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FEBRUARY Issue FREE

THE Custom Lifestyle Magazine for Car, Motorcycle, and Music Enthusiasts www.CVNorthWestMagazine.com

Cutting Edge Products New CVNW Partners NAMM JAM Concert Photos Gratuitous Celebrity Photobombs And‌

PART 2 of our 2-part series on

WITCHBURN


Letter from the Editor…… CV NorthWest Magazine proudly presents “The NAMM issue!” The Mag was in Anaheim to attend the conference, and it was an incredible experience. The Mag met quite a few people, and cemented some business relationships for the future, we are excited. We got to sit in the famous Rainbow on Sunset in LA and interview Markus Allen Christopher of M!SS CRAZY - he’s a great guy, with a sincere belief in what he does, and has such insight into himself and his music. We continue our personal interview with WITCHBURN in this issue - Jamie Nova answers some poignant questions about being a lady in metal, but also about the band’s successes so far. Back with vehicles (even tough the PAC NW weather is terrible) with the Ali Oop custom auto, courtesy of Marlene Worley. A HUGE shout out to the Vegas crew who allowed us to hang out with them: OTB’s Scott Westbrook and Gee Silver, Kevin Lastovica, Jason Constantine, Todd Kennedy, Drew Calvert, and hornsup to Stoney Curtis and Ben Graves. ENJOY!

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Cover Rock Calendar

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M!SS CRAZY

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New you can Use

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NAMM Coverage

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NAMM JAMM Photos

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Ali Oop

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WITCHBURN

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The Tattoo Process

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CV NORTHWEST MAGAZINE © 2012 is published monthly and NO reproduction of content is permitted without Publisher’s prior approval. Publisher assumes no financial responsibility for the errors in ads beyond the cost of space occupied by error; a correction will be printed. Publisher is not liable for: any slandering of an individual, or group as we mean no malice or individual criticism at any time; nor are we responsible for the opinions or comments of our columnists; and promises, coupons, or lack of fulfillment from advertisers who are solely responsible for the content of their ads. Publisher is also to be held harmless from: failure to produce any issue as scheduled due to reasons beyond control; all suits, claims or loss of expenses; this includes but is not limited to, suits for libel, plagiarism, copyright infringement and unauthorized use of a persons name or photograph. Publisher does not promote excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages.


Feb 01

Maiden NW

New Copper Penny

Portland, OR

Feb 01

She's Not Dead

New Copper Penny

Portland, OR

Feb 01

Whiskey River

the Austin Bar & Grill

Everett, WA

Feb 01

Witchburn

El Corazon

Seattle, WA

Feb 02

Wikid Sin

Rock n Wrestling

Portland, OR

Feb 08

She's Not Dead

Malibu's Bar

Vancouver, WA

Feb 09

She's Not Dead

Gonzo's Bar & Grill

Kent, WA

Feb 09

Whiskey River

Muckleshoot Casino

Auburn, WA

Feb 15

Metal Shop

The Swiss

Tacoma, WA

Feb 15

Same ol' Situation

New Copper Penny

Portland, OR

Feb 15

She's Not Dead

Hot Rods

Goldendale, WA

Feb 15

Sweet Emotion

New Copper Penny

Portland, OR

Feb 16

Mechanism

the Central Saloon

Seattle, WA

Feb 16

She's Not Dead

Dax's Bar & Grill

Richland, WA

Feb 19

Witchburn

El Corazon

Seattle, WA

Feb 22

She's Not Dead

The Lehrer

Portland, OR

Feb 22

Wikid Sin

Tiger Lilly Bar

Portland, OR

Feb 23

Metal Shop

7 Cedars Casino

Sequim, WA

Feb 23

She's Not Dead

The Lehrer

Portland, OR

Feb 23

Wikid Sin

Tiger Lilly Bar

Portland, OR

Feb 26

Mechanism

Studio Seven

Seattle, WA

CV NorthWest would like to welcome a new member to our list, “She’s Not Dead”! Look for an expose on the ladies in a future issue of CVNW!


The faces of Frontman Markus Allen Christopher sits with CV NorthWest Magazine M!SS CRAZY has gone through a few lineup changes, let’s first ask who’s is in the band right now... Markus Allen Christopher: Guitar,Lead Vocals Chris Jordan: Drums,Vocals Chris Stringari: Bass,Vocals Craig Launer: Lead Guitar,Vocals CVNW: Tell us about the journey to get to this lineup over the years. I feel really good about our current lineup, I think it’s the best musically we’ve ever had – Stringari and I have been friends since junior high (so it was a no brainer to have him) – Chris Jordan and I did M!SS CRAZY II together and we’ve kept in touch through time – and we brought Launer into the mix. I feel that Jordan and I are the nucleus, and that’s not to say anything against the other guys, but Jordan is the drummer I wish we had from day one; had Jordan been around, we would have been a better band from the start, and frankly, I didn’t want to continue M!SS CRAZY without Jordan, because he lit the fire under me big time when I thought it was all going to end (after the first album & tour); he came in and really just fired me up. We bounce off each other so well that it makes me excited to write new music and do another album. CVNW: What would Chris have brought to the band? <INTERJECTION: Sherry Keith orders a “red headed slut”> Well, not so much to be a better drummer, the work we had done was exceptional, but it was to be a better bandmate; Jordan and I have such a good hard rock connection on M!SS CRAZY II that just shows – the chemistry makes me feel that M!SS CRAZY II really rewrote rock at that time, there weren’t really a log of band putting out good new rock albums then. Jordan and I believe in the same things, we fit like a glove, we are totally on the same page musically and personally – outside of the band we are friends, we laugh at the same stuff, like the same actors, like the same movies – I’ve been looking for this bandmate and friend my entire life. CVNW: Talk about the synergy of the band – how do you think you complement each other? We’re like Lars and Jaymz of Metallica…we have the core connection - Stringari comes in and lays down tracks he knows our influences should produce (since we grew up in the Bay area together, we had the same influences) - Jordan understands me, he knows what we need and because of this I know I wanted him in my most successful project Launer is from the Bay area too, so musically we are in sync because we grew up with the same quality influences around us – these guys are committed to the band, too, because the influences in Northern CA are TOO good for you to slack and not make the grade and be as good as those huge acts. CVNW: The makeup is KISS-ish, the theatrical influence is evident, was about your musical influences? The makeup came from Tommy Lee (reunion tour of Motley Crue), how he painted his face very Brandon Lee like, and I’m a HUGE fan of Brandon Lee and that tie in to Bruce Lee who, next to God and Jesus, is the most important thing in my life; his teachings, his manners, his personality, his being, his discipline, the way he established himself are everything I want my music to represent, I want it to be as bad ass as him, and that’s why I wrote the “Hail Bruce Lee” tribute to him on GR!P. I my heart I know he knows I wrote it, and Brandon knows I wrote it too – I went to their graves and it meant SO MUCH to me, more than many things in my life (and I’ve visited Graceland) and the photos I took are timeless to me – it encouraged me to be, as a musician, what Brandon wanted to be, and I went and did it.


Bottom line, Bruce and Brandon are part of who I am, and who I am is Brandon/Bruce but playing the music of my influences (KISS, Def Leppard, Motley Crue, Cinderella and even Fastway). CVNW: Where did M!SS CRAZY get the name? The name originates from 6 months prior to me starting the band; I was in a band with my sister, and she was hard to work with, and while I did a lot for her, I still nicknamed her M!SS CRAZY – Kim (original bassist) and I were in my sister’s band and we left to form M!SS CRAZY. CVNW: Where does the album title GR!P come from? Chris Jordan came up with it, and I think it best represents what our music does, and what our music stands for, the intensity of our new album, how it grips you and holds on to you. GR!P is gripping, absorbing, and the feeling of power this band has to offer. Look, when you play hard rock and you do it well, it resonates – when we did our first album and toured after, I saw the reaction of the people we met, and the looks in their eyes, what it meant to them, what it meant to me, I lived for those moments, those towns we played, those albums we sold – that stuff means more to me than almost anything I’ve done in my life, and inspired me to do M!SS CRAZY II, Freakshow, the Markus Allen Christopher album, and now GR!P. It told me that this is who and what you are, if you’re going to do it, it needs to be top notch. CVNW: When was your first show? In 2006 at a club called the Quarternote in Sunnyvale, CA – it was jam packed CVNW: How did you feel waiting to head on stage? I was hyped, couldn’t wait to get out there – I was not nervous at all – I’m so confident with what I can do, so into rock n roll so wholeheartedly, that I just don’t get nervous (here he gets distracted by YUMMY mozzarella sticks for a minute) – that show set the path and tone for the whole tour – Kim was with me, DT on drums, and Manny – and we played this show, and it was packed, and everyone understood what we were doing, that we were bringing back something that had been missing from hard rock, guitar oriented rock music, and I felt that the bands that I admired so much weren’t delivering that type of music anymore, so I started the band because I wanted to hear music that was not currently in the music industry, filled with stuff that was not 70’s/80’s influenced rock (AC/DC, KISS, etc), so in a way, I started this band to give myself the music I wasn’t getting in the industry. I’m all about genuine hard rock, and if you’re going to be in a band like M!SS CRAZY, you can’t just mess around and just be in a band; I admire Cinderella, AC/DC, KISS, Ozzy, I’m going to write songs that matter, that rock, not songs written by some of the hack bands of the 80’s like (deleted). Out of the Cellar, the first Poison album, anything from Stryper, Back in Black, those type of bands set the tone for hard rock (with KISS, Motley Crue, etc). It’s like you have the Madonna’s, the Lady Gaga’s, and then you have 50 bands that have 1 hit in 1 year by mimicking them – but M!SS CRAZY is not a mimic, it IS Def Leppard, KISS, Kix, Cinderella; I emulated the best from that genre so that I wouldn’t be a one hit wonder like many imitators, so that we’d be a lasting band with music that spoke to people and music that rocks all the time. M!SS CRAZY is all of those bands in one. CVNW: What is one of your most memorable show(s)? Without the weirdness of Dancing Dan…I’d go with Sheboygen, WI. We played there 2 times about 6 months apart, and you couldn’t have fit another person in that place, maybe an employee. Those people in Sheboygan, WI are so pure, so righteous about rock, I almost felt as if I didn’t deserve to play there. Philly, packed crowd, great fans, great people we met afterwards. Cherry Hill, NJ (the Cherrywood) – packed, sold out, great people, great fans. Des Moines, IA. Hempfest in Seattle. Opening for Buck Cherry in Arizona Cardinal stadium was a major rush and a thrill – all the time I was thinking, “holy crap this is where the Arizona Cardinals play”; I played 3 nights at the 50 yard line, unbelievable. We’ve played everywhere – places where there were only 50 people because you couldn’t fit 60, and even those shows meant as much to me as playing in front of 35,000 people at Hempfest. I love an intimate


crowd, I love people who come to me and say “this album did … for me, can I have your autograph” and I think “dude, I’m important enough to you to sign your autograph” that makes me feel great. And there are people in the business who don’t like the fans and just want the money, that’s not us – I went on tour and made $50,000, but it cost us $45,000 to do it, but I would pay $100K for that experience, to play the shows we played. CVNW: When people come to a M!SS CRAZY show, how do you want people to feel? I want them to know that, they came to see hard rock, in their face (whether there’s 100 or 1000 people); you look at people’s faces, and they are into it, and you think “whoa, what is this? you guys are really good, you sing like the album sounds”, and we have other artists come see us and they have their arms crossed, and afterwards they are like ”hey, we thought you guys were going to be shitty, you guys are great and you sing just like the album” – when you come to see M!SS CRAZY, no matter who is there, I grab everyone in the crowd and let them know, “hey, you came to see a hard rock show, and whatever song we’re doing, from the 10th to the 15th you’ll be there with us, and after I’m going to meet you and we’re gonna hang out, and take pictures, and it’s all good. I wait for everyone to leave, and act like they are as important as I am, and that’s been the key for me and my fans, and I do that everywhere I went. I never did anything that would cause us to have a bad reputation. CVNW: Did you always want to be a rock star, or did you have other interests early in your life? I wanted to play soccer and hockey – my dad played pro soccer in the Bundesliga for Berlin, and won 4 championships playing for Canada, so I was kind of pressured to play soccer, and I was very good (I won MVP 1 of the 5 years I played), but then I saw KISS and got into music. I saw Paul Stanley, and what he was doing on stage, and how people were reacting to him, and I had to do that, I saw how special they are, and it meant to me that we should stand up for what we believe in and want to do, I got goose bumps, and that was it for me. CVNW: What one song speaks to you as an artist? “So Long”. I just love it. It’s a genuine song. I wrote that song and that first album, and it screamed to me “no compromise” and that set the tone of M!SS CRAZY. CVNW: Have you ever taken voice lessons or is your singing voice god –given? I’ve never taken voice lessons, but I have asked for voice pointers from some phenomenal singers. I hear something and ask “hey, what’s this, or what’s that” and I learned from watching and emulating certain singers. But I tell you, I didn’t know how to sing like Markus until 2005, I was a different singer earlier in my life – I discovered it in the shower, believe it or not. The great thing is that I can drink all night, smoke all night, not get any sleep, get up, warm up for 5 minutes, and BAM, I sing like Markus anytime. The voice never goes away. CVNW: When did you get the feeling that you’ve arrived, or do you think you might still have mountains to climb? I have some steep mountains to climb, because hard rock is already the underdog in society today, in general. Let’s look at the entertainment hierarchy – Disneyland, Six Flags, video games, Lady Gaga, Beyonce, Clear Channel, and then


the rest of us…it’s sad because the industry takes a certain marketable commodity and pushes it and promotes it and tells us it’s good – it used to be Def Leppard, Van Halen, but now those are bands that have longevity because of their fame and their devoted fans, but that’s not the demographic that the industry wants, Lady Gaga and Britney Spears control the world, American Idol, the X Factor – we could sell out the Whiskey for a record company, and they’ll say “wow, you guys are great but we don’t care because you’re not pop, and we don’t feel the world will accept you and your makeup, even though you’re dam’ good. If you came out when Def Leppard came out, you’d be collecting royalties and doing a reunion tour…” And I tell you, ACDC, Def Leppard, RATT, KISS, Motley Crue, they all know who I am, sometimes it’s hard not to feel like they are all about themselves and not about helping or breaking in a new band that was influenced by them, and that’s sad. CVNW: What are some of the biggest hurdles you’ve had to overcome? The recession – it killed the second tour. The government f**ked up the USA to where we couldn’t do the things we did on the 2006/2007 tour because we didn’t have the same privileges from the club owners (they said “we used to pay you $1000, now we’re going to pay you $250, and sorry, that doesn’t work for me), so we had to write good music and record good albums so that people would purchase our stuff over the internet, and that pushed us farther into the underground than we wanted to be at that time, meanwhile tour gigs were being cancelled despite the fact that we were receiving such good reviews (or because of…?). I can be as badass as I can be, but right now it’s just to the underground fans, which I think has to change. CVNW: How do you think the internet has represented or held up your music? The internet is the reason that M!SS CRAZY exists today, and sells records, MySpace was responsible for our touring with social media promotion. CVNW: Is that a positive force for change? I hate social media, but I have to be honest, it’s the best way to go. I have a social media page (MySpace) for myself, and I have over a million plays on my music, M!SS CRAZY has over 1.5 million plays, we have over 100,000 friends, and I finally joined Facebook several months ago and have been using that as well. CVNW: Tell us how you’ve evolved musically over the past several years? I think we have really stayed true and have not had to evolve, because we’ve had time to do what we wanted to do. The new album is an elaboration of M!SS CRAZY II and Freakshow – as in “hey, I can write like this, or I can write like this” – it all refers and reverts back to arena hard rock. CVNW: What spurs you to write a song, I’m a melody guy, and a riff dude – I’ll come up with a riff and have no idea what I’m going to sing to it but when I take the time to come up with something cool enough riff-wise and I don’t know what the lyrics are, I’ll just sing some stuff but perfect the lyrics as time goes, it’s almost a stream of consciousness. I’m the kind of guy who closes his eyes, and when he tries to write a riff, it’s not a new type of riff like Lady Gaga or Linkin Park, but I write things that Ace Frehley would write, or Jaymz Hetfield would write, so I use my


kind of guy who closes his eyes, and when he tries to write a riff, it’s not a new type of riff like Lady Gaga or Linkin Park, but I write things that Ace Frehley would write, or Jaymz Hetfield would write, so I use my execution and delivery with the dynamics of my music from those bands, the best of 80’s (and 70’s) that inspires me all the time. Hell, it could happen at 4 in the morning, but when the muse comes, I’m off and running. Here’s a fact – I wrote the first M!SS CRAZY album in 3 days – in an apartment, a two bedroom apartment with one room cleared out, and there was nothing in that room but a little amp, a pad of paper, and a guitar. I wrote that album in 3 days and recorded it in 4 days because I had the influence inside me, the motivation, and the anticipation of “I want to create hard rock music and I’m the guy to do it”. CVNW: What inspires your writing? My fans. Certain people who write me and tell me I’m good when I have the doubts, because I’m never as successful as I want to be, and I listen to the reviews and the people who’ve written about me and how they adore my music, and it gives me the biggest thrill (better than money), and I know that if I’m going to write and record anything, I have to make sure I deliver something good enough for those people, to live up to their expectations. Those people who I met on tour, who I posed in pictures with, those true fans that understand hard rock like I do. A quick story...I got a FB message from a guy who said “hey dude, I got turned on to you, I just bought ALL your albums, I can’t believe I didn’t know about you”. And I responded “I Love You”. He was like “uhhh”. So I said “dude, do you know how much that means to me, that you just friended me, then you write on my wall, and tell me you bought everything I did”. I love that guy, because that tells me that I did something right. CVNW: How do you feel when you’re on stage? Like there’s nowhere else I’d rather be. That’s like getting paid to have the most fun you could possibly have. When I’m on stage, there’s an emotion of serenity that happens, my band is there, the crowd is there, it’s like an artist that paints a picture and everyone wants it, when you create something with your own brain and people are receptive and want to experience it (especially when you’re outside your home town), there is no more flattering feeling in the world for me. I don’t know what else I could do that would make me feel so good than fans that validate you by showing up, seeing you, buying your stuff. CVNW: Finish this lyric “when we started this thing, all we needed, needed was a ….”. For people to listen. Because our vision, when we first did M!SS CRAZY, we wanted people to think “WTF? These guys are wearing makeup, who do they think they are?.” That separated us from everyone who was out at the time; hey, I look like Brandon Lee, and we don’t suck, we were as good as our influences, we were better than our look. When people listen, they realize this, and we haven’t done an album in 4 years, but people are still consistently buying our music, so there a quality that people recognize. Thousands of people have our music – even Japan to Germany – that’s quality, hard rock never dies, you can’t kill it, and we rock.


CVNW: When you hang ‘em up, what do you want people to say about you and the band? “Hey, that was a great band, and I’m glad that I got to know that band, and I knew Markus, and he was different than everyone else, he was unique”. I feel like I’ve spoken to every single fan I have, and that makes me different and separates me from a lot of people, I don’t consider myself better than anyone else, I don’t consider myself a person with an ego, but I have confidence in what I do and my abilities, but also I busted my ass to get this good, and if I’m not as good as the people who influenced me then I shouldn’t be doing this, and I chose to do it because I knew I could do it and could do it well. When you live for hard rock, your demeanor becomes that of the fans who support you, those people understand who you are and what the music means to them. I will always be on top of my game, and I will not do another M!SS CRAZY if it can’t be as good as my prior albums, if I can’t give 100% then I’ll just hang ‘em up. CVNW: You haven’t played live since 2008 with M!SS CRAZY, what have you been doing? I did Freakshow with Jeff LaBar, Frankie Banali, Tony Franklin; we tried to hook up a tour, had a lot of things going on, but also had a lot of things go bad, and it never materialized. I respect that experience and those people, and Freakshow gave me a ton of notoriety in the industry, but that put a bitter taste in my mouth and made me move to Canada for a couple of years and made me question my career and what I was capable of. But now I realize that I have to be true to who I am, and that’s why there’s a new M!SS CRAZY album out now, and there will be another album coming out soon, because I love rock and I love what I do. CVNW: What’s up for M!SS CRAZY in 2013? Push GR!P to the masses, because it’s damn good music and it shows we’re back. But we’re going to get another album done, we’re going back in the studio to prove that we can do it, and do another kick ass album. I want to keep supplying those hard rockers with awesome music, I don’t want to take 4 years to make another album.


Marijuana: NEW Laws in WA & CO If you live in Colorado or Washington, or plan to travel there, there are new marijuana laws that affect drivers who use the drug.. Soon after voters in Washington state passed Initiative 502 in November 2012, legalizing private recreational marijuana use by adults, smokers gathered at the Space Needle in Seattle to celebrate. Law enforcement officers indulged them, overlooking for an evening the fact that the law does not allow public consumption. Now the party's over, and legislators and others in Washington and Colorado, which passed a similar measure, are grappling with a number of legalization issues, including how to handle people who use marijuana and then drive. If you live in Colorado or Washington, or plan to travel there, here's an update on how the new marijuana laws affect driving now and how the impact of legalized pot may play out. Decisions that officials make in Colorado and Washington are likely being watched in many other states that are debating whether to legalize the use of non-medical marijuana. Two States, Two Different Laws Washington and Colorado handled the legalization differently when it comes to marijuana use by drivers. Washington state has defined a standard for how much of marijuana's active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, must be in the bloodstream before a driver can be charged with driving under the influence (DUI). Under the new law, it is not lawful to operate a motor vehicle with a level of 5 nanograms per milliliter of THC in the blood, as detected by a blood draw. If a driver has a level of 5 nanograms THC or greater, he or she will face the same conviction as a driver under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. For a first offense, punishment includes suspension of the license for 90 days (even before conviction) and fines, which vary by court, says Brad Benfield, a spokesman for the Washington Department of Licensing. If a driver is convicted, that license suspension could extend to up to four years. Conditions to get it back vary, possibly including drug rehab classes, court fines and licensing reissue fees. "It does set a legal standard of intoxication [with marijuana] where one didn't exist before," Benfield says of the new law. Colorado's Amendment 64, also passed in November 2012, legalizes private pot use by most adults and allows them to grow a small number of marijuana plants. However, no legal blood limit was set for drivers. The debate about what should be done is ongoing. In one of the latest drafts in Colorado, legislators are recommending that drivers who test over the legal THC limit could argue they were not impaired. The same provision does not exist in state law that's applied to those charged with being under the influence of alcohol. If they have a blood alcohol level of .08 or higher, they are automatically considered impaired. The new proposal, which requires an evaluation based not just on blood levels but impairment linked with marijuana, will be introduced in the 2013 legislative session, Adams and others predict.


Comparing Alcohol and Marijuana The effects of alcohol can't be compared, apples to apples, with the effects of marijuana, says Lenny Frieling, an attorney and chairman of the Colorado chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). "Unlike alcohol, the correlation between active THC in your blood and impairment in driving is poorly correlated," he says. Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML nationally, agrees. "There is much greater variability about how marijuana influences behavior [compared to alcohol]," he says. The same amount of marijuana, for instance, may greatly affect a new smoker but not an experienced or chronic smoker, Armentano says. Body weight can play a role, too, in one's reaction, he says. Maximum blood levels of THC occur before the onset of impairment, he says. "As the levels go down, impairment goes up." "The body processes marijuana in a fundamentally different manner than it does alcohol," Armentano says. For that reason, blood tests for marijuana are not impairment tests, he says, but simply detection tests that don't reflect the degree of impairment. More study is needed, he says, to figure out how to gauge if someone's driving is affected by his marijuana use. It's a matter of identifying the best tests to detect actual impairment from marijuana use, he says. While the effect of marijuana are variable, he says, "generally users perform most poorly 20 to 40 minutes after inhalation, but after 60 minutes their performance often begins to return to what it was before smoking." Having a medical marijuana prescription has no impact on whether a driver will get a DUI, Frieling says, although many motorists think otherwise. If they are under the influence, they will likely be charged, he says. Research on Alcohol, Marijuana and Driving Marijuana and alcohol do affect drivers differently, as Armentano says and several medical studies suggest. In one study, published in 2009, Yale researchers looked at the effects of marijuana and alcohol on the ability to drive, reviewing published studies. Both substances impaired driving skills, they found. However, they found that the effects of marijuana varied more greatly among people than did alcohol effects. They also found that marijuana smokers tend to compensate while driving by a variety of strategies, such as driving more slowly or passing less often. However, combining alcohol with marijuana eliminates the ability to use the strategies, they found. In a more recent study, published in 2012 in the journal Clinical Chemistry, researchers who reviewed published evidence found that blood THC concentrations of 2-5 nanograms per milliliter ''are associated with substantial driving impairment, particularly in occasional smokers." They found that higher blood THC concentration is linked with increased crash risk, although other experts disagree. But studies don't show a direct correlation between impaired driving and THC concentration, the researchers say.


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Name: Lovely Leslie Pit Bull Terrier Four (4) Months Old Female 25 pounds

F AM ILY DO G S N EW L IF E SH E L TE R 9 1 01 S E S t a nl ey A ven u e P o rt l a n d, O re go n 9 72 0 6 5 0 3- 7 7 1- 5 5 9 6 w w w .f a m i l y do gs n ew l if e .o rg THIS SPACE DONATED BY CV NORTHWEST MAGAZINE


According to a new Harris Poll commissioned by the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM), technology such as musical apps and online lessons is inspiring more than a quarter of young people between 8 and 21 years old to learn to play. Brands exhibiting at the 2013 NAMM Show will mirror the trend, debuting hundreds of tech-driven products that offer fresh, interactive ways to learn and make music. The nationwide survey found that affordability and convenience of tech and online musical educational tools are encouraging 16 percent of all Americans ages 8 and older to play a musical instrument because they connect the desire to learn with easy access to instruction. These tools include YouTube videos, websites with sheet music files, and apps created to teach music. Apps for smart phones and tablets can help new music makers do everything from learn to play chords and tune their instrument to score compositions. This infusion of tech products into the music product industry is natural and expected; the tech -learning trend also means that the audience for teaching and learning apps keeps brisk pace with the number of products surging into the market. The NAMM Show gathers 90,000 members of the music product industry from around the world to preview new products from thousands of brands across every category. Registration is open for qualified members of the music instrument, product and pro-light and sound industries. Exhibit space is still available for the 2013 event. Learn more about the NAMM Show at http:// www.namm.org/thenammshow/2013. CV NorthWest Magazine journeyed to the Anaheim Convention Center to attend the show and provide coverage of products, artists, and to put our fingers on the pulse of the music industry.


Star Sightings around NAMM

Nikki Sixx Motley Crue, Sixx AM

Dave Mustaine MEGADETH

Ummmâ&#x20AC;Ś STEVIE WONDER!

Orianthi

M. Shadows Avenged Sevenfold

Zakk Wylde

About NAMM The National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) is the not-for-profit association with a mission to strengthen the $17 billion music products industry and promote the pleasures and benefits of making music. NAMMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and programs are designed to promote music making to people of all ages. NAMM is comprised of approximately 9,000 Member companies located in more than 87 countries. For more information about NAMM or the proven benefits of making music, interested parties can visit www.namm.org, call 800-767-NAMM (6266) or follow the organization on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


NAMM Show & New CV NorthWest Partners! Cympad is an incredible, affordable and easy to use system for optimizing the sound and performance of virtually all cymbal sizes, types and brands. Cympad is specially designed and made from premium-grade cellular foam to simply and effectively protect your cymbals and control your sound.

What started as the expression of individuality led to the demand of a product that has become recognized worldwide. We produce the finest quality, most radical designs, and unique instrument cases in the industry today!

DEAN GUITARS is committed to producing the finest guitars in the world. Dean electric guitars, acoustic guitars, basses and other musical instruments are built following the highest standards in the industry. From beginners to the most influential artists in the world, our instruments are the #1 choice for guitarists around the globe. From beginner guitars, high-quality affordable import guitars, as well as the best USA built guitars in the biz. Dean Guitars makes a GUITAR THAT IS FOR YOU.

Terry Guinn combines his love of art and music, and his experience as an art director, to produce unbelieveable pieces of art for use, well, any way you can conceive. Terry's motto to "save a drum" allows him to find a drum and bring it back to life with his unique and original art.

Ernie Ball is a leading innovator of guitar strings. The company was the first to offer rock strings with the introduction of Slinkys, and further revolutionized the market by offering guitarists Custom- Gauge速 single strings. Ernie Ball also produces Music Man速 guitars and basses, volume pedals and other accessories.


The Kelly SHU™ - Kick Drum Microphone Shock Mount & Isolation System - an integrated shock-mount for any standard kick drum microphone; offering drummers, drum techs, F.O.H. and audio engineers a better sounding and space-saving alternative to the age old boom stand typically used for kick drum microphone support...

LISZKO USA, your source for the finest leather guitar straps. LISZKO has become popular among guitarists and base players because of the high quality standard LISZKO has set for itself. LISZKO’s goal is to continually produce new product lines and stay on the cutting edge of creative technology.

Los Cabos Drumsticks manufactures drumsticks, mallets, and related products for the music industry. When you purchase a pair of our sticks, you are investing in quality craftsmanship. With nearly two dozen models to choose from, Los Cabos Drumsticks offers something for every drummer.

The Magnetapick is the only guitar pick in the world that will magnetically adhere to most metal surface - guitar strings, mic stands, etc. - without affecting the tone of your instrument. The patented Magnetapick sticks and stays where you put it...now your pick will be exactly where you placed it.

Monoprice, Inc. is an e-commerce leader specialized in high quality consumer electronics, cables, audio and video, computer and mobile accessories. The online store features over 4,000 products at prices far below retail with unmatched delivery and customer service.

Driven by an unmatched legacy of innovation and a total dedication to quality and reliability, Peavey Electronics embodies the pursuit of perfection in music and audio. Peavey Electronics is one of the largest makers and suppliers of musical instruments, amplifiers and professional audio systems in the world— distributing more than 2,000 products to more than 130 countries.


Over the past 20 years, Gary Ponder has established himself as a music producer, studio musician, performer, and private drum/percussion instructor in the local San Fernando Valley and surrounding Los Angeles areas.

Pro Cymbal is a company dedicated to making the daunting task of cleaning cymbals into a very simple process, without the use of toxic chemicals. With our PC-2 cymbal cleaning machine and method (Patent Pending), no cymbal is too dirty. We can make ANY cymbal look and sound like the day it was made.

We are a Rock-n-Roll Inspired Apparel company from Redondo Beach/Los Angeles California. Vintage-Modern Rock & Metal vibe, quality kick ass gear, cool prices! The pure love of the music & the people it represents is the heart & soul of this company and the line itself. ROCK-N-ROLL GANGSTAR APPAREL has a rock solid backbone and real musical roots. It is a brand for the people who love the music and the people who make it!

Supernatural Cymbals rise above. We craft each cymbal by hand, from start to finish. Our master cymbal-smiths come from centuries of cymbal making. Drummers in mind, our goal is to make the best, most durable cymbals in the world. We are Supernaturals, hand crafted Turkish cymbals.

Guitar Hands速 Hand Care is their unique hand care product, designed by a dermatologist for musical hands to feel perfect for playing music in the studio or live. Guitar Hands速 is a hand care product for musicians and for all people who love music.


CVNW NAMM PhotoBombs!


2013NAMMJAM


Rusty Cooley

Michael Angelo Batio


Stevie Wonder

Nikki Sixx

Steve Stevens

Markus & SherryK

Bjorn Englen


1954 Chevy 150 ‘53 Chevy Briz bumpers (both ends shaped to fit) Chopped Roof (4’) Frenched Headlights (3”) Framed ‘60 Chrysler Taillights Custom Fit ‘64 T-Bird Console Rehinged Doors (to suicide, remote open) Fitted ‘55 Chevy dashboard

Transplanted ‘37 Chevy hood louvers Reshaped Hood above a ‘56 Corvette Grill Lakes Pipes (just for show though...shhhh) Custom sewn & padded Honda bucket seats (stock backseat) Mustang II front end & Ford 9” rear end 350 CI with 700 R 4-speed auto tranny Billet Rims & Whitewalls Raspberry Frost paint with silver flake & blue pearl added


it as inspiration when we get up there on that stage and DESTROY it. CVNW: In this day and age, it’s all about marketing and presence, how do you think social media has contributed to your success?

Witchburn has officially arrived; tabbed in Metalholic’s Top 25 women in Hard Rock & Metal, the band is being recognized for their skill, power, and ability to, well, ROCK! CV NorthWest spends some downtime with Jamie Nova in this 2 part series. This issue, on being Witchburn, working with legends, and what it means to carry the sword for lady metal rockers… CV NW: What is your opinion about the state of affairs of women in the metal scene, are you happy with the recognition that so many talented women in metal have received, or do you feel like there is still a bit of an uphill battle? There is always an uphill battle before you when you are a woman in an industry that is dominated by men. I can’t even begin to tell you how often Mischa and I hear, “So are you with the band? Merch girl? Are you the girlfriend of one of the members? Oh really, you're actually IN the band? Oh, you must be the singer...” While that last statement does ring true for one of us, there are so many times that we just laugh it off and use

It definitely helps us maintain a closer and more consistent relationship with our fans. We are able to get a bit more personal with the use of social networking media. It has made it easier to reach a larger number of fans across the world more quickly, but just because you create a page and have a large number of “friends” or “fans” on that page, it doesn’t mean that all of those people are going to show up at your show. There is still a large amount of footwork, old school elbow grease and touring needed to build a foundation on which a band can stand.


CVNW: Of course, talk about being on Metalholic’s top 25 women of metal list. Do you feel that’s validated all your efforts? We feel that it is a great step in the right direction as far as having all of that hard work we've put into the band recognized. It feels great to be receiving these accolades, but we still have a very long way to go before we will feel truly validated in the grand scope of things. CV NW: Jack Endino is a legend in the Seattle music scene, what has working with him brought to the band? Jack is amazing. He has a real talent for capturing a band and the feel of their music in a very real and natural way. It's like how a photographer for National Geographic magazine wants to capture a wild animal in its natural environment... Jack wants to capture the sound that is your band and present it in a recording that sounds like you. He's like a mad scientist in the sense that he's so creative in the ways he'll go about getting the right vibe to come through in the tracks. One thing working with him has brought to the band is higher level of confidence. He has helped us grow as musicians from the time we did our first full length record with him through the recording of our new album that we haven't yet released. He's proven to us that we can, in most instances, trust our gut instincts when it comes to the way we make music in this band, while not being afraid to experiment and try new things. CVNW: KISW “Pain in the Grass”, 2011, you are in the lineup with Korn, Hinder, Queensryche, 5 Finger Death Punch – tell us about that experience. We actually did two festival shows with that line up, Pain in the Grass for KISW in Seattle and then PDX RockFest in Portland, OR. We made some great friends being on that bill. The guys in Five Finger Death Punch were really into Witchburn after watching our set at that first show. Then at the second one, we played a little

earlier in the daytime and they were right there on the side of the stage before we went on, even though they could've been sleeping comfortably on their bus. They were just super supportive and full of encouraging words, and they were genuine. We've kept in touch with Chris Kael pretty well since then; he came out to see us play on the Dio Disciples tour, when we played The Hard Rock in Vegas last October. CVNW: What did sharing the bill with big time bands such as those teach you about success in music? When bands at that level of success demonstrate that it doesn't matter what label you're on or where your single is in the charts or how many records you're selling when it comes to comradery within the business amongst fellow musicians and supporting good music, it speaks to the fact that we really are all on the same level in that regard. Every band started somewhere, and every


band who has worked, emphasis on the word "worked", to achieve success in music has had to pay their dues. When we first started this last tour with Dio Disciples, our tech Shotty (who we met when we toured with Crowbar and Prong last spring while he was working for Tommy Victor and those guys) had gone out one day and picked up a vinyl copy of AC/DC Fly On The Wall and then gave it to Mischa at the show that night, because Simon Wright (who played drums on that record and was in AC/DC for 8 years) was on the tour playing drums with Dio Disciples, after having played with Ronnie James in the band Dio for many years, all the way up until Ronnie passed away. So, Shotty gave Mischa this record and was telling her that she should get Simon to sign it, but Mischa isn't really the type of person who asks for autographs very often, so she was being kinda shy about it. Then after the show, as we were all just hanging out chatting and stuff, one of the guys who knew that Shotty had given her that record asked her if she had gotten Simon to sign the thing yet, as Simon was standing right there next to her. So Simon, being the absolute sweetheart of a guy that he is, grabs a sharpie and asks what she's got, and of course he's more than happy to sign it and all that, then as she was saying thank you, she told him that she's been into AC/DC and Dio since she was really young and so when she feels like she is among childhood heroes, she tends to get a little bit shy. At that point, he just smiled and put his arm around her and said, "Well, you're one of us now... you're on tour

with us." All of the guys in the Disciples treated us that way, on that whole tour, and they often mentioned that Ronnie was the same way, saying that he had always made it a point to treat the opening bands on every tour with respect. Actually, Crowbar and Prong both treated us that way as well on the month long tour we did with them the previous spring. We've been very blessed to have been treated like gold on the tours we've done as an opening act. We know that doesn't always happen for bands, so we do feel lucky to have gotten to experience touring as an opener the way it ought to be, according to the gospel of Ronnie James Dio. CVNW: Metal guitarist and violinist, how does Mischa feel those instruments complement each other? They express different emotions in the music, so she uses them to convey different aspects of a song. She says the violin can bring across a sleeker sound, sometimes a softer and more tender feeling, often more of an eerie tone or a dramatic feel, sometimes it can stir a sharper more unnerving sense. To her, it's like using different colors and textures in a painting, as opposed to just monochromatic shadows and shading, in order to add more depth and dimension for example. There is a lot you can do with just one color, varied technique and tools, etc. but if you want to take it further and add a new medium to create with, using other "colors", other instruments, can bring a new breath of life to your art.


ample would be Dio Disciples, who did all of those things for us every night of the 5 week US tour we just did together this past fall, 2012. CVNW: Where does Witchburn go from here? Upward and onward, always. We will be releasing our new album, Bathed In Blood, in 2013 and we have just started working with new management as well, so we are looking forward to accomplishing a lot this year, but mostly, we are very excited for everyone to hear our new record. We should have a release date on that soon.

WITCHBURN isâ&#x20AC;Ś Jamie Nova - Vocals Mischa Kianne - Guitar / Violin Jacy Peckham - Bass Dana Sims - Drums

FIND them @ https://www.facebook.com/witchburn CVNW: What do you hope to accomplish with your music, what message do you try to convey? We long to create music that speaks to people of all backgrounds, religious beliefs, on all of different types paths in life. To make music that resonates all the way to the depths of their core and shakes the foundations they've based their beliefs on, provoking thought and questions. Music that stirs an awakening within, makes you re-evaluate your surroundings, and encourages you to be yourself and follow your dreams. CVNW: What motivates you to keep improving, to keep expanding your horizons as musicians and a band? As musicians, we are always our own worst critics. We are always reviewing our performances and songs in order to observe what we can improve upon. We yearn to always write something better than the last song we wrote. We love to play shows with bands that inspire us and challenge us to become better musicians. Bands whose level of professionalism exceeds our own. Bands that push us to attain a higher level of performance quality and musicianship. One such ex-


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The NW is RICH in talent and that talent NEEDS to be heard!

At KOUV we believe in keeping it local 24/7 by supporting Northwest music and businesses

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Understanding the TATTOO Process Not too long ago, most Americans associated tattoos with sailors, bikers and sideshow artists. But tattoos have become more popular in recent years, and the people who get them are as diverse as the styles and designs they choose. And some people who would never think of tattooing pictures or symbols onto their bodies use permanent makeup -- a type of tattoo -- to emphasize their eyes and lips. It is no longer “different” to have ink, so we wanted to explore the process. How are tattoo’s done? Artists create tattoos by injecting ink into a person's skin. To do this, they use an electrically powered tattoo machine that resembles (and sounds like) a dental drill. The machine moves a solid needle up and down to puncture the skin between 50 and 3,000 times per minute. The needle penetrates the skin by about a millimeter and deposits a drop of insoluble ink into the skin with each puncture. The tattoo machine has remained relatively unchanged since its invention by Samuel O'Reilly in the late 1800s. O'Reilly based his design on the autographic printer, an engraving machine invented by Thomas Edison. Edison created the printer to engrave hard surfaces. O'Reilly modified Edison's machine by changing the tube system and modifying its rotarydriven electromagnetic oscillating unit to enable the machine to drive the needle. Modern tattoo machines have several basic components:  A sterilized needle  A tube system, which draws the ink through the machine  An electric motor  A foot pedal, like those used on sewing machines, which controls the vertical movement of the needle. When you look at a person's tattoo, you're seeing the ink through theepidermis, or the outer layer of skin. The ink is actually in the dermis, which is the second layer of the skin. The cells of the dermis are far more stable than the cells of the epidermis, so the tattoo's ink will stay in place, with minor fading and dispersion, for a person's entire life. A tattoo machine creates a puncture wound every time it injects a drop of ink into the skin. Since any puncture wound has the potential for infection and disease transmission, much of the application process focuses on safety. Tattoo artists use sterilization, disposable materials and hand sanitation to protect themselves and their clients. Clients work with artists to create custom tattoo designs, or they chose images from flash, which are tattoo designs displayed in the shop. The artist draws or stencils the design onto the person's skin, since the skin can stretch while the artist uses the tattoo machine. The artist must also know how deeply the needles need to pierce the


skin throughout the process. Punctures that are too deep cause excessive pain and bleeding, and ones that are too shallow cause uneven lines. The tattoo itself involves several steps:  Outlining, or black work: Using a singletipped needle and a thin ink, the artist creates a permanent line over the stencil. Most start at the bottom of the right side and work up (lefties generally start on the left side) so they don't smear the stencil when cleaning excess ink from the permanent line.  Shading: After cleaning the area with soap and water, the artist uses a thicker ink and a variety of needles to create an even, solid line. Improper technique during this step can cause shadowed lines, excessive pain and delayed healing.  Color: The artist cleans the tattoo and then overlaps each line of color to ensure solid, even hues with no holidays -- uneven areas where color has lifted out during healing or where the artist missed a section of skin.  Final cleaning and bandaging: After using a disposable towel to remove any blood and plasma, the artist covers the tattoo with a sterile bandage. Some bleeding always occurs during tattooing, but most stops within a few minutes.

Caring for your new Tattoo Taking care of a new tattoo can prevent health problems and protect the quality of the image. Most artists give clients a pamphlet that explains all the necessary procedures. Customers generally receive instructions to:  Remove the bandage one to two hours after completion. 2) Wash gently with cool or lukewarm water, using a mild antibacterial soap.  Pat dry. (Don't rub!)  Apply very thin coats of antibacterial ointment and work into the skin. Too much ointment can pull color out of the tattoo.  Avoid soaking the tattoo in water or letting the shower pound directly on it. 6) Avoid the sun, sea and swimming pool until healed.  Refrain from picking at scabs. They will fall off as the tattoo heals, usually in one to three weeks.  Use ice packs if swelling or redness occurs. 9) Call a doctor if you have even the slightest signs of infection.


CVNW February 2013  
CVNW February 2013  
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