Page 1

ALONG THE RIVER BANK

The magic of Myanmar

BEHIND THE SCENES

Keeping Guam’s tourism alive

MASTER OF DANCE

The Chamorro rhythm


contents April/May 2018

4 8 10 12 15 24 26 28

TRAVEL

Myanmar

8

ARTIST

Frank Rabon

15

SPORTS

Paddling

CALENDAR

Events in April and May

FEATURE

Tourism

DINING

Chef Singh

ESSENCE OF GUAM

10 24

4

Children’s organizations

OUT & ABOUT

Readers’ and event photos

Buenas is the new name of Guam’s leading lifestyle magazine and reflects the popularity of the magazine among all who live on-island or who visit Guam! The magazine will continue to bring its readers lively features on the lifestyle of Guam — what is happening throughout the island, who is doing something fun or special and what’s coming up on the Guam calendar.

Connect with us!

www.buenasguam.com

About the cover: Tourists enjoy the beautiful beaches of Tumon Bay. Tourism is one of the biggest drivers of Guam’s economy.


Buenas April/May

PUBLISHER Maureen N. Maratita BUSINESS EDITOR Meghan Hickey LIFESTYLE EDITOR Lara O. Neuman REPORTERS John I. Borja Wayne Chargualaf CREATIVE DEPT. SUPERVISOR Vikki Fong DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Keisha Gozum

2018

GENERAL SALES MANAGER Ken Dueñas PRODUCT REPRESENTATIVES Arvie Cipriano Cristina Tabet ADMINISTRATION Janice Castro Carmelita McClellan Jenalyn Aguon MANAGING DIRECTOR Marcos W. Fong

Glimpses of Guam Inc. Mission Statement: To connect people with information.

Glimpses Publications include: Marianas Business Journal • MBJ Life • Guam Business Magazine • Buenas Magazine • Beach Road Magazine

Buenas April/May 2018 • Entire contents copyrighted 2018 by Glimpses of Guam, Inc. Buenas is published bi-monthly by Glimpses of Guam, Inc., 161 US Army Juan C. Fejeran St., Barrigada Heights, GU 96913. Telephone: (671) 649-0883, Fax: (671) 649-8883, Email: lifestyleeditor@glimpsesofguam.com • All rights reserved. No material may be printed in part or in whole without written permission from the publisher.


4


Travel///Myanmar

Myanmar

Traveling down the Irrawaddy river

Story and photos by Julian Ryall

W

ith a twinkle in her eye, Mumu wants me to buy a t-shirt. For me, she promises an excellent deal for a dark green shirt bearing a picture of a golden elephant. For me, just $30, she says with a cheeky smile and that twinkle once again. Best deal around, she insists. It is, of course, a game and as I make my way slowly along the muddy riverbank towards the boat, she quickly drops the price to $25 and then $20. We haggle back and forth, but never once do we not smile at each other; it is a very important part of both the transaction and the game. I don’t actually really want the t-shirt, but I admire her resilience and, before I set foot on the gangplank, I buy it for $15. As the engines of my cruise boat shudder into life and we pull slowly away from the riverbank, she waves and calls for me to come back again sometime. Clearly Mumu knows a mug punter when she sees one. But when everyone that I come into contact with in Myanmar is as friendly and smiley as Mumu — even those who are not trying to hawk me something — it is hard to resist. One of the world’s great rivers, the Irrawaddy starts high in the Himalayan glaciers and flows fully 1,373 miles before emptying into the Andaman Sea through nine delta channels. It provides food and cultivates crops, while its waters are consumed and used to clean. But most importantly, it is a road that permits commerce, trade and journeys for the people who live along its banks. Increasingly — and despite political unrest in some parts of the country — it serves as a route for travelers looking for a travel experience that is out of the ordinary. In virtually the geographical center of Myanmar and — inevitably — on the banks of the Irrawaddy, is one of the ancient capitals of this nation and a city that has become synonymous with the high-tide of British Empire thanks to Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The Road to Mandalay.” The city occupies the flat plain to the east of the river and, according to local legend, the Buddha himself visited CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

5


Travel///Mynanmar

Mandalay Hill, which rises to the north of the city. Pilgrims pass a succession of statues of the Buddha, invariably coated in gold-leaf, before emerging alongside the stupa at the summit to admire the city laid out in a neat grid below. That grid is dominated by the colossal fort that sits at the heart of the city, with each of its four sides over one mile long and the defensive walls 30 feet high. The Irrawaddy is easily a mile wide at Mandalay, which serves as the ideal jumping-off point for an exploration of this majestic and meandering waterway. As the sun is beginning to set, the last rays catching the stupas that dot Sagaing hill on the west bank, I board the RV Orient Pandaw, a 60-berth ship that is part of a fleet built from traditional blueprints by Pandaw Cruises to recreate the Irrawaddy Flotilla that operated on the river until World War II. Outwardly almost identical to the ships that plied these waters during the years of the British empire, today the fleet has all the modern conveniences of luxury travel, including superb local cuisine, internet access and a fully stocked bar. And as we push off from the bank, where villagers are washing their clothes in the river, I enjoy a long, cold gin and tonic. Over the coming five leisurely days, our vessel chunks sedately past villages and fields being ploughed by oxen. Heavily forested hills are topped with more golden monuments and we pass through small eddies caused when the Chindwin River joins the Irrawaddy. The leisurely days are punctuated by trips ashore to explore villages, such as Yandabo, which is famous for a unique style of pottery made from clay hewn from the river bank. A clinic set up with funds from the Pandaw Charity is another stop along the river, as is the rarely visited town of Salay. Home to more than 50 monasteries, this was once an important British trading post, but its status has faded. Nevertheless, the waterfront area still has dozens of colonial era buildings, some still with clearly identifiable lion and crown reliefs above the main doors. The cruise comes to an end as we tie up alongside the river bank at Bagan, another former capital that is famous today for the 3,000-plus pagodas and stupas that pierce the forested plains. Many date back to the 12th century and have interiors that are still decorated with faded frescoes and statues of the Buddha sitting in alcoves. Locals will tell you that the best way to admire the view across this ancient landscape is to perch atop one of the pagodas at sunset and watch as that golden disc catches the gilded towers one last time before it slips behind the encircling hills.

MYANMAR How to get there: There are no direct flights from Guam to Myanmar, so at least one change is required to reach Yangon. The best option is to fly with China Airlines to Taipei before catching the flight to Yangon. Travel time: Due to the complicated connections, give yourself 24 hours of travel time. Visa requirements: Visitors need to obtain a tourist visa in advance, which typically costs $50 and the application can be carried out online. Applicants need to have at least six months remaining on their passport. Best time to go: The best time to visit Myanmar is during its winter months, between early November and the end of February. Currency and conversion rate: 10,000 Myanmar khat = US$7.35 Languages: English is widely spoken throughout the country. Must see in Yangon: The Shwedagon Paya complex, where everything appears to be made of gold. Must see in Mandalay: Mandalay Hill and the fortress at the heart of the city Stay in Yangon: Sule Shangri-La, Yangon. 223, Sule Pagoda Road, Yangon. Tel. 951 242828. www.shangri-la.com Stay in Mandalay: The Mandalay Hill Resort Hotel, No. 9 Kwin 416B, 10th Street at the foot of Mandalay Hill, Mandalay, Myanmar. Tel: 95 235 638. www.mandalayhillresorthotel.com

6


Artist///Frank Rabon

Cultural Calling Keeping Chamorro history alive through dance Guam’s Master of Chamorro dance Francisco B. “Frank” Rabon doesn’t dance to impress, but to express. Story and photos by John I. Borja

A

s a seasoned cultural performer and mentor, Rabon says his performances always come from the heart. It’s not about putting on a show, but rather, representing the identity of the island’s indigenous people. That’s what he teaches his students as the founder of the Taotao Tano’ Cultural Dance group. The group was established in 1983 and since then, more than 15 cultural performing groups from Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Japan and mainland United States formed under the tutelage of Rabon. He makes sure the groups are unified in the goal of representing the Chamorro people. “[Performing arts is] the first thing you come in contact with that introduces you to the people’s identities,” Rabon says. Prior to 1983, Rabon says cultural performances depicting ancient Chamorro history barely existed. He began dancing in 1971 and recalls only performing Polynesian dances at the Hilton Guam Resort & Spa. Furthermore, popular dances from the mainland United States also made their way to Guam. Rabon says locals have since adapted those dances with some variations, but they weren’t authentically Chamorro. “I remember my instructor asking me, ‘Why aren’t

8


Artist///Frank Rabon

Chamorros doing their own thing?’ I didn’t know anything about that. Not even my grandmothers knew,” he says. Still, Rabon believed that ancient Chamorros must have had some way of expressing their traditions and beliefs prior to colonization, more than 400 years ago. To find those important pieces of the past, Rabon began the long journey of research into the history of ancient Chamorros. Rabon stresses that it’s not easy to find documents relating to Guam’s past. He finds bits and pieces of information about Guam when he travels, like how ancient Chamorros sustained their community. Rabon took note of this and incorporated it into new dance movements and chants. “I thought, ‘Why don’t I start creating things that represent the lifestyle of our people?’” he says. “We’re seafarers, canoe builders, farmers, fishermen, weavers and crafters.” In some performances by Rabon’s groups, the audience may notice movements imitating actions such as rowing an outrigger canoe or spearfishing. However, Rabon says cultural dancing is less about physical movements and more about heart. Cultural performances tell a story with expressions translated through movement, with no intention of trying to make a dance flashy, he says. The hardest part of recreating Chamorro dances, Rabon says, comes from the criticism of his peers. “Acceptance is the most difficult part of putting together a dance or chant, especially from fellow Chamorros,” he says. It’s not uncommon for those in the performing arts industry to strive for acceptance, but for Rabon, it’s more so the acceptance of the stories he’s trying to convey through his dances. Not everyone on Guam believes that Chamorros had these kinds of traditions, he says, so he has to put in more effort to be as accurate with his productions as possible. He also says he is open to hearing feedback from the community and is ready to learn if someone could produce more information about Guam’s past. Regardless of the criticism, Rabon says he is glad that Guam now has its own performances depicting ancient Chamorros. “We had it. We lost it. Now it’s back again and it’s strong through the hearts of all these members,” Rabon says of his organization. The 64-year-old says it’s now up to his students to continue his legacy in the hopes of keeping the Chamorro history alive. Rabon serves as Creative Director of Pa’a Taotao Tano’, a nonprofit organization that benefits cultural dance groups. Pa’a Taotao Tano’ translates to a way of life of the people of the land, according to the group’s website. “Now I can just keep myself to writing grants and bringing money into the programs so we can continue the preservation, perpetuation, education and promotion of our Chamorro language and culture,” he says.

Taotao Tano’ dancers supervised by Frank B. Rabon perform at the Sheraton Laguna Guam Resort.

Frank B. Rabon performs with his group during StayWell’s ribbon-cutting ceremony at its new location in Maite.

9


Sports///Paddling

Photo courtesy of Joshua J. Duenas

10

Photo courtesy of Joshua J. Duenas


Sports///Paddling

New perspective

Paddling offers a triad island experience There is no other sport in the world that the people of Guam can connect with more culturally than paddling. By John I. Borja

T

he indigenous Chamorros were seafaring people, often using canoes for transportation and fishing. While the people have since adapted new ways of harnessing those industries, the practice of canoeing still flourishes. Today, the canoeing community is a mix of recreational and competitive paddlers who glide across Guam’s pristine beaches, whether it is on a single-seat or six-seat canoe. Numerous paddling clubs and organizations open their doors for anyone — locals, tourists or military members — to engage in the family-valued sport. The equipment and guidance is there; all that is needed is the willpower. “Don’t think that paddling isn’t for you until you try it,” Jessica E. Rohr says. The 26-year-old has been actively paddling for about two years and is a member on the Guam women’s national team. She was recruited through paddling group Animun Tasi, where she got into the groove of the sport. Starting off in paddling wasn’t easy, Rohr says. When she was first learning, she says she spent months feeling discouraged because she felt she wasn’t contributing enough to her team. “It’s physically challenging, but you realize that it’s mostly mental,” she says. “When you’re in the boat, especially when you’re out of the reef, you can’t get out of it. You have to get your mind to kick in and pick up the slack.” It’s fortunate that the paddling community is so helpful and encouraging. The longer you’re in the canoe, the more you trust and rely on your teammates to act as one, she says. Paddling has become a fun-filled activity for her, but she says others see it as a competitive sport. This can be seen at the local level, with high school competitions filled with approximately 250 paddlers, as well as the

regional level, with the Micronesian Cup, Micronesian Games and the Pacific Games. Guam teams square off with other Pacific islands to earn the title of fastest paddlers, either on sprints or long-distance races. “Discipline is a huge part of it,” says Joshua J. Duenas, head coach for the Guam women’s national team. On a six-man canoe, each paddler has a particular role to play. The most competitive paddlers know how to work with each other in these roles to power through a race, he says. Competitive paddling on Guam took off in 1994, according to Duenas. The interest has boomed since. Still, Duenas says the sport can be viewed as a recreational and fitnessbuilding activity. “It’s great exercise and a good way to get healthy. And when you paddle off-shore, you get to see parts of the island you haven’t seen before,” he says. Jermaine Alerta, president of the Guam Kayak and Canoe Federation, says the federation assists local companies in planning paddling events for employees and memberaffiliates to enjoy. Member clubs with the federation have programs for children to get them out of the house, too, he adds. “There are very few feelings better than that of looking back to the shore and being in awe of the land’s beauty. It truly allows you to be one with nature and appreciate life in general,” he says. Rohr encourages all first-timers and visitors to Guam to try paddling, because it helped her see a part of the island she hadn’t seen before. “I was born and raised here, but I’m not Chamorro. But paddling has opened up this whole new perspective of Guam for me, and it made it feel even more like home.” 11


Events calendar

WHAT’S NEXT APRIL 7

Ritidian Beach Cleanup Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Location: Guam National Wildlife Refuge Volunteer applications must be filled out and are available at www.fws. gov/volunteers/resources.html. Call 355-5096 for more information.

APRIL 7

Keep Guam Beautiful Beach Cleanup Time: 9 a.m Location: Asan Beach Bring water bottles and wear closed-toe shoes, hats and sunscreen. For more information, contact Lisa Aguon at 477-7279 ext. 1018.

APRIL 8

United Airlines Guam Marathon Start time: 3 a.m. for marathon; 4 a.m. for half marathon; 5 a.m. for 10K and 6 a.m. for 5K Location: Gov. Joseph F. Flores Memorial Park (Ypao Beach) For more information visit untiedguammarathon.com.

APRIL 14

Smokin’ Wheels Racing Guam’s Top Ride 2018 Time: 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Location: Guam International Raceway Park

MAY 2-6

Guam Micronesia Island Fair Location: Paseo de Susuana The annual signature cultural event of GVB showcases the vibrant cultures of Micronesia. Experience the weekend with master carvers, blacksmiths, traditional sailing experts, jewelers, weavers, dancers, musicians and chefs.

12

MAY 4-6; 18-20

Inarajan Village Fiesta Location: Inarajan Village For more information contact the Inarajan Mayor’s Office at 475-2509.

MAY 5

Ritidian Beach Cleanup Time: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Location: Guam National Wildlife Refuge Volunteer applications must be filled out and are available at www.fws. gov/volunteers/resources.html. Call 355-5096 for more information.

MAY 12

Guam Symphony Society O Sole Mio Time: 6 p.m. Location: Hyatt Regency Guam The concert features guest vocalists and a fully plated dinner. For more information and ticket prices call 477-1959 or email guamsymphonysociety@gmail.com.

MAY 25

Relay for Life Guam Time: 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. Location: George Washington High School Track/Field For more information, contact Tina Noket at 477-9451 or tina.noket@ cancer.org.

MAY 25-27

Agat Mango Festival Join the annual festival of mangos in Agat. Contact the Agat Mayor’s Office for more information at 565-4335.


Events calendar

APRIL sun 1

mon 2

tue 3

wed 4

thu 5

fri 6

MOVIES • Blockers • A Quiet Place • The Miracle Season • Spninng Man

sat 7

• Ritidian Beach Cleanup • Keep Guam Beautiful Beach Cleanup

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

• United Airlines Guam Marathon

MOVIES • Truth or Dare • Overboard • Beirut

MOVIES • Rampage • Super Troopers 2 • Tully

MOVIES • Avengers: Infinity War • I Feel Pretty • Traffik

• Smokin’ Wheels Racing Guam’s Top Ride 2018

FEATURED MOVIE April 27

Avengers: Infinity War Directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo Starring Robert Downey Jr., Jeremy Renner, Scarlett Johansson, Elizabeth Olsen, Chris Hemsworth and Mark Ruffalo

The Avengers and their Super Hero allies must be willing to sacrifice all in an attempt to defeat the powerful Thanos before his blitz of devastation and ruin puts an end to the universe. (Official synopsis from marvel.com)

*Event times and dates may change without notice.

13


Events calendar

MAY sun

mon

tue 1

6

7

8

wed 2

• Guam Micronesia Island Fair (May 2-6)

9

thu 3

• Guam Micronesia Island Fair (May 2-6)

10

• Guam Micronesia Island Fair (May 2-6)

13

20

• Inarajan Village Fiesta

14

21

15

22

16

23

17

24

fri 4

MOVIES • Bad Samaritan • Inarajan Village Fiesta • Guam Micronesia Island Fair (May 2-6)

11

MOVIES • Life of the Party • Class Rank • Dark Crimes • Breaking In

18

MOVIES • The Untitled Deadpool Sequel • Show Dogs • Book Club • Inarajan Village Fiesta

25

MOVIES • Solo: A Star Wars Story • Relay for Life Guam • Agat Mango Festival

27

28

29

30

31

• Agat Mango Festival

FEATURED MOVIE May 11

Life of the Party Directed by Ben Falcone Starring Melissa McCarthy, Gillian Jacobs, Maya Rudolph, Molly Gordon, Dbby Ryan and Jessie Ennis

When her husband suddenly dumps her, longtime dedicated housewife Deanna (McCarthy) turns regret into reset by going back to college … landing in the same class and school as her daughter, who’s not entirely sold on the idea. Plunging headlong into the campus experience, the increasingly outspoken Deanna — now Dee Rock — embraces freedom, fun and frat boys on her own terms, finding her true self in a senior year no one ever expected. (Official synopsis from warnerbros.com)

*Event times and dates may change without notice.

14

sat 5 • Ritidian Beach Cleanup • Inarajan Village Fiesta

12 • Guam Symphony Society O Sole Mio

19 • Inarajan Village Fiesta

26

• Agat Mango Festival


Cover feature///Tourism

Faces of Tourism Story and photos by Wayne Chargualaf

I

n celebration of Tourism Month in May, Buenas spoke with some front-line employees in Tumon, those who interact with tourists on a daily basis and serve as their first point of contact with Guam’s tourism industry. The millions of dollars that pour into one of the biggest drivers of the island’s economy all come down to the friendly smiles and warm welcome of people just like the six profiled.

Jaimielyn M. Pinaula Position: Receptionist, clerk typist I, Guam Visitor’s Bureau Length of time in position: Seven months Time in tourism industry: Seven months How she contributes to the tourism industry: “By showing people around and helping them out. A lot of tourists don’t really understand English, so it’s great that we have an [electronic] translator. It translates word-for-word, so sometimes it’s not exactly right so we kind of have to figure it out.” What tourism means: “The world is full of different kinds of places and different kinds of cultures, so tourism is about different people learning about each other. Also, it’s really important to Guam’s economy.” Languages spoken: “American Sign Language. I’ve used it in the medical field, but I haven’t used it in the tourism industry yet.” Funny story: “For Chamorro Month, GVB set up some food in the front of the building. Tourists are so willing to try everything, sometimes we have to stop them from trying to eat pugua like it’s food.”

Leonard K. Kaae Jr. Position: Co-owner, Hafaloha Length of time in position: “We incorporated Hafaloha in 2013, so about five years.” Time in tourism industry: “I didn’t really work in the tourism industry [before Hafaloha]. My grandparents owned a luau service, so I had a little interaction with tourists, but not much.” How he contributes to the tourism industry: “I like to think we do a good job of serving tourists and giving them a quality product.” What tourism means: “It means everything, especially living on an island. It’s our main source of income and it’s crucial to Guam’s success.” Languages spoken: “I pretty much just speak English and Pidgin.” Funny stories: “There’s a lot, mainly from the language barrier. But being islanders and being hospitable, it’s pretty easy to get around that. We’ll just crack some jokes and be friendly, just be who we are.” 15


Cover feature///Tourism

Chylo P. Williams

Aria T. Morales

Position: Customer service associate, ABC Store

Position: Server, Shamrocks Pub and Eatery

Length of time in position: “Seven years, going on eight years.”

Length of time in position: “A couple of months.”

Time in tourism industry: “This is my first job in the industry.”

Time in tourism industry: “I’m from Hawaii, so I worked in restaurants all over the island for about five years.”

How she contributes to the tourism industry: “By providing good customer service and helping people out. Sometimes it can be hard when a customer is rude, but you just have to be patient and smile.” Languages spoken: “I can speak some Japanese. I wouldn’t say I speak it fluently, but I can explain most things. I can also speak some basic Korean.” What tourism means: “Tourism here in Guam means a lot. You need to be good to the tourists and help them out. You just have to be a helpful, welcoming person.” Funny stories: “Not really any funny stories, but I do have a good time at this job. It’s a lot of fun.”

16

How she contributes to the tourism industry: “We just try to give everyone good experiences when they come in here.” What tourism means: “Tourism is about gaining new experiences.” Languages spoken: “I speak English, Hawaiian and I kind of speak Spanish. Basically, if my mom says something to me in Spanish, I can understand and respond back.” Funny stories: “It was St. Patrick’s Day yesterday, and last night about three or four military guys all came in here wearing robes and slippers from the Hilton. I recognized the robes and slippers because [my husband and I] stayed at the Hilton our first week here, so I knew exactly where they got their stuff from. They weren’t even wearing any green but nobody wanted to pinch them. It was hilarious.”


Cover feature///Tourism

Nevaeh E. Dizon

Remedio R. Pangelinan

Position: Sales associate, DNA Evo

Position: Sales lead, JP Superstore

Length of time in position: “Almost two years.”

Length of time in position: “I’ve worked here for about five years as a sales associate, and I’ve been a sales lead for about seven or eight months.”

Time in tourism industry: “This is my first job in the industry.” How she contributes to the tourism industry: “Just helping people in general, understanding their culture and language. My goal is making their vacation easier.” What tourism means: “It’s basically interacting with people and getting to know them regardless of cultural barriers.” Languages spoken: “I know some Japanese. I know a little bit of Russian, but after two years here I’m starting to understand more and more of what they’re saying, which is pretty cool. I know some Korean and Chinese too.”

Time in tourism industry: “About as long as I’ve worked here.” How she contributes to the tourism industry: “I like helping people and dealing with customers of different nationalities and cultures.” What tourism means: “Tourism is about making people feel welcome and people sharing their cultures with each other.” Languages spoken: “I’m pretty ok at Japanese. I understand a little Korean and Chinese. As far as Russian, I just know the basics.”

17


Special products

HIS HERS FAMILY


Dining///Chef Singh

Love all, serve all, fresh and fast By Wayne Chargualaf

F

or more than 20 years, Guam has been able to reap the benefits of Chef Kotwal Singh’s years of international culinary experience with everything from a food truck, a nearly two-decade career as executive chef at Hard Rock Café in both Guam and Saipan and, starting in 2015, in the food court of the Micronesia Mall with Singh’s Café Kabab & Curry. “My wife actually owns Kabab & Curry,” Chef Singh says. “I make the recipes, I’ll stop by and taste things and make sure everything’s good. My wife is the force behind it. I just stop by and help out.” After graduating high school and attending culinary school for three years, Chef Singh started his career in 1979 as a dishwasher in India. He ended up travelling and working in Hong Kong and Taiwan, working for companies such as the Ramada Inn, the Peninsula Group, the Sheraton and Gaylord where he learned 24

everything he could, working with chefs from Germany, France, Switzerland and China. His career eventually brought him to Guam in 1994. In 2001 he started working at Hard Rock Café Guam and has been there since. “I like [Hard Rock Café] because I’m happy with what I do,” says Singh. “They trust me because I’ve been there for a long time. I have to follow very strict guidelines with them, but it’s been good.” Singh opened a restaurant called the Grand Taj Curry and Grill in the Grand Plaza Hotel in Tumon in 2012 as well as a food truck called Hotdog and Curry in 2007. Singh eventually sold the restaurant and then sold the food truck when he and his wife decided to open Kabab & Curry in the Micronesia Mall. Kabab & Curry is based on a simple concept: taste good, look good, smell good and be fast. Singh cites this commitment to quality as well as the unique cultural mix of Kabab & Curry’s


Dining///Chef Singh

menu as the reason for the restaurant’s success. “There’s Indian food here of course, there’s some Japanese, some Thai and Middle Eastern,” Singh says. “From what I’ve seen Middle Eastern food is growing, you see it everywhere.” According to Singh, a successful restauranteur can’t just identify trends to be successful. You also have to understand which markets are buying into those trends.

“They ate healthy food here [Kebab & Curry] and they felt good and that makes me happy. I can’t change 140,000 people, but I can have some influence” Photo by Wayne Chargualaf

“From 18 years old to 26 or 27 — those are mostly the shawarma customers. After 25 all the way up to 60 or 70, they typically want curry. They’re very different markets and we have both of them,” Singh says. Singh also proudly points to his restaurant’s emphasis on serving healthy food, saying that people have told him that their own health has improved as a result of eating regularly at Kabab & Curry. “Of course it isn’t really about our food, it’s that they changed their habits. They ate healthy food here and they felt good and that makes me happy. I can’t change 140,000 people, but I can have some influence.” Another thing that makes Chef Singh happy is Hard Rock Café’s commitment to giving back to the community. Inspired by Hard Rock Café’s motto of “love all, serve all,” Singh is heavily involved with Hard Rock’s long-running partnership with Kamalen Karidat to serve food to the homeless every third Tuesday of the month and to make a special feast for them on Thanksgiving and Christmas. “Guam’s given me a lot of things,” says Singh. “My kids were born and educated here, they have good jobs and they’re doing well. Because of Guam, I have a lot, so that’s why I feel I have to give something back.” Photos courtesy of Chef Kotwal Singh

25


Essence of Guam///Children’s organizations

Essence of Guam Children’s organizations

A Buenas series featuring nonprofit charitable organizations on Guam and how you can contribute

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Guam Mission: To provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. What they do: Provides one-to-one mentorship for children 8 to 16 years old facing adversity in school and community settings; teaches a positive action curriculum in schools as part of Partnerships for Success; and provides workshops on reading, workforce development and financial skills and literacy in public housing communities. Program manager: Norita Charfauros Chairman of the board: Brian Bliss Phone: 472-2227 Email: bbbsg@teleguam.net Facebook: BBBSG Website: guambbbs.org Send donations to: P.O. Box 3131, Hagåtña, GU 96932 How else to contribute: Volunteer mentors, event volunteers and group leader volunteers

26

Harvest House Mission: To help children and teens on Guam develop a heart for God by providing a safe haven to help them grow physically, socially, mentally and spiritually. What they do: Harvest House recruites foster families, promotes awareness, hosts seasonal events and services families through the Harvest House Closet. President and spokesperson: Jared Baldwin Director: Bethany Taylor Phone: 300-LIFE Email: Harvest.House@hbcguam.net Website: www.harvesthouseguam.org Facebook: HarvestHouse.Guam Volunteer: Message through Facebook page or via email for more information. There are opportunities to volunteer for events, sorting through donations for Harvest House Closet and babysitting. Donate: Donate through the website by clicking the button on the bottom of the page that says, “Donate Financially.”


Essence of Guam///Children’s organizations

Junior Achievement Guam Mission: To inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. Junior Achievement is the world’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to educating students about work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy through an experiential, hands on program. What they do: Implements three separate programs based on grade level: the Company Program, Global Marketplace and More than Money. The Company Program introduces high school students to the key elements involved in organizing and operating a business. Global Marketplace introduces middle school students to the ways in which countries buy and sell from each other to gain an understanding of producers and consumers in an interconnected marketplace. More Than Money introduces 5th grade students to financial literacy and entrepreneurship through hands on activities. Executive director: Beth Lizama Phone: 487-4452 Email: beth.lizama@jaguam.org Facebook: JA Guam Instagram: @GuamJA Twitter: @GuamJA Volunteer: To mentor students or teach a program, contact Beth Lizama. Donate: Please contact Beth Lizama. How else to contribute: To sponsor a program or classroom to teach, please contact Beth Lizama.

Guam Foster Families Association Mission: To help Guam’s children grow by strengthening and supporting families. What they do: The association’s constituents are solely children under Child Protective Services. It supports children, their biological families, foster homes or relative placements by providing assistance through donations of clothing, household items, school supplies and food. CEO, executive director, chairman and president: Kathleen Thomas-Benavente Vice president and public information officer: Jenei Aguon Phone: 688-4765 Facebook: GuamFFA Fundraising events: Zero K; Easter Egg Hunt; Open Hearts, Open Closet Volunteer: Listen for quarterly radio announcements on BOSS 104, STAR 101 and The Point 93.3. To volunteer for the Zero K, contact Mr. Frederick Tupaz at Guam Community College by calling 7355638 or 735-5700. Donate: Call Jenei Aguon at 688-4765.

27


Out and About

OUT & ABOUT

Photos by Colin Kirk

2018 Pastries in Paradise was held on Feb. 22 at the Guam Museum.

Photos by Justin Green

The Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Guam held a Chinese New Year gala on Feb. 23.

Photos by Maureen N. Maratita

The Japan Club of Guam hosted the 20th Arts & Crafts Fair on March 4 at the Hotel Nikko Guam.

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS! To submit your photos for Out & About, email high-resolution photos to lifestyleeditor@glimpsesofguam.com with “Out & About” on your subject line. Please include the description, date and location of your event photo(s).

28


Buenas April/May 2018  

Behind the scenes: Keeping Guam's tourism alive | along the river bank: Myanmar | Frank Rabon: Master of dance | Out & About | Sports: Paddl...

Buenas April/May 2018  

Behind the scenes: Keeping Guam's tourism alive | along the river bank: Myanmar | Frank Rabon: Master of dance | Out & About | Sports: Paddl...

Advertisement