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INTERNATIONAL insisted on paying some form of rent. These people believe that if you accept something for no return you are taking away your dignity. Rent often consists of goods such as a bag of cement every month. Football is big and people were able to tell me that Ronaldo was a ‘fake’ and that Ireland were no good. I agreed with them on both counts. A Methodist Minister, Rev Aidan Moffatt and his wife, lived beside our accommodation. When they heard that I worked in the Community Development Unit of DCRGA they brought me to visit projects they run. One was a drop-in facility for street children

Tanzanian activists enjoying Changing Ireland’

“(Everyone has) insisted on paying some form of rent. These people believe that if you accept something for no return you are taking away your dignity.” where they learn literacy and computer skills. They also run a school but they can only afford to pay one teacher’s salary. Because of this, they depend on volunteer teachers and have been very successful in attracting volunteer teachers from Europe and America during holiday time. All the parents I met strive to get an education for their children, they see it as an escape from the extreme poverty.

Community Development

On Community Development, I heard that “Training for Transformation” a course given by one of our CDP funded groups, Partners Tf T, is well known in Zambia. I got to visit the local Council Office and heard phrases I didn’t expect to hear in Zambia; such as that their Government’s aim is to tackle “not only the symptoms but also the causes of poverty in Zambia.” This approach acknowledges the multi-dimensional nature of chronic poverty - poverty that is long-term and inter-generational - and seeks to address HIV and AIDS, gender inequality and good governance. The word empowerment was also used many times at my meeting with Council

“A course given by one of our CDP funded groups, Partners TfT, is well known in Zambia.” officials. Hope for the future then! What I most remember about these people is their intelligence, the beautiful singing as they work, and their constant smile. “One pebble dropped in the sea of history can produce waves of grace that break on distant shores hundred of years later & thousands of miles away…God had breathed on the waters and made the ripples into waves.”

Tanzanian women reading about themselves in ‘Changing Ireland’ outside our office on October 12th. The women were here through Banulacht, the Limerick Women’s Network and Irish Aid, as part of an ongoing exchange programme.

Disability and the South

Around 10 per cent of the world’s population, or 650 million people, live with a disability. They are the world’s largest minority. The World Bank estimates that 20 per cent of the world’s poorest people have some kind of disability, and tend to be regarded in their own communities as the most disadvantaged.

John Moran – volunteer and civil servant John Moran, who – for some years – was with the Community Development Unit of the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, returned recently from a volunteer working visit to Zambia. He travelled with neighbours from his Co. Galway community to work for three weeks alongside Fr. Padraic Kelly from Cornamona in Kitwee, Zambia. Local builders and project workers christened him ‘Big John’ on his first day on the site and his impressions of Africa – based on material he had read and television reports – were turned upside down. John is now with the Department of Social Welfare.

31.

“Well-off Europeans” want action on poverty 73% of Europeans consider poverty to be a widespread problem in their country while 89% want urgent action by their government to tackle the problem. This call for action is not only held by those who are struggling to get by; 85% of respondents classified as well-off agree that poverty needs urgent government action. Nearly 80 million people, or 16% of the EU population, live below the poverty line. The information comes from a Eurobarometer survey carried out in September. More info: http://ec.europa.eu/public_ opinion

The words ‘silent’ and ‘listen’ have the same letters

Profile for CHANGING IRELAND

CHANGING IRELAND ISSUE 30/31  

Hot in Issue 30/31: bumper Double Issue Community Development Programme to end after 20 years/ 180 projects: facing wind-up in 2010/ New Pro...

CHANGING IRELAND ISSUE 30/31  

Hot in Issue 30/31: bumper Double Issue Community Development Programme to end after 20 years/ 180 projects: facing wind-up in 2010/ New Pro...

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