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1.“Fantastic_Voyage” David_Bowie 2.“nightswimming” rem 3.“let_down” radiohead 4.“your_ex-lover is_dead” stars

s g n o s 5 at th ire insp

jian

5.“smile” nat_king_cole and stopped writing for awhile. I totally relate to that. It’s usually a way of exercising emotions that are shitty. You know, my job hosting Q, doing interviews, writing articles, doing speaking gigs, they’re all creative, but it’s not the same. You don’t break up with someone and do your radio show to work it out! LS: What musical artist was most moving to interview? JG: Sonny Rollins, the jazz saxophonist. I love interviewing people in their 70s or 80s, because there’s no more bullshit. They’ve had so much happen in their lives they’re ready to say it like it is or tell great stories. Sonny was a bit of a Yoda. He’s very spiritual, very, very thoughtful, very aware of the creative process. Leonard Cohen. These guys are like sages. With Leonard Cohen or Sonny Rollins, I felt I could ask anything. I’m asking questions like, are you freaked out about death?! They’re not just questions I’m asking as an interviewer. I’ve got this chance with this guy who is just so powerful and thoughtful and sage and inspiring. LS: Do you feel creatively influenced by your Persian roots? JG: I’d say yes. As a first generation Canadian, I can’t escape or detach or be foolish enough to think I’m not deeply involved in my Eastern roots. I’m a Western guy, but my family values, some of the social conventions, my personal habits are Eastern, are Iranian. It’s a very, very creative culture, some of the most romantic poetry, influential from dance to literature to ceramics, and a real appreciation for the role of expression, the subtlety of expression, the power and beauty of words. Whether I am or I’m not influenced by my Persian roots, I’d like to think I

am because I have such great passion for that Iranian legacy of art and creativity. LS: Who is your dream musician to interview? JG: I love Bowie. He’s always been ahead of his time. He’s never been satisfied, he’s never rested on his Bowie laurels, even if it’s led him to some weird places, it’s been this constant evolution, pushing, pushing. He’s been remarkably influential and he’s a super smart and interesting man…We haven’t tried booking him on Q. It’s probably because if I interviewed Bowie, where would I go from there? My joke is it’s going to be on my deathbed. It’s like sleeping with your dream date. Where do you go from there? Everything’s going to be crap after that. Or it’s crap sex. What if I interview Bowie and he’s horrible and he’s nasty or something? Then what? Then I’m crushed. It’s not worth it, I tell you it’s not worth it! LS: What's next for you as Jian Ghomeshi, human being at large? JG: I’ve been working on a book. But it’s really hard. I’ve got my daily show, my production company managing Lights and others, speaking gigs. I really want to take Q to the next level. I fastidiously prep for everything I do, so I pull these long hours. I’m not sure exactly where I’m supposed to finish the book in there, but that would be something I’d like to do in the next year or two. I’ve actually got several books in my head. One deals with popular culture and social change. Another is called Your Neighbour Is A Terrorist. It’s about how brown people, like Iranians, can assimilate so Westerners start to believe that we’re actually not terrorists. So we can fool them. It’s kind of a How To guide.

Profile for Burner Magazine

Burner Magazine: The MUSIC Issue  

On March 1, 2011, Burner Magazine is excited to unveil Burner 03: The Music Issue, with editorials and features of Yoko Ono, Saul Williams,...

Burner Magazine: The MUSIC Issue  

On March 1, 2011, Burner Magazine is excited to unveil Burner 03: The Music Issue, with editorials and features of Yoko Ono, Saul Williams,...

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