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can only happen in retrospective. If I feel strongly that there is a starting point, I can’t necessarily explain why this is happening the way it is. When the film was taking shape, I sometimes had the feeling that I was composing music, not directing a film. So many small details might seem incoherent, but when one watches all of them together, one might get a picture of wholeness - like in the case of a symphony, where the sounds, first independent of each other, together form a work, perfect and whole. e fashionably mystical number 42 doesn’t say anything - but at the same time it tells you everything. Just like the film. What did you feel when Symphony no. 42 was selected for the Berlinale Shorts competition programme? When József Fülöp, the head of the Media Institute at MOME called me with the news, I started jumping up and down in the middle of the street, screaming in happiness. I didn’t expect this news at all, so it was one of the greatest surprises of my life. How would you describe your personal style? Right now I’m still testing my boundaries and enjoy experimenting. I like films that are composed with a certain elegance, so this is an important factor of my work, too. I strive for the unexpected - this way, I never get bored throughout the filmmaking process. What would you say is your signature as a director? I believe that my films oen have a sophisticated, sarcastic and slightly sterile sense of humour. I like handling subjects that are especially sensitive to me but at the same time I think one cannot always talk about serious things seriously.

What is your favourite trend in the short film world right now? Animation is my ultimate favourite when it comes to short films. I’m biased, for sure, but nobody has been able to convince me otherwise. e world of animation has recently seen a lot incredibly exciting developments. I oen stumble upon animations where I have the feeling that this is not like anything I have ever seen before. Take for example the short animations from Japan - they use material, sound and the filmic language in a truly special and innovative way. e community of animators is very small worldwide. It is easy to meet everyone from the industry - there are not too many big animation film festivals or workshops. Everybody knows everybody. It is a strange but exciting community where everyone is ready to help: to share with each other what they have, to explain their own specific technique to others. I am in touch with a lot of animators internationally, which can be very inspiring. Which direction do you see your filmmaking career going in the future? What kind of films do you plan to make? One thing I am sure of: my next project will be a short film. I have a few small ideas ready: right now, I find spaces particularly interesting. I have already experimented a lot with sounds in Symphony no. 42., but there is much more to do! I would like to do as much travelling as possible, and slowly, it will become clear which direction to take. Right now I’m not worried. What career advice would you give to a young filmmaker? ink everything through twice - but never three times! WOSH by Daazo.com 65

Profile for Daazo.com - The European short film center

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2014 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2014 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

Profile for daazo
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