Page 1

KANAZAWA

Japan’s ultimate road trip

TURN UP THE BEAT

Skratcher Guam is in the mix

Meals on Wheels

“Fast food” has a new meaning


contents August/September 2018

4 8 10 14 16 22 24 26 30

TRAVEL

Kanazawa

16

ARTIST

Enzo

CALENDAR

Events in August and September

ARTIST

Skratcher Guam

COVER FEATURE

Foodtrucks

BUSINESS

The Great Dame

ESSENCE OF GUAM

14

30

22

4

Non-profit women organizations

LISTICLE

Back to school essentials

HOBBY

Antique typewriters

Buenas is Guam’s leading lifestyle magazine and reflects the popularity of the magazine among all who live on-island or who visit Guam! The magazine will continue to bring its readers lively features on the lifestyle of Guam — what is happening throughout the island, who is doing something fun or special and what’s coming up on the Guam calendar.

Connect with us!

www.buenasguam.com

About the cover: Chelsie Mair, co-owner of Songge Guam displays one of the delicious woodfire pizzas.


Buenas August/September

PUBLISHER Maureen N. Maratita BUSINESS EDITOR Meghan Hickey LIFESTYLE EDITOR Lara O. Neuman Jesse C. Babauta REPORTERS John I. Borja Wayne Chargualaf CREATIVE DEPT. SUPERVISOR Vikki Fong

2018

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Luisa Joy Castro Keisha Gozum GENERAL SALES MANAGER Ken Dueñas PRODUCT REPRESENTATIVES Arvie Cipriano Garion Abulencia ADMINISTRATION Janice Castro Carmelita McClellan Jenalyn Aguon MANAGING DIRECTOR Marcos W. Fong

Glimpses of Guam Inc. Mission Statement: To connect people with information.

Glimpses Publications include: Marianas Business Journal • MBJ Life • Guam Business Magazine • Real Estate Journal • Buenas • Beach Road Magazine • Drive Guam • Pocket Deals

Buenas August/September 2018 • Entire contents copyrighted 2018 by Glimpses of Guam, Inc. Buenas is published bi-monthly by Glimpses of Guam, Inc., 161 US Army Juan C. Fejeran St., Barrigada Heights, GU 96913. Telephone: (671) 649-0883, Fax: (671) 649-8883, Email: lifestyleeditor@glimpsesofguam.com • All rights reserved. No material may be printed in part or in whole without written permission from the publisher.


Travel///Kanazawa

Photo courtesy of Star Cruises

Road trip to Kanazawa Story and photos by Julian Ryall

Route 66 is often cited as the ultimate road trip, but a five-day drive through offthe-beaten-track prefectures of central Japan will rival that journey — particularly during the autumn months as the mountain forests take on their winter hues and snow caps the highest peaks. 4


A

fter arriving at Tokyo’s Narita International Airport and making the transfer to Tokyo Station, catch a bullet train for the 75-minute journey to Karuizawa Station, the most convenient jumping off point for a part of Japan that is rich in tradition and history, has breathtaking countryside and cultural masterpieces and takes unforgettable cuisine for granted. Yet, for all that, these prefectures are too often overlooked by foreign visitors. Pick up your rental car — conveniently close to the station — and hit the road. The journey is on a combination of main roads and toll freeways, but the in-car navigation system can be set to English and signs on virtually all the highways are in English. The first stop is in the quaint town of Kakeyu, set deep in the valleys of Nagano Prefecture and famous for its onsen — hot springs. All the small hotels that line the narrow streets have their own therapeutic onsen, while a free foot bath is constantly steaming outside the town hall. But that will have to wait until after your first adventure. Iwao Tobimatsu takes visitors on cycling tours through the surrounding mountains, using road bikes for the paved sections but providing mountain bikes for the off-road options, which include a purpose-built course on a heavily wooded hillside overlooking the town. To add more local flavor, participants are encouraged to take to their bicycles in the jet-black outfits that Japan’s famous ninja warriors once wore. This valley was until a century ago still very isolated and considered a somewhat mysterious community, although it became more accessible once the tunnel was bored through the head of the valley and the road continued on to the city of Matsumoto, nestled in a broader valley and dominated by its 16th century castle, the oldest surviving original castle in Japan. After checking in, explore the historic heart of the town, which has been carefully preserved and has flagstoned streets flanked by traditional merchants’ houses. Matsumoto is famous for soba; or buckwheat noodles, which make an excellent dinner, while horse meat is another local delicacy. And don’t miss the opportunity to try some of the local sake rice wines with your evening meal.

Be up early the next morning to catch the castle — nicknamed “Crow Castle” due to its black wooden exterior. The wide moat has swans and countless koi carp, and the surrounding mountains make an excellent backdrop. Visitors can climb the surprisingly steep stairs inside the main tower of the six-story castle, passing displays of armor and weapons dating back to Japan’s 150 years from 1467 that are known as its “warring states” period. It is another 90-minute drive through spectacular mountains (home to monkeys, deer, wild boar and even the occasional bear) to the Shinhotaka Ropeway. Don’t be fooled by the relatively pleasant temperatures at the bottom of the ropeway, at 1,117 meters above sea level. By the time you reach the top of the mountain, you will be at 2,156 meters and everything around is coated in a thick layer of frost, with waves of icy clouds rolling over. On clear days, visitors have panoramic views of Mount Yarigadake — known as the Matterhorn of Japan — and numerous other peaks sufficient for the Michelin Green Guide to have awarded the observation deck two of its coveted stars. Continuing on, head for the town of Takayama, where again much effort has gone into preserving the traditional Sanmachi Suji quarter alongside the river. The narrow streets are lined with wooden merchants’ houses from the Edo Period and a number of museums, the highlight of which is the Takayama Jinya, which was the local office of the national government from 1692 to 1868 and is the only surviving building of its kind in the country. Bureaucrats, tax collectors and judges went about their business in a series of tatami-mat rooms linked by wood-lined corridors in the low and sprawling building After a stroll through the morning market the next day, the route takes you to the hamlet of Shirakawa-go, which has become a good deal more famous since its gassho-zukuri style of steeply pitched and thatched buildings were recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage site in 1995. Set among paddy fields and surrounded by streams bringing water off the surrounding mountains, a number of the buildings are open to the public and detail the lives of the people of this farming community and how they have managed to preserve the village to this day. CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

5


Travel///Kanazawa

The Chirihama Nagisa Driveway is a surprising minor detour — a 6-mile stretch of beach on the east coast of the Noto Peninsula that is open to cars — before a relaxing evening meal and onsen in the Kagaya hotel, where the crab is locally caught and superb. First stop the next morning is Kanazawa, another town with a carefully preserved heart, where one may be invited to take green tea with the okami, or owner, of the venerable Kaikaro chaya, or tea house. Geisha have been entertaining guests at Kaikaro for nearly 200 years and the wooden building, with a traditional sunken hearth on the ground floor and geisha changing rooms upstairs, reeks of the parties where they sang, danced and poured the beer and sake for their patrons. Overflowing with seafood of every description, the nearby Omi-cho market is the ideal place for a lunch of sushi and for working up an appetite for the Kanazawa Samurai Theater, where actors perform traditional dances accompanied by taiko drums and samisen lutes and visitors are able to try on suits of samurai warrior armor or the kimono worn by geisha. The final stop en route for Nagoya, where it’s best to leave the car, is the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, which is housed in a huge silver sphere, making it an unmissable landmark in the paddy fields and hills of the prefecture. As well as the obvious crowd-pleasers — Tyrannosaurus Rex, Stegasaurous, Triceratops and others — the museum shows off three unique species of dinosaur that have been discovered in Fukui, including a new species of raptor.

HOW TO GET TO KANAZAWA How to get there: United Airlines and Japan Airlines operate direct flights to Narita. Travel time: About three to four hours flight to Narita, then a 75-minute train ride to Karuizawa. Best time to go: Cherry blossom season is a difficult-to-predict two-week spell in April, but the spectacular autumn foliage can be enjoyed from late September all the way through to mid-November. Currency and conversion rate: $100 is 11,135 yen at present rates. Languages: A smattering of Japanese would be an advantage, but signage and menus are very often available in English, while many people speak at least some English. Car rental: www.japanican.com Ninja mountain biking in Ueda City: www.chougenbou.com Matsumoto Castle: www.matsumoto-castle.jp Shinhotaka Ropeway: www.shinhotaka-ropeway.jp Takayama Historic District: www.travel.kankou-gifu.jp Shirakawa-go: www.ml.shirakawa-go.org Chirihama Nagisa Driveway: www.hot-ishikawa.jp Kaikaro Tea House: www.kaikaro.jp/eng Omi-cho market: www.kanazawa-tourism.com Samurai Yakata: www.samuraiyakata.com Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum: www.dinosaur.pref.fukui.jp Accomodations: The Matsumoto Hotel Kagetsu: 4-8-9 Ote, Matsumoto City, Nagano Prefecture 390-0874. Tel. 81 263 32 0114. www.matsumotohotel-kagetsu.com The Takayama Green Hotel: 506-0031 Takayama City, Nishinoisshiki 2-180, Gifu Prefecture. Tel. 81 57733 5500. www.takayama-gh.com Kagaya: 80 Yo-bu, Wakura-machi, Nanao-shi, Ishikawa Prefecture, 926-0192. Tel. 81 767 62 1111. www.intl.kagaya.jp Tsuruya: 4-601 Onsen, Awara-shi, Fukui Prefecture, 910-4104. Tel. 81 776 77 2001. www.awara-turuya.jp

6


Artist///Endo

Endo's harmonic beats By Lee Ann Jastillana • Photo by Wayne Chargualaf

M

ichael Henderson came home from his first rave in 1999 with a newfound passion for DJing and electronic music. The then 17-year-old immediately bought turntables and immersed himself in the music by reading manuals, mastering software and practicing late at night. Flash forward almost 20 years later and Henderson, whose stage name is Endo, has played for events across the globe including: Pacha, Marquee and Cielo in New York, Sound in Los Angeles, Guvernment and Coda in Toronto, Club Vertigo in Costa Rica, Sands in Ibiza and this year at Electric Island Festival in Guam. Endo’s sets are all harmonic progression — every song is in key, or intentionally out of key and adjusted harmonically. “Beat matching was the addiction originally,” Henderson says. “But now I’m very big on mixing songs with complementing harmonies and keys.” His sets are also adjusted according to setting and audience mood. For example, he’ll play happier tunes on a sunny beach and bass-driven tech house for moody after-hours. Henderson enjoys how he can control the effect of his music on an audience, and he even has a unique method for doing so. He goes through every song on the piano, figuring out the musical key signatures of each. He then writes them down and has a code system that tells him what keys go together. When he’s playing, he’s able 8

to filter his collection based on what keys are compatible with each other. In this way, Henderson is able to keep his audiences hyped and energetic. “I also have a color coding system and a rating system for energy level and vibe — it’s kind of nerdy, but that’s what I do,” Henderson says. “It’s all about finding the right songs for the right moment.” Henderson grew up a musician, and being a drummer got him immediately hooked on beat matching. His current musical influences include DJ Craze, Z-trip and Bad Boy Bill. “I’m really just a music junkie,” he says. “I live for the groove and the melody.” Apart from his visit to Guam and recent shows in Hawaii, Henderson has been busy working on his DJ booking app, “AGNT,” and his new 12-week DJ course for Berklee online, “Learn to DJ with Traktor,” a DJ software package developed by Native Instruments. Behind his successes are years of hard work. One of the biggest difficulties in his career, according to Henderson, is his inveterate focus on DJing instead of producing. He feels he could have quickly gone much farther had he shifted his attention toward producing. After finishing his first DJ album, “Keys,” he hopes to begin making his own music. “I’m going to be moving into the production world and making albums and finding my sound,” Henderson says.


Events calendar

WHAT’S NEXT AUG. 1

Little Miss Guam and Little Miss Junior Guam 2018 Pageant Finals Time: 6 p.m. Location: Ocean Sirena Ballroom at Sheraton Laguna Guam Resort Call Leah’s Fabulous Productions at 486-3231 for more information.

AUG. 4

5th Annual Pink Ball Time: 6 p.m. Location: Dusit Thani Guam Resort To purchase tickets, call 486-0918 or email info@pinkballguam.com.

AUG. 4

Ritidian Beach Clean-Up Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Location: Guam National Wildlife Refuge All volunteers are welcome to join. To sign up in advance or for more information, visit fws.gov/refuge/Guam/Events.html or call 3555096.

AUG. 11

Batik Painting Workshop with Judy Flores Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Location: Judy’s Tonggan Garden Studio Registration fee: $55 per person. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, email sales@guambatikgallery.com.

AUG. 25

Electric Island Festival End of Summer For details, visit electricislandfestival.com/eif-eos.

AUG. 25

Onward Mangilao Golf Club Annual Fun Run Time: 5:45 a.m. for the 10k; 6 a.m. for the 5k; 6:15 a.m. for the 2k Location: Onward Mangilao Golf Club Registration fee: $5 for youth and juniors, $10 for adults and $15 on race day For more information, call 734-7030 or 647-7765

10

SEPT. 1

Ritidian Beach Clean-Up Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Location: Guam National Wildlife Refuge All volunteers are welcome to join. To sign up in advance or for more information, visit fws.gov/refuge/Guam/Events.html or call 3555096.

SEPT. 3

Labor Day

SEPT. 15

Guam International Coastal Clean Up Time: 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Location: TBD For more information, contact Marilyn Guerrero at 475-0647 or 475-0666.

SEPT. 16

2018 Proline Drifting Championships Round 4 Time: 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Location: Guam International Raceway For more information, email info@upshiftent.com

SEPT. 22

Guam Community College Foundation 2018 Par Excellence Golf Tournament Time: 8 a.m. Location: Leo Palace Resort Country Club Registration fee: $125 per player For more information, call the GCC Development and Alumni Relations Office at 735-5516/5554 or email bonniemae.datuin@ guamcc.edu or gregorio.manglona@guamcc.edu.

SEPT. 30

Trench Challenge 2018 Time: 6 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Location: Guam International Raceway Registration fee: $85 per person For more information, email info@trenchevents.com


Events calendar

August sun

mon

tue

wed 1

5

6

7

• Little Miss Guam and Little Miss Junior Guam 2018 Pageant Finals

8

thu

fri

sat

2

3

4

9

10

11

MOVIES • Christopher Robin • The Spy Who Dumped Me • Searching

MOVIES • The Meg • Dog Days • BlacKkKlansman

• 5th Annual Pink Ball • Ritidian Beach Clean-Up

• Batik Painting Workshop with Judy Flores

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

MOVIES • Crazy Rich Asians • The Wife • Juliet, Naked • The Little Mermaid

MOVIES • The Happytime Murders • Slender Man • Replicas • A.X.L

• Electric Island Festival End of Summer • Onward Mangilao Golf Club Annual Fun Run

31

FEATURED MOVIE Aug. 17

Crazy Rich Asians Directed by Jon M. Chu Starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding and Michelle Yeoh

The story follows New Yorker Rachel Chu (Wu) as she accompanies her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young (Golding), to his best friend’s wedding in Singapore. Excited about visiting Asia for the first time but nervous about meeting Nick’s family, Rachel is unprepared to learn that Nick has neglected to mention a few key details about his life. It turns out that he is not only the scion of one of the country’s wealthiest families but also one of its most sought-after bachelors. Being on Nick’s arm puts a target on Rachel’s back, with jealous socialites and, worse, Nick’s own disapproving mother (Yeoh) taking aim. And it soon becomes clear that while money can’t buy love, it can definitely complicate things. (Official synopsis from warnerbros.com) *Event times and dates may change without notice.

11


Events calendar

September sun

mon

tue

wed

thu

fri

sat 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

11

12

13

14

15

Labor Day

9

10

MOVIES • The Nun

MOVIES • The Predator

• Guam International Coastal Clean Up

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

• 2018 Proline Drifting Championships Round 4

30 • Trench Challenge 2018

FEATURED MOVIE Sept. 28

Smallfoot Starring Channing Tatum, James Corden, Zendaya, Common, LeBron James, Danny DeVito, Gina Rodriguez, Yara Shahidi, Ely Henry and Jimmy Tatro

An animated adventure for all ages, with original music and an allstar cast, Smallfoot turns a myth upside down when a bright young yeti finds something he thought didn’t exist — a human. News of this “smallfoot” throws the simple yeti community into an uproar over what else might be out there in the big world beyond their snowy village, in an all new story about friendship, courage and the joy of discovery. (Official synopsis from warnerbros.com)

*Event times and dates may change without notice.

12

• Ritidian Beach Cleanup

MOVIES • Robin Hood • The House with a Clock in Its Walls • Johnny English Strikes Again

MOVIES • Night School • Smallfoot

• Guam Community College Foundation 2018 Par Excellence Golf Tournament


Artist///Skratcher Guam

Hip Hop Hooray These DJ’s have a serious itch to skratch Story and photos by Wayne Chargualaf

H

ip hop is said to be comprised of four elements — rapping, DJ-ing, breakdancing and graffiti. Although all four elements have had a persistent influence on the popular culture, a specific type of DJ-ing — turntablism, which is primarily thought of as cutting and scratching with vinyl records — tends to be closely associated with old-school hip hop and as such has seen its popularity wax and wane over the years. Nevertheless, a group of DJs on Guam have committed themselves to preserving and spreading the art form and the culture that is associated with it. Skratcher Guam, the local chapter of a global, Vancouver-based turntablist organization called Skratcher, was formed by three local DJs — Junior Corpuz, Paul-Myer Basilio and Jeff Tseng. Although they had discussed joining the organization as early as August 2017, it wasn’t until October of that year that they became official and held their first open DJ session as Skratcher Guam at Kreem X Butter, a barber shop located in Harmon. “We get our haircuts here, and they asked us if we want to have our sessions here because these guys scratch too,” Basilio says. “It was perfect because they support the culture, so from there we asked them to sponsor Skratcher Guam and the rest is history.” The exact definition of turntablism is somewhat up for debate, according to Corpuz, who has practiced the art for more than 20 years. “There are a lot of different types of DJs who do different things,” he says. “To me, turntablism is using the turntable as an instrument.” The members of Skratcher Guam meet on the first Tuesday of every month at Kreem X Butter for their open sessions. They set up their turntables in a circle and invite people of all levels of experience and skill to drop in and try their hand at cutting and scratching with vinyl records, most of which have beats and musical tracks specifically designed for turntablists. As a single beat plays over a speaker, the people in the circle take turns demonstrating their creativity and skill, with newbies often hesitantly moving the record back-and-forth trying to create their first scratch. “We’ll start off doing four bars each,” Basilio says as a session starts. He frequently offers cheerful encouragement to less experienced DJs. “That’s great, you’re really making it talk,” he tells a DJ after they’ve taken their turn. “It’s all about practicing every day, even if it’s just 15 minutes a day practicing your coordination, your combinations and things like that,” he says. Although they say they’re just in the beginning stages of building a foundation for Skratcher Guam, Basilio says the group hopes the trickle of people they see dropping in during their open sessions and returning are a sign of things to come. “We’ve had people who tried it out a couple of times and one day they come back with their own portable turntable,” he says. “They say, ‘I had to get my own turntable and come back, I’m hooked now.’” 14


Artist///Skratcher Guam

15


Cover Feature///Food trucks

Food trucks Finding them is half the fun Text and photos by John I. Borja

H

aving a difficult time trying to hunt down food trucks on Guam? We got in contact with 15 mobile food service establishments to offer a glimpse of what they serve and where. Food trucks are always on the move, so be sure to call, text or check out their social media accounts to find out where they are. Most food trucks only accept cash, so keep that in mind and happy hunting.

A&L Foods

A&L Foods is a family-owned business that serves a variety of barbecue fiesta plates. For a quick bite, the food truck also makes shish kebabs with your choice of meat. Owners: Allan B. Lacap and Loida Batac Opened: August 2011 Type of food: Island-style barbecue and fiesta plates Popular dishes: Grilled spicy squid, pork and chicken shish kebabs Favorite spots: Behind the Guam Museum and Chamorro Village Contact: 787-2416 or 489-0302 Facebook: @A&L Foods Instagram: @shiskabobguam

Dikiki Donuts

Dikiki Donuts has three main types of donuts: cinnamon sugar, powdered and glazed. Every month the food truck creates a special donut with flavors like Oreo, caramel drizzle, Fruity Pebbles and breakfast waffle. Owner: Jim Dimag Operations manager: Crystal Dimag Opened: November 2014 Type of food: Donuts Popular dish: Glazed donuts Favorite spots: Chamorro Village and Macheche Mart Contact number: 998-6464

Fat Boy Slim

Photo by Wayne Chargualaf

16

Using the slogan, “Where happy meets healthy,� Fat Boy Slim strives to make healthy eating fun and uses witty names for its dishes. Owner Ray P. Chargualaf is a fitness expert and he uses his knowledge to create meals fit for customers. Owner: Ray P. Chargualaf Opened: September 2017 Type of food: Lean and healthy Popular dishes: Schoolboy Que, Sushi Mane, Kanye Mess Favorite spot: GTA TeleGuam in Upper Tumon Contact number: Text 480-4215 Facebook: @fatboyslimguam Instagram: @fbsguam


Cover Feature///Food trucks

Photo courtesy of Guam Barbecue Company

The Food Truck

Guam Barbecue Company

Hafa Adai Lemonade

Hafa Huli Shrimp

The Food Truck is well-known for its banh mi but it offers other finger foods and is also available to cater private parties. Owner Joseph P. Atalig is also a managing partner of 9th Street Rotary. Owner: Joseph P. Atalig Opened: October 2016 Type of food: Vietnamese street food Popular dish: Banh mi Favorite spot: Behind the Guam Museum Contact number: 864-8105 Facebook and Instagram: @thefoodtruckguam

Hafa Adai Lemonade uses locally-grown calamansi for its beverages. The business also uses compostable straws in an effort to support an eco-friendly environment. Owners: Kristian Cruz, Tiffany Muna-Barnes and Kenneth Cruz Opened: May 2016 Type of food: Calamansi-themed beverages Popular beverage: Strawberry mango calamansi Favorite spot: Behind the Guam Museum Contact number: 688-0699 Instagram: @hafaadailemonade

The Guam Barbecue Company puts just about any type of meat on the grill, depending on what its customers like. Off the grill, the food truck serves local favorites such as beef tinaktak and shrimp eskabeche. Guam Barbecue Company can also cook for special events. Owner: Joseph Okada Opened: May 2017 Type of food: Chamorro-style smoked meats Popular dish: Smoked pork and beef Favorite spots: DNA Inc. parking lot, KUAM Communications parking lot, Dededo farmers market and The Venue Contact number: 687-0276 Instagram: @guambarbecuecompany

Hafa Huli Shrimp started business selling fried huli chicken and later got into the groove of serving a variety of shrimp dishes, like its popular dish garlic shrimp which comes with two scoops of rice and macaroni salad. Owners: Jason and Kari Dydasco Opened: September 2015 Type of food: Hawaiian island style Popular dishes: Garlic shrimp and smoked Angus brisket Favorite spot: Behind the Guam Museum Contact number: 864-4854 Facebook and Instagram: @HafaHuliGuam 17


Cover Feature///Food trucks

Hooker’s Fusion

Husband and wife team Ennis James and Nao Hooker often bounce ideas off each other to come up with dishes that fuse both Japanese and soul food. From fried macaroni and cheese balls to a unique twist on takoyaki, Hooker’s Fusion enjoys pairing the two cuisines together for a delicious result. Their partner Ethan Cruz handles Teppan Hut, which is part of the business. Owners: Ennis James and Nao Hooker, Ethan Cruz Opened: September 2016 Type of food: Japanese, soul food Popular dish: Bacon and rice on a stick Favorite spots: University of Guam, Mangilao Night Market on Thursdays and Dededo Night Market on the weekends Facebook: @guamhookersfusion

Koko Crepes

Ever wanted a crepe with an endless amount of toppings? Koko Crepes can offer that. The family-operated business offers several desserts to satisfy a customer’s sweet tooth. Owner: Tanya Belyshev Opened: November 2017 Type of food: Desserts, savory foods Popular dish: Make-your-own crepe with limitless toppings Favorite spot: Behind the Guam Museum Facebook: @koko.crepes.3

Photo by Leland Francisco

Munchies

Munchies is one of few food trucks that accepts credit cards, which has been a favorable factor among customers. Initially planned as a shrimp truck, the menu has expanded to include a variety of seafood options for customers to choose from. Owners: Francine and Gerson Hoebing Opened: March 2017 Type of food: Seafood Popular dishes: Poke bowl and selection of tacos Favorite spots: Frannie’s in Mangilao, University of Guam and behind the Guam Museum Contact number: 688-8769 Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter: @munchiesguam 18

Pokeyz Snack Shack

Owner Marc Elliott’s traditional-style poke is heavily influenced from his time in Hawaii, then mixed with unique flavors he created through trial and error. Owner: Marc Elliott Opened: July 2014 Type of food: Hawaiian poke Popular dish: Spicy mayo poke Favorite spot: Behind the Guam Museum Contact number: 689-3743 Facebook: @pokeyzguahan Instagram: @pokeyz671


Cover Feature///Food trucks

Sip ‘N Dip Guam Street Food

Sip ‘N Dip is like a drive-thru, fast food restaurant that moves, according to owner Marisol Malumay. The food truck’s menu caters to those who want something quick and easy to eat. Owner: Marisol Malumay Opened: October 2017 Type of food: Snacks, light meals, appetizers, chasers Popular dishes: Breaded mozzarella sticks, fried calamari Favorite spot: Chamorro Village Contact number: 483-0027

Songge Guam

Equipped with a wood fire oven, Songge Guam can get a pizza ready for a customer in less than 20 minutes. The food truck sells quickly, so coowner Roke Quichocho recommends placing an order as soon as possible. Owners: Roke Quichocho and Chelsie Maier Opened: July 2016 Type of food: Wood-fired pizza Popular dish: Sup’ Prim, which consists of five-cheese blend, pepperoni, Marianas marinara, Italian sausage, mushrooms, red onion, olives and jalapenos Favorite spot: Surfside, Talofofo Bay Contact number: 686-7653 Facebook and Instagram: @songgeguam Photo by Leland Francisco

The Warrior Wagon

The Warrior Wagon primarily serves coffee and American food. Owner Kelly Harper also sells military-themed apparel and accessories as a way to support veterans. Owner: Kelly Harper Opened: March 2018 Type of food: Veteran-owned and operated coffee Popular beverages: Hot chai tea latte and kona mocha frappe Favorite spot: None, always roaming Facebook: Search “The Warrior Wagon”

Z’s Green Canteen

Z’s Green Canteen prides itself on its plant-based, locally sourced foods. The canteen promotes healthy eating and its dishes are friendly to a vegetarian diet. Owners: Tonnie C. Guzman and Nikki Roberto Opened: June 2017 Type of food: Plant-based Popular dishes: Green and Yellow smoothies, avocado and cookies ice cream, pumpkin tinaktak Favorite spots: East Hagåtña beach park across East Island Tinting Contact number: 487-5683 Facebook: @ZsGreenCanteen Instagram: @zs_greencanteen

For convenience, a group of food trucks come together between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday nights in Hagåtña so that customers can have options. On Tuesdays, the food trucks are located behind the Guam Museum, towards the end of the courtyard. On Thursdays, they set up at the former auto dealership lot behind The Venue. 19


Business///The Great Dame

Clothes with confidence The Great Dame’s style is far from lame Story and photos by Lee Ann Jastillana

Huge, busy clothing stores can easily turn into a nightmare. In addition to the tangled hangers and long lines, you’re dodging someone every second, you can’t decide between two dresses you’ve salvaged and your best friend isn’t responding to any of your texts. The Great Dame, a Guam-based online boutique, attempts to provide a solution to these all-too-familiar shopping hassles.

O

pened last December, the clothing store offers free styling appointments at its showroom in Hagåtña. Customers who book an appointment can shop exclusively at the showroom, go for fittings or receive styling advice for an event. Justine Gaminde, founder and owner of The Great Dame, feels that it’s important to offer styling consultations to unsure shoppers that need a second opinion. In addition, she wanted to offer a more exclusive experience for her customers, allowing them to shop the showroom solo. Booking an appointment is quick and straightforward. Clients log onto The Great Dame website and request an appointment through the “Style Me” page. After a customer completes the consultation request, Gaminde confirms the appointment through a phone call or by email. Her busiest days are typically Thursday and Friday, and consist of four or five appointments. She allots at least an hour per person but says that appointments take longer. The showroom is stocked with trendy pieces like matching sets, wrap dresses, rompers and jumpsuits. Customers primarily tell her what they want to try on before coming to the showroom. For customers that haven’t decided on an outfit, Gaminde first has them pull items off the rack and then discusses their selections afterwards. Having affirmation from a second set of eyes boosts her customers’ confidence in the outfits they purchase. Although it isn’t required, Gaminde recommends signing up as a Great Dame member before an appointment. Should a customer wish to make a purchase at the end of the appointment, already being a member would speed up the check-out process. Customers usually end up making a purchase after their consultations, but Gaminde says they don’t have to. Many women who are curious about her brand or interested in checking out

22

pieces in person want to just take a look around the showroom, and she welcomes that. Inventory is limited, and once an item is sold out, Gaminde does not restock. Working with five vendors, she carefully selects clothing pieces that fit her brand’s aesthetic — aspirational, classy and confident. “A great dame is not scared to wear what she wants to wear,” she says. From flowy dresses to camo-print pants, Gaminde’s personal style changes depending on the current fashion trends and her mood. She considers herself an early adopter of style trends, and the clothes she sells reflect this. The Great Dame’s styling appointments help customers find their personal style by allowing them to have creative direction. For clients looking to put an outfit together for an event, Gaminde will try to get a feel for their style by asking her customers what outfits they typically gravitate toward and what clothing styles they’d like to wear for the upcoming occasion. Gaminde notices that women on Guam can be hesitant to wear what they want for fear of being judged. Through her appointments, she hopes to help Guamanian women build confidence in the clothes they wear. “People are afraid to stand out, but I feel like it doesn’t matter — it doesn’t matter how old you are and it doesn’t matter what your body type is, you can always look good,” Gaminde says, “There’s no excuse to not look good.” For Gaminde, with the right clothes and the right attitude, anyone can pull off any look. Having the outfit everyone at the event is buzzing about is the ultimate goal. “I think that’s kind of going back to what The Great Dame represents,” Gaminde says. “You walk into a room, and you’re wearing the outfit that turns heads.”


Essence of Guam///Women’s organizations

Essence of Guam Women’s organizations

A Buenas series featuring nonprofit charitable organizations on Guam and how you can contribute

Soroptimist International of Guam

Mission: To be the best volunteer organization that positively impacts the lives of women and girls through programs that lead to social and economic empowerment. What they do: SIG annually awards $2 million in education grants to women who have overcome challenges including extreme poverty, domestic or sexual violence and addiction through the Live Your Dream Education & Training Award. SIG hosts the Dream It Be It Career Support for Girls program aimed to help, support and encourage girls that come from difficult circumstances through career mentorship, guidance and training. In addition, SIG addresses issues that impact women and girls in our community like domestic and family violence, human trafficking, teen dating violence and equal rights for women. President: Yuka Oguma Phone: 689-4367 Email: siguam@soroptimist.net Facebook: facebook.com/Soroptimist-International-of-GuamSIG-242069252486142 Instagram: @si_guam Volunteer: Anyone interested in volunteering or becoming a member can send a message through the Facebook page or call or text 689-4367. To make a donation: Donations can be sent to mailing address: Soroptimist Int’l of Guam P.O. Box 654, Hagåtña, GU 96932.

24

Businesswoman of the Year Inc.

Mission: The Businesswoman of the Year program aims to recognize women in business and to raise funds for scholarships for students at the University of Guam, Guam Community College and Northern Marianas College. What they do: The program hosts the annual Businesswoman of the Year award and gala, and through proceeds from the gala, First Hawaiian Bank and Guam Business Magazine fund scholarships for students pursuing business and related degrees at the University of Guam, Guam Community College and Northern Marianas College. President: Maureen N. Maratita Vice President: Narlin Manalo Phone: 649-0883 ext. 126 Email: businesseditor@glimpsesofguam.com or bagahan@fhb.com To contribute: People are invited to purchase a ticket to the annual gala in April or donate to the program. To purchase tickets or to discuss further contribution, contact businesseditor@glimpsesofguam.com or bagahan@fhb.com.


Essence of Guam///Women’s organizations

Alee Women’s Shelter — Catholic Social Services

Mission: To encourage the development of the spiritual, intellectual, economic, and social well-being of families, persons with disabilities, abused adults and children, the elderly, the homeless and others in need of services. We will respect the dignity of persons of all ages. We will collaborate with others to find the best way to service the community. What they do: The Alee Women’s Shelter provides emergency, protective shelter for victims of family domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and rape. The shelter serves women, with or without children, who are in crisis from family domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and rape. The location of the shelter is kept confidential in order to provide safety and security. President: Most Reverend Michael Jude Byrnes Executive Director: Diana Calvo Phone: 648-HOPE (4673) Email: alee@catholicsocialserviceguam.org Website: catholicsocialserviceguam.org Volunteer: Fill out the volunteer registration form available on the website and submit it to the Catholic Social Service facility at 234 U.S. Army Juan C. Fejeran Street, Barrigada, Guam 96913. To make a donation: Visit catholicsocialservice.org to donate. Donations are taken electronically through PayPal. How else to contribute: Sponsor a drive — food, clothing, household goods, personal care items — donate a service or product, sponsor a dinner at its homeless shelter, entertain or interact with the elderly, sponsor a fun day for any of its clients — children, elderly, individuals with disabilities — or share your crafting ideas.

Island Girl Power

Mission: To decrease the occurrence of teen pregnancy, suicide, substance and sexual abuse; empower young ladies to make healthy lifestyle choices; encourage positive self-esteem with mentors and role models; and inspire cultural and community pride. What they do: Island Girl Power empowers young girls to get through traumatic, emotional hardships through suicide, depression, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, dating violence and sexual assault prevention. Through the Clubhouse program, IGP helps to build self-esteem through career presentations, mentoring, skill-building classes and self-defense classes. The IGP program also inspires community pride and environmental awareness by hosting community guest speakers, clean-ups and various sustainability projects. Director: Juanita Blaz Phone: 688-4752 Email: islandgirlpower671@gmail.com Website: islandgirlpower.com Twitter: @IslandGirlPower Volunteer: To volunteer or become an IGP Member or community sponsor, take the bi-weekly tour on Wednesday at 11 a.m. or Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Call 9891604 to sign up for the tour in advance. Volunteer forms can be obtained during the tour. To make a donation: Contact via telephone, fax or email. Check donations can be mailed to #181 E. Marine Corps Dr., Suite 207, Hagåtña, GU 96910. How else to contribute: Donate clothing, food, appliances, accessories, etc. to the Island Girl Power thrift store.

For The Love of My Sister — Xokiahi Cares

Mission: To empower women to work together and to uplift each other. What they do: The For The Love of My Sister Project is a program driven to assist in women development, knowledge, and empowerment. The program sponsors financial training classes for women and children, self-esteem building seminars, self-defense classes, daycare location assistance, family events, couple’s events, youth events and family building seminars. CEO: Tracy “T.C.” Jordan Phone: 787-3622 Email: fortheloveofmysister@yahoo.com or projects@xokiahicares.org Website: xokiahicaresinc.wixsite.com/ fortheloveofmysister Facebook: facebook.com/ Fortheloveofmysister How to volunteer: To volunteer, contact via telephone or email. How to donate: Donations can be made online through xokiahicaresinc.wixsite. com/fortheloveofmysister/donate How else to contribute: Call For The Love of My Sister to contribute to other Xokiahi projects. People can donate shoes, personal care items or other supplies. One may also be able to donate to the new child care center that helps provide scholarships and grants.

25


Listicle///Back to school essentials

7

3

1

12

5

9

12 back to school essentials Text and photos by Lee Ann Jastillana

S

adly summer vacation has come to an end and schools are opening up for another semester of classes. Here are 12 back to school essentials sure to help make this year a breeze.

1. Gel pens

Price: $ Where to find them: Any office supply store on Guam including National Office Supply, Standard Office Supply and Guam Modern Office Supply.

2. Laptop

Price: $$$ Where to find it: Tech stores including Beyond the Box, ComputerSmart and bestbuy.com. 26

3. Planner

Price: $ Where to find it: Bestseller, National Office Supply and Keepsakes by K.

4. Instant coffee or energy drink

Price: $ Where to find it: Any grocery store on Guam including San Jose Supermarket, Pay-Less Supermarkets and Cost-U-Less.


Listicle///Back to school essentials

5. Hard drive or USB

Price: $ – $$, depending on storage size Where to find it: National Office Supply, Guam Modern Office Supply, Kmart, Micropac and bestbuy.com

6. Multi-subject notebook

Price: $ Where to find it: National Office Supply, Standard Office Supply and Guam Modern Office Supply.

7. Folders

Price: $ Where to find it: National Office Supply, Standard Office Supply and Guam Modern Office Supply.

8. Earphones

Price: $ – $$ Where to find it: Ross Dress for Less, Beyond the Box, JP Superstore and Kmart.

9. Water bottle

Price: $ – $$ Where to find it: Ross Dress for Less, JP Superstore and Kmart.

10. Tumbler

Price: $ – $$ Where to find it: Ross Dress for Less, JP Superstore and Kmart.

11. Sweats (hoodies, sweatshirts, sweatpants and joggers) Price: $ – $$ Where to find it: Ross Dress for Less, your school store, Bench and Kmart.

12. Backpack or tote bag

Price: $ – $$ Where to find it: Ross Dress for Less, JP Superstore, Longchamp, Herschel Supply Co. and LeSportsac.

27


Special feature///GU Self Storage

Storage facility offer security and services W

hether for personal or business use, self-storage facilities are a convenient and reasonable option for storing your property. We all accumulate stuff we don’t need daily, and sometimes you need a place to store it outside of your home. When you’re moving to a new house or renovating your current one, using a self-storage unit can help in the transition period. It’s also a good option for business storage, and many small businesses take advantage of storage and other services that may be offered. GU Self Storage opened April 10, 2017 in the former Guam Power Authority building on Route 16 in Harmon. The indoor, climate-controlled 300 plus units range in size from 5-by5 feet to 10-by-25 feet and 22-by-27 feet and is owned by Calvo Enterprises Inc. “The building was previously Pay-Less [Supermarkets] for years and GPA’s headquarters. It’s right in the open and seemed like an ideal opportunity to facilitate the needs of the community,” says Terry Debold, who is responsible for the GU Self Storage’s public relations and sales. “It was easy to retrofit. It didn’t require a lot of renovations. It was already climate-controlled, which is important for a lot of people — they want to make sure that their property is protected in a climate-controlled area.” The 40,000-square-foot facility also includes mailboxes and a conference room, where small-business owners or clients with virtual offices can hold meetings or conduct presentations. It also features a covered entry area, so clients can load and unload their things without anything getting wet when it rains. There is also a backup full power generator. “We’re the most highly secured storage on Guam,” Debold says. With nearly 200 security cameras inside and outside the facility feeding to a 24-hour CCTV system and lights placed around the property, clients can feel safe about themselves and their property at all times. The double access control system requires a PIN for entry into the gate and then again to the building. Access is easy through large garage doors, and the facility is equipped with pallet jacks and specialized appliance jacks for customers to use. Starting from $50 per month per unit, the rates are reasonable and are prorated depending on the usage terms. There are also vehicle and boat storage areas, as well as space for containers. Also operating out of the facility is Mail Hub, a mail service, notary and shipping supplies business that partners with Shopthe48.com to bring Guam residents goods from any stateside retailer. The office is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, but tenants have access to their units 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. 28


Hobby///Antique typewriters

Not my type These mechanical marvels have stood the test of time Story and photos by Wayne Chargualaf

“D

oes it have a spacebar?” This was the question asked by a teenaged girl as she took a seat in front of an L.C. Smith No. 8 Secretarial, a typewriter dating from the early 1930s. The typewriter’s owner, local artist Ariel Dimalanta, patiently showed her how to work the old machine’s heavy, clunky action so that she could compete in a typing competition held at the Agana Shopping Center on June 29. The other contestants who eventually lined up were a mix of curious and tentative youths, and older people wanting to try their hand at a skill they hadn’t employed in years. The winner, Joseph Borja, walked away with a spy camera that can fit into the palm of a hand, also from Dimalanta’s collection of antiques. “A friend of mine turned me on to old typewriters,” Dimalanta says. “I thought they were interesting because they were used to create media and I work in the media field. The mechanism also intrigued me.” Much as vinyl made a comeback after it had been declared dead due to the rise of the compact disc — which was itself, of course, superseded by digital streaming — the typewriter has become the obsolete technology fetish of choice. Driven by a generation of young collectors who didn’t grow up banging words directly onto paper with little, furiously clicking machines. Over the past few years, the trend gave birth to a spate of books, websites and social media groups obsessed with typewriters. Famous devotees like actor Tom Hanks and a well-received 2017 documentary called “California Typewriter” brought the trend fully into the spotlight. Timely as it may be, however, Dimalanta’s collection — which was displayed in the Agana Shopping Center during the month of June — predates the recent rise in popularity. “I started collecting antiques in the ‘80s,” he 30


Hobby///Antique typewriters

says. “I’d get things from flea markets, rummage sales and garage sales.” Dimalanta says that as word got around that he collects antiques, people started to call him if they came across something at a flea market or even if their grandparent was cleaning and going to throw items away. “I think once you start collecting things, things start coming to you,” he says. Dimalanta’s reputation as a collector became well-known over the years, and he says this is the reason the Agana Shopping Center contacted him. “The Agana Shopping Center said that because their center court is so empty, they want to have something there, rather than this big, empty space,” he says. “Since it was Philippine Independence month and I was already displaying some of my work in the Obra art show on the second floor, they asked me to display some of my collection.” During the time Dimalanta’s collection was showcased, he says he enjoyed the range of reactions he saw, especially the way they varied across age groups, from older adults reminiscing about the typewriters they grew up with to young children who didn’t even know what they are. “That’s the joy of collecting, when people appreciate it,” he says. “Of course you appreciate it yourself, but it’s even better to share it.” Dimalanta has 30 typewriters in his collection, the oldest items dating from between 1893 and 1912. He sold some of his best pieces years ago to collectors and after years of collecting not only typewriters, but other items such as antique cameras, bottles, sea shells and lighters, he says he’s ready to part ways with the rest of his collection. “I’m willing to sell the entire collection for $10,000 and individual typewriters for between $150 and $250, depending on the typewriter,” he says. “It’s kind of like selling a pet though, I want to make sure it goes to someone who appreciates it and will take care of it.” Dimalanata says he thinks typewriters will always have appeal in a world where the speed at which technology advances seems to also increase its disposability. “I just like the old stuff,” he says. “After a few years, everyone throws away their smart phone, it’s the new garbage. These things are built out of cast-iron and steel, they’re built to last forever.”

31


Buenas - August/September 2018  

Meals on Wheels: "Fast food" has a new meaning | Travel: Kanazawa | Artist: Enzo & Skratcher Guam | Business: The Great Dame| Essence of Gua...

Buenas - August/September 2018  

Meals on Wheels: "Fast food" has a new meaning | Travel: Kanazawa | Artist: Enzo & Skratcher Guam | Business: The Great Dame| Essence of Gua...

Advertisement