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AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art Tuesday 4 June 2019


AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art AUCTION | Paddington Tuesday 4 June 2019 | 7pm Gala Preview | Paddington Thursday 30 May 2019 | 6-8pm Auction Viewing | Paddington 31 May - 4 June 2019, 10-5pm The Mike Chandler Estate Viewing | Bondi 28 May - 1 June 2019, 10-5pm The Mike Chandler Estate Special Event | Bondi 36 lots on view Saturday 1 June 2019 | 2-4pm

PADDINGTON LOCATION A | 326 Oxford St Paddington NSW 2021 P | +61 8057 6789

BONDI LOCATION A | 31 Lamrock Ave Bondi NSW 2026 P | +61 9300 9233


ADRIAN NEWSTEAD OAM Founding Director - Senior Specialist Adrian Newstead OAM established Cooee Art in 1981 and has organised and curated more than 400 exhibitions of Indigenous art since that time. A former President of the Indigenous Art Trade Association and Director of Aboriginal Tourism Australia he became the Head of Aboriginal Art for Lawson~Menzies in 2003, and Managing Director of Menzies Art Brands until 2008. Adrian is an Aboriginal art consultant, dealer, author and art commentator, based in Bondi, NSW. He has more that 35 years experience working with Aboriginal and Australian Contemporary art.

MIRRI LEVEN Director - Specialist Having gained degrees in International Development and Fine Arts, and a Masters in Art Administration from the University of NSW College of Fine Art Mirri undertook fieldwork in the Solomon Islands and India whilst acting as the international photo editor for a London based travel magazine. She joined Cooee Art in 2007 and was appointed the Gallery Manager in 2010. In 2013, she left Australia to take up a role as director of a contemporary art gallery in London. Mirri has been a director of Cooee Art since 2015. She plans its exhibition program and project development, and is a founder of its auction arm, the Cooee Art MarketPlace. She has been a member of the Aboriginal Art Association of Australia board since 2017.

KATHLEEN ROBERTS Auction & Gallery Administrator Kathleen Roberts has a Bachelor of Arts majoring in History, Politics & International Relations from Edith Cowan University W.A., and a Masters in Museum & Heritage Studies from the University of Sydney. She is a Juris Doctor candidate at the Australian National University. Pursuing her interest in the field of art and cultural property law she has attended seminars at The World Intellectual Property Organisation, UNESCO and UniversitÊ de Genève. Kathleen is a former administrator for Aboriginal & Oceanic Art at a prominent Sydney auction house, an active member of The Art Gallery Society of NSW, and joined Cooee Art in March 2017.


INTRODUCTION Welcome to the first Cooee Art MarketPlace Aboriginal Fine Art offering for 2019. Our June 4th multi-vendor auction features 105 lots including 36 works from the estate of collector and art enthusiast Mike Chandler. The estimated value is $750,000 - $1.4 million. Mike Chandler was a close friend and client who patronised Cooee and other prominent galleries around Australia. For more than 2 decades Mike, and his delightful wife Barbie were welcome additions to any art event or exhibition.Though Barbie’s death two years ago affected him deeply, he still made an effort to visit galleries, exhibitions and to champion Aboriginal art amongst his family and friends. We will miss him greatly. The paintings from his estate are offered as Lots 46 – 75 preceded by a short tribute. These artworks will be on display in our Bondi showroom with a special event on Saturday 1st June at 2pm. Sale highlights include a highly significant early Papunya board by Johnny Scobie Tjapanangka (Lot No. 16) that has been returned to Australia from the US. Women’s Dreaming, 1972, 63 x 72.5 cm, estimated at $40,000-60,000, is believed to be the only painting that Scobie created during the Bardon years. An illustration of this work and accompanying notes including a copy of the original field note and drawing is reproduced in Geoffrey Bardon and James Bardon’s magnum opus on the origins of the Western Desert Painting Movement.* An even earlier Papunya board, Lot No.15, is a genuine sleeper. Created in 1971 it was just the forth painting ever created by Johnny Warrangkula Tjupurrula and carries the very conservative estimate of $8,000-11,000. Contemporary urban works by Lin Onus and Richard Bell stand out in this offering. Major works by Onus have been hotly contested in recent sales. Smaller works on illustration board are very tightly held by their owners as they are both beautiful and exceedingly rare. Gumurring Garkman, 1994 is a delightful image in Lin’s most successful style. Used as the template for one of Onus’s most enduringly popular fine art prints, this original work is estimated at $50,000-60,000 (Lot 21). A treasure awaiting any discriminating collector. Richard Bell’s, A White Hero for Black Australia, presents one of the most iconic sporting images of all time in the artist’s signature graphic style. The subject is the medal ceremony for the 200-metres at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Peter Norman, Australia’s five-time national champion stands with African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos. More than just a compliant bystander, it was Norman who procured the Human Rights badges they wore, and Norman who suggested the black athletes share the same pair of gloves. The work measuring 100 x 150 cm is estimated $25,000-35,000 (Lot 20). Other works worthy of note are the stunning pair of Mokoy Spirits by Telstra Art Award winner Nawurapu Wunugmurra(Lot 24) (Est $10,000-15,000), a lovely offering of 10 small boards depicting aspects of the Old Texas cattle station by Queenie McKenzie ( Est $15,000-20,000), a magnificent major work by Minnie Pwerle with a very contemporary edge (Lot 36, Est. $25,000-35,000), and a number of fine works by Emily Kame Kngwarreye. The sale is peppered with a number of lovely old bark paintings by Arnhem Land masters and several 19th and early 20th century artefacts. We look forward to hearing from you or seeing you in person in the lead up to the auction. The quality of the artworks on offer is exceptional and our buyer’s premium is only 20% - less than that of other auction houses. You can discover a wealth of information on all of the major artists whose works are included in this catalogue as well as detailed information about the content and subjects of the artworks, on our website. Best regards, Adrian Newstead OAM *Geoffrey Bardon and James Bardon Papunya, A Place Made After the Story, The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, p372


the depth of our expertise “ With in both the primary and secondary art markets and our progressive outlook, we provide sellers with a vital distinction from the staid, conservative approach of our competitors. We understand that Australian Aboriginal artworks are a vital cultural legacy and believe that they are best promoted and offered for sale by those who are passionately committed to them

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- Adrian Newstead OAM Cooee Art MarketPlace Director


LOT #1 Inyika Donaldson & Estelle Hogan Minya Tjuta (Seven Sisters Dreaming at Tjintirikara), 2004 134 x 143 cm : Frame 137 x 146 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Spinifex Arts Project, WA Cat No. (obscured) Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London, UK Private Collection, Tas EXHIBITION HISTORY Ilkurlka: The Art of the Spinifex People, 17 September – 22 October 2005, Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London, UK When the Spinifex people returned to their homelands in the 1980s after their displacement during the Maralinga atomic tests, they found the southern part of their country had been converted into a nature reserve, the northern third leased to Aboriginal people from the north and the centre deemed vacant crown land. In order to document their land claim over country three times the size of Israel and twice the size of Tasmania, a suite of paintings were produced and used as evidence in the high court’s deliberations. Their native title was recognised by the High Court of Australia in 1992, and the paintings were subsequently given to the Western Australian Museum in a symbolic exchange of art for land. This work created by Estelle Hogan and Judith Donaldson depicts important sites that lie in their country through which runs the Seven Sisters Dreaming songline.


LOT #2 Minnie Pwerle (1910-2006) Awelye Atnwengerrp, 2005 123 x 90 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $5,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery, NT Cat No. 06217 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Dacou Gallery certificate of authenticity Minnie Pwerle, whose husband was the brother of famed artist Emily Kngwarreye, began painting her country Atnwengerrp and its associated Dreamings in earnest at 77 years of age. While Minnie resembles Emily in her prodigious output and gestural vigour, it is the bush melon and its seed, rather than the yam, or bush potato, which were her own Dreamings and the subject of her art.


LOT #3 Mitjili Napanangka Gibson (1930-2010) Marruwa, 2006 91 x 91 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Gallery Gondwana, NT Cat No. 9439MN Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Gallery Gondwana certificate of authenticity Mitjili Napanangka Gibson began painting on canvas inspired by her niece, Dorothy Napangardi, in 2006, the year this work was created. They shared many Dreaming stories, in particular those associated with Mina Mina, a sacred site for the Napanangka and Napangardi skin groups on Warlpiri land. In this painting Mitjili has depicted a part of a long narrative Dreaming story about two young girls. Their tracks are shown as they walk between sites around the Murruwa area where they sat down.


LOT #4 Nyumitja Laidlaw (c.1938- ) Seven Sisters Dreaming, 2005 98 x 151 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Kayili Arts, SA Cat No. NL-001 Art Mob, Tas Cat No. AM3976/06 Private Collection, Tas The Kungkarrangkalpa were running away from Wati Nyirru who was pursuing them in their travels. In this painting the women have set up a camp at Kulyuru and constructed shelters (wiltja) from branches and bark.


LOT #5 Jan Billycan (1930-2016) Untitled, 2009 90 x 60 cm : Frame 94 x 64 cm synthetic polymer paint and natural earth pigments on plywood panel $3,500 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA, Cat No. 26637 Private Collection, Tas This painting, an expression of her unique and startling talent, depicts the birth place of her father’s clan. There is a big warla (mud flat) at this place in the Great Sandy Desert close to and west of Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route. In 2011 Jan Billycan won the West Australian Indigenous Art Award at the Art Gallery of Western Australia in Perth.


LOT #6 Lydia Balbal (c.1958- ) Pikarong, 2009 91 x 91 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA Cat No. 26304 Aboriginal and Pacific Art, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Short Street Gallery certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Aboriginal and Pacific Art Gallery, Lydia Balbal, artist’s solo exhibition 2009 Pikarong is a site of ‘living’ (permanent) water on Lydia’s parent’s country. The region is abundant with bush foods and associated with the king brown snake. It is north of Winpa near Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route.


LOT #7 Rosella Namok (1979- ) Stinging Rain, Dark Night, 2016 108 x 180 cm : Frame 110 x 182 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Rosella Namok, Qld Cat No. RNC20170726 Lockhart River Arts, Qld Cat No. 17-376 Private Collection, Tas accompanied by a Lockhart River Arts certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Exhibited Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, NT, 2017 In Stinging Rain, rhythmic parallel lines paced obliquely to the vertical, create a moody narrative. The razor sharp gashes to the painted surface, have been created using a fine edged scraping tool. This work relates to fishing from a boat on the river during a downpour. ‘It’s always good when it starts to rain’, writes Rosella. ‘It stings your face and stirs up the fish underneath.’


LOT #8 Bill Tjapaltjarri Whiskey (c.1920-2008) Rockholes and Country near the Olga’s, 2006 155 x 155 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Watiyawarnu Art Centre, NT Cat No. 10-06999 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Watiyawarnu Art Centre certificate of authenticity While this is a compelling work depicting his country, it is intentionally cryptic. Specific information about the Dreaming is purposefully suffused in fields of ambiguous dots. Water places, such as Pirupa Akla are marked by sets of concentric circles, their dazzling presence representing their powerful life-giving significance, rather than their actual size. The actions of the White Cockatoo and Crow ancestors are encrypted as dotted patches that reference topographic features associated with the Dreaming. The depiction of country in this particular work conveys the distance between landmarks in Whiskey’s country, where isolated water places are concealed among swathes of vegetation. Remaining true to the conduct of his ancestors, who had kept their distance from explorers, Whiskey protects the secrets of his country behind a veil of descriptive dotting and sections of white, indicating the refraction from shattered quartz and the smoke of signal fires.


LOT #9 Abie Kemarre Loy (1972- ) Body Painting, 2010 120 x 192 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $15,000 - 22,000 PROVENANCE Gallerie Australis, SA Cat No. GAAL05101579 Private Collection, SA accompanied by a Gallerie Australis certificate of authenticity The linear designs in Abie’s painting represent awelye (women’s ceremony and body paint designs) for the Ahakeye (Bush Plum). These designs are painted onto the chest, breasts, arms and thighs. Powders ground from red and yellow ochre (clays), charcoal and ash are used as body paint and applied with a flat stick with soft padding. The women sing the songs associated with their awelye as each women takes her turn to be ‘painted-up’. Women perform awelye ceremonies to demonstrate respect for their country and the total well-being and health of their community.


LOT #10 Rosella Namok (1979- ) Low Tide, Patterns in the Sand, 2016 90.5 x 120 cm : Frame 92.5 x 120.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $3,000 - 5, 000 PROVENANCE Rosella Namok, Qld Cat No. RNC20170710 Lockhart River Arts, Qld Cat No. 17-361 Private Collection, Tas accompanied by a Lockhart River Arts certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Exhibited Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, NT, 2017 In painting this work, Rosella has used her fingers to create rhythmic parallel striations, a style derived from the sand drawing that was taught to her by her grandmother. She explains that for time immemorial ,beach people have talked in the sand. ‘Out camping, the old people sit around the fire, yarn ‘bout before-time’, and draw in the sand. They talk about family ways, how you’re related, which family side you’re from, and who you can go with. They know country for everyone too - land country, sea country.’


LOT #11 Judy Napangardi Watson (c.1925-2016) Mina Mina - Hair String, 2005 107 x 122 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $9,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Warlukurlangu Artists, Yuendumu, NT Cat. No. 1130/05 Private Collection, UK Lawson~Menzies, Aboriginal Art, Nov 2006, Lot No. 124 Private Collection, USA This painting depicts Women’s Dreaming of the Karnta-kurlangu, a large number of ancestral women who danced across the land, creating important sites, discovering plants, foods and medicines and establishing the ceremonies that would perpetuate their generative powers. The dancing women wore hairstring belts (marjardi) and tassels rubbed with red ochre and fat to emphasise their passion and power. They danced with enthusiasm and great enjoyment. The potent life force with which they imbued the country is evoked in Judy’s love of colour and richly textured, drag-dotting style which traces the sinuous lines of dancing women crossing the country.


LOT #12 Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri (1932-2002) Larumba Dreaming, 1994 125 x 82 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Private Collection, Melbourne Vic Sotheby’s, Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, 31/10/2006, Lot No. 130 Private collection, USA Formed in the Dreamtime, at the dawn of creation, Larumba is depicted in this painting through a rainbow of colours and creative abstraction. Larumba was initially occupied by the artist’s ancient Tjapaltjarri grandfather, who wandered over this vast desert country in search of food and fresh water, which he found in abundance, before setting up a permanent camp. The tracks he left behind are depicted in the work as human foot prints, which are portrayed in a travelling mode near clumps of wild bush plums. At the centre is a fresh water hole, shown as concentric circles, which reveals the water’s sacred nature. Besides depicting a water hole, the concentric circles here, also represent a ceremonial sandpainting, that symbolises the ancestor’s sacred Dreaming site. Sacred also is Napperby Lake itself, which the artist has indicated using a complex pattern of lines that invite the imagination to see the Lake’s salty water as it flows along underground claypans. These twist and turn over a vast area, across, and under the surface of, this Ancestor’s Dreamtime country.


LOT #13 Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri (1926-1998) Mouse Dreaming, 1996 92 x 155 cm : Frame 94.5 x 157.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $15,000 - 20,000 PROVENANCE Warumpi Arts (Papunya Community Art and Crafts, NT) Cat No. MN496085 Kimberley Art, Vic Private collection, Tas Bears artist’s name and inscription verso Mick Namarari was credited as having played the decisive role in propelling Papunya Tula art away from the edifice of Tingari cartography and towards the ethereal minimalism typical of 1990s Pintupi men’s art. This painting depicts Tjunpinpa (Mouse) Dreaming at a hill site north-west of the Kintore Community. The overall dotting represents the footprints of each mouse and also kampurarrpa an edible berry which it eats. Men of the Tjapaltjarri kinship subsection are custodians for the ceremonies associated with this mythology. Mick Namarari was the first recipient of Aboriginal Australia’s highest cultural accolade, the Australia Council’s Red Ochre Award, presented to him in 1994 four years prior to his death.


LOT #14 Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa (Mrs. Bennett) (1935- ) Untitled, 2006 91 x 122 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $8,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Yanda Art, NT Cat No. Mrs.B200620 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Yanda Art certificate of authenticity and a series of images of the artist painting the artwork Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa’s depictions of the sand-dune country and surrounding rocky outcrops bear a relationship to the designs used for body painting during the inma ceremonial dance. At the time of her death in February 2013, Nyurapayia had reached the pinnacle of desert law and sacred knowledge and was revered by women throughout the Western desert.


LOT #15 Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula (1925-2001) Old Man’s Story, 1971 31 x 38 cm : Frame 57.5 x 66 cm synthetic polymer paint on composition board $8,000 - 11,000 PROVENANCE Stuart Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT, Cat No. 48 Private Collection, NT Joel Fine Art, June 2008, Lot No. 159 Private Collection, Vic bears Stuart Art Centre label with title, artist’s name, a drawing with identification annotations by Pat Hogan, together with the annotation ‘2 Con No 48’ verso This small work is known to be only the fourth work that this seminal Western Desert painter ever created. It was catalogued one week prior to Billy Stockman’s renowned Wild Potato Dreaming (2 Con 49) that sold at Sotheby’s in 1998 for $201,500 setting a new high watermark for any Aboriginal painting at that time. It was sold by Pat Hogan, along with a number of the most important Papunya works ever created, from the second consignment of work from Papunya at the very dawn of the Western Desert art movement in 1971.


LOT #16 Johnny Scobie Tjapanangka (1938-2000) Women’s Dreaming, 1972 46 x 53 cm (irregular) : Frame 63 x 72.5 cm synthetic polymer powder paint on composition board $40,000 - 60,000 PROVENANCE Painted at Papunya in June/July 1972. Stuart Art Centre Alice Springs, Painting No. 22 consignment No. 14 Tim Guthrie Collection, Vic Private Collection, NSW Private Collection, USA This painting comes with an accompanying certificate of authenticity from the Stuart Art Centre Alice Springs identifying the artist and consignment number.


Extract from book

ILLISTRATED An illustration of this work and accompanying notes including a copy of the original field note and drawing of the time by Geoffrey Bardon, as well as a photograph of the artist by Allan Scott can be found in Geoffrey Bardon and James Bardon Papunya, A Place Made After the Story, The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2004, p372 Johnny Scobie worked as a stockman and drover in central Australia before settling at Papunya. This work is believed to be the only painting that he created during the Bardon years. When he took up painting in earnest in the 1980s his works were of outstanding quality and differed in their interpretation of the Dreaming stories from those of his contemporaries. In this painting Johnny Scobie has set out the women’s dancing ceremony at a place west of Sandy Blight Junction in Western Australia. Here women’s ceremonial motifs are presented for the dancing ritual. The paths of the dancers are elegantly and symmetrically shown by sets of horizontal lines crossing the design. The principal dancer’s footprints are indicated by tracks and a significant women’s sign is included at the top centre; there are also marked ceremonial objects.


LOT #17 Kitty Kantilla (c.1928-2003) Jilamara, 2000 56 x 75 cm : Frame 74 x 94 cm natural earth pigments on paper $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Jilamara Arts, Melville Island, NT Aboriginal and Pacific Art Gallery, NSW Cat No. KKP0050 Idris Murphy Collection, NSW The roots of Kitty Kantilla’s art, regardless of medium, were always tied to the fundamental Tiwi creation story. Bima, the wife of Purukapali, makes love to her brother-in-law Tarpara while her son Jinani, left lying under a tree in the sun, dies of exposure. Purukapali becomes enraged and after his wife is transformed into a night curlew he begins an elaborate mourning ceremony for his son. This was the first Pukumani (mortuary) ceremony, and tells how death first came to the Tiwi Islands.


LOT #18 Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri (1932-2002) Untitled - Rock Wallaby Dreaming, 1984 61 x 91 cm : Frame 75 x 105 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat. No. CP840215 Private Collection, NSW Lawson~Menzies Australian Aboriginal Art, Nov 2007, Lot No.158 Private Collection, USA This work, depicting Rock Wallaby ancestors was created in 1984. It is one of the last that he created for Papunya Tula Artists having begun is career painting during Geoffrey Bardons’ time in the community in 1972. Though he’d been Chairman of the Papunya Tula during the late 1970s and early 1980s he had become a largely independent artist by 1985. Approximately 280 Kms north-west of Alice Springs and west of Mount Wedge is Marrunga (Waite Creek). From this site Mala the Rock Wallaby travelled south-west past Ayres Rock and into Pitjantjatjara country. The concentric circles in this work are the camps made by the two old men wallabies shown as U shapes at the top and bottom of the work. These two old wallaby men were of the Tjangala skin group and whilst at this site they led young initiates through part of their instruction in Aboriginal law and ritual. The tracks show the movement of the men’s travels in the area and the elongated curved lines represent the design painted onto men’s bodies for the ritual.


LOT #19 Kathleen Petyarre (1940-2018) My Country - Bush Seeds - After Sandstorm, 2010 152 x 152 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $16,000 - 22, 000 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Gallerie Australis, SA Cat No. GAKP1010621 Private Collection, SA accompanied by a Gallerie Australis certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Parcours des Mondes, Saint Germain, Paris, 2013 Katheen Petyarre is best known for her finely wrought, intimate renditions of the vast landscapes in the Eastern Desert. These were created during the epic journeys of her Dreaming ancestor and totem, the tiny Thorny Devil Lizard, referred to as ‘that Old Woman Mountain Devil’. This tiny desert creature is believed to have created the vast desert home of the Eastern Anmatjerre people by moving each grain of sand, grain by grain, since the dawn of time. Petyarre and her clanswomen believe that they are its descendants, and have therefore inherited the responsibility for caring and nurturing the vast landscape that she depicts so intimately and carefully in her paintings.


LOT #20 Richard Bell (c.1953- ) A White Hero for Black Australia, 2014 100 x 150 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Milani Gallery, Qld Private Collection, Vic The subject of this painting is the Olympic medal ceremony for the 200 metres in Mexico City on October 16, 1968.  African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos each raised a black-gloved fist during the playing of the US national anthem. While on the podium, Smith and Carlos, who had won gold and bronze medals respectively turned to face the US flag and then kept their hands raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human-rights badges on their jackets in what is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympics. Australian Peter Norman was a five-time national 200-metres champion. The time he set in this event at the Olympic Games remains the Oceanian record to this day. Yet he is best known as the third athlete pictured in the famous photograph. After the final, Carlos and Smith had told Norman what they were planning to do during the ceremony. They asked Norman if he believed in human rights. He said he did and that he would stand with them. On the way to the medal ceremony, Norman saw the human rights badge being worn by a white member of the US Rowing Team, and asked him if he could wear it. It was Norman who suggested that Smith and Carlos share the black gloves used in their salute, after Carlos left his pair at the Olympic Village. This is the reason for Smith raising his right fist, while Carlos raised his left. Norman was not selected for the 1972 Summer Olympics, and retired from the sport soon after.


LOT #21 Lin Onus (1948 -1996) Gumurring Garkman, 1994 49 x 74 cm : Frame 80 x 104 cm synthetic polymer paint and ink on illustration board $50,000 - 70,000 PROVENANCE Purchased directly from the Artist’s Estate, Vic Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Private Collection, Vic Queensland Art Gallery, Qld Benalla Regional Gallery, Vic Lin Onus played a pivotal role in the emergence of urban Aboriginal art through his practice as an artist and advocate. A Yorta Yorta man from Cumeraganga on the Murray River, he grew up in urban Melbourne strongly influenced by the work of realist painters including Albert Namatjira and began his own career as a watercolorist and photorealist. Onus’s work evolved after his ‘adoption’ by Arnhem Land Elders in the mid 1980s conferred upon him the right to use certain traditional stories and designs. This enabled him to develop a distinctive visual language. Through a fusion of Western and Aboriginal systems of organising space, vision and design he sought to portray landscape as a carrier of myth, history, and ideology. In this, and other works on a similar theme, Onus depicted the Dreaming reality encoded in the landscape. Here frogs, painted with traditional body markings, sit with their heads popping above the surface of the water in a still pond surrounded by gum trees. The work conveys the message that beyond the immediately apparent lies the Dreaming reality, accessible if one is open to its presence. Lin Onus employed many different innovative and time-saving techniques in the creation of his photo-realist and graphic works. To create many of his original paintings he made stamps made of foam and rubber, and sponges, to paint entire surfaces of stipple and leaves that were later completed using brushes to refine the outlines and highlights. He would paint under-surface features and subsequently use screens (on art boards such as this) to create the basic structure and content of the work and then rework the image or paint over elements to add highlights and areas of light and shade.


LOT #22 Gunybi Ganambarr (1973- ) Dhanbarr - Larrakitj, c.2009 Height: 203 cm natural earth pigments on wood $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Buku Larrngay Mulka, NT Cat No. 2749V Annandale Gallery, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Buku Larrngay Mulka certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Annandale Gallery, NSW

LOT #23 Owen Yalandja (1960- ) Mimi Spirit c.2008 Height: 220 cm natural earth pigments on carved wood $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Maningrida Art and Culture, NT Private Collection, Vic

LOT #24 Nawurapu Wununmurra (1952- ) Mokoy Spirits, 2009 Height: 190 and 170 cm natural earth pigment on Hibiscus wood $8,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE commissioned by Balang Arts, Katherine NT Private Collection, NT

Image | detail


LOT #25 Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1910-1996) Yam Seed Dreaming, 1992 122 x 61 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $18,000 - 22,000 PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery, NT Cat No. 92F077 Private Collection, NSW In this work Emily strikes out with linear tracings that demonstrate the various colours she associates with the mature phase of the Yam’s life cycle - when the ripe fruit and seeds start the process of drying. Intermingling with the fruit and seeds are the falling leaves and flowers of summer that draw the emus to feed on her country and to raise their young. Here Emily is at one with her world. She moves with full confidence and resolve after the excitement and satisfaction of an abundant season. We witness the transformation of the desert after an abundant season as the country dries out. The grass seeds fall and scatter, settling into thickly carpeted sweeping swathes on the desert floor.


LOT #26 Rosella Namok (1979- ) Pink Bamboo, 2016 120.5 x 91 cm : Frame 122.5 x 93 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Rosella Namok, Qld Cat No. RNC20160713 Lockhart River Arts, Qld Cat No. 16-597 Private Collection, Tas EXHIBITION HISTORY Exhibited Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, NT, 2017 Rosella Namok’s paintings focus on patterns and marks found in the landscape and the natural world. In this work, Pink Bamboo, you get this sense of intense observation of the surrounding environment and its colours. The intense deep red/wine red colour is set against a deep blue-black ground. This linear, almost geometric painting suggests the very special environment of the artist’s tropical home country.


LOT #27 Roy Underwood, Lennard Walker, Richard Brooks, Ned Grant & Alan Jamieson Yarliritja | Spinifex Men’s Collaborative, 2004 173 x 135 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Spinifex Artists, WA Cat No. C.289 Flinders Lane Gallery, Vic Cat No. FG04605 Private Collection, Tas accompanied by a Flinders Lane Gallery certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Flinders Lane Gallery, Vic This is a major Spinifex men’s painting of Yarlirritja in the western sector of the Spinifex lands. At Yarlirritja, the Minyma Tjuta (Seven Sisters) first gathered white ochre and painted themselves up and began to sing. Because the songs were not supposed to be heard by men, Nyirru, the old man who pursues the sisters, was strongly affected when he happened to chance upon the group of sisters performing. Hiding in the darkness Nyirru was drawn in and thus began his pursuit and consequently the path of this major Western Desert story. The painting also shows the Irtarra trees prominent in the area where the sisters and Nyirru were camped. This collaborative painting is a cartographic map of country owned by the men of the Spinifex country. At the time it was painted each of the participants sat with their back to their own clan lands with the unstretched canvas lying on the ground between them. Each participant then painted their own country as they all worked toward the centre of the canvas accompanied by singing as they brought this Dreaming to life.


LOT #28 Cowboy Louie Pwerle (1941- ) Meeting Place, 1991 121 x 210 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $1,500 - $2,500 PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery, NT Cat No. 91K37 Thomas Vroom Collection, The Netherlands, Cat No. NVp:378 Private Collection, Tas accompanied by a Delmore Gallery and Thomas Vroom certificate of authenticity On Utopia Station, north of Soakage Bore, is a large soak (central roundel) and a series of smaller soaks in a dry creek bed. The two arc shapes at the centre are the two mythological ‘boss’ men who lay down at night to protect the soak water. At this place men gather to sing and enact the travels and adventures of their totemic ancestors. From such stories come examples and precedents of tribal law. The misdeeds of an ancestor, and the consequent punishment are object lessons taught to young initiates as part of the ceremony. During the ceremony special objects are created and prepared. The design on the shield used in this ceremony, as well as the ground and body designs are all meant to be memorised. Of equal importance is the need to understand the full significance of the ceremony, both mythologically and ritually.


LOT #29 Nellie Stewart (1938-2012) My Country - Minyma Kutjara, 2013 198 x 198.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, NT Cat No. 60-16 Vivien Anderson Gallery, Vic Aboriginal and Pacific Art, NSW Cat No. #10-453 Private Collection, Tas accompanied by a Tjungu Palya certificate of authenticity In this work, two sisters are at Punti. The elder sister is teaching the younger sister ceremonial law. They are singing and dancing together. They are travelling to Punuwara and on to Docker River in the Northern Territory.


LOT #30 Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1910-1996) Anooralya Yam, 1995 55 x 77 cm : Frame 85 x 105 cm synthetic polymer paint on paper $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery, NT Torres Collection, SA Gallery Savah, NSW Cat No. 433 Private Collection, NSW signed by the artist centre left hand side accompanied by a Gallery Savah certificate of authenticity Reflected in this work is the Anooralya Yam, the most important plant in Emily’s custodianship. This hardy and fertile plant provides both a tuber vegetable and a seed bearing flower called Kame (Emily’s tribal name). It was the subject of a great number of Emily Kngwarreye’s paintings, which were created, most familiarly, in a vast array of vibrant colours.


LOT #31 Lily Karadada (c.1937- ) Wandjina, 2002 120 x 160 cm natural earth pigments on Belgian linen $8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Narrangunny Art Traders, WA Cat No. N-2160-LK Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Cat No. 9926 Private Collection, NSW EXHIBITION HISTORY Lily Karadada - The last of the great Wandjina painters, April 2011, Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Widely regarded as the last of the great Wandjina painters from the Kimberley in north west Australia, Lily Karedada was born near the Prince Regent River surrounded by caves and rock galleries. Here it is believed that during the creation period the Wandjina lay down leaving their life giving essence in the caves as they returned to their home in the clouds. Wandjina bring the monsoon rains and fertility to the land. They are usually shown either in groups or surrounded by associated totemic species. Always depicted frontally, their large eyes dominate in a mouthless face, sometimes on top of a simple robe-like body. Radiating lines around the eyes or in a halo around the head represent the lightning that heralds a storm. The first lightning strike renders their mouths tightly closed. If their mouths were left open, we are told, it would rain incessantly, carrying everything away in a torrent.


LOT #32 Paddy Jaminji (Jampin) & Rover Thomas Joolama Devil Devil Spirit, 1985 70 x 93 cm : Frame 75.5 x 99 cm natural earth pigments on composition board $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Field Collected, WA c. 1985 Dr Peter Elliott Collection, NSW thence by descent Paddy Jaminji, was the classificatory ‘uncle’ of Rover Thomas and a highly respected elder during the establishment of the Warmun Community at Turkey Creek in the early 1970s. By a strange twist of fate he became the founder of the contemporary painting style of the East Kimberley region after being displaced from his working life as a stockman along with his countrymen. This painting depicts a Devil Devil, Manginta, the spirit of Tuwarrin. According to legend, Manginta is killed by Yulamangi another Devil Devil when he tries to steal the Corroboree. Boards like this were used to re-enact the story during ceremony.


Image | Queenie McKenzie | Courtesy Greg Weight


LOT #33 Queenie McKenzie (1930-1998) Texas Country, 1995 74 x 145.5 cm : Frame 76 x 146 cm natural earth pigments on canvas $15,000 - 20,000 PROVENANCE Purchased directly from the artist at the Pensioner Unit in Turkey Creek, NT c.1996 Art Mob Gallery, Tas Cat No. AM15880/18 Private Collection, Tas These are the hills of Old Texas Station. The hills are depicted in a variety of colours. The trees are the old ghost gums that grow here. Queenie remembered being tied to one when she was young after trying to run away from the Police. Horseshoe Creek is shown running between the hills. There was an anthill on the way to this place. It was small when Queenie was a little girl and it grew bigger and bigger as she progressed throughout her life.


LOT #34 Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1910-1996) Merne Alagura, 1993 90 x 150 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $40,000 - 60,000 PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery, NT Cat No. 93L058 Private Collection, NT accompanied by a Delmore Gallery certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Beyond the Veil, Olsen Gruin Gallery, New York, USA, 2018 The use of colour in this painting, Merne Alalgura, reflects the hot outback summers, where little rain has fallen. The lines indicate the growth pattern of the Anooralya finger yam at its peak, ready to fall into decline and brought to maturity by the intense and unforgiving summer sun. In her layered approach we also see the sporadic clustering of plants in later stages of maturity. Understanding the life cycle of these plants is vital to survival in the bush. This is affirmed within the narrative of the song cycle sung during the ceremony, which reinforces the significance of this knowledge and teaches social codes and obligations to the next generation.


Image | Emily Kngwarreye | Courtesy Greg Waight


LOT #35 Queenie McKenzie (1930 -1998) Set of 10 images depicting aspects of Old Texas, 1997 20 x 30 cm each : Frame 30 x 40 cm each natural earth pigments on canvas boards $15,000 - 20,000 PROVENANCE Narrangunny Art Traders, WA Cat Nos. QM101-110 Private Collection, WA All 10 works bear catalogue number and artist’s signature verso. Image of the artist holding each artwork In this lovely set of 10 small works Queenie McKenzie has painted sites in the country of her childhood and early working life on Old Texas Station where the rocky hills are seen as separate forms on the edge of the desert plain. The sites depicted are Bililyerinbee, Buffalo Hole, Boonjoorji, Woolwoolji, Wooljing, Diamond Mine, Boolmowen, Top Country, Eagle Hawk Dreaming, and Eagle Hawk Hill. ‘I bin born Old Texas, dat called Salt Pan country. Salt water you gotta drinkim’. No more goodfella water, all salt – bitter. I bin born la dat country.’ ‘Dat white stone from the hill, they break ‘im up for spear. Good spear dat one.’* *Jennifer Joi Field, Witten in the Land, The Life Of Queenie McKenzie, Melbourne Books, 2008


LOT #36 Minnie Pwerle (1910-2006) Awelye Atnwengerrp, 2007 123 x 270 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Purchased direct from the artist’s daughter Barbara Weir, NT Boomerang Art, Qld Cat No. 4074 Private Collection, Qld accompanied by a Boomerang Art certificate of authenticity and an image of Barbara Weir with the artwork


Minnie Pwerle began painting depictions of her country, Atnwengerrp, and its Dreamings when in her late 70s. There are many parallels in the careers of Minnie Pwerle and that of her countrywoman the great Emily Kame Kngwarreye. Both began painting late in life and both created work for a period of seven years. Both painted the majority of their works equally gesturally and produced a prodigious output. Both artists painted works that were immediately popular, most especially amongst women, and were able to support a number of close relatives with the income they generated. Indeed the comparison between the two women, who were sisters-in-law, extended to their fundamental feelings of reverence, abandon and intuition. The manner in which they created their works appeared to be the result of an urgency to reconnect to the past and to keep the Dreaming a living reality. Just like Emily Kngwarreye before her, in painting after painting Minnie boldly and self-assuredly depicted the body designs painted onto women’s breasts and limbs for the regular ceremonial revivification of her country. While the rambling tuberous roots of the Yam or Bush Potato were Emily’s Dreamings and the subject of her art, Minnie’s primary focus was the Bush Melon and its seeds. Her Awelye-Antnwengerrp paintings drew directly from these ceremonial practices, depicting bush melon, seed, and breast designs in powerful multi-coloured brushstrokes that built into a structured patchwork of luminous colour most often emanating from within a darker under-layer. The energy of these vibrant colourful works seemed to capture the joy of coming across these sweet bush foods, now scarce and difficult to find. Minnie passed away in 2006, her life an extraordinary journey mapping the transition from that of a nomad, through the early years of the pastoral industry, to a new era of Aboriginal control, and a flourishing art movement at Utopia. It has only been possible to assess the true quality of her output in retrospect, because her career as a painter was rapid and chaotic and her output uneven and often repetitive. Since her death, it has become apparent that her finest works are enduring masterpieces and, despite her many minor works, these place her amongst the most important Aboriginal artists that painted during the early years of the twenty first century.


LOT #37 Minnie Pwerle (1910-2006) Awelye Atnwengerrp, 2002 137 x 91 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Urapuntja Artists, Utopia NT Cat. No: FMMPw0206 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Vic (label verso) Sotheby’s Aboriginal Art, October 2006, Lot 147 Private Collection, Vic Mossgreen Auctions, Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, April 2008, Lot No. 61 Private Collection, Vic


LOT #38 Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1910-1996) Spirit Desert III, 1992 91 x 152 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $35,000 - 45,000 PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery NT, Cat No. 92I167 Gallery Gondwana, NT Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Gallery Gondwana certificate of authenticity This thick textured fusion of deep-ochred yellow and pink hues gives a concentrated view of the desert’s food sources after rain. Often hidden from view these seed, fruit and root vegetables are enormously bountiful. The requirement to understand the life cycles of all bush foods is necessary to survival. The dramatic transformation of the desert from bare to abundant is a display of the desert’s power. Linked into this is women’s ceremonial life called ‘awelye’ that is based on the belief that they help nurture the desert food sources by assuring future fertile generations.


LOT #39 Jimmy Njiminjuma (1947- 2004) Namarrkon the Lightning Spirit, 1994 66.5 x 55 cm natural earth pigments on Eucalyptus bark $2,500 - 3,500 PROVENANCE Maningrida Arts and Culture, NT Cat No. 065/94 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Maningrida Arts and Culture certificate of authenticity Jimmy Njiminjuma lived with his father Anchor Galuma, at Mumeka outstation during his youth. He was taught to paint in a traditional style by his father and uncle, Peter Marralwanga, both renowned cave and bark painters. During the 1980s, Njiminjuma took a primary role in teaching his younger brother John Mawurndjurl the art of bark painting. In the Kuninjku tradition of Western Arnhem Land, Namarnkon - The Lightning Spirit, is painted on cave walls and on bark in the form of a Ngaldjurr - Leichardt’s grasshopper (which it is said to have made). The species emerges, mates and is most active and visible between October and December when there are intense electrical storms. Ngaldjurr is then said to be looking for Namarnkon which strikes out with the stone axes that protrude from its joints. The lines circling Namarnkon link his head to his loins and are said to be lightning bolts.


LOT #40 Peter Marralwanga (1916-1987) Frogs, 1977 63 x 19 cm : Frame 79.5 x 35 cm natural earth pigments on Eucalyptus bark $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Gift from the artist to NT Police Officer Charlie Meneghetti in 1977 Jim Davidson Collection, Vic Aboriginal and Pacific Art Gallery, Vic Private Collection, Vic Marralwanga was greatly influenced by Yirawala, particularly in the use of cross-hatching or rarrk in-fill, derived from the designs of the Mardayin ceremony. Maralwanga was innovative with his rarrk techniques and empowered many of the next generation of artists, such as John Mawurndjul and his own sons Ivan Namirrkki and Samuel Namunjdja, to continue experimentation and invention in their works. However, Maralwanga differed from these younger artists, particularly Mawurndjul, who allows rarrk designs to drive his work into pure abstraction. In contrast, Marralwanga’s compositions always centred upon the figurative, to which the rarrk designs remained subservient, while altering the formal convention of the rarrk’s colour sequencing and orientation in order to illuminate, to its utmost, the flow and movement of the figure.


LOT #41 Jimmy Njiminjuma (1947- 2004) Njalyod - Rainbow Serpent, 1981 104 x 48 cm natural earth pigments on stringy bark $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Maningrida Arts and Crafts, NT Cat No. L335UAR Private Collection, Vic In this striking bark, Nalyod - The Rainbow Serpent is shown at Minmilgan, a site for Dhuwa moeity tribesmen of the Gungurulg and Gunbordo clans. The site is its spiritual home. Here Nalyod is said to be responsible for the increase of tubers called manbordbak. The serpent is described as ‘a mother one’. Only senior men may approach the site. It is said that several generations ago a man and woman were killed by the Serpent for gathering the tubers close to the sacred spring where he resides.

LOT #42 John Mawurndjul (1952- ) Ngarrbek - The Echidna, 1993 28 x 82.5 cm natural earth pigment on Eucalyptus bark $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Maningrida Arts and Culture, NT Cat No. MAW215 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Maningrida Arts and Culture certificate of authenticity


LOT #43 Narritjin Maymuru (1922-1982) Possum Tree Dreaming, c.1960 101 x 43.5 cm irregular : Frame 117 x 60 cm natural earth pigments on Eucalyptus bark $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Purchased in 1974 from Aboriginal Arts Australia, Perth WA Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Vic Private Collection, Vic Narritjin was a great ceremonial leader in North East Arnhem Land and the keeper of the important possum tree story. Guwark, the sacred bird of the Dreamtime, lives at the top of a sacred tree situated on the high cliffs above Blue Mud Bay. Only the very old initiated men can look upon this sacred tree, and then only at dawn, when the grey mists swirl about the tree and give an elusive glimpse of its branches. In this work the tree is represented by the pointed object depicted down the centre. High on the top of the tree sits Guwark, waiting for cicadas and possums to scamper up the tree with messages from the people living on earth. Then he flies off across the ocean to the island of the spirits, Baralku, and tells their problems to the spirit heroes. After consultation amongst themselves, they appoint Barama, one of the chief spirits, to relay the answer to the big black bird, which then flies back across the ocean. As he approaches the tree he screeches out ‘guwark guwark’ and the possums and cicadas scamper up the tree to hear his message and take it down to the people anxiously waiting below. Once Guwark was a man who went out fishing with a companion in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Huge seas overturned their canoe, and Guwark gave the only paddle to his companion, who drifted onto shore with it. Guwark was drowned and went up into the Milky Way, but each day he flies down to the sacred tree to wait for his messages, returning to the heavens each night.


LOT #44 Narritjin Maymuru (1922-1982) Djarrakpi, 1969 130 x 61 cm : Frame 145 x 80 cm natural earth pigments on Eucalyptus bark $7,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Painted in North East Arnhem Land, NT Private Collection, Qld Sotheby’s Aboriginal Art, Nov 2009, Lot 102 Private Collection, Vic The painting represents the site of Djarrakpi and its lake on the eastern coast of Arnhem Land, north of Blue Mud Bay, and one of the Manggalili clan’s major ancestral sites. The main feature of the painting is a sacred object which refers to the sacred Marawili tree (either a Casuarina or a Cashew). The body of the object is painted with a version of the Manggalili clan design representing the waters of the lake in different conditions of wind and light. Djarrakpi was created by Guwak the Koel Cuckoo at the end of his journey across the land, together with a number of other ancestors, including Marrngu the Possum. The Possum spun his fur to create the sand dunes at Djarrakpi. The human figures represent the female ancestors related to Djarrakpi - the Wurrathithi (Wuradidi) who travel to that site and inhabit the seaward side, or the Nyapililngu who were at Djarrakpi when Guwak arrived. The women are distinguished by the possum fur string breast girdles they wear. The digging sticks in the lower section of the painting are analogous to the female ancestors.


LOT #45 Charlie Mardigan (1926-1986) Untitled, 1968 64.5 x 22.5 cm (irregular) natural earth pigment on Eucalyptus bark $2,500 - 3,500 PROVENANCE Painted at Wadeye (Port Keats), NT Aboriginal and Pacific Art, Vic Private Collection, Vic Wadeye artists were introduced to bark in the 1950s by missionaries who recognised the growing market for bark paintings from Arnhem Land. Charlie Mardigan became a leading exponent and his bark paintings were renowned for expressions of the orderly nature of the universe, and of human society.


Michael Chandler 1945 - 2019 The following lots numbers 46 through to 82 are all part of the Mike Chandler Estate and will be on display at our Bondi showroom at - 31 Lamrock Avenue, Bondi Beach

Viewing | 28 May - 1 June 2019, 10-5pm Special Event Saturday 1 June 2019 | 2-4pm


Many members of the Aboriginal art community were saddened to hear of the passing of collector and art enthusiast Mike Chandler in January this year. Exhibitions at our own Cooee Art, Gallery, Gabriella Roy’s Aboriginal and Pacific Art Gallery and so many others will not be quite the same without him. Though he’d never really recovered from the loss of his lovely wife Barbie two years ago, he still frequented galleries and art fairs, enthusing about the latest young artist or community to break onto the art scene. Apart from his devotion to Barbie, art, and design, fine wine and food, travel, animals and boats were his greatest passions. Mike was widely credited amongst his peers as Australia’s greatest typographer. He’d transplanted himself from London to Sydney in 1978 and quickly established Australia’s pre-eminent typography, typesetting and artwork studio here. A recent obituary credited him as having helped improve the work of every single great writer and art director in Australian advertising throughout the last two decades of the 20th century. When Mike retired in 2003, he and Barbie combined their love of art and travel haunting galleries and auctions and visiting remote Aboriginal art communities. With a background in advertising and promotion, and with children working overseas, they began to champion Aboriginal art through a series of European exhibitions. They collected deeply and sold many fine works from established art centres while promoting a number of un-represented Daly River artists living in the tiny Bulgul community. Just prior to his death Mike was working on a project that he presented to me as an opportunity for the Aboriginal Benefits Foundation. He had designed beautifully type-set posters of many of the greatest and most uplifting speeches and poems ever written. He wanted to give them to Aboriginal community organisations and schools as a way of motivating young people. They included John Lennon’s Imagine, Paul Keating’s Redfern Speech, and Martin Luther King’s, I Have A Dream. This concern and compassion was a measure of the man. At his funeral, family and close friends spoke about how great Mike was at everything he put his hand to. We will remember him as a great advocate for Aboriginal art, and a great humanitarian who was committed to making a difference to the lives of young Indigenous people. He died suddenly at his home at Palm Beach on January 6th at 74 years of age. The collected of works below will be sold on the 4th of June 2019 as part of our Aboriginal Works of Art auction starting at 7pm. A special tribute and private view of these artworks from his collection will be on discplay at our Bondi Showroom on Saturday 1st June. Please come and pay tribute.


LOT #46 Jean Burke (1945- ) Tjangara, 2005 110 x 204 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $4,000 - 6000 PROVENANCE Agathon Gallery, Sydney, NSW Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Agathon certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Perspective of Country, January 2019, Cooee Art Paddington Born in the bush at Anumarapiti in the Western Desert, Jean arrived at the mission in Ernabella with her parents when she was a baby in the mid 1940s. Shortly after their arrival her mother passed away and her father took her from Ernabella to Warburton, walking from rock-hole to rock-hole for 800 kilometres. Along the way many women took turns in breast-feeding the infant child. ‘I always thought I had no family. I was really sad because other girl’s mothers told them stories about country. I was lost. My own mother wasn’t telling me stories about families and country.’ Jean began painting in Warakurna under the watchful eye of her uncle Tommy Watson at the Docker River Community Arts Centre. Her paintings are based on the linear designs related to sandhill country and her softer palette demonstrates a deep connection to the numinous landscape.


LOT #47 Tjuruparu Watson (1935-2011) Untitled, 2007 120 x 220 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,500 - 5,500 PROVENANCE Agathon Gallery, NSW Cat No. 03/07-1191 Private Collection, NSW Tjala Arts, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Geoffrey (Tjuruparu) Watson was born in the bush at a rockhole called ‘Kulkutja’. It lies close to Kintore in the Northern Territory, a long way from Irrunytju, where the artist lived. Irrunytju was his mother’s country. He was a teenager when his family walked into Warburton mission, after walking hundreds of miles to the west.


LOT #48 Pirrmangka Napanangka (c1945-2001) Tjintjintjin, 2000 91 x 153 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $9,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. PN20000663 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW This painting depicts designs relating to the site of Tjintjintjin, west of Kintore community. There is a series of rockholes at this site and an underground cave. In ancestral times an old lady travelled to Tjintjintjin from Malparinga, north-west of the Kintore community. She also visited the soakage water sites of Ngatanga and Yaranga, which are all west of Mantati Outstation. She then travelled further east to Muruntji, south-west of Mt Liebig. At Muruntji she was accosted by one of a group of boys so she chased them and caught all but the culprit, who managed to escape. She killed the others and cooked them in the fire. She then travelled to Kaltarra where she entered the earth.


LOT #49 Tjunkiya Napaltjarri (1927-2009) Rockhole at Umari, 2002 122 x 153 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. TN0211245 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Papunya Tula certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Collector’s Edition, August 2013, Cooee Art Gallery In this work the lines through the centre represent the sandhills surrounding the site. A group of women gathered here to perform ceremonies. The women, one of Nangala kinship and others of Napaltjarri kinship, later travelled towards the east. One of the mythologies associated with the area concerns a relationship between a Tjakamarra man and Nangala woman. This is a mother-in-law relationship which is very taboo in Aboriginal culture.


LOT #50 Lilly Napangardi Kelly (1948- ) Sandhills, 2004 90 x 150 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrngu, NT Cat No. 77-0336 Neil Murphy Indigenous Art, Sydney, NSW Cat No. NJM04/0213 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Neil Murphy certificate of authenticity and two images of the artist painting the artwork - one with Mike Chandler Lily’s paintings refer to sand hills, the effect of wind and rain on the desert landscape, and the crucial waterholes found in the area. The best of these works evoke the ephemeral nature of the drifting, changing sandy country in the finest microcosmic detail. Rain streaks the land as it runs off the sand hills while the blowing wind folds them into the undulating waves of an infinite expanse. Beholding each work in its entirety, is to view the landscape in macrocosm as the eye follows the hypnotic fine doting and muted tones that build up into a mysterious, enigmatic topography of her land.


LOT #51 Makinti Napanangka (c. 1930-2011) Untitled (Hairstring at Lulpinga rock hole), 2004 120 x 183 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Red Sand Art Gallery, Alice Springs, NT Cat No. 081004 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Red Sand Art Gallery certificate of authenticity and an image of the work hanging the the home of Mike Chandler EXHIBITION HISTORY Collector’s Edition, August 2013, Cooee Art Gallery Makinti’s gestural style and bold line work was derived from painting with her fingers dipped in earth ochres onto her clanswomen’s bodies for ceremony. The tactile surfaces of her paintings reflect this touching and sensing, just as her painterly use of colour and form generates a sense of celebration and movement. Through these haptic surfaces Makinti maintains her cultural traditions while the images serve to revivify the journeying of her two ancestral female ancestors, the Kungka Kutjarra as they dance their way across the country. Their travels follow the desert water sources and, particularly in Makinti’s art, Lupulnga, the rockhole where she was born and where her connections to her spiritual origins are felt. Small ovoid roundels, often in linear sequence, denote this crossing of country. Caring for country is an important motivation for this bond, as the water sources must be cleared of debris and sand to keep them, and the life they support, fresh and flowing.


LOT #52 Tatali Nangala (c.1928-2000) Women’s Ceremony at Kaakuratintja, 1998 91.5 x 46 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $1,500 - 2,200 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. TN981001 Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Vic Cat No.7204 Lawson Menzies, May 2007, Lot 108 Tjala Aboriginal Arts, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Papunya Tula certificate of authenticity This painting depicts designs associated with Kaakuratintja (Lake MacDonald). During ancestral times two women visited this site on their travels to Lampintja and Walukaritjina nearby. The women were gathering the edible seeds known as wangunu or woollybutt from the perennial grass Eragrostis eriopoda. These seeds are ground into flour, water added and the resultant thick paste is cooked in hot sand and ashes to form a type of damper.


LOT #53 Inyuwa Nampitjinpa (c 1922-1999) Pukunya, 1998 169 x 48 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. IN981137 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Papunya Tula certificate of authenticity Inyuwa Nampitjinpa was among a group of Pintupi people who made their weary way into Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) settlement just before Christmas 1956. They had walked hundreds of kilometres from west of the salt lake of Karrkurutintjinya (Lake Macdonald) to experience first-hand the supplies of food and water on offer at the settlement under the new government administration that had replaced the Lutheran missionaries. Nampitjinpa already had four children – three sons and a daughter – with her elderly husband Rartji Tjapangati. Nine years later, Rartji Tjapangati passed away in Papunya, and Nampitjinpa re-married. Her second husband was Tutuma Tjapangati, one of the most senior men in the founding group of artists painting at Papunya in 1971. Nampitjinpa and her family moved back to the Pintupi homelands community of Walungurru (Kintore) soon after its establishment in 1981. As seen in this work depicting Pukunya, which was created in 1998, her work retained only the most basic elements of traditional imagery, referencing rockholes, campsites and women’s utensils simplified to the point of abstraction.


LOT #54 Inyuwa Nampitjinpa (c 1922-1999) Pulkanya, 1997 91 x 61 cm synthetic polymer on Belgian linen $2,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No IN970583 Tjala Aboriginal Arts, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW This work depicting Pukunya, was created in 1997. It retains only the most basic elements of traditional imagery, referencing rockholes, campsites and women’s utensils simplified to the point of abstraction.


LOT #55 Inyuwa Nampitjinpa (c 1922-1999) Travels of a Tingari Women to Pinari, 1998 91 x 91.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. IN9811156 Sotheby’s Aboriginal and Oceanic Art, Nov 2005 Lot No. 327 Deutscher & Hackett, Important Aboriginal and Oceanic Art, May 2016 Lot No. 95 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW


LOT #56 Nabulla Napurrula Scobie (1950- ) Sandhills, 2003 120 x 120 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $1,800 - 2,500 PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrngu, NT Cat No. 77-9134 Neil Murphy Indigenous Art, NSW Cat No. NJM03/0136 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Neil Murphy certificate of authenticity This work depicts the travels of Two Women who came up from Mitukutjarrayi in the south stopping at the mountain outside Kintore before travelling north-west.


LOT #57 George Tjungarrayi Ward (1945- ) Muruntji, 2003 183 x 244 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $40,000 - 60,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. GW0305074 Utopia Art Sydney, NSW Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Cat No.13-11367 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Papunya Tula certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Collector’s Edition, August 2013, Cooee Art Gallery This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Kaakuratintja (Lake McDonald). In mythological times, a Tingari man visited this site before travelling west to Patantja. As he travelled he carried two Kuniya (pythons) with him. One large venomous snake also travelled west from Lake McDonald. According to Pintupi mythology, the Tingari travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites during the Dreamtime.


LOT #58 Walangkura Napanangka (c1946-2014) Womens Ceremony, 2005 150 x 181 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Mason Gallery, NT Cat No. WN0522 Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Tjala Arts, NSW Private Collection, NSW Accompanied by a collection of photos of the artist painting the work EXHIBITION HISTORY Maunsell Wickes, Utopia II, Sydney NSW, October 2005 The curves through this painting represent the hill country through which an old woman, Kutungka Napanangka, travelled during her journey from the west. She visited the rockhole and underground cave site of Mantati Outstation, approximately seventy kilometres west of the Kintore Community. She then travelled further east through Ngatanga, Papunga and Yananga to Muruntji, south west of Mount Leibig.


LOT #59 Eubena Nampitjin (1924 -2013) Tilla Rockhole, near The Cunning Stock Route, 1997 120 x 80 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, Balgo Hills, WA, Cat No. 745/97 Alcaston Gallery, Vic Cat No. AK4128 Lawson Menzies, Aboriginal Fine Art, May 2005, Lot No. 27 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Warlayirti Artists certificate of authenticity In this work Eubena has painted some of her country south west of Balgo, along the middle stretches of the Canning Stock Route, near her birthplace. This is the place where Eubena would often hunt and gather food. The strong lines in the painting depict the tali (sandhills) that dominate this country.


LOT #60 Bai Bai Napangarti (1935- ) Culbardu, in the Great Sandy Desert, WA, 1995 90 x 60 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, Balgo Hills, WA Cat No. 25/95 Cooee Art Gallery, NSW The Marecaux and Thompson Collection, NSS Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by the original Warlyirti Artists certificate of authenticity Bai Bai has painted some of her traditional country, which is located in the Great Sandy Desert, south of Balgo. She has depicted a soak with underground water linking two very sacred areas for women of the region. People of the Tjungurrayi and Nakamarra groups are sitting nearby with their boomerangs, nulla nullas and digging sticks.


LOT #61 Patsy Marfurra (c.1944- ) Durrmu, 2007 110 x 110 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Durrmu Arts, Peppimenarti, NT Cat No. PM300807 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW Cat No. TAA1206 Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Durrmu Arts certificate of authenticity Patsy Marfura moved to Peppimenarti when in her late 30s. There she learnt to weave dilly bags and mats (Syaw) from her grandmother and other female elders. Patsy was in her 50s when, in 2001, the Peppimenarti artists began painting and became known for canvases which reference the weave of dilly bags and fish nets. These are traditionally made with the pinbin, or bush vine, that grows near the river. The syaw is used to catch fish, prawns and other edible living creatures in the creeks and rivers.


LOT #62 Patsy Marfurra (c.1944- ) Durrumu, 2003 76 x 118 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $2,200 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Durrmu Arts, NT Karen Brown Gallery, NT Cat No. KB1816 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Durrmu Arts certificate of authenticity Patsy’s works demonstrate her traditional knowledge related to women’s business. Her colour palette is derived from the colours of bush plants and the dyes the women traditionally get from them. Like her countrywoman Regina Wilson, Patsy’s colourful and stunning compositions visually transform the three dimensional nature of traditional weaving into two dimensions - from baskets and mats to the flat two-dimensional surface of a painting on canvas.


LOT #63 Sally (Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda) Gabori (1924-2015) Outside Hunting Reef, 2006 211 x 121.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $6,000 - 9,000 PROVENANCE Mornington Island Art, Qld Cat No. 840-L-SG-0206 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Mornington Island certificate of authenticity Inscription on accompanying certificate reads “This painting is about a hunting reef on my country on Bentick Island.� Sally Gabori


LOT #64 Tiger Palpatja (c.1920-2014) Wanampi - Water Snakes, 2005 122 x 102 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Minymaku Arts, Amata Community, SA Cat No. 310-05 Lawson Menzies Lot 141, May, 2007 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Minymaku Arts certificate of authenticity Wanampi, the water snake, believed to be the ancestor of the Pitjantjatjara people, is the source of the austere power of his red desert country. Tiger was a senior custodian for the Wanampi creation story, which was central to his identity. It still instructs people in the reciprocal relationship between men and women to this day. The story tells of the frustration between two brothers and their wives. The men were spending too much time on their ceremonial activities so the women stopped providing food for them. The men then tricked the women by turning themselves into snakes and leaving enticing snake trails nearby which prompted the women to start digging vigourously and deeply after the food. When one sister eventually speared a snake, the injured and angered men swallowed the women whole and retreated forever into the holes, channels and gullies that the women had dug throughout the country. Tiger’s artworks offer us a window into the soul of the earth, forged from his own song cycles and feel for the land.


LOT #65 Eunice Napanangka Jack (1940- ) Kuruldu, 2004 92 x 122 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Ikuntji Art Centre, Haasts Bluff, NT Cat Nu. IK04EJ125 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Ikuntji Art Centre certificate of authenticity and exhibition catalogue LITERATURE Illustrated in full colour in exhibition catalogue Eunice Napanangka - Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney, NSW 2004 EXHIBITION HISTORY November 2004 Eunice Napanangka - Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney, NSW Eunice was born in 1940 at Lupul in the Sir Frederick Ranges in Western Australia. Her mother carried her piggy-back from Winparrku on the Walpiri side of Lake Mackay all the way to the ration station at Haasts Bluff in central Australia when she was a young child. Her father was Tutuma Tjapangarti, one of the first men to paint for Papunya Tula and, during the 1970s, she assisted her husband Gideon Tjupurrula Jack who also painted at Papunya Tula. She began painting in her own right when the Ikuntji Women’s Centre opened at Haasts Bluff in August 1992. Her paintings are interpretations of her own country near Lake Mackay and that of her husband including Tjukurla, Tjila, Kurulto and Lupul.


LOT #66 Eunice Napanangka Jack (1940- ) Hair String, 2004 92 x 122 cm synthetic polymer on Belgian linen $3,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Ikuntji Art Centre, Haasts Bluff, NT Cat No. IK04EJ132 Boutwell Draper Gallery, NSW Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Ikuntji Art Centre certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY November 2004 Eunice Napanangka - Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney, NSW A brilliant colourist, Eunice is renowned for using layers of colour to build up a vision of bush wildflowers and grasses as well as Hairstring, Tali (sandhill) and Mungada (apple). In this Hairstring work hundreds of varied colour strokes, represent the hair being rolled on women’s thighs to make bags and clothing. Now an elder in her late 70s, Eunice is a renowned a hunter, dancer and senior custodian of traditional law.


LOT #67 Eunice Napanangka Jack (1940- ) Hairstring, 2004 122 x 153 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Ikunji Art Centre, Haasts Bluff, NT Cat No. IK04EJ94 Boutwell Draper Gallery, NSW Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Ikuntji Art Centre certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY November 2004 Eunice Napanangka - Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney, NSW


LOT #68 Paji Wajina Yankarr Honeychild (c,1912-2004) Nurtu, 2002 91 x 100 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing, WA Cat No. PC062/02 Lawson Menzies Aboriginal Art, Nov 2005 Lot No. 170 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Private Colection, NSW EXHIBITION HISTORY Australian Galleries, Cooee Art at Australian Galleries, Sydney NSW, April 2016 This site is called Nurtu. According to the artist: ‘We used to stay here when I was a kid. This was a ‘living’ water hole (a permanent water source) and we would move from place to place. We never stayed in one place too long.’


LOT #69 Yannima Tommy Watson (1935-2017) Untitled, 2005 120 x 200 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $10,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Red Sand Art Gallery, NT Cat No. RSTW031 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a certificate of authenticity, working photos and an image of the artist with the work. Grounded in Tommy Watson’s paintings are rockholes, mountain ranges, and creekbeds, however we see these transmitted in waves of light. Many of his paintings are, in fact, evocative of nuclear shock waves, light waves, and explosions. Notably, his transition to stardom was actually far from contrived, or even self-driven. This is perhaps why the description of art star was so incongruous when applied to Watson. He preferred not to enter into art dialogue at all, a fact that was helped by his almost total reliance on his first language, Pitjantjatjara.


LOT #70 Patju Presley (c.1940- ) Untitled, 2006 133 x 167 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Irrunytju Arts, WA Cat No. IRRPP101006 Agathon Gallery, NSW Cat No. AGPP1106060005 Tjarla Arts, NSW Cat No. TAA#1188 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Patju’s images are schematic representations of the epic journeys and creation stories of his country. References to important landforms, rockholes and songlines implicitly evoke the creation ancestors, their interactions and incidents that occurred during the earth’s creation. His paintings demonstrate his intimate knowledge of country through intricate details of the changing vegetation, water sources and weather conditions at particular locations. They are heavily loaded with complex symbolic meanings and layered cultural references.


LOT #71 Linda Gilbert (c.1960- ) Syaw, 2007 200 x 160 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Durrmu Arts, NT Cat Nu. c702 Karen Brown Gallery, NT Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW Cat No. TAA1201 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Durrmu Arts certificate of authenticity Linda Gilbert lives and paints at Peppimentarti, an Aboriginal community in the Daly River region of the Northern Territory. Peppimenarti, or ‘Peppi’ as it is known, is situated on Tom Turner Creek approximately 320 km south west of Darwin. This painting depicts the traditional syaw or fish-net that is woven each year by the women of Peppimentarti from sand-palm, or merrepen, to catch barramundi and small crayfish.


LOT #72 Nellie Stewart (1938-2012) Nyapari, 2010 122 x 142 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, NT Cat No. TPNS10453 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Nellie Stewart is a senior Pitjantjatjara woman. Her works are bold and colourful landscapes depicting country. They incorporate landmarks created during epic spirit journeys and the activities of creation ancestors. Two sisters are at Nyapari during the Dreamtime. The elder sister is teaching the younger sister ceremonial law. They are singing and dancing together. They were travelling to Punuwara and travelled on to Docker River in the Northern Territory.


LOT #73 Pulpurru Davies (1943- ) Nyukur, 2006 76.5 x 76.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Kayili Artists, WA Cat No. 06-210 William Mora Galleries, Vic Deutscher & Hackett, Australian and International Fine Art, Nov 20186 Lot No. 135 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Kayili Artists certificate of authenticity Pulpurru grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life with her family as they moved from waterhole to waterhole in their traditional country. They lived this way up until the 1960s, by which time they were one of the last groups of nomadic people in Australia. This painting depicts a small part of the Wati Kutjara (Two Men) Dreaming myth which takes place at Nyukur, a site with two rockholes west of Mina Mina. Two women are confronted by the Wati Kutjarra who want to see what they are carrying. The women hide their special possessions underneath them as they sit down. The men travel on towards Lake Kulutjarra where they find mingkurlpa (bush tobacco) before heading back towards Mulayaritjan and see the women again. They watch them cry and sing. One of them has lost her special dog which is white like Pintalypa (bush tomato before it is ripe). She is wailing for her dog and singing to her female companion: “Where are we going to look, where can he be?� as they walk this way and that, in circles looking.


LOT #74 Pulpurru Davies (1943- ) Kiwarr 76 x 51 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $600 - 800 PROVENANCE Kayili Artists, WA Cat No. 07-124 Aboriginal & Pacific Art, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Kayili Artists certificate of authenticity Pulpurru grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life with her family as they moved from waterhole to waterhole in their traditional country. They lived this way up until the 1960s, by which time they were one of the last groups of nomadic people in Australia. In this painting Pulpurru has depicted Kiwarr, a rockhole where her family used to dig for water. The water is sometimes very deep under the sand and all the family would have to help dig. One person would be down the hole, passing a wooden dish above their head to someone outside to throw the sand clear. Pulpurru has painted this country after a big rain and created a wash, funnelling water to a slight depression. Nearby, there are caves made by a ninu (bilby) digging for minga (ants). Other rockholes that are Pulpurru’s family water sites are also shown, including her birth place Yankaltjunku, Nyukurda and Mirra Mirra, where one of Pulpurru’s sons was born.


LOT #75 Shorty Jangala Robertson (c1930-2014) Ngapa Jukurrpa - Water Dreaming, 2004 122 x 46 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $1,500 - 2,000 PROVENANCE Warlukurlangu Artists, N.T Cat No. 1567/04 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Warlukurlangu Artists certificate of authenticity ILLUSTRATED Illustrated in The new McCulloch’s encyclopedia of Australian art, The Miegunyah Press. Childs, Emily McCulloch, McCulloch, Susan EXHIBITION HISTORY Rainmaker Rhythms, Cooee Art Gallery, August 2006 Ngapa Jukurrpa – Water Dreaming, Cooee Art Gallery, August 2009 Shorty Jangala Robertson was born at Chilla Well, a large soakage and claypan 290 kms north-west of Alice Springs. In this painting the artist has used straight lines to represent the ngawarra (flood waters) running through the landscape. The bars joining the long lines represent mangkurdu (clouds).Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. It travelled across the country, lightening striking the land. This storm met up with a storm from Wapurtali, to the west. It was picked up by a bird and carried further west until the load became too heavy for the bird to bear and it dropped that storm at Purlungyanu, where it created a giant soakage. At Puyurru, west of Yuendumu, the bird dug up a giant snake, Wanayarra, that carried water with it and created a giant lake, Jillyiumpa.


LOT #76 Patrick Tjungurrayi (c.1943-2018) Tjiparitjarra, west of Kintore, 2005 122 x 61 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat No. PT0511171 Private Collection, ACT This work depicts a site in the Western Desert associated with the mythological Tingari beings who travelled over vast stretches of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping particular sites. The Tingari Men were usually followed by Tingari Women and accompanied by novices and their travels and adventures are enshrined in a number of song cycles. These mythologies form part of the teachings of post initiatory youths as well as providing explanations for contemporary customs. Stories associated with the Tingari are of a secret sacred nature and only related in full to initiated men.


LOT #77 Ruby Williamson (c.1940- ) Honey Grevillea, 2005 101 x 101 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $600 - 900 PROVENANCE Minymaky Arts, SA Cat No. 102-05 Tjala Arts, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Ruby Tjangawa Williamson, a Pitjantjatjara artist, grew up with her family in the bush near a sacred site, Kata Ala, on the West Australian side of the border with South Australia. When Ruby was a teenager, she settled with her family at Ernabella, far to the east. Ruby grew up and went to school at the mission there until she got married and moved north to Areyonga, where her husband worked on the cattle station. In 1999, the senior women of Amaᚯa, including Ruby, founded Tjala Arts. Her first solo exhibitions were in Hobart in 2003 and 2005, and then in Melbourne in 2008. The colour and composition of her works are constantly innovative. Their appeal stems from their beauty and virtuosity. Her artwork is in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of South Australia, the Queensland Art Gallery, and the National Gallery of Australia.


LOT #78 Dinah Garadji (1921-2006) Designs - Landscape,1998 138 x 163.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $2,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Karen Brown Gallery, N.T Cat No. KB2105 Tjala Arts, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW accompanied by a Karen Brown certificate of authenticity This work depicts the artist’s grandmother’s country in a traditional manner. The site is near Borroloola Crossing. There is a freshwater lake between two steep hills and once you cross through the grasshopper plain to the north you reach the O’Keefe Valley.


LOT #79 Dinah Garadji (1921-2006) Designs of Country, 2000 95 x 127 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $2,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Karen Brown Gallery, NT Cat No. KB0050 Lawson Menzies, Lot 298, May 2007 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Dinah was a senior member of the Ngukurr Community. She was born at Milinybarrwarr, the old mission downstream from Ngukurr in the early 1920s. She did not begin painting until the early 1990s and continued to develop her style and use of bright acrylics to depict the country that she loved and knew so well. Dinah Garadji’s works stylistically combine structure and freedom. Her earliest paintings have more figurative elements and reference to particular locations while many of her later works are total abstractions. She referred to many of her paintings as ‘patterns and designs’. Within these works there is a strong sense of country and place. Having begin painting in her 70s Dinah derived great pleasure from the outpouring of her life experiences onto the canvas. As an artist she was increasingly experimental in her approach and style as she grew older.


LOT #80 Maida Stewart (c.1980- ) Bambatj Mirringgi Ta Wan, 2010 200 x 270 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Agathon Gallery, NSW Cat No. MSA0021020310 Tjala Aboriginal Art, NSW Cat No. TAA3021 The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Maida Stewart-Amukun, an Aboriginal health worker who started painting in 2007, was a finalist in the 25th Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards. Stewart-Amukun paints subjects like the rag-burning ceremony, a ritual conducted to link the family and someone who has passed on. Visual stories like these interest her because they will be the legacy that her son will come to inherit. She lives at Bulgul, a small indigenous community consisting of 10 to 15 simple houses spread along the coast north of the Daly River mouth. The residents still engage in traditional hunting and gathering activities each day including fishing, crabbing and gathering of native plants.


LOT #81 Marjorie and Stewart Morgan Two Bulgul Paintings, 2011 91 x 59 cm and 111 x 76 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $1,200 - 1,800 PROVENANCE Tjala Arts, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW Visit to Bulgul - Margorie Morgan Waterlily - Maida Stewart Michael and Barbie Chandler championed the work of artists from Bulgul, a small indigenous community consisting of 10 to 15 simple houses spread along the coast north of the Daly River mouth. The works created there intertwine the artist’s strong convictions in both their traditional Aboriginal heritage and their Christian faith. They speak of specific Aboriginal beliefs and traditions, but their message connects with the larger, urban and modern world, touching on poignant messages of humanity that resonate anywhere, in any language. Bulgul residents including the three Morgan sisters and Maida Stewart still engage in traditional hunting and gathering activities each day including fishing, crabbing and gathering of native plants.


LOT #82 Jean Burke (1945- ) Liru Ngura, 2005 117 x 205 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Agathon Gallery, NSW Cat No.106 Tjala Aboriginal Art, Sydney, NSW The Mike Chandler Collection, NSW


LOT #83

LOT #84

Artist Once Known A South East Australian Lil Lil Club, Darling River Region C19th Height: 51 cm carved hardwood

Artist Once Known An Early West Australian Spearthrower c.1890 Height: 67 cm carved hardwood

$1,000 - 1,500

$1,200 - 1,600

PROVENANCE Field Collected, late C19th Private Collection, Vic

PROVENANCE Field Collected, c.1890s Private Collection, Vic

of classic form, replete with stone adzed markings, old shiny patina. Mounted.

of classic curvilinear design, adzed wood, replete with incised zig zag design in parallel striations. The point to attach spear secured with kangaroo sinew. The bulbous handle covered in Spinifex resin for holding bone or stone knife blade.

For stylistically similar pieces see Lawson~Menzies Aboriginal Art, November 2006 Lot No. 47, and Mossgreen Auctions, Fine Early Aboriginal & Oceanic Art, Sydney August 2010, Lot No. 25

West Australian spear throwers, called ‘Woomeras’, are traditionally used to hunt larger game such as kangaroos.


LOT #85 Artist Once Known Bulbous headed club, South Eastern Australia c. late 19th century Height: 40 cm carved hardwood $1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Field Collected, late C19th Private Collection, Vic an axe shaped club, the head of bi-convex form, with gently curved handle and deep lustrous patina See Sotheby’s, Aboriginal Art, London, 21/09/2016, Lot No. 11 for a similar example

LOT #86 Artist Once Known West Australian Message Stick c.1940s Height: 41 cm carved hardwood $600 - 900 PROVENANCE Field Collected, c.1940 Private Collection, Vic of spatula shape, the front incised with incised undulating parallel striations representing water, the back featuring a number of roundels associated with water deliniated by parallel incisions. Red ochre patina.


LOT #88 LOT #87 Artist Once Known A Leangle - Sickle Club, c. mid to late 19th century Height: 58 cm carved hardwood $1,200 - 2,000 PROVENANCE Field Collected, 1900s Private Collation, Vic

Artist Once Known Two Fighting Clubs, North East Queensland, c.1900 Height: 62 and 71.5 cm carved in hardwood $2,500 - 3,500 PROVENANCE Field Collected, Qld Private collection, Vic

of classic hook shape with incised cross hatched design and nipple ended handle. Shiny old patina.

A bulbous headed club, its entire surface replete with fine striated fluting.and and Pineapple-headed club. Both of circular section with tapering shafts, roughly pecked at handle to form grip and dark glossy patina.

For a similar example see Deutscher & Hackett, Important Australian International and Aboriginal art, Melbourne November 2014 Lot No. 98

For similar examples from the Robert Stewart of Southwick collection sold through Christies, Paris in 2007 and Sotheby’s, Aboriginal Art, Sydney, November 2008, Lot No. 34


LOT #89 Samuel Lock (1822-1881) Corroboree South Australia, c.1840 22 x 31 cm : Frame 45 x 53 cm watercolor on paper $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Purchased by the current owner from antiquarian book seller in London, 2006 Private Collection, Vic Samuel Robert Lock was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, and became a self - taught miniature painter. He travelled to South Australia in 1839 when 17 years of age and was employed as artist in the Government Survey Office. He subsequently visited Tasmania & Pacific Islands. This small watercolour work depicting a corroboree is believed to have been painted when in his 20s near Victor Harbor/Lake Alexandrina south east of Adelaide. On his return to England, Lock worked as a photographic painter and later opened a Regent Street studio for miniature painting, converting Talbotypes into miniatures. He worked in London for the next 20 years where he exhibited at the Royal Academy during the years 1849 to 1854. He moved to Brighton in 1877, but died 4 years later after contracting Bronchitis in Italy while on a trip to Europe & Middle East.


LOT #90 Augustus Earle (1793-1838) Bungaree and his wife Goosberry, c.1820 - 1822 29 x 20.5 cm : Frame 47 x 38.5 cm hand coloured lithograph $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Printed by C. Hullmandel and published by J. Cross, London 1830 Purchased by the current owner from antiquarian book seller in London in 2012 Private Collection, Vic Augustus Earle was the most accomplished artist working in New South Wales in the 1820s, and although he only remained in the colony for just over three years, he quickly established himself as Sydney’s leading artist. He sometimes depicted his own adventures and included himself in his landscapes, but his main income came from portrait commissions from Sydney’s new wealth. Bungaree, from the Broken Bay area of New South Wales, was the most famous Indigenous Australian in the early nineteenth century. He gained his fame by assisting the colonists and by becoming a leader of the Indigenous people in Sydney until his death in 1830. As a reward for his services, various governors and officers gave Bungaree discarded uniforms and a cocked hat. In 1815 Governor Macquarie decorated Bungaree with a breastplate inscribed with the fictitious title ‘Chief of the Broken Bay Tribe’. In this portrait Earle has depicted Bungaree welcoming strangers to the colony, with colonial houses in the background. He cast Bungaree in the pose of a landowning gentleman, parodying colonial society and emphasising the tragedy of the Indigenous peoples’ loss of their native land. Beside him sits his wife Goosberry on one side and two bottles of drink nestled in a wicker basket on the other.* * From National Gallery of Australia collection notes


LOT #91 Augustus Earle (1793-1838) Natives of New South Wales in the Streets of Sydney, 1830 20.5 x 29 cm : Frame 38.5 x 47 cm hand coloured lithograph $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Printed by C. Hullmandel and published by J. Cross, London 1830 Purchased by the current owner from antiquarian book seller in London in 2012 Private Collection, Vic Earle lived in Sydney from 1825 to 1828, punctuated by a seven-month side journey to New Zealand in 1828. An inveterate traveller, he is noted for being ‘the first independent, professionally trained artist to visit each of the five continents and record his experiences. This lithograph is among the most significant images produced during the early colonial years of Sydney. It was actually printed later in London after Earle’s return and bears a number of minor alterations from the original.


detail

LOT #92 Artist Once Known NSW Parrying Shield, c 19th Height: 67 cm carved hardwood with incised design $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Field Collected, late C19th Private Collection, Vic of extended lozenge shape, with fine incised zig zag striated pattern in relief on front, solid wood handle and fine adzing on the back. Mounted.


LOT #93 Rusty Peters (c.1935- ) Rock Pigeon, 2007 90 x 120 cm natural earth pigments on canvas $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Our Land Gallery, WA Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Private Collection, NSW accompanied by an Our Land Gallery certificate of authenticity EXHIBITION HISTORY Passing On Tradition - New and Old Kimberley, June 2010, Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Black & White, December 2008, NG Art Gallery, NSW In this painting Peters depicts country about 20 miles from Springvale. All around this region, witchetty grubs come out from the ground and make their home in the white trees. The Dreamtime story tells how, a long time ago, a strong wind blew the witchetty grubs into the water and they were washed upstream. The artist relates: ‘Pretty dangerous country around here - all that water and sink holes and sometimes that wind comes up just like in the Dreamtime. A man has to be careful - don’t want to be like those witchetty grubs. Don’t want to be washed away. All around here are Rock Pigeons - they’re black and they come out at night time. They’re different from the grey ones you know - they’re around during the day. Everything in this part of the country is just different.’


LOT #94 Freddie Timms (1946-2017) Moonlight Valley - Bow River (diptych), 1994 150 x 90 cm each natural earth pigments on Belgian linen $12,000 - 16,000 PROVENANCE Narrangunny Art Traders, WA Cat No. N-0360-FT Private Collection, WA accompanied by a Narrangunny Art Traders certificate of authenticity In this image Freddie Timms has painted Bow River Cattle station with the old stock route from Moola Bulla to Wyndham passing through it. During his droving days, he regularly participated in the two week cattle drives along this route. On Bow River there were some ten cattle camps along the way and Damper Creek was but one of them. Also known as Moonlight Valley, it was the last camp before Durham Station, locally known as Doon Doon. The wild ‘scrub’ cattle that were mustered in the high ‘top’ country were held in yards there prior to the two week walk into the busy processing facility and port of Wyndham.


LOT #95 Rover Joolama Thomas (1926-1998) Two Ceremony Men, 1996 76 x 122 cm natural earth pigment on canvas $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Neil McLeod Fine Art Studio, Vic Kintolai Gallery, SA Cat No. KG-RT-96-733 Private Collection, NSW Acclaimed as a cultural leader and the seminal figure in establishing the East Kimberley School, Rover Thomas was actually born hundreds of kilometers to the south of Gidja country, on the fringes of the Western Desert. So remote was his birthplace that, had he not spent a lifetime of travel and finally settled in the north, he would most likely painted with closer aesthetic ties to the Pintupi painters of Kintore and Kiwirrkurra. The subject of this painting refers to ancestors of the Western Desert peoples whose influence spread into the Kimberley with the migrations of desert peoples to the area. These two spirit ancestors traversed the land and created sacred sites while giving people the law and culture. Their law continues to inform the initiations of young men to this day. The profound secret/sacred nature of their teachings belong to the esoteric realm of men’s law and are not discussed in public. In this painting minimal forms are juxtaposed and framed by the dot work along the edges. They appear as if we are looking at a painting within a painting. The Rothko-esque surface imbues this landscape with a sense of spirituality and sacredness; like seeing deeper into a place beyond words, as befits the sanctity of the ancestors themselves.


LOT #96 Set of 8 Kimberley Paintings on paper, 1997-2001 Goody Barratt - Cuminbah, 1997 Nancy Nodea - Irrulirrulji - Red Breasted Robin, 1999 Jack Britten - Looloom Country, 1997 Queenie McKenzie - Jesus Over Texas, 1999 (framed) Beerbie Mungnari - Badaba Billabong (Kildurk), 2001 Jack Britten - Booloo-booloon (Sandstone Country), 1997 (framed) Beerbie Mungnari - Thirsty Creek (Newrey Station), 1999 Henry Wambini - Cwali-wali Country, 1999 56 x 76 cm each natural earth pigments on paper $15,000 - 18,000 PROVENANCE Narrangunny Art Traders Private Collection, WA Maxine Taylor and Terry Brooks were the first appointed art coordinators in the community at Turkey Creek and established the Warmun art centre in the old post office building on the eastern side of the township. Here they worked with a group of 6 old men and a small number of female elders until the art centre was incorporated in 1998. Taylor and Brooks then established their own Narrangunny Art Traders in Wyndham. These works were all created for them between 1997 and 2001.


LOT #97 Cyril Brown, Lennard Walker, Fred Grant, Lawrence Pennington, Bill Anderson, & Roy Underwood Wati Kutjara | Spinifex Men’s Collaborative, 2005 133 x 187.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Spinifex Arts Project, WA Cat No. C227 Private Collection, Tas This collaborative painting is a cartographic map of country owned by the men of the Spinifex country. At the time it was painted each of the participants sat with their back to their own clan lands with the unstretched canvas lying on the ground between them. Each participant then painted their own country as they all worked toward the centre of the canvas. Each and every site depicted was named and sung to bring the country to life.


LOT #98 Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula (1942-2001) Bandicoot and Emu Dreamings, 1984 40.6 x 30.5 cm each synthetic polymer paint on canvas boards $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Corbally Stourton Contemporary Art Collection, UK Sotheby’s, Melbourne 29 June 1998 Leonard Joel, Aboriginal & Oceanic Art, July 2008, Lot No. 248 Private Collection, Vic Illustrated in Corbally Stourton P, 2000 Songlines and Dreamings II p.53. Turkey Tolson lived at Papunya during the early years of the painting movement. He joined Papunya Tula Artists as one of its youngest members, and painted his earliest artwork for Geoff Bardon in 1972. His unassuming leadership style, individual approach and quiet creative momentum informed an enduring career that lasted more than 30 years. These two small works have the following annotations verso: Bandicoot Dreaming at Tjiterchnga - The Bandicoot withheld the firestick and other travellers were unable to light a fire. The IceCold man lives at this site to this day, guarding the sacred objects in the caves. Emu Dreaming at Tipunga east of Ilpilli - The Emus travelled to the area, sometimes overland and sometimes beneath the ground. A range near Brown’s Bore with rounded hills is said to be their backs (Young Emu chicks have brown lines down their backs).


LOT #99 Simon Hogan (c.1930- ) Tjening, c.2010 91 x 121 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Spinifex Arts Project, WA Cat No. C979 Marshall Arts, SA Cat No. MA2352 Private Collection, ACT accompanied by a Spinifex Arts Project certificate of authenticity In this painting one of the most revered Spinifex elders, Simon Hogan, has illustrated his extensive knowledge of his country and its Dreaming. At this site a boy called Wirintji camped. Kanpa trees grow into the Tjening rockhole here and these trees relate to the boy’s special powers. Wirintji hunts a water snake that lives in the claypan at Warlyuwarlyutjara which can change form and go into Mulga trees. Wirintji knows the marks and signs of this snake and carefully follows it seeking his chance to capture and eat the snake. This is but a small part of a long narrative journey that connects important places throughout Spinifex Country. This particular story runs far to the west connecting all the sites toward Jigalong.


LOT #100 Christine Nakamarra Yukenbari (1977- ) Winpurpurla, 2004 60 x 44.5 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $900 - 1,200 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists Balgo Hills, WA Cat No. 1139/04 Private Collection, ACT accompanied by a Warlayirti Artists certificate of authenticity Christine Yukenbarri is the daughter of Lucy Yukenbarri and Helicopter Tjungurrayi, and the niece of Patrick Tjungurrayi. In this lovely small work she has painted some of her mother’s country south of Balgo, in the Great Sandy Desert. The country is called Winpurpurla after the soakwater depicted in the centre of this work. This soakwater is what the local tribe refers to as ‘living water’ as it is a permanent water source. Women often travel to Winpurpurla to collect a variety of seeds including lukarrari (which is ground to make damper) and kumpupatja, the wild bush tomato. The lines arcing through this painting represent the sandhills which dominate this country.


LOT #101 Lucy Yukenbarri (c.1934-2003) Tjintjula Soak, 1997 120 x 80 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $3,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, WA Cat No. 673/97 Songlines Aboriginal Art, San Francisco USA Cat No. TDB16 Bonhams, Aboriginal Art, Sydney, June 2011, Lot No. 133 Private Collection, NSW accompanied by a Warlayirti Artists certificate of authenticity This work depicts a central rockhole in the Great Sandy Desert. It is surrounded by sand dunes, rich in bush food, particularly Pura, a wild bush tomato. The artist has painted the fruits around the edges of the painting. Lucy Yukenbarri was a senior law woman with an irreplaceable knowledge of the ancient places, ceremonies and narratives.


LOT #102 Boxer Milner (c.1934-2008) Purkitji, 1996 75 x 50 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $1,600 - 2,400 PROVENANCE Warlayirti Artists, WA Cat No. 583/96 Hogarth Galleries, NSW Private Collection, NSW Private Collection, ACT Boxer Milner, a tall gentle old cattleman, began painting in the late 1980s. Growing in confidence as an artist through the 1990s, his paintings veered further and further away from conventional Balgo aesthetics as he went on to create ever more exciting and challenging compositions. In this small work Boxer depicts the flooded creeks and billabongs at Marduwarra near Pukitji, north of Balgo Hills.


LOT #103 Alkawari Dawson (c.1930-2010) Kataya Wati, 2006 147 x 92 cm synthetic polymer paint on canvas $2,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Irrunytju Art Centre, WA Cat No. IRR06097 Private Collection, ACT accompanied by a Irrunytju Art Centre certificate of authenticity Alkawari Dawson, a senior Ngaanyatjarra artist, was born in the bush at Tjun Tjun rockhole and lived a semi-nomadic life near Warburton in West Australia. After the death of her first husband Alkawari married Nyakul Dawson and moved to Irrunytju where she raised a family. Her paintings engage with the Kataya Wati Tjukurpa (Emu Man Dreaming) relating to the country of her birth. In this painting we see erratic emu tracks, writhing lines, sprays of dots and intense colours. They suggest snakes and mamus (devils or monsters) lurking in deep shadows, sparks from camp fires, shining dogs’ eyes, and the helter-skelter panic of baby emus.


LOT #104 Angelina Tjaduwa Woods (1954- ) Ilkawitja, 2009 91 x 109 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $2,500 - 3,500 PROVENANCE Spinifex Arts Project, WA Cat No. C825 Private Collection, ACT accompanied by a Spinifex Arts Project certificate of authenticity Tjaduwa (Angelina) was born in 1954 and was in her early 30s when she moved with her 5-year-old son to live amongst others near the Ilkurlka rockhole in 1987. Until that time she had been one of a small extended family group located near Wayara, to the north. This painting shows the country running east/west in a band through the northern section of Spinifex country where she was born.


LOT #105 Kathleen Donegan & Elaine Thomas Minyma Tjutaku, 2008 120 x 119 cm synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen $2,800 - 3,600 PROVENANCE Spinifex Arts Project, WA Cat No. C681 Private Collection, ACT accompanied by a Spinifex Arts Project certificate of authenticity In this work Elaine Thomas and Kathleen Donnigan, both senior and highly knowledgeable women from Spinifex country, have collaborated to tell part of the Seven Sisters Dreaming that passes through Elaine’s country. Kathleen, whose country Mamatu is further to the east has added details of Kapi Piti Kutjara Tjukurpa which passes through her own country. Both women are responsible for their own extremely remote birthplace and each of these is connected through the Seven Sisters songline.


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AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art AUCTION | Paddington Tuesday 4 June 2019 | 7pm Gala Preview | Paddington Thursday 30 May 2019 | 6-8pm Auction Viewing | Paddington 31 May - 4 June 2019, 10-5pm The Mike Chandler Estate Viewing | Bondi 28 May - 1 June 2019, 10-5pm The Mike Chandler Estate Special Event | Bondi 36 lots on view Saturday 1 June 2019 | 2-4pm

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AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art | 4 June 2019  

COOEE ART MARKETPLACE AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art | 4 June 2019

AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art | 4 June 2019  

COOEE ART MARKETPLACE AUCTION | Aboriginal Works of Art | 4 June 2019

Profile for cooeeart
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