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Labs

open source organisations wHat for? words by Brigitta Iványi-Bitter

Outside the academic institutional structure we can find a number of interesting places where we can develop our projects, skills and knowledge. it’s not that film schools are out-of-date, but certainly there is a tendency to participate in open source structures after/instead of school.

Open collaboration based on open-source software came to the fore two decades ago. Its underlying principles are now found in many other ventures. Some of them are online; others are offline, such as TEDx, Bitcoin, or others in the field of medicine, and traditional scientific experimentation. Just think about how Wikipedia became the most popular research tool, leaving behind the Encyclopedia Britannica. You can use the operating principles of these organisations to create your own OC organisation. What are the main principles you have to have in mind? In all instances, participants create goods and services of economic value, they exchange and re-use each other’s work, they labour purposefully with just loose coordination, and they permit anyone to contribute and consume. These principles distinguish OC from other organisational forms, such as firms or cooperatives. To understand the performance of OC, you have to identify three elements that affect performance: the cooperativeness of participants, the diversity of their needs, and the degree to which the goods are rival. Analysers found that OC performs well even in seemingly harsh environments: when cooperators are a minority, free riders are present, diversity is lacking, or goods are rival.[1]

Media labs are also popular organisations for collaborative project developers, who are interested in the field new media, media art and new technologies. ere are a number of important skills you are likely to develop in an open minded and collaborative environment like a media lab, skills that are difficult to attain in traditional schools. In a flat organisation like a lab, you learn how to manage your time, share information and develop creative research methods based on the common denominators of a lab’s community. While you learn about digital media, startups, documentation of your own projects, social studies etc, you experience new methods of co-working, which enable you to explore your film topics in a brave and (self)challenging way. Furthermore media labs can create a meeting place for art and tech projects, in which film makers, media artists and engineers in the field of new technology in biology, nanotechnology, robotics can share ideas. Learn, play and be an entrepreneur! There are new ways to organise film projects with other fields of interest, so everyone can create their own way of collaboration. [1] Sheen S. Levine, Michael J. Prietula, Open Collaboration: Principles and Performance, Organisation Science, 2014, DOI: 10.1287/orsc.2013.0872

WOSH by Daazo.com 43

Profile for Daazo.com - The European short film center

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2014 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2014 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

Profile for daazo
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