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Hans Edquist: In the past you've mentioned influences from rock to metal to drum and bass, but your sound encompasses such a wide variety of instrumentation that it becomes difficult classify. So, what genre is Pendulum? Rob Swire: Country western and jazz...but no, I don't think it really fits in a genre as such. It seems weird to a lot of people over here, the whole mixing of electronic music and rock and roll. I mean, in the UK it's quite common, rock bands do both all the time. But in the States we get asked the question by magazines all the time - "Are you electronic or rock?" Well...both. HE: Do your fans affect the growth and style of your music at all? Gareth McGrillen: It wouldn't be conscious if it did. In fact, I think we quite consciously try to not let the scope and size of our fan base affect it. Ultimately all the bigger fan base does is make us more free to do what we want. HE: I recall an interview in which you said “everything is subject to change" as far as writing style, reformatting songs for live remixing and performance goes. Does that statement still hold true? RS: Yeah, definitely. Sometimes so much so that I forget the lyrics. [Laughs]. HE: I feel that Pendulum's music is very much laced with theatrics - every song is, musically and lyrically, very moving, depicting a lot of human desperation, tension and release. Do you guys ever use audio or visual media while writing songs? GM: That's a very eloquent question. RS: And true. With In Silico [Pendulum's sophomore studio album] we actually made little videos to go along with what we thought each track looked like. GM: Sometimes when we're working on stuff and you listen and it sounds like it's about to be

in a scene where Keanu Reeves is about to cut an Eskimo's head off. RS: If it doesn't fit with the visual we try to modify it. So we have a visual going along with the track...and if it doesn't fit, if it doesn't look right, then we change the track. GM: And I guess that's how we achieve that cinematic kind of vibe. HE: Speaking of In Silico: Rob, you drafted the demos for that using Commodore 64 Nintendo emulators. In a nutshell, how the hell is that possible? RS: The main thing I used that for was the programming. GM: That tune style though, it was very Nintendo-ish. RS: Honestly, we actually went through twelve to fifteen versions of that before we actually got to the final. HE: How important are lyrics versus melody in the writing and recording process? Do they feed off of each other? And are the lyrics personal, abstract or a combination of the two? RS: They feed off each other now, but in the past we always did the song first and tried to get the vibe right for that and then the lyrics would come in at the end. But I think now we're trying to mix the two from the ground up from the beginning. HE: Granite is one of the most epic tracks I've ever heard. In consideration of the lyrics/video, what are your beliefs regarding extra terrestrials? RS: That track is really more about a sense of invasion than UFOs specifically, but the guys who did the video for it really took the rein on that. But originally it was more about a sense of invasion ... it was written around the time that a lot of shit was changing - you know, with our personal privacy and stuff like that.

Profile for Burner Magazine

Burner Magazine: The MUSIC Issue  

On March 1, 2011, Burner Magazine is excited to unveil Burner 03: The Music Issue, with editorials and features of Yoko Ono, Saul Williams,...

Burner Magazine: The MUSIC Issue  

On March 1, 2011, Burner Magazine is excited to unveil Burner 03: The Music Issue, with editorials and features of Yoko Ono, Saul Williams,...

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