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THE WORLD’S LEADING

DESIGN NAMES 2019


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CONTENTS

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“We believe in the power of good design and how it can impact your lifestyle greatly

9

EDITORIAL

10

SHALINI MISRA

14

JOANNA WOOD

18

KATHLEEN HAY

22

ANDREW WINCH

26

LAURA POMPONI

30

PAUL JONES

34

JEREMY HEYES

38

LORI PINKERTON-ROLET

42

PAUL BISHOP

46

LONNI PAUL

50

BEN LEWIS

54

NIKKI HUNT AND ANDREA SAVAGE

58

ALEXANDRA NARANJO

62

ROSA MAY SAMPAIO

66

DAYNA LEE & TED BERNER

70

CHERYL SMITH DIGENNARO

74

NATHALIE TREMBLAY

78

ERNESTO SANTALLA

82

BLAINEY NORTH

86

SUZANNE WONG

90

SVETLANA TRYASKINA

94

KIM SCODRO

98

MARCO BRAGHIROLI

102 NORIKO SAWAYAMA


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Selecting designers to be featured in this annual issue is never an easy task. Globally, there is so much talent, vision and expertise from a design community that is shaping the world - in literal terms. In fairness, we could feature countless designers, however a list has to be drawn up each year and for 2019 this is our selection. The individuals chosen are all shortlisted or award-winning designers; their work is broad, varied, diverse and reflects their geographical standpoint and cultural ideals. They have been selected for their

innovative approach, passion and commitment to their sector. We have combined all design sectors that we cover as a publishing business, over the four titles: design et al, Luxe et al, Hotel et al and Maison et al, to include designers who work in residential and commercial sectors, together with architects and designers working in the Super – Yacht and Aviation sectors. . We hope you will enjoy their words, thoughts, insights and inspiration. Joanne


SHALINI MISRA SHALINI MISRA LTD

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“ Having your work recognised with prestigious awards, such as The Design Awards, is certainly an important moment for every interior designer.”

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Shalini began her career as an architect. After qualifying from the Delhi School of Architecture and Planning (SPA) in India, she moved to New York to study Urban Planning at the University of Columbia. The next destination in Shalini’s career was London, where she completed her Masters in Virtual Reality in Architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture. Not long after settling down in London, Shalini started designing homes for friends, which marked the beginning of her career as an interior designer. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Maximalism inspired by mid-century modern and Art Deco. Where does your design inspiration come from? People I meet whilst travelling. From the Maasai tribe cultivating the age-old customs in Kenya, fearless guides in the Amazonian forest in Peru all the way to the charming owners of local taverns in Greece – all these people have incredible stories to share, interesting angles from which they observe everyday life. It’s like a kaleidoscope of different gazes looking at the same picture yet seeing different images. I am often inspired by my clients. A lot of them come from interesting backgrounds. When you start working on a project you develop a unique connection and I am always grateful for the opportunity to learn from others. One client, for instance, is an art collector and it is thanks to her that I discovered some brilliant artists and galleries that I collaborate with in my current projects. What products/services could you not live without when designing? A sharp pencil, tracing paper, scale ruler, plenty of daylight and fresh coffee, of course. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? Sustainability, self-expression and conceptual interpretation of what surrounds us – this triptych will certainly define the next decade of design. When it comes to the future of design in hospitality, we first need to acknowledge some lifestyle changes that happened over the course of last two decades. People have very limited personal time, yet they still crave the same richness of experience as they used to in the past. We may not have enough time to visit a baker, a grocer, a fishmonger and a newsagent all in the course of a short lunch break but we still yearn for this kaleidoscopic experience. Understandably so. That is why eclectic concept stores and restaurants have enjoyed a wave of popularity in recent years as they allow individuality and accessibility to thrive under the same roof. In this light, the aim

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of design will be to make navigation around these places a unique and seamless experience; from delineating the overlapping zones dedicated to different experiences to assuring the uniqueness of each of its components. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? Having your work recognised with prestigious awards, such as The Design Awards, is certainly an important moment for every interior designer. This year, I couldn’t have been more grateful to design et al for awarding us the Design Society International Designer of the Year and the Best City Space awards. These special moments give me a chance to pause, reflect and fully appreciate the wonderful journey I have shared with my team, clients and family. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? In the next year, I look forward to expanding our portfolio into new business areas and geographic locations. We are already growing at an amazing rate with wonderful creative projects worldwide, including a farmhouse in Delhi, a luxury resort in Sonoma, California, a 26,000 sq ft villa in Dubai, several houses and restaurants in London, and apartments in New York. Expansion into boutique hotels, flagship designer stores and offices are also in our plans. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself… Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Peru and the Amazonian jungle. I fell in love with the great wealth of cultures and traditions of this vast country and its otherworldly natural reserves when I first visited it with my family. Second time round, I discovered more of its varied folklore present in traditional textiles, dance and music, which convey a sense of thankfulness for growth and interconnectedness with the natural world. Your favourite food and drink? I take an active interest in wellness and this also translates into my favourite food and drinks. I enjoy food that is nourishing, satisfying and bursting with nutrients. A combination of avocado, coriander and roasted pumpkin seeds on rye bread is one of my favourite morning recipes. I do have a sweet tooth too; I love Turkish baklava and halva as well as freshly baked French pastries.


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JOANNA WOOD JOANNA WOOD INTERNATIONAL INTERIOR DESIGN

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“I have always been influenced by the work of great architects and designers including David Hicks, Sir John Soane and John Fowler.”

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Joanna has 35 years of experience in Interior Design. Setting up what was then called Joanna Trading 25 years ago. Joanna has always loved architecture and that is where her passion for all thing’s interiors came from. Throughout her career she has gained extensive experience in both the private residential market and for the property investment market. How would you describe your personal interior design style? I’ve never quite believed that there is a rule book for design. Of course, you can combine colours and textures as advised but really, all good design comes from following your needs and personal taste. I personally work very hard to not have a branded style as an interior designer, but I always focus on comfort. Creating balance in a room is what interests me; it must be both visually appetising and restful enough to hold you as a willing captive for hours. Where does your design inspiration come from? I have always been influenced by the work of great architects and designers including David Hicks, Sir John Soane and John Fowler. I think that great design endures as fashion changes. I am also, of course, inspired by travel and the arts, particularly the theatre and ballet. What products/services could you not live without when designing? I absolutely adore beautiful door furniture and believe bespoke door handles can be a real investment, the best talking point and can elevate a property. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? The industry is currently enjoying a revival of marvellous colour. I am greatly enjoying the return of 1960s and 70s geometrics. These bold patterns are strong but still useable for living spaces, providing chic alternatives to neutral schemes.

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Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Layering textures is so important, silk on wool for example creates more effect in a room even if the scheme is monochromatic. 2. Consider mixing antiques with contemporary pieces for a modern and timeless look. It needs an expert’s eye to be done well but ensures a room or property continues to look stylish for years. 3. Think about budget – be realistic with how much work can be done on a project. 4. Look at the light aspect and think about where the sunshine comes from to ensure that the rooms are planned properly and used to their fullest. 5. Do not be afraid of colour in the home. Clients are embracing it once again and it creates more joyous and liveable spaces. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Always sleep on an idea and come back to it in the morning. Things always look clearer the next day when approached with a fresh head. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? I believe it is important to celebrate the brilliant projects and achievements made in this diverse industry. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite food and drink? Anything Italian, of course! Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? I always want to escape to Thyme Manor. It’s the most beautiful countryside destination in the Cotswolds. The historic buildings have been meticulously restored creating magnificent soaring spaces, grand and impressive but at the same time humble and true to their working heritage and inextricable connection to the land around them.


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KATHLEEN HAY KATHLEEN HAY DESIGNS

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“ Hay possesses an unwavering attraction to the natural world, honouring the subtle forms of nature in her unique selections.”

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Kathleen Hay is an award-winning interior designer and her work has been featured in national, regional and international publications. She is recognised for her work being sophisticated, clean and chic. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) With many years of experience on both the business and creative sides of the trade she has gained a well-rounded perspective on interior design practice and principles. Also, an apprenticeship with designer Geo Davis for many years before starting Kathleen Hay Designs nearly twenty years ago. Her degree in Economics gives her a unique strength in running a firm. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Distinctly appointed spaces always combine an eclectic blend of furnishings and accessories. Tastefully layering fabric, furniture, and artwork to achieve interior landscapes filled with texture, pattern, and shape. Hay possesses an unwavering attraction to the natural world, honouring the subtle forms of nature in her unique selections. Often incorporates natural objects to achieve a synergy that vibrates with classic and timeless appeal. Favouring serene, calm, and organised spaces. Where does your design inspiration come from? The natural world is a huge source of inspiration, as is international travel. What products/services could you not live without when designing? Good lighting, well-crafted furniture, and highquality materials. Plus, talented architects and builders with whom to collaborate. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? The trend of traditional interiors and finishes with a modern and fresh twist. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. The fast-changing technologies and how to incorporate them into daily life for clients. 2. Good lighting: finding a way to incorporate LED technologies that are also attractive.

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3. Proportion and scale: making sure furnishings fill the space and incorporating lighting fixtures that augment the overall design scheme. 4. The way a family lives in their home. It is so important to make sure you have asked them questions about how they live daily, do they cook and entertain often, do they like to be outside in good weather, etc. 5. Sustainability: choosing materials that are environmentally sound, incorporating materials that hold up for the long haul. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Forms need to be beautiful, but also functional. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? Any recognition of achievement is important as a means of validating one’s work. The Design Awards are increasingly recognised as a source of the “best in the world”. It is an honour to even be shortlisted. What projects are you currently working on? Current projects include a large residential summer estate on Nantucket Island incorporating a main house, guest house, and artist’s studio. The redecoration of an early 20th century stone house on the water in Marblehead and an apartment in New York City for a couple that is downsizing. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? To get involved in networking with colleagues to discuss the challenges we all face and to share our experiences with one another, and to launch a furniture line. Your favourite food and drink? I could live off coffee and red wine, with the occasional Kir Royale to shake it up. The place that enables you to totally relax? I love lingering over a long, delicious meal with a good wine and dear friends. It will always be a source of relaxation for me.


K AT H L E E N H AY D E S I G N S AWARD-WINNING INTERIOR DESIGN FIRM

www.kathleenhaydesigns.com


ANDREW WINCH ANDREW WINCH DESIGNS

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“ We have seen an increase in the use of sustainable fabrics and materials, we incorporate these into our projects where possible.”

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Andrew studied Art at Central St Martin’s college and then completed a degree in 3D design at Kingston College of Art. He went on to gain experience as a skipper in the Caribbean, followed by a six-year apprenticeship with acclaimed yacht designer, Jon Bannenberg. Andrew formed Andrew Winch Designs in 1986. How would you describe your personal interior design style? My personal interior design style is constantly evolving, and I don’t confine it to a style. I gain inspiration with every project. There is no house style at WD and the scope of our work is broad, to reflect each client’s dreams. What products/services could you not live without when designing? When we sit down with a client, we are not in front of a computer, we are sitting with pens and paper, we need to be able to draw in front of the client, and they need to see the dream come alive before their eyes. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? We have seen an increase in the use of sustainable fabrics and materials, we incorporate these into our projects where possible. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Home/Family: It is vital that the client’s lifestyle fits seamlessly with yachts, aviation or architectural projects. There has been a significant increase in the number of younger clients with young families, so the projects need to fit into this lifestyle. 2. Sustainability: This will become mainstream as it is a topic individuals cannot ignore. We have projects in the Maldives and the Seychelles where sustainability is a concern. Within Winch Design itself, we are always introducing policies in order to minimalise plastic use and to ensure the company is eco-friendly. 3. Technological Developments: A lot of our clients are very tech savvy and having state of the art technology, from sound systems to spas is of the utmost importance to them. 4. Nature and natural forms: It’s importance to never lose touch with where the inspiration for my designs comes from; nature, the sea.

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5. Individuality: This is the ultimate luxury these days, to express one’s individuality and not have the same as anyone else. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Never cut any corners. Attention to detail is the most important thing. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Design Awards heightens the profile of an individual, it is an honour to be recognised in front of the global design community. What projects are you currently working on? We are working on several exceptional private properties around the world, including a Cliffside residence in South Africa with one of the best views I’ve ever seen. With regards to yachts, we are close to delivering the 111m Tis, which features both a Winch exterior and interior, as well as a number of other ground-breaking yachts in the works, including Cosmos with Heesen, unveiled at the Monaco Yacht Show 2018. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? Our aim is to keep realising our clients’ visions and answer their every desire, to provide them with comfort, privacy and intimacy in every environment. We are building them a lifestyle that crosses boundaries and is not defined. In 2019 we need to continue to design iconic projects! Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite food and drink? Pasta and Chateau Batailley. The place that enables you to totally relax? On board my boat. The place that gives you most inspiration? Our studio, The Old Fire Station, on the river Thames.


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LAURA POMPONI LUXURY PROJECTS

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“ What truly fascinates me about the construction of a yacht is the complexity of the process. It is like a DNA spiral, and I love solving these issues.”

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Laura Pomponiwas born in Rome but grew up in Ancona where she studied at the Polytechnic University and got a Degree in Engineering. After Laura’s graduation, her career started with working for the large Italian tech company: Telecom Italia Mobiles. It needs no explanation that this involved lots of traveling and international business. However, the ability to really understand the base elements of interior design, and a deep interest in colours, shapes, art and architecture was always simmering beneath the surface. Please tell us a little about your background I grew up surrounded by fashion designers (including my grandmother). However, I chose to study engineering because I am passionate about maths and complicated equations. What truly fascinates me about the construction of a yacht is the complexity of the process. It is like a DNA spiral, and I love solving these issues. Strong passion for art and design, my love for material research and finding innovative applications made me to start my own business. Luxury Projects Design Studio and Atelier headquartered in Ancona (Italy) was founded in 2008. Now, several years down the line, we are challenged with complicated projects and experiencing new cultures, both the ingredients for creating innovative and amazing interiors. A brief description of your company and what you do The overall philosophy of the Luxury Projects’ team aims to provide clients with an enrichment of their daily life extending through to their yachting experience. Luxury Projects’ dedicated team of Architects, Interior & Lighting Designers, Engineers and Naval Architects continuously seek improvement at every step. We can create the perfect design for your new yacht, give your present yacht a fresh new look with the latest in interior design, or completely redesign the yacht’s interior, providing a second life to the entire ship. Luxury Projects’ knowledge of project management ensures all projects are delivered within a timely manner, within each client’s needs, style and budget. Do you have any upcoming projects that you are able and willing to talk about? We are currently working on a contemporary warm interior for a 74m vessel, where space, convertible areas, elements of surprise and details are the keywords of the project from scratch. New architectural features include creating welcoming atmospheres, warm colours, special custom-made light features and bespoke furniture in a new 60m yacht.

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What have been your professional highlights from 2018? We are so proud of all the successful projects delivered by Luxury Projects on time and within budget, unfortunately most of them cannot be mentioned! The most rewarding thing as a designer is and remains the relationship built with the client and when the project is completed. What would you name as the main factor that separates you as a designer/company from your peers? True understanding of yacht building, the whole process. Though I must admit we are not the only Interior design studio that is capable of this but still, we are quite unique in this sector. What do you feel, as an industry expert, are the biggest challenges the superyacht/private aviation industry is both currently facing and will face in the years to come? It seems like the market is somewhat shrinking, though some yards are doing well others face difficulties. It looks like Sailing yachts have become less popular while Explorer vessels momentarily are a hype. New generation owners coming into the high-end luxury “toys” market: their new approach to yachts and business jets is foreseen by my studio simply as a new extra challenge. Do you have any plans or news that you would like to share with the industry coming into 2019? We are working on getting some innovative projects. That will allow the Luxury Projects’ team to express their creativity and innovative approach to them. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself… Your favourite restaurant? I love food and cooking, therefore always a special trattoria as well as a gourmet restaurant! The place that gives you inspiration? Being close to nature in any season and visiting top Italian artisans experimenting new material, finishes and lights. The perfect drink ? A glass of really good red Italian wine. Final thoughts or words of wisdom ? Luxury is in details, but simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.


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PAUL JONES RIGBY & RIGBY

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“ My style is more led by contemporary interior design, which juxtaposes traditional and heritage elements of a property. For me, clean lines with a contemporary twist is the most interesting and appealing interior design style.�

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From 2005 Paul Jones studied Architecture at Birmingham University, before gaining a range of experience in the ministry of defence, commercial and pharmaceutical architecture fields. In 2014 Paul moved into high-end residential design with Rigby & Rigby. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Personally, my style is more led by contemporary interior design, which juxtaposes traditional and heritage elements of a property. For me, clean lines with a contemporary twist is the most interesting and appealing interior design style. Where does your design inspiration come from? My design inspiration evolves predominantly from the client, their vision and aspirations for their home. The client’s imagination and ideas drive the overall design into a concept. What products/services could you not live without when designing? There are several items that are integral to my everyday tasks, I could not live without tracing paper, or AutoCAD. In a digital sense, I must have my iPad Pro with me, to be able to access an app called Concept. It is an advanced sketching and design tool for use by architects to design homes where you can sketch ideas naturally by hand, produce precision drawings to scale, iterate on designs quickly and export to software applications like AutoCAD. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Design is strengthening with the advances in technology, combining smart tech for the home that is both intelligent and discreet. For instance, a television situated in a bedroom should have the function to be turned off fully, with no lights left on, in order to not disturb sleep. There are also apps to control heating, lights, and more, so you can control the environment of your home from any location within it. Overall, technology is becoming as much about wellness as it is about function. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Elegance feeds into the comfort, style and products required for a project and how someone lives in their space.

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2. Technology is a vital element to include in the design. A smart home adds ease to a client’s life, whether that is controlling the heating and lighting from their phone or having the ability to isolate integrated music systems to zones in the house. 3. Ergonomic design is essential, as this allows for comfort and ease of use. Without these things a product can become obtrusive and inconvenient to use. 4. Colour is crucial, not just due to the fact it is pleasing to the eye, but because it is all about the feelings it can form. 5. The final area that must be considered when approaching design in the future is the budget. In many cases, design must adhere to a set budget yet still be of the highest quality and longevity. A designer must work within the budget but ensure that quality is not compromised. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to design, what would it be? In the case of designing products, it is important to consider the client, as well as the setting and context of the piece. Both requirements will help to reflect upon the product’s use, shape, size and material. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Design Awards are a recognition of talent and achievement, which is very important to Rigby & Rigby being placed amongst other designers who are leaders in their respective fields. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? My favourite place to travel is the Middle East where we also have several projects. The place that enables you to totally relax? For me, listening to music enables me to totally relax. The place that gives you most inspiration? National Trust homes give me the most inspiration, as I love being in the outdoors and taking inspiration from nature, alongside the heritage of all the buildings in the trust.


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JEREMY HEYES WATG

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“ Travel exposes you to a certain level of cultural diversity, the designs I create are directly influenced by the local traditions, and customs, as well as the aspirations of the area.”

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Jeremy was educated as an Architect in the UK with a period of study and work in Europe, focusing on Graz in Austria. Since joining WATG in 1992 Jeremy has specialised in hospitality projects and has designed projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Timeless and classic. I aim to create designs that will still be revered and respected in 50 years’ time. Where does your design inspiration come from? Travel exposes you to a certain level of cultural diversity, the designs I create are directly influenced by the local traditions, and customs, as well as the aspirations of the area. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Design is becoming more diverse and multifaceted, it must respond to the end user on so many different levels. The challenge is that the end user is a global citizen who has seen most of the world’s best examples of design. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: Experiential design is the key and should be defined by five touch points: 1. Lifestyle 2. Technology 3. Sustainability 4. Memorable Moments 5. Sense of Place and Culture If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to design, what would it be? Listen to your heart and instincts, if you’re honest they won’t let you down!

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How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The recognition of the industry is of paramount importance, it is your peers and clients validating your work. It encourages everyone involved to continually strive to improve and create fantastic, award-winning designs. What projects are you currently working on? Currently, I’m working on a luxurious five-star hotel and residences in Qatar. A luxury resort destination in Spain and an integrated high-end resort in the Balkans. I will also be completing the next phase of Porto Montenegro. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? A deserted sandy beach anywhere in the world, no matter what the weather! Your most treasured possession? The first drawing my son created, it depicts a ruined castle we visited on one memorable holiday. Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? One of my own I’m afraid, the swim up bar at Hotel Monte Mulini in Croatia. (Listed by Conde Naste Traveller as one of the top ten pool bars in the world). It has an exquisite view of the bay, backed by lush greenery. Your favourite food and drink? Freshly cooked fish and a glass of chilled dry white wine.


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LORI PINKERTON-ROLET PARK GROVE DESIGN LTD.

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“ My personal taste is eclectic, but we work to meet the requirements of the clients and architecture, so each project is entirely unique – rather than designed to my own style.” The World’s Leading Design Names 39


Lori studied at both the Inchbald Design School and Chelsea College of Art & Design (now part of University of London). Park Grove Design started in 1993, specialising in High-end Residential projects, but now focus on Hospitality, Care and Dementia and Property Development projects in the UK and worldwide. Lori served as President of the British Institute of Interior Design and currently sits on the Projects Panel of the Construction Industry Council. How would you describe your personal interior design style? My personal taste is eclectic, but we work to meet the requirements of the clients and architecture, so each project is entirely unique – rather than designed to my own style. Where does your design inspiration come from? Always from nature. Flowing lines, textures, visual features and fascinating colour combinations and the effect of changing light can always be found in nature. I am forever in search of new mountain and hill walks. What products/services could you not live without when designing? I need a great camera, laser measure, phone and a good light reflective value metre. The other requirement is input from others. Visits to museums and galleries are essential. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Recycling & upcycling: What will happen to this when it is no longer needed? 2. Inclusive Design: Will this suit people of all ages and abilities without the need for adaptation? 3. Materials: Will this be fit for purpose over the long-term?

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4. Value for money: Is this scheme the best use of the available funds in meeting the client brief and what is the agreed life-span? 5. Does the design delight? If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to design, what would it be? Simple is better, but not if the logic of using a product is not immediately evident in the design. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? It is essential to reward achievement to underline the integrity of great work but also to inspire future generations of designers. What projects are you currently working on? A well-known hotel group, several care and retirement projects and the re-design of a Convent! Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? Possessions are not that important to me, but the most likely candidate is an Erte lithograph gifted to me by dear friends in New York. Your favourite food and drink? Chocolate and red wine. Rather a good combination, don’t you think? The place that gives you most inspiration? Japan, Japan, Japan.


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PAUL BISHOP BISHOP DESIGN BY PAUL BISHOP

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“ One thing remains paramount throughout all of our works, whether it be a five-star resort, fine dining restaurant, or a modern workplace, and that is the design is never compromised.�

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Bishop Design was founded in 2004 by Paul Bishop. From here the design firm have continuously completed projects across the MENA region and Internationally creating an award-winning portfolio. The dedication and the personal touch which is applied to each project has enabled the design firm to achieve such impressive success. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) With art being one of my biggest passions growing up (alongside athletics, middle-distance running where I represented both county and country at school boy levels!) this led me to attend Brighton School of Art. I immersed myself in all aspects of design from fashion, textiles through to theatre, graphics and furniture and product design, with the dream at that time to be either a fashion or theatre set designer. It was not until I attended Kingston University to study furniture and product design that I discovered interiors, and it was almost instant that I knew this was what I wanted to do. A distinctive memory of my time at Kingston was the day my teacher referred to my work as a piece of jazz. Bewildered at the time, it was not until recently whilst watching ‘La La Land’, I finally made sense of what he had said. Sebastian explains it so eloquently in the movie, how jazz is a combination of differing elements and sounds that come together in one perfect harmony. It was a huge compliment, and it was extremely nostalgic for me having watched the film. It was not until I came to Dubai that my career commenced. Upon graduation I was tour managing a Rock Band and producing music videos. Prior to that I merely took on evening and weekend jobs whilst studying in the UK. These jobs varied from bar man (mixologist) to high-end retail sales – all of which subliminally shaped me in some way as these are the sectors of design which we specialise in. I had worked in Dubai for 8 years for a select few interior design firms when I was given the opportunity to move to Singapore to continue my position as the interior design director for Wilson Associates. On the verge of packing up my belongings and getting on the plane, I was hesitant. Like I said, Dubai was a blank canvas when I arrived, and it still was 8 years on. It was evolving from a humble city into a modern superstructure with opportunities for change and innovation around every corner, and I wanted to be here for that transformation, or rather, be a part of it. I decided to turn down the offer and stay, which saw the launch of Bishop Design LLC in 2004. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Interiors offer endless potential for differing narratives and directions, sometimes simply elegant and other times uniquely diverse. I thrive on the opportunity to explore these varying styles and combine them, with each project affording me new found knowledge and skill. I believe that by adapting this ideology of blending styles, we are faced with greater opportunity to explore unique design solutions, whether this be through a distinct

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furniture piece, or dynamic textures, the design becomes more striking and playful in comparison to one style alone. Where does your design inspiration come from? Everywhere. Restraints do not exist as to what I, or anyone, can draw from to turn a thought or concept into a substantial reality. We process thoughts both consciously and sub-consciously. Travel is when I am most inspired; exposed to things I perhaps would not come across roaming the streets of Dubai. Immersing yourself into different cultures is crucial, otherwise you fall into a trap of walking through the world with only one point of view, and interiors become lifeless if they simply revolve around one mere ideology. Establishing a narrative and an engaging journey is paramount, and what I believe to set some designs apart from others, therefore it is of the upmost importance that inspiration is drawn from varying mediums, cultures and demographics; brought together to create a truly engaging story. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Technology is already making a dramatic effect, and I feel this to become even more substantial, especially within the next 10 years. Not only within the interiors themselves, but more importantly throughout the design process, and how we create the final design. Augmented reality, for example, has existed for almost 30 years however is only recently coming up on our radar. With heightened interest, and in turn greater research and investment, I feel this to make immense developments and, very soon, completely revolutionise the way in which we carry out our processes. Walking into a space, we’ll be able to utilize the systems to show how functional the layout will be and how the final design will look. With this progression in mind, we are most definitely gearing up to a paperless industry (yet I’ll be sticking with my old school methods!) Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Staying current and ahead of the trend. 2. A more knowledgeable end user. People are tapping into the latest trends and hottest venues, so it is paramount to provide unique and neverseen-before experiences. 3. Creation of a narrative. The most effective way of connecting with guests is to take them on an immersive visual and physical journey throughout a space. 4. Functionality will always remain the core for any interior. Sacrificing this will result in an unsuccessful venue, regardless of how stylish and dynamic the aesthetic comes across. 5. Influencing society. We as designers work at the intersections of social interactions, building communal platforms for people to interact, work and gather inspiration from. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? To be recognised by the leading industry magazine Design et al is a great testament to both our work and our firm. The International Hotel & Property

awards has become a hugely renowned awarding body on a global scale, with no other awarding body that optimises the true excellence of the interior design world in the same fashion as Design et al, that be through their promotion of healthy competition, and in their celebration of diverse projects from across all continents. A nonpareil organisation whose recognition benefits our growth in the market on, not just a regional, but on an international scale. What projects are you currently working on? 2018 has certainly been a year of substantial growth and development for both myself and the Bishop Design studio as a whole. The last 6 months have been a witness to our long-awaited global expansion objectives, with projects currently underway in Bahamas, Mauritius, Paris and India. Our latest hotel resort in GOA, India is a particular highlight, encompassing approximately 1.5 acres inclusive of a swimming pool, private gardens and restaurants, in addition to 8 private room suites. The project has certainly tested the abilities of both myself and the team due to its immense scale, however I see the project to be a stepping stone towards greater achievements, with the confidence that our increasing talent and skill can be contributed to similar, even larger projects soon. Whilst I am incredibly dignified to commence this new chapter for Bishop Design, we shall continue to remain both dedicated and humble to our name within the F&B sector, with our current projects set to position the regions F&B offerings at an entirely new and unprecedented level of originality and quality. I have had the immense pleasure to work alongside some great names within the industry so far this year, notably hospitality innovators Solutions Leisure along with Atlantis the Palm in their most recent venture The Wavehouse, a dynamic fuse of dining and entertainment, embracing the integration of retro gaming, indoor climbing facilities, a restaurant, bar and external flow rider, promising to offer a never-seen-before addition to the regions dining experiences. Work has also commenced on our second restaurant alongside French culinary master Chef Jean-Edern in Paris, approaching food and beverage in an elevated contemporary and stylish manor, exuding luxury and class, synonymous with the inspired heritage of Paris. One thing remains paramount throughout all of our works, whether it be a five-star resort, fine dining restaurant, or a modern workplace, and that is the design is never compromised. Myself and the team continue to remain dedicated to each project that comes through the studio, me personally working on every single one, to ensure that the highest quality and standard is continuously met, which I believe to be the reason for our success over the years.


Tel: +971 4 399 0271

Fax: +971 4 399 0273

info@wearebishopdesign.com

www.wearebishopdesign.com


LONNI PAUL LONNI PAUL DESIGN

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“ My design style is classic, and I am attracted to sophisticated and elegant forms — but I will always put a modern twist on the classic.”

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Lonni started her career in design by designing and building spec homes. Based on those homes Lonni was asked to do many high-profile interior design projects. Lonni attended the UCLA school for Architecture and Design to build upon her real-life experience! How would you describe your personal interior design style? My design style is classic, and I am attracted to sophisticated and elegant forms — but I will always put a modern twist on the classic. Where does your design inspiration come from? I find inspiration in fashion, architecture and my travels around the world. Traveling and living in different countries has helped me understand and appreciate the beauty that can be found in different cultures. I find design inspiration in many different forms. An Armani jacket in Italy, origami in Japan or a yurt in central Asia. There is design inspiration all around us. What products/services could you not live without when designing? I cannot live without studio webware, which is the program I use to run the business end of my company, my Livescribe pen to take notes on job sites and fabric books, including my own line of performance fabrics. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Design has become much more “accessible” through the internet and TV design shows. This wealth of access and information, however, does not make the design process easier - and in some ways can complicate it, giving client’s too many options and ideas to select from. For this reason, I believe the importance and expertise of a designer will become much more invaluable and apparent. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Liveable luxury – No room in a home should be off limits and with new technologies available in fabrics you can have luxurious looking rooms that are able to withstand the everyday wear that comes with having children and animals. 2. Elevated living – Surround yourself with beauty and meaningful items that bring you joy. People sometimes underestimate the powerful affect that their surrounding environment can have on their mood and general state of being within a space. It is important to tap into what’s important for a client and create that environment for them to experience every day. 3. Celebrate family – I believe a home should be the reflection of the life you live in it - and that means making sure all family members feel comfortable in the space. I love to include children in the decision-making process and feel it gives them “pride of ownership” in their own space within the home.

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4. Display a life rich in experiences – With the way the future is moving forward, the world is becoming much smaller. Designer’s and our clients can use this to our advantage by collecting inspiration from around the world and by being influenced by more exotic themes and collecting meaningful and unique pieces to adorn a home. 5. Enjoy the process – Design should be fun and not taken too seriously. There are so many “rules” and sometimes you need to break a few for a space to come together without feeling too formal or unliveable. Colour, on walls and pillows together with art and accessories are great ways to add a sense of playfulness to a space. Keep the larger “investment” pieces more classic so they last beyond passing trends. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to design, what would it be? Take chances but always remember the client will be living in the space long after your job is done. Always keep in mind that the goal of residential design is for the client to feel that their home is a sanctuary. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? It is a very prestigious to be recognised by The Design Awards. The awards are voted on by our peers which makes it a distinct and validating honour. What projects are you currently working on? Currently I am working on several high end residential and commercial projects across the 96 country, abroad and in the middle east.

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What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? To design a boutique hotel and continue to build my business globally. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Europe! Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Any Aman Resort! Your favourite food and drink? My favourite food is Sushi. The place that enables you to totally relax? Airplanes! It might sound strange but on long distance flights, when I am unreachable, I can just relax, read, watch movies and sleep! Of course, I need a spa appointment after those long flights which is another chance to relax! Any final thoughts? I am grateful every day that I’m able to work in a profession that I’m passionate about.


www.lonnipauldesign.com

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BEN LEWIS TRENZSEATER

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I am continuously inspired each day by design, through architecture, interior design and classic furniture design where there classic detailing provided a signature style.”

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Ben Lewis and his brother, Hamish Lewis founded Trenzseater in 2004. They established Trenzseater and fulfilled a niche in the market for bespoke furniture and luxury interior design. Trenzseater are a stylish company, they are modern while sophisticated, specialising in furniture designed and manufactured in New Zealand. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I was inspired by my grandfather’s furniture business growing up, his drive and passion for manufacturing some of the finest furniture in New Zealand gave me from an early age a grounding and foundation in an industry which I fell in love with. The first sofa I designed and was successful for production was when I was 14, which was the start of many more as I design all our furniture designs for Trenzseater. I had a vision to start a high-end furniture and interior design business in New Zealand which I did at the age of 20 to cater for a market where clients wanted something personalised, different to what anyone else had. Trenzseater was established with my brother Hamish, and together we have grown the business into one of New Zealand’s most prominent furniture, interior design stores. Our interior design service grew purely through industry experience, with my interior design work now being highly regarded and recognised on an international level. Trenzseater has 3 stores throughout New Zealand which house all the product we manufacture to order in New Zealand along with all our beautiful International brands we distribute from Europe. These stores are a true showcase to our interior design expertise, demonstrating our unique quality of product and manner in which we present product. How would you describe your personal interior design style? It is sophisticated elegance. It’s a design with intriguing layers of classic textures and materials, encapsulating refined opulence that is set on a grand scale. A timeless classic. Where does your design inspiration come from? I am continuously inspired each day by design, through architecture, interior design and classic furniture design where there classic detailing provided a signature style. I also enjoy, and are inspired by fashion, art and antiques. Natural materials inspire me for their unique, classic qualities, marbles, stone and the character you get from solid timbers. What products/services could you not live without when designing? The use of our design studio where we house all our fabrics, wallpapers and sampling along with our CAD technicians who make the plans look perfect! What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? I believe design is moving towards interiors which are eloquently layered providing layers of interest and personality to a design that make spaces a

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pleasure to be in and enjoyed at the same time. We also see in design the use of matt and brushed metal finishes, brass in door hardware and light fixtures along with the use of a lot of natural marbles and stones. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future 1. Include intriguing layers of texture, pattern and design. 2. Incorporate an element of colour in an interesting, subtly manner. 3. The use of opulent, grand scale objects in your design is pivotal. 4. The use of a diverse mix of materials that work harmoniously together. 5. Incorporate well-appointed table lamps, floor lamps and pendants in your design. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? To have an eye for detail, it’s the detail which sets a design apart from the ordinary and makes it something unique and special. What projects are you currently working on? Currently some very exciting projects, an English Manor House which is an identical match to what you would expect in the English countryside yet it’s in New Zealand. There are also several beautifully appointed architectural homes throughout New Zealand which are all currently in progress at various stages. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? To continue to deliver a high level of interior design work to our clients along with exploring international opportunities. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Aitutaki - Rarotonga along with Queenstown New Zealand Your most treasured possession? Memories, family and life Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Woodpecker Hill in Auckland + Bluebird in London, Chelsea. Your favourite food and drink? Italian, Pinot Noir. The place that enables you to totally relax? Enjoying the heat of the sun! Any final thoughts? I love quotes “There are many things in life that will catch your eye, but only a few will catch your heart, pursue those”. “DREAM BIG, THINK BIG, GO BIG”.


T R E N Z S E AT E R I N TE R IOR DE S IG N

NEW ZEALAND AUCKLAND - 80 Parnell Road, +64 9 303 4151 CHRISTCHURCH - 121 Blenheim Road, +64 3 343 0876 QUEENSTOWN - 313 Hawthorne Drive, +64 3 441 2363

INTERN ATIONAL ENQUIRIES - benlewis@trenzseater.com www.trenzseater.com


NIKKI HUNT AND ANDREA SAVAGE DESIGN INTERVENTION

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“ The Design Awards play a critical role in driving healthy competition and in raising industry standards by the very nature of their judging criteria.”

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Nikki Hunt and Andrea Savage operate the Asia Pacific based leading design studio, Design Intervention. Upholding a high reputation and a multi award winning history in the industry, Design Intervention have continued to grow and achieve excellence. Their mission, simply to design homes that make people happy.

Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: Technology Bespoke Personal Stories Human Centred Functional

Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) As hosts of one of Asia’s most popular design shows, Nikki and Andrea are two of the most recognised designers working in Asia today. The multi award winning duo work on projects across the Asia-Pacific region and their work has been widely featured in International design publications garnering world-wide acclaim. They have a wide and varied portfolio as their work is highly personalised to each project and reflects the style and personality of each client.

How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Design Awards play a critical role in driving healthy competition and in raising industry standards by the very nature of their judging criteria. Being judged by fellow members of the design community, clients and customers makes the awards. A truly accurate reflection of the design landscape. Celebrating this excellence positively impacts clients and ultimately consumer confidence. Not all awards are equal and The Design Awards, to us, is true recognition from the industry.

How would you describe your personal interior design style? We believe that design is about far more than aesthetics: good design can improve quality of life, but great design can affect mood; it can literally transform the way people feel. At Design Intervention, we like to design happy fun filled spaces that cheer the heart and inspire the soul. Where does your design inspiration come from? As designers, we draw inspiration from anywhere and everywhere. If design is in your blood inspiration will come from the world around you, even when relaxing, watching a movie; we will be looking at the sets, and the costumes. Finding inspiration is not the problem... switching off may be! What products/services could you not live without when designing? Bespoke furniture and services. At Design Intervention, we strive to create personalised spaces that are unique and reflect the personality of the homeowner. The key is in the combination combining bespoke pieces with bought pieces and family heirlooms, and then the accents that are added. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? The impact of technology and how it is disrupting the interior design industry is undeniable. It is changing not just how we interact with clients but how we design. The democratisation of design and access has elevated the importance of the unique and the personal.

What projects are you currently working on? As always, it is a varied and interesting portfolio: a hotel in Japan, a pied et terre in central London, penthouse project in Bangkok and a multigenerational family compound in Singapore. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Nikki: Japan Andrea: Africa Your most treasured possession? Nikki: My laptop – the internet affords access to unlimited knowledge. Andrea: My phone Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Nikki: Tatsuya, it’s my local Japanese restaurant here in Singapore – where literally everyone knows my name. Andrea: Soneva Fushi The place that gives you most inspiration? Nikki: The only time the design side of my brain truly switches off is when I go skiing in Hakuba, Japan. I found myself increasingly enamoured with the area and eventually built my own holiday retreat there to escape to each year. Andrea: Honestly, it’s the world around me.

www.fromental.co.uk 56 The World’s Leading Design Names


Figuring out the precise formula that works best for each client is the starting point of our work process. Our mission is to celebrate the personalities of our clients and reveal their passions and aspirations. We tell their story, and so our portfolio is as varied as the clients we serve. These images showcase our projects: some are grand, others serene, some bright and others neutral but there is always a meticulous attention to the minutia that ensures, that for each client, we achieve the home of their dreams.

75E Loewen Road, Tanglin Village, Singapore 248845 | T: +65 6506 0920

www.fromental.co.uk

www.designintervention.com.sg | E: info@diid.sg

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ALEXANDRA NARANJO ALEXANDRA NARANJO INTERIOR DESIGN

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“ My personal style is a seamless mix of timeless and classic. I love to inter-mix clean lines with the movement of antiques.”

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Alexandra Naranjo Design offers an awardwinning interior design service. With more than two decades of experience, she is one of the most celebrated luxury designers in Toronto. Offering a wide range of services, Alexandra only takes on a select number of clients at a time, ensuring that each project receives the attention it requires.

simultaneously speak for itself while affirming its own unique identity. As such, a room should be a space that authenticates its own voice through colour, fabric and flow. 5. Individualism—a space should inspire guests, yet reveals a part of the owner’s identity, their uniqueness and subjectivity.

Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I’ve been in the interior design industry for over 15 years. I began professionally by opening my own business at the age of 25, which transformed into a specialised interior design boutique and store. The space later became a design studio where I was able not only to present design concepts and furniture pragmatically, but also to develop conceptual realities for clients.

If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Attention to detail is essential for any designer. Little things do matter, from fit, to form, to polish. Detail is the essence to perfection in a time of mass production and cheap disposable goods. This, of course, leads to respect. Respect for products is undoubtedly the connection between space, creation and maintaining a room’s unique beauty and identity. Without respect, there is no connection to a human touch and the essence of beauty.

I became a specialist in high-end residential spaces. This has allowed me to develop and maintain global contacts for specialised items that reflect the client’s design. This has, in turn, allowed me to develop a clientele based on referrals. How would you describe your personal interior design style? My personal style is a seamless mix of timeless and classic. I love to inter-mix clean lines with the movement of antiques. I have a great appreciation for French Design. This has allowed me to create statements through large patterns or bold colours or unexpected textures within a room. However, I never have a particular design set for my clients. Rather, I aim to deliver a uniquely bespoke work for each desired space, which incorporates the client’s lifestyle and personal preferences. Accordingly, each interior becomes a union between beauty and functionality. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? As a reflection of our Western culture, I believe design is becoming further refined and individualistic. We are creating more and more tailored designs that identify with a client’s desires and needs. Today, everyone wants their own piece of art—their own unique space to call home. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Functionality—a room should simultaneously be a space of beauty and tranquillity, while being a home—a place to live and be. 2. Be Daring—today, design is not a passive reflection of the world. It is a reflection of the world—of life, time and change. 3. Understanding Movement of Structure, Form and Space—a designer must take everything into perspective, incorporating elements from the natural world: the view from the window, the way the light interacts. And, incorporating these elements within structure to create spaces of unity and balance. 4. Creating Statements—every room should create a statement. Whether subtle or bold a room should

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How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The International Design Awards are important for the industry and the professional designer because they acknowledge and confirm the best ideas, techniques and productions that are offered at our present time. Such recognition further drives our industry by promoting excellence and the creation of new innovations. What projects are you currently working on? I am currently working on a 100 acres property on the outskirts of Toronto, Canada. For the site, I was given carte blanche on the design. We are turning this magnificent property into a private resort, which includes a main house, a guest house, and a cabin with lake views, hiking trails and a tennis court. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? Over the next twelve months, I am focused on the above-mentioned project incorporating all specificities and perfecting every detail. As always, I am focused on exploring new materials to develop and refine new ideas and visions. I am also focused on continuing the implementation of my own private design line of fabric, wallpaper and furniture. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? I am and have always been the happiest in Europe. It’s hard to decide on one European location because the “old world” all somehow speaks to my being and feeds my soul. Your most treasured possession? My 3-pound little Yorkie named Dolce. The place that gives you most inspiration? Any museum they are a treasure-trove of undiscovered beauty.


TRUE ELEGANCE AND CLASSIC DESIGN NEVER GOES OUT OF STYLE

Alexandra Naranjo Interior Design 7250 Keele Street, Suite 315, Vaughan ON, L4K 1Z8, Canada Phone: (416) 992-3562

www.alexandranaranjo.com


ROSA MAY SAMPAIO ROSA MAY ARQUITETURA DE INTERIORES

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“ My work is eclectic; I do not want to be categorised as having a particular style. I will do contemporary or traditional, as well as mix the two, interiors that will never go out of style..”

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After 22 years of experience within the industry, Rosa May has vast experience of the Brazilian market, as well as projects developing within Argentina. Her professional career has seen her accumulate several passages for some of the most prestigious awards in the world, as well as projection within international publications. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) Rosa May Sampaio has worked professionally for more than 26 years in the market. She received her BA in Literature at PUC University in Rio de Janeiro and in Art History by the École du Louvre in Paris. She also studied interior design in Espade (São Paulo). She has also worked as a set designer for theatre. Her body of work has been featured in magazine, books and specialised publications, such as Casa Vogue, Casa Cláudia, D&D Argentina, Elle Decor, Marie Claire Maison, Kaza and Vogue Italia, among other international vehicles. Rosa May has been featured as one of the 80 best interior designers of the world in Andrew Martin’s Designer Directory, and her projects have been finalists in The International Design and Architecture Awards, in 2015, 16, and 17 (having won in the category Pool/-Pool House). In addition, she has worked in commercial and residential projects in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina and the United States. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Timeless; designs should be simple, without a dated look. My work is eclectic; I do not want to be categorised as having a particular style. I will do contemporary or traditional, as well as mix the two, interiors that will never go out of style. Where does your design inspiration come from? The projects are conceived to dialog organically with nature and the architectural elements where they find themselves, be them in the city, beach or countryside. This philosophy reflects itself in a constant search to create cosy, beautiful and innovative spaces, stimulating fulsome and harmonious coexistence for the people who inhabit them. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Beautiful, unique finishes, interesting fabrics, furniture, the incorporation of rare objects and artwork and lightning. We put extreme emphasis on high-quality design and detailing.

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In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? Comfort and beauty. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Sustainability 2. Art 3. Proportion 4. Automation 5. Comfort If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Scale, Proportion, Geometry, Elegance and Harmony. What projects are you currently working on? Country houses, apartments in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and New York. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? Design of new collection of outside furniture, as Brazil has such vast coast. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? London (UK), and places with nature is broad and lush. Your most treasured possession? Pieces inherited and maybe part of my life and a vast collection of Brazilian engravings. Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Hotel: Hotel Plaza Athénée Paris - France Restaurant: La Caracola in José Ignácio Punta del est - Uruguay. Bar: La Huella, in José Ignácio Punta del estUruguay. Your favourite food and drink? My favourite food is artichoke and king crab. My favourite drink is beer. The place that enables you to totally relax? Nature and classic music concerts. The place that gives you most inspiration? Nature.


E-mail: rosamaysampaio@terra.com.br

Phone Number : (+5511) 3085-7100 / (+5511) 99974-5251

Rua Alemanha, 691 – Jardim Europa – São Paulo/ SP 01448-010

Instagram:@rosamaysampaioarq / @rosamaysampaio

www.rosamaysampaio.com.br


DAYNA LEE & TED BERNER POWERSTRIP STUDIO

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“ When designing a product or pondering the purchase of a product, we consider what is involved to acquire its materials, mindfully staying away from any damage to animals, earth and ocean.”

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Dayna Lee and Ted Berner are founders and principal designers of Powerstrip Studio. Graduates of Rhode Island School of Design, Dayna and Ted are international award-winning designers, who, with their background in motion picture art direction, have established a reputation for their cinematic approach to design. Where does your design inspiration come from? A story is conceptualised for the project and our design choices are made to tell it. The people who inhabit the space engage to create the emotions within the designed spaces. We want the space to be warm with emotion, generous, have a sense of exploration and a cultural understanding that renders the design to align or contrast. Each story is told with colour, lighting and texture. With some projects, there is a reference to history. What products/services could you not live without when designing? Whilst designing large projects, we cannot live without great partners – engineers, architects, procurement agents – who share the priority of design and therefore are willing to make extra effort to meet it. A budget and Owners’ goals are also necessary to define while designing. Without these, the design process would be like a game without rules, no fun. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? We have observed that design often moves towards the latest cutting-edge game changer tool for manufacturing or responds to latest technology – as simple as a lightbulb or advanced as a room that can respond to human biometrics. Ultimately, the design must deliver comfort, style and a story. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Natural light, the direction and timing of the sun. 2. Colour palette that can expand with tertiary colours. 3. Ever changing guests’ lifestyle and desires informs culture. 4. Natural climate and foliage. 5. Art, type of art, shape of art, scale of art.

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If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? When designing a product or pondering the purchase of a product, we consider what is involved to acquire its materials, mindfully staying away from any damage to animals, earth and ocean. They believe that inanimate objects can project good and bad energy because it is all about the intentions of designer, maker and user. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Design Awards are very important to the Powerstrip Studio designers as the competition is global. Through the completion process and awards ceremonies, we have made lasting friendships with other designers on other continents. The public, industry and peer response to Powerstrip Studio’s design projects been heartwarming and radiant. What projects are you currently working on? Bankside Hotel London – ground-up construction in Southback near the Tate Modern. Untitled, Jackson Hole, Wyoming – renovation and new-build structure of a 70’s ski lodge. Untitled, Berlin – ground-up avant garde construction in Mitte. Private Residence, Cayman Island – on Seven Mile Beach Historic Key West Bungalows – a luxury renovation of 48 colonial structures. St Ermin’s Hotel London – renovation of listed Westminster baroque hotel. The Rowan Palm Springs – ground-up construction in Palm Springs. The Hundred, Indonesia – ground-up skyscraper construction. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? Our son and daughter; they are rescue animals. The place that gives you most inspiration? Capri, where we attended the Design Awards Ceremony, following a swim in the Mediterranean.


CHERYL SMITH DIGENNARO NEWPORT YACHT INTERIORS

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“ My personal style is contemporary, streamlined, and well-proportioned foundations for the overall space, infused with highly creative details and accent pieces to define the aesthetic scheme.”

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Cheryl DiGennaro, founder of Newport Yacht Interiors. Her company focuses on providing interior design, décor, refit services and furnishings to the highest standard. Cheryl holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts & Design degree from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, MA. How would you describe your personal interior design style? My personal style is contemporary, streamlined, and well-proportioned foundations for the overall space, infused with highly creative details and accent pieces to define the aesthetic scheme. I have an affinity for creating unexampled living spaces with unique combinations of material, scale, colour, pattern and texture. I favour bold and vibrant accent colours, complementing a subtler foundation. Where does your design inspiration come from? I am inspired by multiple elements on each project. First and foremost, I vet my clients’ lifestyle needs, aesthetic visions and functionality preferences prior to formulating a design concept to identify the basis of my approach. The yacht itself also inspires the overall interior design appointments, as it must be a cohesive melding of styles. I feel it is imperative to be inspired by each client, to insure their utmost satisfaction with the result. I am highly inspired by textiles; the colours, patterns and textures ignite my imagination for unique combinations and relationships to the surrounding spaces. Admittedly, my biggest inspiration is my desire to create living spaces, which exude luxury and relaxation, all the while enhancing the beauty found in life at sea. What products/services could you not live without when designing? 1. Naturally sourced & sustainable materials; Exotic wood, stone, glass and organic options, including recycled and eco-friendly materials. 2. 3D printing; furnishings, flooring and lighting fixtures and possibly interior structures using recycled materials. This process allows for unlimited design possibilities. 3. Spatial planning; a focus on seating/ conversation areas to accommodate larger groups for socialising & recreational sport; multipurpose spaces. 4. Incorporating “smart” elements, multi-functional pieces, innovative technology to enhance entertainment onboard. 5. Bold colours, patterns combined and layered, rich textures in textiles. Also, high performance materials are becoming prevalent in the market and allow designers a wider range of options. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Yacht interior design is moving in a much more custom designed, bespoke direction. Many builders are now frequently asked for customised interiors, allowing owners the ability to incorporate many of their lifestyle preferences. For years, we have seen neutrals play a huge role in interior palettes. Owners are more frequently hiring designers to bring their personal style into the yacht to individualize the interiors. We see more colour, patterns and unique concepts. In my field of yacht

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interior design, performance fabrics are becoming much livelier and bolder, thus allowing designers more choices to infuse individuality into the interior design of marine applications. Newport Yacht Interiors sources eco-friendly materials when available. I see more builders taking these steps as well, which in turn educates and may influence the owners to request more sustainable design elements throughout the yacht. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Superyacht industry is a leader in innovative technology, new materials and creative design. Beyond giving recognition to the winning leaders in their respective fields, the awards create a global opportunity to influence the growth and innovation of future trends. The awards are a source of inspiration as well as information that would not be as highly circulated without the exposure given by one’s involvement. What projects are you currently working on? Our schedule has been quite busy. Newport Yacht Interiors is working on several custom interior projects for superyachts, which will be leaving Newport and heading to warmer climates for the winter season. We are nearing completion of fully outfitting a 2018 620 Lagoon with bespoke, luxury bedding, accessories and custom carpeting for 5 staterooms and 40 exterior custom cushions for a 2012 620 Lagoon. On deck for winter projects, we have a 1932 Huckins being restored in Maine in which we have designed the soft goods throughout, maintaining the classic art deco influence. Newport Yacht Interiors has recently designed the soft goods for the new line of luxury picnic boats for Hinckley Yachts, creating 6 options offered to new buyers. We are also currently working with 3 new Hinckley owners, one located in Spain, to create fully customised interiors for their new builds. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? Newport Yacht Interiors will be expanding our inhouse Designer Fabric Showroom at the beginning of 2019, moving to a larger space to accommodate growing business. I would like to work on a project involving a new build using many sustainable and eco-responsible materials and procedures to be an example of inspiration for the yachting industry. This year, we have completed more than 30 yacht interior projects. My goal is to complete 40+ in 2019. Your most treasured possession? My 2 sons, although they are off to college now, they have brought more joy than I could have ever imagined. The place that enables you to totally relax? Hiking in the mountains or sailing. The place that gives you most inspiration? My meditation matt.


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NATHALIE TREMBLAY ATELIER CACHET

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“ I am very passionate and have a creative mind; I imagine and create. Design is a visual and expressing language for me. It’s my way of seeing. ”

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Nathalie is the Co-Founder and Principal Designer of Atelier Cachet, an award winning, multidisciplinary design firm that builds Modern, Luxe Estates and Designs Couture interiors. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I am very passionate and have a creative mind; I imagine and create. Design is a visual and expressing language for me. It’s my way of seeing. My way of relating and connecting with the world. I strive to create couture interiors that captivate and move. With the demonstration of my body of work, I have been featured in numerous International prestigious publications and have received International recognition with distinctive design awards. I graduated with honours in interior architecture and design. I believe that every project has its own unique set of challenges and solutions, worthy of a creative cutting-edge contemporary design. We approach each project with a fresh vision, focussed passion and commitment to outstanding service. How would you describe your personal interior design style? My interior design style is authentic, I am known for my sleek, design-forward, couture interiors. My chic and fearless designs move along asymmetrical lines. The colour grey. I use it everywhere. It’s the most neutral colour. I love white because it feels bright, clean and pure but I feel more powerful with black. Black grounds everything and I will use a little punch of colour here and there. One design element is always a punch of colour. I love to inspire and enrich my client’s lives by creating comfortable environments with a unique character. Where does your design inspiration come from? My design inspiration is driven by everything I see, touch, hear, imagine and feel. I absorb inspiration from all dimensions. Such as cars, architecture,

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music, art, nature and fashion. I’m inspired by beautiful architectural spaces that changes the way we see things and ourselves. It could be a choreography that speaks volume and takes my breath away. A ‘wow’ moment! In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? We are in an ever-progressing world where design is constantly evolving. I think we are moving towards a major shift in design history. Design and technology will increasingly be aligned to create better environments and provide meaningful engagement that will simplify our lives. Design will be more individualised with a sense of beauty, freedom expression and well-being. Creating interiors with a deeper understanding of how people experience a space will become more significant. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The International Design & Architecture awards recognise excellence on a global scale, highlight the importance of design for business and society. They are a group that recognise, celebrate, promote design visionaries, and emerging talents. It’s also an opportunity to showcase the latest development in design, encourage mind creativity and inspire the next generation. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? Individuality. By embracing authenticity and being true to myself and my brand. Everyone is unique, and everyone is special, find your rhythm. Value your individuality, develop it and cherish it with the world.


AD in fo @atelierc a c h e t . c o m

www. a t e l i e rc a c h e t . c o m

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ERNESTO SANTALLA ERNESTO SANTALLA PLLC

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“ All of my projects are driven by how they work and the spatial experience they provide. The architectural expression is at the service of functionality.”

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Ernesto Santalla obtained his degree in Architecture from Cornell University and has been practicing as an architect and interior designer in Washington, DC and internationally since 1984.

3. Incorporate all the relevant technologies seamlessly 4. Select appropriate materials. 5. Delight the senses.

How would you describe your personal interior design style? All of my projects are driven by how they work and the spatial experience they provide. The architectural expression is at the service of functionality.

If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Make sure it serves a real market need. Design with economy of means.

Where does your design inspiration come from? Inspiration is drawn by the context of the project, such that it reflects its location uniquely. What products/services could you not live without when designing? Quality lighting is paramount to our work. Finely crafted cabinetry and innovative textiles are always incorporated. With the constant evolution of technologies being incorporated into homes and, businesses, it’s critical to the success of a project that we keep abreast and anticipate these needs. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Our lives are increasingly less formal, and open plans with access to natural light are on the rise. There is a welcome trend towards living in smaller spaces. The key to elegant living in smaller spaces is impeccable designed. Commercial spaces are all about making a statement and creating a fresh image and brand identity are paramount. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? Durability, functionality and aesthetics can only exist in tandem. There is increasing sensitivity to social responsibility and there is no room for excess. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. The quality of the space is of the essence. 2. Address all of the functional requirements without exception.

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How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The International Design & Architecture awards provide a global platform for designers and architects worldwide to showcase their work. The awards provide a view into the state of the Art of design. What projects are you currently working on? We are completing an Experience Centre for a company that specialises in automation and audio-visual technologies. Given the wide market sectors the company serves, the Experience Centre’s contemporary aesthetic is understated and elegant. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? We are expanding our hospitality and restaurant portfolios. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? A bracelet and ring I inherited from my parents, which I repurposed as cuff links. The place that gives you most inspiration? Rome, Italy Any final thoughts? I love that my job is to bring beauty into the world.


3144 Dumbarton Street NW, Washington, DC 20007

ernestosantalla.com

+1 202-965-1284 The World’s Leading Design Names 81


BLAINEY NORTH BLAINEY NORTH AND ASSOCIATES

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“ I strive to create spaces that are unexpected, exciting, rich in meaning and detail and are tailored specifically to each client. I believe luxury is defined by experience.”

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Blainey North has been creating inspiring and exciting designs since 2000 when she founded Blainey North and Associates. The Australian based company specialise in interior architecture and the design of luxury environments for a wide range of differing projects. They aim to create design which has its own unique design language as well as pushing the boundaries of design. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) My high school art teacher noticed I had been painting and sketching buildings for five years, without a person in sight! I then studied architecture which is my great passion in life. I do not really need motivation to keep working in the field as design is really a way of life for me. I cannot imagine doing anything different, it’s just who I am. How would you describe your personal interior design style? I strive to create spaces that are unexpected, exciting, rich in meaning and detail and are tailored specifically to each client. I believe luxury is defined by experience. It’s that gasp when you walk into an awe-inspiring space, or a sigh when you sit in a wonderfully comfortable couch and gaze around a room thinking “this is living”. There are really no rules in how to achieve this set of emotions in an interior, however I do know that great design has good proportion, beautiful materials and detailing. I also feel like it is like any amazing work of art, it has a deep concept and that underpins the creation. Luxury is about the execution of this craft and about it being tailored specifically to you, and your wants and desires. Where does your design inspiration come from? Each project has its own unique theme and idea which is born from the site, the client and the brief and is often inspired by nature or art. To do this it requires a collective of people to come together with one vision working on disparate parts of the project to enable a consistent whole. I think our firm is unique in our approach to retain that concept throughout every design decision within the entire project. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? I think we are moving away from minimalism toward a more decorative and individual style of design and expression. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Being unique is always one of my most important motivations in design. 2. Design for the long term, as I think the world is moving towards buying better quality and making it last, rather than badly built interiors that need to be redone in five years. 3. Designing for a moveable client. As more people travel, our sense of home is rapidly changing. I think interiors need to reflect this by referencing their location or the needs of that space in its environment. 4. Relationship to others - Our cities are becoming more densely populated, which means living in closer proximity with others. In the same way our sense of privacy is changing with social media and phones. I believe spaces need to be more considerate of others in the future rather than being internally focused.

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5. Materiality - The materials we build with change all the time and I think it is important to be aware of these and try and implement sustainable materials that are built to last. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to design, what would it be? Always think of the feeling of a space before you build it. I believe if you can’t feel it, you can’t create it. What are the key influencing elements at the moment? I think fashion and art are always important influences in design, however I think the extreme weather patterns we are seeing around the world are quite inspiring and could form the basis for some exciting new design concepts and solutions. What projects are you currently working on? My offices are working on many exciting projects at the moment. A new store concept for the British Fashion Designer Alice Temperley inspired by the mosaic mirror art of Iranian artist Monir Sharoudy Farfamanian; a new hotel in Brisbane inspired by kinetic stage show design; an amazing new waterfront home in Sydney designed to form its own tidal cove; a full floor apartment next to the Opera House inspired by an underwater landscape and the new Crown Spa at Barangaroo inspired by the feeling between consciousness and sleep. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? I think you can expect the unexpected from our work. I feel that I am personally entering a design renaissance, as I feel creatively awakened in a very different way. We have set up an office in London and hope to spend more time in Europe as I absolutely love the energy of London, which was home for a period of my childhood. Our new furniture collection which marks a departure of style, will also be launched next year. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? An artwork which depicts the way I like to feel when I’m in love…. which is my favourite emotion. Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? My favourite hotel is Le Sirenuse in Positano Italy. My favourite restaurant is Seans Panorama in Bondi Australia (a little restaurant opposite the beach with food grown from Seans farm) and my favourite bar is the Connaught Bar by David Collins in London. Your favourite book / film? Favourite book is Nadja by Andre Breton and my favourite movie is Three Colours Blue by Krzysztof Kieslowski. Your favourite food and drink? My last meal would be porchini and truffle lasagne with a glass of Aged Reisling. If you weren’t a designer, what would you be? I really can’t imagine not being a designer, as it’s so much a part of who I feel I am, however if I was not a designer I would work as an Environmental Lawyer of sorts as I am very passionate about the environment.


Chasm Coffee Table

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SUZANNE WONG ATTITUDE ASIA

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“ Understated elegance and timelessness is very important to all of my projects. Regardless of the design direction, each project should reflect a sense of sophistication and calmness.”

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Attitude Asia Interiors was founded by award winning interior designer, Suzanne Wong in 2005. Focusing on providing interior design with a luxury vision. Elegance and Timelessness is the design mantra. Taking advantage from the European colonial upbringing, luxury fashion branding experiences, and emphasizing on client’s satisfaction, their dynamic team approaches interior design from a refreshing angle. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I have been lucky to be working with clients who valued Understated Elegance as much as I do. A born Macanese in an artistic family, raised under European cultural influence and educated in the United States, I have a strong passion for creating timeless beauty. In 1996, I devoted myself to working within the luxury lifestyle industry focusing on managing brand images, interiors settings, and marketing for international luxury brands. These included Cartier, Cerruti, and Ermenegildo Zegna. Through my working life in Europe, Hong Kong, and China, the international lifestyle experiences have enriched my ability to portray vivid personality in interior design projects with sophisticated perspective. My sophisticated sense of space, proportion, colour, and detail is appreciated by discerning private clients, as well as notable publicly listed property developers in Europe, Hong, Kong and China. How would you describe your personal interior design style? Understated elegance and timeless. These are very important to all of my projects. Regardless of the design direction, each project should reflect a sense of sophistication and calm. Where does your design inspiration come from? Art exhibitions, travelling, books, movies and nature. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: Soul History Culture Tranquility Comfortability

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What products/services could you not live without when designing? Lighting design services is becoming very important in all my projects. Good lighting design is like the perfect make-up highlighting the best features. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? As we evolve, our homes and work spaces should too. The new movement of design is about reflecting our inner-self and enhancing it. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Any design schemes should have a soul with a story to tell. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? It is a very good platform for designers from all around the world to share and learn from each other. What projects are you currently working on? The team is working on 7,000 square feet show house, a 300 keys luxury hotel and a 22 storey commercial building. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? The goal of the coming twelve months, and at any given time, is to make the results of every project a token of pleasure. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Any small quiet town in Europe with true natural beauty. The place that enables you to totally relax? Sitting outdoor with my dog in a tranquil garden reading a good book.


SVETLANA TRYASKINA ESTEE DESIGN

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“ I believe that every good design starts with a good layout and the purpose. I can design any style, but my trademark is to design spaces that are cosy and warm.”

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Svetlana Tryaskina, founder of Estee Design is a creative, detail-orientated designer who is enthusiastic about her work. Her passion for interior design is strong. Svetlana expresses her personality in her work, with the use of unique objects and art. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) Born in Moscow into a family of a professional musicians, I was introduced to the world of art from an early age. My grandfather was a prominent artist in Soviet Russia and my grandmother - a professional actress. After receiving my degree from the prestigious Russian Academy of Music, I have moved to New York, where I began my career as a textile artist. During my years in New York City, working with many fashion designers and creating my own original work, I discovered my love for colours, textures, patterns and textiles. My extensive work experience with companies like Ralph Lauren, Jones New York, Escada, to name a few, taught me strong communication, organisational skills, and an outstanding work ethic. In 2001, along with my family, I moved to Toronto, Canada. Following my passion for interior design, I enrolled into the International Academy of Design and Technology of Toronto. As a graduate from this prestigious design school, I worked on many design projects and established a distinctive personal style that is recognised by my peers with multiple awards from the interior design community. My work has been featured in several design publications over the years. How would you describe your personal interior design style? I believe that every good design starts with a good layout and the purpose. I can design any style, but my trademark is to design spaces that are cosy and warm. I have a personal appreciation for many design styles, so mixing pieces that work in harmony from different periods is always exciting to me. I also love colour and I am not afraid to use it! Where does your design inspiration come from? Usually, I start with meeting my clients and learning about their needs, lifestyle and their inspirations. The project space itself and its architecture can also be a major source for my creativity. Of course, my travels, current art and fashion, colours of the year and work of leading designers in any field inspire me and play a big role in how I approach each new project. I don’t like to repeat myself and always try to come up with something that I’ve never done before, always challenging myself in every new project. What products/services could you not live without when designing? I love using wallpaper in my design! I am a wallpaper junkie! In my work I want to end the

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stigma against using wallpaper in a space, that to my surprise, still exists. Wallcoverings add texture, unique personality and give depth to any room. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? I believe that people will want to bring more and more individuality to their homes. They would love to bring home the experiences of comfort, unique solutions and distinct style from beautiful hotels they see while traveling. We are moving from a desire of being generic to a desire of being unique in the interior spaces. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Comfort 2. Logic 3. Uniqueness 4. Longevity 5. Style If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Never compromise on the quality of the materials. The success and the longevity of the design is often determined by the excellence of the carefully selected materials. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? It is great to receive recognition of your work form the best in the industry! This experience is priceless, and every creative person can validate the gratitude one experiences after your hard work is validated by your peers. I also think that The Design Awards is an amazing platform for leading designers to showcase their work and share their talent with the rest of the design world on the global scale. What projects are you currently working on? I am currently working on several residential condo projects in Toronto. I am very excited about completing one of them within the next month for a very special couple. I have designed a lot of bespoke millwork cabinets and furniture for this project and can’t wait to see it all come together. I have also been working on a commercial project for clients from New York City. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your most treasured possession? My two most beautiful, kind, smart and funny boys. They are by far my best treasures in life! The place that enables you to totally relax? Any warm place by the see or the ocean. A large body of water puts everything in perspective for me and somehow things become less important other than that moment.


001.416.827.4220

info@esteedesign.com www.esteedesign.com

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KIM SCODRO KIM SCODRO INTERIORS

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“ I love classic and elegant design. I believe furniture should be something truly loved instead of following the trends. Quality made furniture should last a lifetime, and it’s always nice to give a piece new life by reupholstering it.”

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Based in Chicago, Kim Scodro Interiors pride themselves on taking the time to get to know each one of their clients, ensuring that each project is inspired directly by their clients. From here, the designers and the client will work together as a team to create spaces that are tasteful, timeless and current. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I received my bachelor’s degree from Loyola University. I have always loved interior design and decided to start my own company 2007. How would you describe your personal interior design style? I love classic and elegant design. I believe furniture should be something truly loved instead of following the trends. Quality made furniture should last a lifetime, and it’s always nice to give a piece new life by reupholstering it. Layering heavy neutral textures is a beautiful look, as is mixing bright bold patterns in different scales. What products/services could you not live without when designing? I could not live without accessories. We always like to remind clients that part of their budget should be reserved for accessories. I am not a fan of cluttering a space, but a simple art book layered with a beautiful object may finish a room. Each space needs a piece that creates personality and gives a room a life. It is always best if this comes from the client’s personal collections. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? I believe that clients and consumers are starting to value function and quality more so than the past. There are no untouched rooms anymore, every piece of furniture has its job. And because of that, all fabrics must be extremely durable. A lot of outdoor fabrics are becoming more luxurious and used inside, so the furniture can look fabulous and hold up against wear. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Client’s needs and preferences. 2. Balance of old and new. 3. Mixing metals. 4. Every detail counts (window treatments, artwork, and accessories). 5. Mix of high and low-quality pieces to stay within budget.

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If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Know how it is made. Quality products are most important. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? It’s very nice to be recognised with an award. Our real award, first and foremost, comes in the form of our clients’ happiness. What projects are you currently working on? Thankfully many projects. We are currently working on several new builds in a few different locations that really excite us! It’s very exciting to work on a project from the beginning stages and see it progress until the client can move into their new home! What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? Our goal is to always make our clients happy and to continue to get the amazing projects we’ve been fortunate to work on. We are also excited about growing our collection with Pearson. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? Paris. Your most treasured possession? My mom’s original wedding band. Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Pizza from Coco Pazzo in Milan and French Martini. The place that enables you to totally relax? Anywhere with my family. Any final thoughts? “It’s nice to be important, but it’s important to be nice.”


Phone Number: 312-925-8023

Email: info@kimscodro.com

Address: 303 E Wacker Drive, Suite 650, Chicago, IL 60601 The World’s Leading Design Names 97


MARCO BRAGHIROLI PRESTIGE ARCHITECTS LTD

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“ All my clients understand my philosophy and my creative approach; it is a synergy where they drive their own desire for design whilst I ensure the building has harmony and consistency.”

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Prestige Architects Ltd, founded by Marco Braghiroli actively works on high-end residential projects. Marco is an Italian architect from Milan. Prestige Architects is based in London and delivers bespoke design throughout the UK and abroad, including Greece, Montecarlo, Italy and the Caribbean. Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I was born and raised in Milan, Italy. I completed my architectural studies at the Politecnico di Milan and later went on to study interior architecture at Provinciale Hogenschool, in Limburg, Belgium. After graduating with my full architectural degree in Italy, I came to the UK to start a new adventure. Within a few short months I was fortunate to find my very first client; in Grosvenor Place, opposite the beautiful Buckingham Palace gardens, working on upgrading 15,000 sqft buildings. During the subsequent years I worked for two successful and well known traditional architectural practices where I became senior associate. In these roles, I was involved in numerous college buildings like Peterhouse in Cambridge and Lady Margaret Hall in Oxford and numerous private properties. This is where I discovered my real passion for private residential projects since 2003; focusing on numerous superior projects in the UK and abroad. I soon developed a vision of opening my own studio, born out of a passion for the work I was producing and demand from happy and enthusiastic customers. From here I have been able to work with these clients and many new ones on some amazing projects! How would you describe your personal interior design style? Focused first and foremost on the client’s requirements. It’s the client’s home we are working on and the fundamental mindset I have is that they should feel comfortable with the project from start to finish. All my clients understand my philosophy and my creative approach; it is a synergy where they drive their own desire for design whilst I ensure the building has harmony and consistency. If you look at the company portfolio you will see that I have been involved in very traditional projects as well as modern or indeed vernacular (which is what I enjoy most). Some of the most exciting projects for me are the ones based outside of the UK where I have the opportunity to learn and integrate local traditional architecture and interior with my own personal twist. These also always seem to serve to inspire me in future projects in interesting ways. Where does your design inspiration come from? Curiosity is one of the key elements of the process, therefore, I always research fully to improve upon and discover new design elements and technologies that I can apply. The end user is key to my design inspiration; their everyday life and taste and the way a household operates. I also love to draw on local, traditional design whenever the opportunity presents itself. I very much believe that the involvement of an architectural and design specialist, who has a passion for their work and who lives by it, will ultimately get the very best result for the client. In addition to this, I have a team of consultant

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specialists on board who work expertly on their piece of the puzzle – such as lighting designers, gym designers, wellbeing consultants or landscape designers, which then allows me to create and coordinate the final puzzle with the aim of achieving the best design result overall. What products/services could you not live without when designing? My team of consultants are crucial when developing a new design and I always reach out to them at the very early stage of developing a scheme. It is critical to me to incorporate, within the early design, brainstorming with their specific experience. What direction do you feel design is moving towards in general terms? Quite often, in my experience, the biggest challenge is to cross the boundary of the designer ego. Projects are frequently completed through the vision of the designer alone and not from the perspective of the client; this often results in inevitable changes being made by them during construction and unfortunately post completion. Essentially, design is progressed by us, the designers, who often develop ideas and try to establish new trends. However, this is sometimes not necessary or even practical in everyday use. It is correct that a designer must find that direction to identify or trademark themselves, but I personally feel this should never compromise the level of project excellence. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in the future: 1. Innovation with simplicity - Technology is a wonderful instrument if used wisely and balanced correctly, reducing the risk of a building or interior design element needing a system re-boot. 2. Surprise in the brief - Try to look at the client brief and develop your design creativity within it. Always look at the existing setting and building and respect the soul of the building; try to enhance it in the creative process. The challenge is in the elegant balance of these three elements; quite often listed buildings are simply screaming to be rediscovered. 3. Seek tradition and beauty - There are still traditional trades which are proud of their work and you should embrace that skill and passion. At times, this may have budget implications, but the results are usually incredible, demonstrating the availability of local trade with great craftsmanship. I constantly search for specific skilled trades and I support and treasure them in my projects. 4. Balance and symmetry - This is important in my work and probably connected to my OCD, but traditional proportion and symmetry within design are always an eye and soul pleaser, for both the designer and client. 5. Sustainability and new material - Always try to look at the sustainability of the process and the innovation of material. The industry is constantly investing in R&D and we, as designers, should aim to promote and integrate this accordingly into the project and the building requirements. The key for me is surrounding myself by a team that has specific passion in the design and construction as they will always add value to my work. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to product design, what would it be? Never resort to taking shortcuts on design and quality. In my opinion, it is better to abandon an idea if it’s not within the agreed budget or indeed plan ahead for this to be executed in the future. You can always identify a shortcut at the end of

a project and, most of the time, it is this shortcut that the designer and the client will regret most at completion stage. Having an open and honest discussion on the initial brief and agreeing a budget will help the process tremendously, resulting in better design fulfilment. Sometimes you may hear of projects doubling in budget with the inevitable tensions between both parties leading to the emergence of shortcuts which can easily be addressed at the beginning of a project. How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? As a company primarily working on the word of mouth having international exposure is very important in my view as it exposes experience and success to the public. What projects are you currently working on? Currently, we are involved in multiple projects for some of our repeat clients. We are working on a large new traditional country home in the UK, two adjacent 7 storey buildings in St. James, adding a basement and mansard to a Grade II listed building; our 1,000sqm private chalet in Switzerland is in progress, working on the early stage design for a new 13,000 sqf house in Greece has started, a feasibility study for a 75,000 sqf early XVII century fortress in Italy and we have an exciting remodelling of a house in Belgravia. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? To continue to create beautifully bespoke projects tailored to our clients’ visions. I personally like to get involved in each project as the front runner which is a surprise for many new clients. The reason for this is I have a deep sense of gratitude and respect for the reasons my clients engage my services, seeking personal attention and expertise and feel professionally obliged to engage with them personally because of this. Ultimately, this is key to delivering a bespoke and personalised customer experience and often assists in my choices of which exciting projects to undertake. One of my future goals is to open the construction arm of the company so that we can ensure a consistency in attention and level of dedication is given across from the design stage to the building stage. We will create a whole project process that transforms project execution and provides an enjoyable and smooth journey for each person involved. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... Your favourite place to travel to in the world? The Caribbean, where you really experience the power of nature. Your most treasured possession? My family which is usually the focus of any time available Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? The Ned, Soho House and Home House in London. Your favourite food and drink? Italian (what else can I say?!) with a good bottle of red. Having said that, I very much enjoy international food. The place that gives you most inspiration? Each new country I visit. New environments always seem to provide me with new ideas through their cultural heritage in their own unique way.


“WE ARE WHAT WE REPEATEDLY DO. EXCELLENCE, THEN, IS NOT AN ACT, BUT A HABIT” - ARISTOTLE

MILAN VIA COLA DI RIENZO 35 20144, MILAN ITALY MILAN@PRESTIGE.EU.COM

www.prestige.eu.com

LONDON 2 MAGISTRATE HOUSE MARKET PLACE TW8 8FJ LONDON@PRESTIGE.EU.COM

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0207 971 1368

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07786 930 494 The World’s Leading Design Names 101


NORIKO SAWAYAMA BABID - BUSINESS ASSOCIATES OF BRITISH INTERIOR DESIGN

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“ I love nature, landscapes, geology and the colours and textures of the natural world. Balanced with a deep appreciation of both Japanese and British culture, art and tradition – this is what inspires my work.”

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BABID is the official interior design institution representing the UK in Japan. BABID are renowned for promoting British interior designers to their Japanese clients. Their aim is to interface with their customers, complete the project to a fulfilling standard, as well as specialising in design, consultation, organisation and direction of the construction team with an art direction.

Where does your design inspiration come from? Bizarrely I now realise that my early education in geography and museum studies are a great influence. I love nature, landscapes, geology and the colours and textures of the natural world. Balanced with a deep appreciation of both Japanese and British culture, art and tradition – this is what inspires my work.

Tell us a little about your background in design (education, experience, etc) I was born and raised in Japan where I majored in geography and museum studies at university. After ten years working as a hotel management consultant I realised how essential good design is to the success of a hotel. Not just the appearance, but the fundamentals of ergonomics and use of space. This time spent as a ‘client’ gave me a fantastic foundation for understanding the needs of my own future interior design clients.

What products/services could you not live without when designing? The Western view of Japanese design tends towards the zen and minimal, however there is another aspect which is richer, textured and more elaborate. This comes from Japan’s heritage of incredible handmade pieces and the amazing artisans and craftspeople who produce them. The unique quality that these pieces bring to an interior are an important part of my work and I collaborate with artists, artisans, furniture makers, and textile designers as much as possible so that these traditional skills are not lost for future generations. These people are essential to my work.

In 1995 I moved to the UK and decided to pursue my interest in interior design, studying decorative paint finishes, soft furnishing, lighting and contemporary art and finally with The Interior Design School in London. This led to my first residential projects which I still love doing and which have grown to our latest new build and large-scale renovation projects. This work runs in parallel to large restaurant and hotel design projects we produce in both Japan and Britain. In 2016 I moved back to Japan for family reasons, and to pioneer the role of the interior designer in Japan. I established the first non-UK chapter of the British Institute of Interior Design, of which I am the proud President. Up until very recently Japan did not have interior designers in residential sector – there were either architects or interior co-ordinators (mainly FF+E specifiers). Having set up my own training school for Japanese architects and co-ordinators to become interior designers, we now have a growing professional interior design community in Japan – one which it is my mission to expand. My latest venture is BABID – where we promote and connect British interior designers with Japanese clients. The designers produce a detailed concept which we then take over and produce from our Tokyo project office where we collaborate with local architects, contractors and artisans to see the projects through to completion. How would you describe your personal interior design style? A sympathetic and rich fusion of European and Asian design philosophies resulting in rich, textural contemporary interiors that pay homage to traditional arts and crafts.

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How important are The Design Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? The Design Awards add prestige and kudos to my career as an interior designer. They give clients, artisans and artists confidence in me by helping to demonstrate and promote the quality of what I do. This gives me a competitive advantage in the global world of interior design. What projects are you currently working on? A ‘curated’ hotel in Tokyo which is a new concept for Japan. We are designing the major interior renovation including restaurants and public spaces as well as the rooms. Alongside this we are curating every item that is specified - selecting art works, commissioning pieces of furniture and bespoke items, using as many artisans and artists as we can and selecting work by other designers. The aim is to create a luxurious hotel with a very individual personality that comes from taking a curating approach to the design of the hotel. My team in London are working on several residential projects, and we have a development of high-end apartments in China currently in progress. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? To roll out the concept of the curated hotel elsewhere in Japan, bringing in British designers and artists as part of the curating team as their work is highly regarded in Asia. This is partly driven by the Tokyo Olympics coming in 2020 and the need for hotels of a high standard that have personality. There is a big market for hotel design as currently there are 30 million inbound tourists in

Japan, which the government want to increase to 60 million by 2030. Final thoughts – tell us a little more about yourself... The British countryside, especially Wales and the South West of England – and especially driving around it at high speed in a great electric car! I lived in Wales for three months many years ago and have very fond memories of walking the dog, mountains, rain and the most amazing scenery. It still inspires me and boosts my energy when I return. Your most treasured possession? My 150-year-old Japanese cabinet which has mother of pearl inlays and so many layers of beautiful lacquer. I bought it in the UK and it is now back home in Japan. It was one of many pieces that probably made its way to Europe when Japan opened up to the West in the 1860’s after the revolution. The old regime which sustained many artisans collapsed and without this continuous supply of work from the wealthy and powerful families, the artisans had to find new ways of making a living. The West was hungry for their work and loved the intricate techniques and craftsmanship. Many of these pieces are now revered in Japan and are making their way home as the artisan skills have since been lost and no one can create the same quality now. Your favourite hotel / restaurant / bar? Hamyard Hotel by Kit Kemp. Love her philosophy and attitude to sustainability. Your favourite food and drink? Japanese traditional cuisine. When I lived in the UK in the early days, there were not many good Japanese restaurants, so I learnt to cook my own traditional Japanese food. Now I am back in Japan I am spoilt for choice! The place that enables you to totally relax? Atami, where I live now, the Japanese countryside, and Wales. The place that gives you most inspiration? Anywhere where I’m out in nature. Even though I’ve lived in cities most of my life – my heart is in the countryside – wherever that may be in the world. Any final thoughts? As a designer I feel that I can make a big contribution to help create a sustainable society – one that takes care of our planet and takes care of the people who live on it.


Architectural Interior Design, Design Consulting and Design Produce Hotel, Restaurant and High-end residence

London-Tokyo

www.babid.org

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The World’s Leading Design Names 2019 Š design et al 25.00GBP

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The World's Leading Design Names 2019  

The World's Leading Design Names 2019, published annually by design et al.

The World's Leading Design Names 2019  

The World's Leading Design Names 2019, published annually by design et al.