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New name, same great content!


contents February/March 2018

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TRAVEL

Auckland

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ARTIST

Peter J. Santos

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COLUMN

Sustainable resolutions

CALENDAR

Events in February and March

BUSINESS

Fat Boy Slim food truck

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22

ESSENCE OF GUAM

Disaster relief organizations

HEALTH

Keep heart healthy

DINING

Jamaican Grill Chef Clay

OUT & ABOUT

Readers’ and event photos

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Buenas is the new name of Guam’s leading lifestyle magazine and reflects the popularity of the magazine among all who live on-island or who visit Guam! The magazine will continue to bring its readers lively features on the lifestyle of Guam — what is happening throughout the island, who is doing something fun or special and what’s coming up on the Guam calendar.

Connect with us! About the cover: Guam residents wave “Buenas!”

www.buenasguam.com


Buenas February/March

PUBLISHER Maureen N. Maratita BUSINESS EDITOR Meghan Hickey LIFESTYLE EDITOR Lara O. Neuman REPORTERS Nicole B. Benavente Wayne Chargualaf CREATIVE DEPT. SUPERVISOR Vikki Fong DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Keisha Gozum

2018

GENERAL SALES MANAGER Ken Dueñas ADMINISTRATION Janice Castro Carmelita McClellan Jenalyn Aguon MANAGING DIRECTOR Marcos W. Fong

Glimpses of Guam Inc. Mission Statement: To connect people with information.

Glimpses Publications include: Marianas Business Journal • MBJ Life • Guam Business Magazine • Buenas Magazine • Beach Road Magazine

Buenas February/March 2018 • Entire contents copyrighted 2018 by Glimpses of Guam, Inc. Buenas is published bi-monthly by Glimpses of Guam, Inc., 161 US Army Juan C. Fejeran St., Barrigada Heights, GU 96913. Telephone: (671) 649-0883, Fax: (671) 649-8883, Email: lifestyleeditor@glimpsesofguam.com • All rights reserved. No material may be printed in part or in whole without written permission from the publisher.

Buenas Readers! Thank you for your support of R&R Pacific — whether you pick up the magazine at one of our distribution points, or read it online. The magazine began life as a publication for our military friends in Guam. In recent years, due to its wonderful stories, it has become popular throughout our island and beyond and we have increased the number of places you can find it — from North to South. The magazine is read by all who live on our island, or who visit Guam. From this issue, we have changed the name of the magazine to Buenas to better reflect its wide and varied readership. What you love about the magazine will not change. But we will continue to bring you many features on the lifestyle of Guam — what is happening throughout the island, who is doing something fun or special and what’s coming up on the Guam calendar. And of course, what’s new for you to consider for entertainment, shopping, sports and after work. As usual, we love hearing from you and knowing that you enjoy the magazine! Thanks for reading and — enjoy! From Buenas Staff


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Travel///Auckland

Auckland

City of sails in a land of natural wonders For a vacation destination with great food, shopping and stunning nature attractions, look no further than Auckland, New Zealand.

By Nicole B. Benavente

S

ituated between two harbors on the North Island, Auckland offers all the thrills of an urban center in one of the most beautiful countries in the world. Known for its outstanding architecture, natural environment quality and recreational opportunities, it is ranked as the third-highest city in the world for quality of life, according to Mercer’s 19th Quality of Living Survey in 2017. From Auckland Airport, a 30-minute drive or a 1-hour bus ride will get you to Auckland Central where you’ll be able to find the type of accommodation to suit your budget — from economical to five-star. Travelers from Guam have the option to rent a car with a Guam driver’s license, although they should be aware that New Zealanders drive on the left side of the road and the driver’s seat is on the right side of cars. If you’d prefer not to take up that challenge, taxis and busses are accessible from the airport and throughout the downtown area. In the summer months — November to April — Auckland is a pleasant city to explore on foot in comfortable 60- to 75-degree weather. You’ll see why Auckland is called the City of Sails as you make your way to the Auckland Waterfront. Small sailboats and grand yachts navigating into and out of the harbor fill the skyline with white canvas. By the waterfront, pedestrians can engage in events and activities — such as outdoor movies in the summertime — dine and relax in one of many restaurants and bars or browse local shops. A 15-minute walk from the water’s edge in Wynyard Quarter is the Auckland Fish Market. The market hosts a variety of seafood retailers, a food market, restaurant, café and deli where you’ll find the freshest fish in the city. Here is where visitors should try fish and chips — a New Zealand staple. For some retail therapy, head to the city’s main high street The Auckland Waterfront provides spectacular views of the cityscape and anchored vessels.

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Travel///Auckland

— Queen Street. You’ll be able to delve into more restaurants, stop into a café or pub and catch a show in one of the nearby theaters. One of the best things visitors can do is step outside the city to experience the natural wonders of New Zealand. A natural escape right off the coast of Auckland is a 30-minute ferry ride to Waiheke Island — home to beautiful vineyards, beaches and stunning views. Take a hike, relax on the beach, tour world-class vineyards or zipline through the forest. Two stunning attractions that shouldn’t be missed are the Waitomo Glowworm Caves and Hobbiton — the movie set of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit films. Both are a two-hour drive south of Auckland. You can rent a car or avail yourself of several tour packages that provide transportation from Auckland to one or both attractions. The Waitomo Glowworm Caves are home to a glowworm species only found in New Zealand. Tourists take a kayak tour to observe the glowing creatures that light up the cave walls and ceilings like blue stars in the night sky. Afterward, you can explore the stunning landscape and rolling hills of Hobbiton that Lord of the Rings enthusiasts will recognize as Middle Earth. Take a look in Bag End, walk among the hobbit holes and enjoy a cider at the Green Dragon Inn. Visitors who are not fans of The Hobbit films can equally enjoy the 1,250-acre sheep farm that Hobbiton is situated in as well as views of the Kaimai Ranges.

AUCKLAND Getting there from Guam: More than 17 hours via Manila, Seoul or another Asian hub Must do: Waiheke Island or Waitomo Glowworm Caves Visa: U.S. passport holders can visit for up to three months without a visa. Passport must be valid for at least three months beyond the planned date of departure from New Zealand. Languages spoken: English is the official and predominant language in New Zealand, followed by Māori — the name of the indigenous people and language of New Zealand. Best time to visit: November – April Currency and exchange rate: NZ$1 = US$0.71

(From top) The walking tour of Hobbiton concludes with drinks at the Green Dragon Inn; the Waitomo Glowworm Caves contain a glowworm species only found in New Zealand; the Auckland Fish Market brings fresh seafood straight from the fishermen’s boats to your table. Stop by the market deli during lunchtime for fish and chips.

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Artist///Peter J. Santos

A dream hobby Bringing wishes to life

Peter J. Santos of SPJ Crafts & Engraving started woodworking in the seventh grade at Hamilton Junior High School in Long Beach, Calif.

By Lara O. Neuman Photos courtesy of SPJ Crafts & Engraving

“I

was late registering for classes and woodshop and typing were the only electives left,” Santos says. “I took to woodworking like a duck to water and haven’t looked back since. I took shop class every year until I graduated.” He liked working with wood so much that he started creating things for around the house, like benches and shelves, when he moved to Guam in 1993 to 2001. In 2001, he enlisted in the U.S. Army on active duty and was stationed in Mannheim, Germany. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation facility in Germany had a woodshop that could be used for a small fee. “I made stuff again just for the house. Friends saw what I made and requested I make them stuff so I did, just as gifts. Then other people started asking to order things for themselves,” Santos says. In 2003, he deployed to Afghanistan and didn’t have much furniture there. “We had an unlimited supply of wood and hardware, so I made tons of stuff for the soldiers in my unit,” he says. In 2006, he moved to Washington state and

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Artist///Peter J. Santos

found that people there also wanted things made. So Santos got a business license in 2007 and started buying equipment. “I started vending at events in California, Washington, Las Vegas and Texas. It was tremendously successful,” he says. Santos makes various woodcrafts — from small necklace pendants to full sets of tables and chairs and many things in between. “Woodworkers are problem solvers. We have to be creative and figure out how to achieve the end product. I also really admire the natural beauty of wood. I never cease to be amazed at how beautiful wood can be. But most of all, I enjoy working with my hands and I get tremendous gratification and satisfaction from making something that people appreciate and enjoy,” Santos says. Although he prefers working with wood, Santos has also worked with metal and glass as well. He sources material from wherever he can find them. “I truly love salvaged materials but that’s not always available, so I get materials from the big box stores or specialty suppliers,” he says. Santos has a full shop, and he can also mill wood from a tree to a finished product. He has heavyduty equipment including band saws, a cabinet table saw, chop saw, belt sanders, disc sanders, drum sanders, planers, grinders, wood lathes, drill presses, router tables and shapers, but his most prized piece of equipment is his laser engraver. “I make a party caddy that people just seem to really love. My kåmyu would be the second [popular product]. However, people also love the name plaques and the rear-view mirror ornaments I make,” Santos says. “What makes my items special is that I infuse the Chamoru culture into everything I do.” Santos takes custom orders and has made items for Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Japan, Korea, Yap, Marshall Islands, Chuuk, Germany, Italy, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Samoa, Mexico and many U.S. states. “I enjoy a challenge, but unfortunately the biggest challenge for me now is having time to do projects, because I am also very social and really love spending time with family and friends.” He also juggles work as a prosecutor at the Office of the Attorney General of Guam and serves in the U.S. Army Reserve. “I have a website that has most of the work I have done, which is pretty extensive. Anyone can go to the website and look at what there is and make a special request. Many of those items were customers’ unique requests,” Santos says. “My motto is the woodworker’s motto — if you can dream it, we can make it.” For more information, visit www.spjcrafts.com. 9


Column///Sustainable resolutions

Reduce your 2018 carbon footprint while getting healthy By Else Demeulenaere and Lieve Dierckx

The new year is here. Energy, hope and happiness are filling the air and resolutions are being made. Changes in food choices, becoming more active, saving more and spending less seem to be the most popular topics. Does this sound familiar to you? Then you know how fast dedication and motivation dwindle down. So how can these resolutions change your lifestyle instead of being a short-lived hype? We decided to link sustainable solutions to these popular ideas. They will not only benefit you, but also our island and our planet, as everything is connected. Often sustainable actions on a personal level might seem small, but they can make a big difference if you spark others’ interests. Make a pledge to yourself because having pride in being a sustainable person is very rewarding. 10

Eat less meat and more local fruits, vegetables and eggs One way to be healthier and sustainable is to eat less meat. Being a vegetarian on Guam can be quite challenging, so here is an easy way to reduce your meat intake. Start off with one day a week, for example, the “Meatless Monday” movement where participants consume only plant-based foods on Mondays as a start. Once you get the hang of it, invite others to have meatless meals with you and your family. Some of the negative impacts that meat production has on our environment are greenhouse gas emissions, extensive use of water resources, deforestation for both raising animals like cattle and growing additional crops needed to feed livestock. Meat provide us with protein; vegetables do too, and more efficiently. Beans, leaves from the Miracle Tree, kale and quinoa are a few examples. If you choose eggs, buy them locally. Get active and connect with nature If gym access isn’t available, go for a swim at any of our beautiful beaches, or for an early morning or sunset run or a hike. A hike


Section///Spotlight

will give a good leg workout, clear your mind and can be very enjoyable. If there is space in your yard, start a vegetable garden. Working in your garden not only provides you with free produce, but can be very therapeutic to destress on weekends or after a busy day at work. Skip fast fashion — get organized Going to a party? Nothing to wear? Try to combine clothes in a new way. Sometimes adding a small accessory might change your look to a more fashionable one. Buy jewelry from local artists. This little detail will make you shine. Keep track of the number of pieces of clothing you buy over the year and make sure when you choose a new item, this is the piece you want. A good rule is: If you see something you like, go back to buy it only if you still want it after three days. Buy quality over quantity. Check if the clothing brands maintain ethical and green policies. Swap clothes with friends, family and neighbors. Organize your clothes, don’t overload your shelves, which will it make easier in the morning to get ready.

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Events calendar

WHAT’S NEXT FEB. 3

FEB. 17 AND 18

Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Location: Guam National Wildlife Refuge Volunteer applications must be filled out and are available at www.fws.gov/volunteers/resources. html. Call 355-5096 for more information.

Events include cooking contests, craft sales, live entertainment, sports activities and a hot pepper eating competition. Time: 2 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Sunday. The 65K Pika Bike Race will be held at 6 a.m. on Saturday. Location: Krammer Beach, Tinian For more information, contact the Marianas Visitors Authority Tinian office at (670) 433-9365.

Ritidian Beach Cleanup

FEB. 3

LOL Comedy Series: Josh Blue live on Guam Time: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Location: Dusit Thani Guam Resort Tickets: $35 for general; $45 for table seating; $70 for VIP. Tickets are available at 76/Circle K and VIP tickets are only available at Mosa’s. Online tickets are available at www.eventbrite. com/e/lol-comedy-series-with-josh-bluetickets-41625543120.

FEB. 10

Annual Valentine’s Day Bazaar

14th Annual Tinian Hot Pepper Festival

FEB. 24

Battle Showcase 2018 Time: 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Location: Guam International Raceway, Yigo Participant registration: $50-$100 available at Proline in Harmon or online at events.com/r/ en_US/registration/battle-showcase-2018vehicle-registration-february-130584. General admission: $10 pre-sale online or retail; $15 at the gate.

Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Elk’s Lodge, Agana Heights Free admission. For more information or reservations for vendors, call Ann Cruz at 6895711.

MARCH 3

FEB. 11

MARCH 4

Time: 2 p.m. Location: Hyatt Regency Guam For more information and ticket prices call 477-1959 or email guamsymphonysociety@ gmail.com.

Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: Hotel Nikko Guam Tasi Room Free admission

Guam Symphony Society Young Artists Awards Concert

FEB. 10

Guam Women’s Club 64th Mardi Gras “Black & White Masquerade Ball” Time: 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Location: Hyatt Regency Guam Grand Ballroom Price: $75; For more information or tickets, contact Donna Kloppenburg at 777-2055 or dwkongum@ite.net or Sue Biolchino at 6892400 or sbiolchino@yahoo.com.

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Dr. Seuss’ 133rd Birthday Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Guam Public Library

20th Annual Japan Club of Guam Arts & Crafts Fair

MARCH 13

University of Guam Charter Day Time: 9 a.m. Location: University of Guam campus For more information and a schedule of events visit www.uog.edu.

MARCH 17-18

Guam Symphony Society Romantic Roundup Location: University of Guam Fine Arts Theater The concert will feature a guest cellist from the University of Iowa. For more information and ticket prices, call 477-1959 or email guamsymphonysociety@gmail.com.

MARCH 17

Pay-Less Kick the Fat 5K Run/Walk and Community Fair Showtime: 5 a.m. Race starts: 6 a.m. Location: Chamorro Village, Hagåtña Register: $10 before March 15; $15 at packet pickup on March 17. Register from admin. chronotrack.com/r/32848.

MARCH 25

Guam Running Club 47th Guam Marathon Showtime: 3 a.m. Race starts: 4 a.m. Start location: University of Guam Calvo Field House Registration: $65 per person for solo or $15 per person for ekiden relay. Register at Hornet Sporting Goods or contact the Guam Running Club at guahanrunningclub@gmail.com.

MARCH 25

Paddles Against Cancer Show time: 8 a.m. Team competition: 10 a.m. Registration: $600 per team

MARCH 26

Guam Running Club Awards Banquet and Runner of the Year 2018 Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Hyatt Regency Guam Banquet: Free to all solo marathon entrants. For others, $35 per adult and $16 per child before March 22; $38 per adult and $18 per child at door. Email guahanrunningclub@gmail. com to volunteer.


Events calendar

FEBRUARY sun

mon

tue

wed

thu 1

fri 2

MOVIES • Winchester • The Cage Fighter

sat 3

• Ritidian Beach Cleanup • Boonie Stomp: Nimitz Caves • LOL Comedy Series: Josh Blue live on Guam

4

5

6

7

8

9

MOVIES • Fifty Shades Freed • Peter Rabbit • The 15:17 to Paris

10

• Yigo Village Fiesta • Annual Valentine’s Day Bazaar • Guam Women’s Club 64th Mardi Gras “Black & White Masquerade Ball”

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12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

• Guam Symphony Society Young Artists Awards Concert

• 14th Annual Tinian Hot Pepper Festival

25

26

27

MOVIES • Black Panther • Early Man • Samson • The Party

MOVIES • Annihilation • Game Night • Beast of Burden

• 14th Annual Tinian Hot Pepper Festival

• Boonie Stomp: Attilong Acho • Battle Showcase 2018

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FEATURED MOVIE Feb. 10

The Party Directed by Sally Potter Starring Timothy Spall, Kristin Scott Thomas, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy and Bruno Ganz

Janet hosts an intimate gathering of friends in her London home to celebrate her political ascension. After her acerbic best friend and others arrive, some with dramatic news to share, an announcement by Janet’s husband provokes a series of revelations. As the sophisticated soiree starts to unravel, a night that began with champagne soon ends up with arguments, shouting and a pointed gun. (Official synopsis from Picturehouse Cinemas.)

*Event times and dates may change without notice.

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Events calendar

MARCH sun

mon

tue

wed

thu 1

4 • 20th Annual Japan Club of Guam Arts & Crafts Fair

11

5

• Guam Symphony Society Romantic Roundup

25 • Guam Running Club 47th Guam Marathon • 76/Circle K Paddles Against Cancer

19

• Ritidian Beach Cleanup

10

13

14

15

16

17

MOVIES • A Wrinkle in Time • The Strangers: Prey at Night • Gringo

MOVIES • Tomb Raider • Love, Simon • I Can Only Imagine

• Pay-Less Kick the Fat 5K Run/Walk and Community Fair • Guam Symphony Society Romantic Roundup

20

21

22

23

24

27

28

29

30

31

FEATURED MOVIE March 16

Tomb Raider Directed by Roar Uthaug Starring Alicia Vikander, Hannah John-Kamen, Walton Goggins, Daniel Wu and Kristin Scott Thomas

Lara Croft is the fiercely independent daughter of an eccentric adventurer who vanished years earlier. Hoping to solve the mystery of her father’s disappearance, Croft embarks on a perilous journey to his last-known destination — a fabled tomb on a mythical island that might be somewhere off the coast of Japan. The stakes couldn’t be higher as Lara must rely on her sharp mind, blind faith and stubborn spirit to venture into the unknown. (Official synopsis from Warner Bros.)

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• Dr. Seuss’ 133rd Birthday

9

• Guam Running Club Awards Banquet and Runner of the Year 2018

*Event times and dates may change without notice.

3

8

• St. Joseph Fiesta

26

MOVIES • Red Sparrow • Alpha • Death Wish

7

• University of Guam Charter Day

18

2

sat

6

• Guam History and Chamorro Heritage Day

12

fri

MOVIES • Sherlock Gnomes • Pacific Rim: Uprising

MOVIES • Ready Player One


Business///Foodtruck

Photo by Wayne Chargualaf

Fat Boy Slim

Healthy, happy and convenient menu brings growth to business By Wayne Charfualaf

F

at Boy Slim, a food truck located across from the U.S. District Court of Guam in Anigua, was created as a complementary business to HÅTSA Guam, a fitness program also owned by Fat Boy Slim Owner and Operating Manager, Ray P. Chargualaf Jr. Housed in a 200-square foot, custom-built trailer, Fat Boy Slim opened its doors in August to provide a convenient, healthy food option for people dedicated to fitness. “Exercise is only one portion of living a healthy and active lifestyle,” Chargualaf said. “Why not create an option that eliminates the guesswork from eating healthy the way I do with my fitness program?” Born and raised in Guam, Chargualaf earned a bachelor’s in kinesiology and physical education and a master’s in sports education and leadership from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He then opened two businesses in Las Vegas that he continues to own, Revolution-Fitness Evolved and Amped Fit Camp. After returning to Guam with his family so that his daughter can

experience an island upbringing, Chargualaf decided to start HÅTSA Guam in August 2016. As HÅTSA Guam grew in popularity, opening Fat Boy Slim seemed a logical next step. “A lot of successful businesses think big, but start small,” Chargualaf says. “I had never been in the food industry, so I wanted to minimize my risk. What option did I have where I can provide the service I want while minimizing fixed costs and still have an air of legitimacy? A food truck.” Although Chargualaf was warned about the difficulties of the food industry, he didn’t let that dissuade him. “I have no culinary experience or training, but I didn’t let that discourage me. A lot of people think as long as you have expertise, you can run a successful business. But that’s one of the biggest mistakes out there,” Chargualaf says, citing this as a mistake he had made himself in an early business venture. “If you have expertise but no business plan CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

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Business///Foodtruck

and no standard operating procedures, then your chances of success are fifty-fifty. If you have no expertise, but you have a business plan and standard operating procedures, then you can apply those things to a field you don’t have expertise in. You can just research. I’m not the smartest or most technical guy in the world, but I have 100% common sense, and I can think like a customer.” With an initial $85,000 investment — $60,000 of which went to the trailer itself, which was built by Tamuning-based Speedway Machine Shop from an original design by Chargualaf — Chargualaf and his seven employees jumped in to the food truck business and learned lessons that can only be taught by experience. Unexpected permitting issues cropped up even though they had developed a checklist and had been certain they had been in compliance, ultimately doubling their initial budget for permitting and compliance and pushing their opening back by about three months. Lacking experience in the industry, for the first three weeks they worked extremely long hours before they were able to refine their processes and build enough buzz that they could reduce their hours of operation while still maintaining — and even increasing — business volume. Even learning to maneuver the trailer was a challenge. But with self-confidence born from both a positive mindset and prior business experience, Chargualaf and his crew were able to overcome these hurdles. “Now we’re reaping the benefits of all that tossing and turning, wondering when things were going to go our way,” Chargualaf says. “Now it’s paying off.” As proud as he is of Fat Boy Slim’s menu — which is divided into two groups of offerings, “Healthy,” which are health-focused, and “Happy,” which focus on flavor for those times when customers want to indulge — Chargualaf believes one of the biggest keys to his food truck’s success is the devotion to pleasing the customer and efficiency. Chargualaf and his crew have worked hard to develop standard operating procedures in order to provide healthy, sit-down restaurant quality food with a speed and price approaching fast food. Chargualaf guarantees a seven-minute turn-around from a customer ordering to receiving their food. “Time is money, and you worked hard for that dollar,” Chargualaf says. “Let’s see that dollar go a long way.” With a price range that hovers around $10 per item, health-conscious customers can order “Healthy” items such as the popular “Pollo Escobar” chicken bowl, “Wiz Kha-LEAF-A” veggie sandwich or “Fat Boy Slim Keto Bowl”, which features sautéed vegetables, chicken and an egg. “Happy” offerings include the “School Boy Que” BBQ chicken, “2Pork Shakur” chorizos pak pak and “Kanye Mess” hamburger steak with gravy. Fat Boy Slim even has “Healthy” and “Happy” dessert options in the form of the “Banana McKnight” banana dark chocolate muffin and “Cardi B.C.P.” banana cream pie, respectively. Even as Fat Boy Slim’s success and reputation have grown, Chargualaf continues to look to the next step. After noticing that most local food businesses focus on lunch and dinner, he decided to start offering breakfast options. Fat Boy Slim’s hours have expanded in January to 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. It’s this combination of thinking like the customer, looking for new opportunities and applying systems that Chargualaf credits with the success of Fat Boy Slim. “Everybody warned me about the food industry,” Chargualaf says. “Once we figured out a system and ironed out all the wrinkles, it’s smooth sailing now.” 16

Photos courtesy of Fat Boy Slim


Special products

HIS HERS FAMILY


Essence of Guam///Disaster relief organizations

Essence of Guam Disaster relief organizations

A Buenas Guam Magazine series featuring nonprofit charitable organizations on Guam and how you can contribute

The American Red Cross Guam Chapter Mission: To provide relief to victims of disasters and help people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies. What they do: The Guam Chapter of the American Red Cross responds to disasters in partnership with businesses and private individuals that support the organization. CEO: Chita A. Blaise Phone: 472-6217 Email: chita.blaise@redcross.org Fundraising events: Golf Classic; Guam Business Magazine Executive of the Year, Red Ball Website: redcross.org/local/guam/hagatna Volunteer: Students from various private and public schools on island volunteer to the chapter as part of their community service curriculum. The youth contribute two to three hours every day as they learn administrative tasks, train on first aid and CPR, volunteer at the naval hospital and occasionally serve as goodwill ambassadors of the Red Cross Chapter. A volunteer form is available on the website for any student and non-student interested volunteers. Send donations to: Guam Chapter of the American Red Cross Building 285 Route 4, Hagåtña, GU 96910

Mission: To deliver medical, human services and development assistance throughout the Pacific region. What they do: Ayuda Foundation is a humanitarian response organization to regional disasters and needs. The primary program of the Ayuda Foundation is disaster responding, or medical missions. The program is dedicated to the movement of medical supplies, food, water and any items highly requested in times of need, such as typhoon/cyclones, earthquakes or tsunamis. The organization also has three major programs: • Island Girl Power, a prevention and empowerment program aimed at Guam’s female youth to make healthy lifestyle choices by encouraging positive self esteem via mentors and role models, inspiring cultural and community pride. • Prutehi I Tano yan I Tasi, or www.GuamServiceLearning.com, which provides service learning opportunities to students. • Wings for Life utilizes donated frequent flyer miles with United Airlines for airfare of medically indigent patients. Executive Director: Carlotta Leon Guerrero Phone: 473-3003 Email: AyudaMicronesia@gmail.com Website: ayudamicronesia.org Address: E. Marine Corps Drive, Hagåtña, GU 96910 Volunteer or intern: Call or email to inquire. Donate: A donation link is available through its website. 21


Health///Heart health

Keep heart healthy F

ebruary is American Heart Month since 1964, when it was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. At that time, more than half the deaths in the United States were caused by cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, remains the leading global cause of death with more than 17.3 million deaths each ear, according to the American Heart Association. The best way to prevent heart disease is with a healthy lifestyle. Here are some suggestions to keeping your heart healthy. Be smoke-free Smoking affects the vessels that supply blood to your heart and other parts of your body. It reduces the amount of oxygen in your blood and damages blood vessel walls. Smoking also increases the stiffness of the blood vessels, making it harder for them to expand and contract as needed. These changes to the arteries can cause a heart attack, stroke or angina. Smokers not only have more heart attacks, strokes and angina than non-smokers, but also at a much younger age. Smoking increases the risk of heart attack by two times, stroke by three times, angina by 20 times and peripheral arterial disease by five times, according to The Heart Foundation. Smokers are four times more 22

likely to die of heart disease and three times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death. Just because you don’t smoke, doesn’t mean you’re necessarily low-risk. Second-hand smoke can cause heart disease in non-smokers. Manage your blood pressure and blood cholesterol High blood pressure over a long period of time is called hypertension. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to a heart attack or stroke and may also affect your kidneys. A blood pressure reading under 120/80/mmHG is considered optimal. Readings over 120/80mmHG and up to 139/89mmHG are in the normal to high normal range. It is very important to get your blood pressure checked regularly. High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease. Cholesterol is a fatty substance that is carried around the body in the blood. Over time, a buildup causes hardening of the arteries, which can cause chest pain and/or a heart attack. You can improve cholesterol with medications, but also by choosing healthier fats and eliminate trans fats. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids like salmon, mackerel, herring, walnuts, almonds and ground flaxseeds.


Health///Heart health

Be physically active Exercise is important to preventing not only heart disease, but many other conditions. To improve overall cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes per week of vigorous exercise, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity. Thirty minutes a day, five times a week is an easy goal to remember. For people who would benefit from lowering their blood pressure or cholesterol levels, the recommendation is for 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity three to four times a week to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke. Regular physical activity can also help you maintain your weight or keep off weight that you lose. Having a healthy body weight lowers your risk of heart problems, as well as your risk of developing diabetes, and helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Enjoy a variety of nutritious foods Eating a varied diet of healthy foods can help with your weight, blood pressure and cholesterol. There are also specific changes you can make to your diet to help prevent heart disease, such as eating less salt, replacing unhealthy fats with healthy fats and limiting alcohol.

Eat an overall healthy diet that emphasizes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless poultry and fish, nuts and legumes and non-tropical vegetable oils. Be mindful of your portion sizes, and choose foods with little or no salt. Look after your mental health Don’t neglect your mental health. Research shows there could be physiological connections between mental health and heart health, according to the American Heart Association. Many forms of mental health issues can affect heart disease such as depression, anxiety and stress. Furthermore, stress can increase hormones like adrenaline and cortisol, impacting blood pressure and heart rate. Get a heart health check The best thing you can do to manage heart health and risk factors is getting screened regularly. You may not be aware of risk factors of heart disease early enough, as often there are no symptoms. It’s important to visit your healthcare provider to check your risks frequently. If you are over 35 years old, already have risk factors or have not been screened recently on heart disease risk, book an appointment to see your doctor. 23


Dining///Jamaican Grill Chef Clay

Serious love for his serious food When Chef Clay P. Wai — known to most as Chef Clay — greets you, it’s with open arms, a smile and a proud and cheerful, “Ya mon, serious food.”

Story and photos by Wayne Chargualaf

W

hat to most people is a catchy marketing slogan is, for Wai and the staff of Jamaican Grill, a mission and a

way of life. “Ya mon, serious food, serious service,” Wai says. “You have to live it.” Wai’s love for his craft is evident not only in his work as chef at Jamaican Grill Dededo, but also in his work as one of the founding members — and first president — of the American Culinary Federation Guam Chapter and his work helping to revise the curriculum for Guam Community College’s culinary arts program. Although his career began essentially as just a way to make some money, Wai has dedicated decades of his life perfecting his craft, pleasing customers and trying to build the next generation of chefs. “It was just an after school job, but I fell in love with it,” Wai says. “It’s been a part of my life since I was a teenager.” Born and raised in Honolulu, Wai’s culinary education began in the early 1970’s. Taking advantage of the era’s hotel building boom, Honolulu Community College created a culinary program that Wai entered in 1971 and graduated from three years later. Upon graduation, Wai began work as a sous chef at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, where he stayed for four years. Deciding he needed to learn more about the culinary arts, Wai began a period of travelling and learning that took him across the United States, Japan and Bali. Wai eventually found himself in Guam in 1989 working as a butcher chef at the Hilton Guam Resort & Spa. He then moved on to be master butcher and sous chef at Hotel Nikko Guam, where he stayed for 13 years. Wai’s time at Nikko was then followed by stints as executive chef at Hotel Santa 24

Fe, LSG Sky Chefs and Fiesta Resort Guam. Shortly after arriving at Fiesta Resort in 2005, however, his career was put on hold after he was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. “I needed to go off-island for treatment for about six months,” Wai says. “I asked the doctor how long I had to live, and he said ‘two weeks.’ I was in shock.” Although he had been smoking since he was 13 years old, Wai credits a lifelong regimen of exercise and good nutrition with his recovery. “If I wasn’t in the shape I was when I had cancer, the doctor says I wouldn’t have made it,” Wai says. “I used to smoke two packs a day. I asked the Lord, ‘Let me live.’ My kids were young. It wasn’t time. I wasn’t ready. I asked the Lord, ‘Let me live and I’ll send out the message [that] smoking isn’t good for you. I promise.’ So that’s all I do. I promote healthy food and it affects the menu.” After being successfully treated for cancer, Wai returned to Guam and resumed the work he loves at the Fiesta Resort. Shortly after his return, however, he decided to pursue his love in a different manner. Wai decided that rather than working in a hotel, he would prefer to work in a restaurant where he can help develop recipes and — even more importantly — develop chefs. “The hotels don’t really focus on building chefs. What they focus on is ‘Can you build a team and get the food out,’” Wai says. When Wai saw Jamaican Grill had posted an ad for a kitchen manager in the newspapers, he knew it was the opportunity he had been looking for. “When I saw the ad in the paper, I said, ‘This is the time. It’s


Dining///Jamaican Grill Chef Clay

time to shut the door on the hotels and open new doors,’” Wai says. “And I was really happy because the two chefs who own Jamaican Grill, Frank and Tim, welcomed my presence.” Wai’s infectious enthusiasm for Jamaican Grill’s mission is evident when he talks about what it takes to remain one of Guam’s most popular restaurants for more than 20 years. “Trying to stay on top of the survival chain is very, very hard,” Wai says. “You have to focus on details. Hot, fresh, tasty food. We live our mission statement: ‘Ya mon, serious food, serious service.’ And we try to [ingrain] that into the employees. The details that go along with that are extensive. All of that builds ‘Ya mon, serious food, serious service.’ Without all of these [details], you don’t have serious food. There’s no way to achieve it.” After a lifetime of dedication to the craft he loves, Chef Clay Wai shows no signs of slowing down. “I’m close to the age of retirement, so for me it’s the perfect setting for me in my life, because I can give back in a comfortable atmosphere,” Wai says. “I’m not saying the job is easy — the kitchen’s never easy. You can’t get everything done in a day. Forget it. I don’t know when I’m going to retire. I know chefs who are still working and they’re 80 years old. I’ll go as long as I can.” 25


Out and About

OUT & ABOUT

Photos by Wayne Chargualaf

The Guam Chamber of Commerce hosted its 5th Annual Song Festival, “Old Time Rock ‘n’ Roll” on Nov. 25 at the Agana Shopping Center. The event featured 21 school performing three songs each.

Photo by Nicole B. Benavente

Photos courtesy of T Galleria by DFS Guam

Dayanara Flores was awarded the distinction of valedictorian of the University of Guam graduating class Fanuchånan (Fall) 2017 on Dec. 17 at the Calvo Field House.

T Galleria by DFS hosted an awards ceremony for the 5th Annual DFS Festival of Trees competition on Jan. 6. The event concluded a competition amongst 10 elementary schools and all of Guam’s public high schools.

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS! To submit your photos for Out & About, email high-resolution photos to lifestyleeditor@glimpsesofguam.com with “Out & About” on your subject line. Please include the description, date and location of your event photo(s).

26


Out and About

Photos by Colin Kirk

The Guam Chapter of the American Red Cross held its 9th Annual High Heel-A-Thon on Dec. 2 at Macy’s in Micronesia Mall.

Photos by Wayne Chargualaf

The Guam Young Professionals held a mixer on Dec. 7 at Tumon Sands Plaza. 27


Buenas February/March 2018  

Buenas and welcome to the first issue of Buenas Magazine! We were formerly known as R&R Pacific. From this issue, we have changed the name o...

Buenas February/March 2018  

Buenas and welcome to the first issue of Buenas Magazine! We were formerly known as R&R Pacific. From this issue, we have changed the name o...

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