself the accused. The play gave a modern view to an old classic, where nonsense and good sense blurred into one. The choice of play was a careful and arduous process. It was essential to encompass both educational and artistic goals so that all those involved would be exposed the full theatre experience. The script demanded discipline and risk-taking from the actors while providing scope for fun and celebration. The rehearsal process involved script writing, dance workshops, music composition, make up and costume design. Secondary students were also involved in the process, developing their understanding of theatre make-up, costuming, prop building, set design, lighting and sound effects. This gave all the students an opportunity to contribute, grow and shine.

20

WONDERFUL WONDERLAND

The enthusiasm, energy and practical assistance of the Discovery College staff, parents and students made the theatre production process a rewarding experience, and once again the persistence, drive, dedication and talent displayed by all made the show a resounding success. As Director, I am always excited and humbled at how much I learn from the students who fearlessly work through this rigorous process. Frank Donnoli Primary Drama Teacher


STUDENTS

Spring 2015

ADVERTISING GURUS

Year 5 learns about persuasion As part of their latest unit of inquiry, Year 5 students have been inquiring into the central idea that ‘Media influences how people think and the choices people make.’ The students formed groups, which acted as media teams to put their learning about persuasive techniques used by advertising companies into action. The media teams worked with real clients around the school and the community to help them advertise their product or event. Client projects included the primary production, DC yearbook sales, athletics day, and student groups like the Green Cobras. The clients asked students to identify the target audience and best format for advertising, which students determined through surveys of numerous groups and research into different types of advertising.

Students arranged meetings with their clients, created drafts of their ideas, worked together on revisions and eventually presented their completed advertisements. The finished products included a range of mediums, including videos, posters, and digital images. In their exhibition for parents, students shared their process and their final advertisements. This hands-on project helped students understand that advertisers use various methods to persuade people to buy or try things, which can have an effect on the choices we make. Terry Evans Year 5 Team Leader

ADVERTISING GURUS

21


Spring 2015

SPORTS

EXPANDING THE FIELD OF PLAY

Cobra teams participate in ACAMIS tournaments

As Discovery College grows, so to has the sports programme and the ability and drive of our Cobra teams. We have been competitively participating in ISSFHK (International Schools Sports Federation Hong Kong) as well as the HKSSF (Hong Kong Schools Sports Federation) in a wide range of sports. However, this year saw the introduction of ACAMIS (Association of China and Mongolia International Schools) tournaments to the Cobra sports agenda. ACAMIS provides a platform for our students to participate in tournament environments at a competitive level with schools placed in ‘divisions’. Discovery College is currently in the Silver Division, in which we must stay for two years to gauge our ability to both play and sustain teams. After the two year period we are given the opportunity to vie for a position in a division with schools of similar student populations and ability of play. In the inaugural year of Discovery College participating in ‘core sports,’ including volleyball, basketball and football, we have had some great success. Champions banners came to DC from the girls volleyball tournament, which was hosted by Lemann International School, Chengdu as well as the girls and boys basketball tournaments, hosted by the International School of Dongguan. In addition, our boys

22

EXPANDING THE FIELD OF PLAY

volleyball team was a finalist in the first year of offering boys volleyball at Discovery College. We have seen positive results from invitational events as well with Discovery College students excelling at the golf event in November, the Cobra badminton team performing above expectations at the International School of Beijing and the Cobra swim team all producing personal best times at the swim meet held at Nanjing International School in March. Most recently this spring, our football teams participated in a tournament hosted by YCIS Shanghai. There was great competition from the Shanghai schools, with our girls team finishing in third place and the boys in fourth. ACAMIS has been a good experience for our students to challenge themselves and work together to achieve tournament success. It also allows students to make connections with students from other schools, as they see each other at various tournaments around the region, building friendly rivalries and most importantly, friendships. Lawrence Wilkinson Sports Coordinator


ALUMNI

Spring 2015

WHERE ARE THEY NOW

ELISA, ALICE AND MAX RONGA Where do you live now? Mexico City, Mexico What brought you there? Our father’s job took us to Mexico from Hong Kong What is the name of your new school? The Edron Academy (an old British school) What are some differences between your school and Discovery College? Discovery College seemed more like a community, as well as the school being more modern. It was very easy to live in Discovery Bay, being at walking distance from our house, and easy to hang out with friends. Discovery College was very welcoming, as well as it allowing for more opportunities in terms of clubs and extracurricular. The teachers were very nice, well-prepared and always ready to lend a hand, and the community was also extremely international, with a combination of many cultures. What types of activities are you involved in (at your new school, in your community, etc.)? Both Alice and Elisa are involved in volleyball. Max (7 years old) is playing daily football. Kids here are very good in football, and Max plays against another school weekly. What do you like best about living in your new city? How is it different from living in Hong Kong? Mexico City has a very friendly environment, as well as a lot of culture and it revolves more around people and traditions. It is less globalised than Hong Kong, with Spanish being the primary and sole use of language. The city is so big that it is hard to be a very big part of it and logistics are very hard to manage. Cars are used regularly, with the driving age at 15, and traffic jams are very common, something that we are not used to in Hong Kong, with the more efficient public transport. Hong Kong is a more modern city, revolving around economic and technological fields. I think the major change, apart from friends, is how effortless and efficient it was to do stuff and make plans in Hong Kong, while here there are a lot of beautiful places and undiscovered histories but it is hard to find out about them.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW

23


Spring 2015

ALUMNI

CLASS NOTES

Updates from our alumni Mimi Ho I will soon be a college sophomore at Fresno State in California. I am currently on the Fresno State Women’s Golf team and have been competing in a high level since school started in August. I qualified to play in all the events last session and this session so far, which not only helps me to improve my game playing against other college players but I get to travel all around the United States. Being a Fresno State Bulldog has given me the opportunity to go to places like Arizona, Mississippi, Las Vegas, Long Beach, Minnesota, Colorado and many others. Though I have been travelling and golfing a lot and missing school, I have not forgotten my education! I initially signed up to become a psychology major but I currently changed my programme to child development, which allows me to focus on behaviours and thought patterns developed in early childhood. The professors are very supportive and attentive, and because of the small classroom setting it makes learning in the classroom very interesting. Barak Michaelis I’m currently studying International Business and Management at the University of Nottingham in Ningbo China. Ningbo itself is a very business oriented city which allows myself and other students to continuously be invited to company visits and the like. I am definitely enjoying my time abroad and love being able to explore the variety of culture in a country as big as China. Learning Chinese on the side is another major perk in my higher education, nicely tied in with my business studies. I definitely recommend International Students to study abroad in unfamiliar countries as far as possible from home (apologies in advance to the mothers reading this). I believe truly jumping into a new country is the best way to experience the world as an adult. Branwen Bindra I am currently studying at SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) in Hong Kong. I have nearly completed my foundation studies which includes drawing, design, colour theory and survey of computer art applications. It has been an overwhelming experience but one that I do not regret. I am learning a lot in a very short amount of time. I will hopefully be transferring to the SCAD campuses in Savannah (US) and Lacoste (France) by the end of next year.

24

CLASS NOTES

Talla Buffery I’m about to start my third term at the University of Nottingham in the UK, where I’m studying English Language and Literature. I’ve definitely been able to experience student life to its fullest, what with nearly going into debt in my first term (I’m still recovering from that.), yet still being able to enjoy the nightlife and everything that Nottingham has to offer. I’ve taken advantage of the wide range of societies and have made many friends through them, such as amateur boxing and writing for the university magazine. Nottingham does have the best meal deals in town but I do miss the occasional binging on garlic noodles and those chocolate croissants in the DC cafeteria. Miranda Skinner I just applied for my Critical and Cultural Practices major for my BFA. I’m really excited to be moving into such a diverse major, where I can focus on multiple different crafts, like ceramics, soft sculpture, painting, and colour photography. I’ve been working on some different portraits in a blue ball pen style that a few of the students in the DC community have taken a liking to, as well as some zine illustrations on fruits for my fall semester elective. Daisy Biggins Since leaving Discovery College and coming to the University of Plymouth I have had lots of great experiences and made some amazing friends. Recently I have attended History socials, whilst also working on essays regarding classics such as Jane Eyre and many Shakespeare plays. Last week I received a first for a presentation I gave during a seminar, an analysis of Thomas Gray’s ‘Elegy In A Country Churchyard’, a poem I found very dark yet interesting, and a result that I am extremely proud of. I miss my family in Hong Kong, but have wonderful course and flatmates, and there is always something happening to keep any homesickness at bay. Sie Rossiter I just got back to Boston from Memphis, Tennessee, where I spent a week working with Living Lands and Waters, a non-profit focused on river cleaning, recycling and sustainability. I applied and was selected to be a coordinator so I teamed up with a senior and we lead a group of nine other university students to complete the project. I’m now completing my second semester at Northeastern. I’m taking courses specific to my major which is a combination of International Affairs and Economics. This winter, Boston was piling up snow and almost hitting a record amount, so my friends and I have been taking weekend ski/ board trips up to New Hampshire and Vermont.


Spring 2015

Healing Children, Naturally Living in Hong Kong, the combined factors of pollution, a stressful lifestyle, and the overuse of medication can leave our children more susceptible to frequent colds and coughs, and allergies such as asthma and eczema. Children’s emotional and cognitive health can also be compromised, which could lead to mood, learning and behavioural issues. IMI is a trusted and respected natural medicine and wellness clinic. For more than 20 years, we have supported thousands of people back to optimal health and wellbeing. We offer services in Naturopathy, Homeopathy, Osteopathy, CranioSacral, Chiropractic and BodyTalk as well as Psychotherapy & Counselling. Our professional team of doctors and practitioners combine modern diagnostic tests with natural medicines and therapies for a lasting healing without dependence on drugs and medications. Please call 2537 1087 to make a booking. If you are unsure where to begin, we offer a 20-minute complimentary session with our Integral Health Adviser, who can explain our services and recommend the treatment that best meets your needs.

Our clinic is located in North Plaza, Discovery Bay.

Web: www.imi.com.hk/children

Email: advice@imi.com.hk CLASS NOTES

25


Spring 2015

26

CLASS NOTES

Shi Jie - Spring 2015  

The latest issue of the Discovery College magazine focuses on the IB Learner Profile and how it is embodied throughout the College.

Shi Jie - Spring 2015  

The latest issue of the Discovery College magazine focuses on the IB Learner Profile and how it is embodied throughout the College.

Advertisement